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Full text of "The Massachusetts collegian [microform]"

ROTOGRAVURE SUPPLEMENT 



^ 



^' "% "ii'^ >^ A 

THOMAS F.WALSH 



HICKE Y - FREEMAN CUSTOMIZED CLOTHES 

ARE EXCLUSIVE IN AMHERST WITH 



66 







99 



College = Candy = Kitchen = Annex 



(AT THl£ REAR OF THO OLD ESTABLISHMENT) 



An excellent place to bring your commencement guests 



MEALS AT ANY HOUR 



QUALITY 




Good. That's what it is 



No USE trying to put a «lefinition around 
Camel. It is as diverse and fugitive as the 
delicate tastes and fragrances that Nature 
puts in her choicest tobaccos, of which 
Camel is rolled. Science aids Nature to be 
sure by blending the tobaccos for subtle 
smoothness and mildness. One way to 
describe Camels is just to say, "They are 
good!" 

Somehow, news of Camel has got around. 



Each smoker telling the other, we suppose. 
At any rate, it's first — in popularity as well 
as quality. It has beaten every record ever 
made by a smoke. Modern smokers have 
lifted it to a new world leadership. 

Camels request a place in your apprecia- 
tion. Try them upon every test known. 
You'll find them always loyal to your high- 
est standard. 

''Have a Camels 



R. J 



REYNOLDS TOBACCO C O M I* A N Y , W I N S T O N - S A L E M . 



©1927 

N . C. 



SERVICE 



ENGRAVED AND DYE-STAMPED PERSONAL CARDS 

100 CARDS $1.85 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

AMHERST, MASS. 




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Y^^«ws 



No! the RichUncle hasn't died- 

The prompt success of his new Bolter 
suit encouraged him to rise to the occas- 
ion. 

Slip into one of these very smart suits, 
in new favored colors, and note the mental 
exhilaration. 



Carl H. Bolter 



EXETER 



Incorporated 
AMHERST 



HYANMS 



'':yi^ 



'i!<:: 



gl|^ MuBButlinBtttB fflolkgtatt 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1928 



Number 1 



ROPE-PULL GOES 
TO SOPHOMORES 

Freshmen Cut Team to Match Rivals. 

Sophomores Unable to Pull Frosh 

Through Pond 



At the annual Sophomore- Krt-sh man 
Kope-Pull, held on Saturday afternoon 
uiross the i>ond. the representatives of the 
Siphomore class showed their superiority 
ovir the neophytes l)y means of their 
ixrellent team work. The up[>erclassmen 
wire unable to jjather uj) more than 4") 
men, and, by reason of ^hkI s|>ortsman- 
ship, the yearlings limited themselves to 
an e<iual number also. Althoujjh the 
sophomores were outweighed b> their 
()l)ponents, they ^"t the jump on the 
Irosh at the start and eoiitinued to gain 
>lowly for the first few minutes, until 
about five of the Freshmen had entered 
the iK)nd. During the remainder of the 
time, it was practically a deadlcH-k, neither 
class gaining noticeably on the other. 
I pperclassmen as usual coached both 
teams. 

Members of both sitles showed signs 
of the extreme exertion and tense strain 
which they underwent. .Also, man\ 
blistered han<ls and chafed sides were in 
evidence. Classmates of the com|X'ting 
teams aided their confrers by supplying 
lemons, wet towels, and rosin. 

Had it been the fate of either class to 
cross the jxind, they would have found 
plenty of water to wade through, as the 
l)ond was unusually full. The contest 
attracted its usual wide attention, the 
side-lines being lined with students, 
faculty, an<l friends. 



Over Two Hundred Enrolled In Largest 

Freshm an Class In History of M. A. C. 

Two Hundred and Nineteen Students Invade Campus .\nd Swell Total Enrollment of College. 

Numerous Transfers 



Building Fund 
Steadily Growing 

1000 New Alumni Contributors 
Wanted by World A|igie Night. 

Summary of Contributions 
''nde'-g'-adiiate Classes— 
Class A mount Percent 

1929 JIKM 0() (i4 

!»•■«) IKXi.OO tK) 

H«l ««74 (K) .->8 

Total $:ilH4 AH) 

1928 IIH4(J<) (•).{ 

Alumni 2i;{2;j l(i (including 

class of '2S) 
Others (Short Course. 

Faculty, etc.) SWH) 9() 
<.ran(| Total $.'5.S.'i()K (Mi 

WANTKI): KMX) new alumni contri- 
butors by World Ag^ie Night, .Saturday, 
<»(t..ber20. 



Class And Fraternity 

Averages Released 

Class Averages for Term Ending 
June 11, 1928 



1928 

!'•'■' nitiiges Xuniliir of .Students 

f''<-twecn 90 and l()f) 2 

8.5 and *M) 14 

m and 8.5 .•}<■. 

75 and 8() :j7 

70 and 75 17 

f».5 and 70 5 

60 and Oo 1 

Average 79.4 

1929 

•fwcen \m and 1(K) ,3 

85 and 90 17 

80 and 85 20 

75 and 80 40 

70 and 75 1.5 

f>5 and 70 5 

55 and ftO l 

Average 79.0 
(Continued on Pafte 2) 



Memorial Building 

Crowded At Reception 

.\nnual Freshman Keceptiitn Success- 
fully Conducted Last Friday Kvening 

A large crowd sin-nt the first part of 
Friday evening getting acquainted at the 
annual Freshman Keieption in the 
.Memorial liuilding. .Members of the 
freshman class were given a chance to 
meet the professors and officers of the 
College iidorinally, and to get ac<|ii.iiiiteil 
with the up|R'rcl,issmen. 

Roman A. Kreienbaum, the chairman, 
opened the form.d pro^;r.iin by giving a 
short speech e.xplaining the pur|M)se of 
the gathering. The first sin-aker, Mr. 
Williams, spoke (»f the .M.A.C. Christian 
Ass<Kiation. telling of its purjK)se and 
work. Miss Skinner was the next speaker, 
and she gave an interesting talk on the 
advantages of the College. Ihe Reverend 
Mr. Ilawley of the First Congreg.ition.il 
Church told about the Amherst churches, 
and asked the freshmen to give the 
churches a chance to prove their worth. 
Robert I.. (Hob) Howie gave a talk ab«>ut 
athletics, telling of the team and its 
prosjK'cts for the next year. Charles S. 
(Shep) Cleaves, the next speaker, gave a 
talk <m the Academic Activities in the 
College, and the pos-sibilities for fresh- 
man participation. The versatile Leonard 
W. "Red" Morrison then entertained 
with a few remarks on everything in 
general, and dramatics in particular. De- 
bating was represented by Dennis M. 
Crowley, who told of the interesting and 
instructive debates held the past year. 
"Pop" Clark then told the freshmen about 
the .'\ggie fighting spirit, which has put 
Aggie in the pl.ice where ahe is at prestiit, 
and will make it continue to advance in 
the future. I'rexy Thatcher then talked 
of the favored place that Aggie gra<luates 
hold in the affairs of the day, and of the 
gfKjd-fellowship s|.«irit dexeloiwd on the 
campus. .•\t the conclusion of the speeches, 
refreshments were served. 

COLLEGIAN TO OPEN 

COMPETITION SOON 

Candidates for Editorial Board Will 
Report Next Monday 



the registrar's office 
incoming class is tlu 



ReiM)rts from 
denote that the 

largest in the liistt)ry of the institution, 
with a total of L'l9 students which is :i(\ 
more than the freshman class of last year. 
It is of interest to (ibserve tli.it the women 
sluileiits number 49 as comp.ired with 4.{ 
in the class of 19.n. At this time the 
corrected list is as follows: 
.\lilrich, ( ieorge K. .North.impton 

.-Xnderscw, Carrolle K. .Ashfield 



.Anderson, M.ibelle 


1.. 


Southw ick 


.Astore, John J. 




W. Stoi kbiid^i 


Maker, Cvrus F. 




S. Chalh.im 


h.iker. W.dter C. 




Frankim 


Marber, Cli.irles 




IVru, N.V. 


Mates, lewis K. 




Ashliehl 


Mates, Richard R. 




l.vnn 


M.itslone, Win. 1', 




W. .\ewtoii 


Metts. Menj.imin 1) 




Norxs.dk, Comi 


Mishop, Herbert L. 


Jr. 


Worcester 


Ml.i. k, Mary K. 




W illi.inisburg 


Moland, Katherine 




Dr.n ut 


Monney, Kenneth F 




Wal|M.le 


Moston. M.irg.iret 




llv.omis 


Mraun, Leo II. 




.Millis 


Mray, A. Dawson 




IhiKoke 


Mrown, .Arthur E. 




Wayland 


Mrown, Ihurl 1). 




Danvers 


Munten, John F. 




MriHkton 


Murrington, John C. 


Jr. 


( harlemont 


((^nlinuetl on I'aile .1) 



Hf 



•HE OUTSTANDING PERFORM- 
ANCE OF THE WEEK 



' ' r new organist's rapifl fire rlis- 
I"'-il of the wrong hymn in Chaj>cl 
'•'^t Iriflay brought forth a new spirit 
'lie organ pipes that promises at 
'■'-l to improve the singing at such 
-T, (f.; if not to iiii[>ro\e the w h(jie 
-tanrlard of the exercises. 



.According to the annual custom, all 
freshmen interested in comjHting for the 
editorial staff of the .Massachusetts 
Collcfiiiin, the College weekly, are cordially 
invited to fje present at a brief meeting in 
the Memorial Building, next Monday 
evening. It is not necessary to have had 
|)revious ex|R'rience in this t\pe of work. 
Membc-rs of the lit( r,ir\ lio.ini ol the 
Colle^vin are elected annually at the end 
of the first term from among those candi- 
dates who have successfully completetl 
the assignments given them for the term. 
Fight typical newspajx-r rejKjrts will be 
required, and several disinterested jK-r- 
sons will grade the pajx^rs submitted in 
order to insure fairness to those comjwting. 
For anyone who has a potential ability 
in gathering and refx>rting news events, 
the Collegian offers an attractive kind of 
outside activity. The work is not unduly 
restricting and leads to res(xjnsible 
j)ositions in determining the opinions of 
the undergraduate body as well as pro- 
viding all subscribers with accurate and 
interesting news. Each \ear sees a large 
group of freshmen report for the competi- 
tion, and it is ex|jected that the incoming 
class will be no exception to those of the 
last few seasons. 



LARGER GROUP OF 
HONOR STUDENTS 

Twenty More on List Than for the 

Preceding Term. Seven Students 

with Averages over Ninety Percent 

.A very marked increase is to be seen 
in the list of honor students for the spring 
term of la.st year, which has just been 
given out by the Dean. There are just 
twenty more names on the present list 
than there were on the list of last fall. 
An increase of three names is als<j to be 
noticed in the first honors group, tnaking 
a total of seven students with averages 
of over 9()'J. 

The list is as follows: 
First Honors Group— 90 to 100 

Harry R. ("ops<»n '29 of K.isthampton, 
Ruth H. Parrish '29 of Creat Harrington, 
Kli/abeth A Steinbugler '29 of Brooklyn, 
N. v., Russell K. Nims '.{Oof (Ireenfield, 
Certrude L. LeClair '.{1 of Southbridge, 
and Benjamin Wilbur '151 of Woburn. 

Second Honors Ciroup — 8.S to 90 

Class of 1929 Stephen .\danis, Cli.irles 
W. Barr, Chesley I,. Black, William (.. 
Kdson. Ruth A. Faulk, Bertram II 
Holland, Paul D. Isham, Roman A. 
Kreienbaum, Klizabeth .A. LyncJi, Ken 
mill I .McKittrick, lavior M, Mills. 
I.eoii.ird W. .\lr)rrison, Bessie .M. Smith, 
'Ointinued on I'aftc 2; 



Frosh Elect Officers 

At First Meeting 

Officers Hold Positions for One Term 

.At the first nutting f)f the freshm.in 
class the follovMiig indivirluals were 
fContinued on Pafte 2, 



WORLD AC;c;iE MCH I 

World Aggie .Night comes this year 
on October 20. On this date meetings 
of Aggie graduates will be held all 
over the country from coast to coast, 
as well as in other parts of the globe. 



CA.MPUS CALENDAR 

"Turn our a nr-v b-iif." 

- Middlrlon 

Wednesday, .Sept. 26 

7 p. m. Index .Meeting 
Thursday 

Assembly Reverend lldwin U. 
Robinson of Holyoke. 

Mass Meeting at 7 p. m. 
Friday 

Freshman loothall 1 lusli \ s. 
Deerfield High. here. 

Razoo -Night Tentative. 
Saturday 

Vatsity lootb.ill I'.cjvvdoin at 
Brunswick. 



Frosh Have Promising 

Football Material 

Thirly-Five at the Opening .Session. 

.Several High .School Stars to 

Face Deertield Frida> 

Thirty five enthusiastic freshmen re 
sponde<l to Coach "Larry" Briggs's c.ill 
lor footb.dl (.imlid.ites List Friday after- 
noon. !• uiid.iment.il drill has be«'n held 
d.iily with .i l.irge number of gcHwl pr<»s 
IH'cts .ittending e.u h session. The m.i 
teri.il this f.ill seems the best th.it h.is 
come to the c.impus during (he p.ist few 
years, and it is expected that the frosh 
grid te.iiii will ni.ike .i very good .Kvoiint 
ol itself tlirougJK. lit the season. .Allliough 
there .ire .i few men who .ire ineligible, 
most o( the c.indid.ites have h.id high 
s< hool exiKrieiue. The competition lor 
all |M)sitions is exceedingly keen, and 
with the opening home g.iiiie (oniing 
September 2S with Deerfield High, the 
te.ini will be put through a strenuous 
workout during this W4ek. 

.Among the men who are lompeting b»r 
ni.in.iger are Willi. mi B.itslone, Kich.ird 
Folger and l.eonanl Sidler Jr A ilelinite 
lineup for the opening g.ime wis not 
obt.iiii.ible, but se\fr.il of the men who 
(ta>nllnut>d on I'ufte ii 

STRONG CANDIDATES 
OUT FOR CROSS-COUNTRY 

Pros|K>cts Look Bright Although 
Squad In Small 

Althcjugh only a small s«juad has re- 
IMjrteil for varsity crtiss-country as yet, 
;:nis, .cts arc brijjht for a v. inning tiam 
of harriers this season. The lettermen are 
Captain Carl A. Bergan '29 and Richard 
Hernaii '.fO, both of whom sliow<>d up 
well List year. Harold .M. Roberts<jn '.!•» 
and Sitm Tourtellot ''M ran in some meets 
last ye.ir and that ex|K'rien(e should help 
them this s<'asoii. from last fall's fresh- 
ni.iii team, promising landidates ar«' 
Henry D. C.irpfner. Albert .Nash, who 
did very well in track meets last spring, 
John W. .N'orthcott, Paul A. Smith, and 
.Allen S. West. Robert S. Sndl '2?), who 
• lid giMMl work .IS a sophomore, and Frank 
I. White '.'{(). also ap|M'ar to be strong 
material. The schedule is as follows: 
()<t. 20 St. Ste|)hens and Si)ringfield a( 

Ann.ind.ile 
0<t. 27 Worcester T(<h , It M A ( 
Nov. 2 Wesleyan at .M A ( . 

Ml Boston I'niv. at Boston 

1!" N. !•. Intercollegiates at Boston 



FOOTBALL SQUAD 
LACKS NUMBERS 

Squad Handicapped by Lack of Re- 
serves. Intensive Training During 
Past Two Weeks 

With C().i.h Ch.ules R. .Nb ( .eiM li at 
Ihe helm .ind several .iliimni. iiii lulling 
"Pop" Clark, Louis Blai k '27 and ".Al" 
(.ust.ifsjMi •2tt as as.sist.iiits, the footb.dl 
te.im got away to an early start ten d.iys 
lieliire College o|)eried. .About twenty- 
seven men .itlended the opening lecture 
on S<-pteniber it .in<l then began intensive 
tr.iining the lullowm^; d.iv. the work 
indiidiiig drilling in .ill the fimd.iment.ils 
of the g.inie. Thret- sessions .i d.i> were 
held, ,ind the number ol men in the sipiad 
w.is s(H>n .iiigminted, bringing the total 
111 Ihirty-seven b\ the ind of the week. 
Bv Sept. ITlh the pr.icliie w.is in full 
swing .iiid sever.il scrimm.iges were held 
to reve.il the rel.ilive merits ol llii. 
v.iiious men. 

The s<pi.id is (airly sm.ill this >e.ii, .mil 
while nine letter men .ire iin ImUd in (he 
number of candidates, (he material on 
the whole I.k ks experieme .iml is further 
haiii|ic.ip|M-d by .i short.ige ol reserves. 
The veterans on the line .ire Captain 
Bowie '29, Brackley '29, Mi Kit trick '29, 
M.inii •;{(», .Mills '29. Plumer '29 and 
Walkden '29, while the b.ii klield will 
li.ive as .1 nucleus l-.llert '.'id, .md .Nit- 
kiewiiz '29. In addition to these men the 
lollowiiiK from last years sipiad will un- 
<loubtedly be heard from in (he coming 
g.inies: Crowley '29, Coukos '29, Davis 
"29, ICIiot '.{(I, Howe '29, Purdy '.•fO, 
Richardson '29, .ind Sullivan '29. Tour 
it^ontlnuiNl on I'ltge i) 



New Captains In 
Spring Sports 

Nitkieuicz and Wehlu-r to Lead in 
Baseball and Track Respectively 



: 



Pres. Thatcher Speaks 

At Opening Assembly 

.Students Crowd Auditorium Because 

of Enlarged Registration 

.Morrison New Organist 

S|)eaking on the ideals, customs and 
purjx)ses of .M.A.C, President Rostoe W. 
Thatcher a<ldressed the students and 
faculty at the opening .Assembly last 
Wednesday. His talk was chiefly for the 
fr«-shmen, telling them of the fnndainent.tl 
idea umlerlying the seeniin^K -< hm 1.-.^ 
treatment to which they are being sub- 
jected. When the frevlinian has to do 
these things, h<- i>- just pro( nring some 
of the training necess,iry for ,in .Aggie 
man. .Althf)ugh lie may not see the value 
of it now, he will ri-.ili/c tlic .idvantages 
in the future. I'rcxy's rii(ss.it;<- t" tin- 
upper-ilassmeii w.is tli.it tin y should find 
the campus and te.ti lung (orce the same 
.i> l.i^t yc.ir, with but fi « .ind minor 
( li.iiiges. 

The opening Asscnil,!;. u.i, not.ildc lor 
twd things in i,,irti( iil.ir. I ;isi, tlic un 
usual fulness ol the lloor ol the aiiditori- 
uni and second liy the hrst .ippcar.uuc ol 
l.eoii.ird .Morrison '2'.l.i- tli<- new or/.uii-t 
tins ye.ir. .Morrison rei i i \ i d ,i In.irt-, 
roiHid ol ,ippl,ius(. ,is he s.il <lo\ui lo|.l.i\. 



At »h<' romplption of la«» Vfar'x track 
and baseball se.isons, two members of the 
present senior class were electetl to the 
captaim ies of tliise sports. BolesLiw 
Nitkiewiiv. iif llr.lyoke, who li.is been 
varsity thir<l baseman for two years, and 
is .1 timely hitter and steady in the field, 
will le.id (he nine next spring, He is 
also fullbai k on (his fall's f(M>tball team, 
having gained his letter last year. 

.As trai k capt.iin, Dana O. Wi-bber of 
.Montague is an outstanding broad jump- 
er, getting Aggii '., only |>oints at (he 
Fas(ern Intercollegiates. He also gained 
sever.d |>oints List spring in the dashes. 
Webber, too, is known in another s|jort, 
.IS he is a promising foiw.ird for the 
\.irsi(y baskilli.ill (eaiii. 

Cadet Officers For 

Fall Term Appointed 



Plumer and Nitkiewicz lo Itv Cadet 
Majors 

T.ill .ippointments of Ca<ht Officers for 
the iH-riixl September 19 to December .'(I, 
192K, are hereby announ<ed. 

To III- ( 'ndrt Mitjors 
Cadet P. Raymond Plumer, 1st Sipiad. 
Cadet Boleslaw .Nitkiewiiv., 2fid S<piad. 

To hr Ciidct Captains 
( adet VN'illiam (>. T.dsori, Troop .\ 
( adet ( li.irles \< ( lernents. Troop E 

< ,id( t l'ris(oti |) \ 'jiiii^;, 1 roop B 

< .idet ( arl ,A. Bergan, I ifH)p F 
(adet Le«>nard F. Sargent 

f ;<>nlliiii|.<l on I'afte 2i 



ANNOUNCE.VIENT 

With .1 whole summer passecl sinie 
the stibjei I of ,i mas<:ot was discusseil, 
the (iilli-i'iiui ixpeils tli.it ide.is will 
be vciliiiiimoiis 111 the near future when 
the T.dltori.il St.ilf .uiriounies that it 
is re.nly to ex.iiilirn- tin- sii;4;;c^t ion., 
IVrli.i|is It will be well to remind the 
iiiiiul.eis ol the siudcut body while 
the pot IS boiling; til, it till- < I'llti'hin 
li.is expn .^-.d its willingness to .iward 
.1 i.isli |,ri/e lo l|i(. [icrvifi presiTifing 
.III M ( .1)1, lid.- |iio|,ox|t ion. Wati h lor 
lilturc .iniiouni ciiniits. 



THE MASSACHUSEITS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1928 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1028 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Oftuial newspafMT t)f the Massatliusetls 
Agiidiltural Collcg.. Publish. d every 
WediH-hday by tin- students. 



BOARD C)\- KOnOKS 



Shbplev Clkaves "29 
EuwARuH. Nichols '29 



I'lditor in-< liii'f 
.M;in;i|{inK Kililor 



among the men of your own age who are 
U> be leaders in all walks of life; to lose 
yoursilf in generous enthusiasm, and co- 
operate with others for common ends; to 
learn manners from students who are 
gentlemen, and form character under 
professors who are Christian— this is the 
offer of the College, for the four best 
years of \<nir life!" 




UKl'AKTMKNT KDIloU^ 
K(litori.i\ SliKH.icv t l.i-AVfcs -M 

j.-eaturc Makgaket 1'. Donovan "M> 

Alumni & Short ( oiirse-i Sai.lv K. Ukadlky Ml 

AthlKic ''-""t SINGLKTON SO 

Lewis M. Lvnus "liO 

FKANK T 1)1)1 liLASS "11 

Campu* J'>HN B. Howard J k. '30 

( KtIL II. WAI-LKICai "iO 



lUSlNKSS DKI'AKTMKNT 
FmcnKUKK D. Thavrr. Jr. "M Uusim-.sH Manan- r 
William A Im.an. Jk. 'M .K.lv.-rtNinu Mi.n;iK>r 
Lawrenie A. Carruth "JO < ir. nl^.ti.-ii M..n.ii;t 

WlNTllROI- (.. SMllll '30 

John R. Tank '30 



Subscriptions $2.(K1 jx-r year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 

to The Massachusetts Collegian, 

In (as.- of rhangi- of address, subscriber 
will please notify the business manager 
as soon as iMtssibK-. 



Fntrre<l as socoiul-cl.iss iiii.tt.-r ut Ih.- .■\i"t>'r'*t 

of iH»taK.- I.rovi.U-il for in se.t.on 1 -i. Act of l)c- 
tobiT. iyi7, autliorizid Aiiaiist JO, 1J1«. 



ONCE AGAIN 

Once again the campus walks ring to 
the familiar trea<l of students seeking the 
education that is offered them within the 
beckoning doors of the many buildings 
that constitute the physical part of the 
institution. OKI friendships and associa- 
tions are renewed; old customs and 
habits assumed; forn.er activities recom- 
mencetl. The reojiening of College holds 
a sense of pleasure for every student that 
cannot be destroyed. 

Hut for the freshman class, the past 
week has not been a reopening. Rather 
it has been an initiation. Here on Aggie's 
campus have been opened to them a 
thousand and one opiM)rt unities to aiti 
them in preparing for the life they shall 
enter when they matriculate. High school 
is far behind, for college is a tremen<lous 
jump from the secondary schools which 
have harbored these freshmen in their 
days of preparation. The new ties that 
will bind them to our College are still in 
the pr(Kess of f<)rmation, an<l it is accord- 
ing to the sympathy and understanding 
with which the new students l<x>k on 
college life that will determine the depth 
of feeling which these ties will hold. 

And so. in this word of recognition and 
welcome to the new members of our 
stutlent body, we wish to emphasize the 
importance of a conscientious and intelli- 
gent respect for an compliance with the 
traditions that have added an intangible 
beauty to the physical splendor of our 
campus. In many cases you will not feel 
that what is aske<l of you matters. Per- 
haps you may consider it unjustified. 
None the less, your memories of the first 
year you spent on this campus will be all 
the more full if you undertake the tasks 
set upon you. whether by your professor 
or your tratlitional masters, the sopho- 
mores, with a spirit of co-operation that 
decries defiance. The Student Senate has 
for one of its puriKises the preservation of 
your well-being, and you may rest assured 
that nothing will be re(piired of you that 
has an element of unfairness. 

So welcome. Class of 10:?2, to this 
campus. College is to a large degree 
what yon make it. Establish your goals 
at the beginning and make your four 
years worthwhile from every standpoint. 
The years spin by amazingly fast, and as 
you conduct your life while in Aggie, just 
so will you appreci.ite what the College 
has meant to \<>u while >ou were fibcili- 
ent and subservient to the social .iiid 
scholastic standards that the institution 
maintains. 



CLASS A.M) FRAIKRMTY 

(ConliiiUk.-d from I'aUv I; 
1930 

Between ••<( and KM) 

H.") and U() 

W)an<lK.'i 

ToandW) 

TOandTf) 

" (■).') and 70 

(10 and 05 

.'>r)an<l 00 

Average 77. !{ 

1931 

Between tM) and 100 

K.f'iand'M) 

SO and S.') 

75 and 80 

70 and 7.". 

«)5 and 70 

(iOand 05. . 

55 and 00 

Average 7:^.4 

Fraternity and Sorority 

Delta Phi Alpha 

Kappa Kpsilon 

U T. V 

Sigma. Phi Kpsilon 

Delta Phi f.amma 

.Alpha Sigma Phi 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

Non-Frat. or S<jrority 

I 'hi Sigma Kappa 

Alpha C.amma Rho 

Kappa Sigma 

Theta Chi 



. 1 

.12 

lil 

. :n\ 

.20 

.12 

, 3 

. . 1 



. . .'{ 
. . s 
..21 
..29 

. .32 
. . If. 



SO 7 
SO 4 
.7S 
7S 5 
,77.8 
.77 4 
.77.3 
.70 2 
.70.0 
.75.9 
.75 9 
.75.1 



Hail! 

The Pen too scratches its welcome to 
the Frosh, but we're on the level and 
will tell you that .Aggie isn't all free ice 
cream and dun olate cake. 

UP 

Believe all that you're told,— but let it 
lie known that you're not at Amherst 
Agnif. (ir-r-r! 

BP — 
A modern scientist has uncovered the 
fact that emotion expresses itself at the 
weakest point,- so when the Profs begin 
to ask questions,- be sure and keej) your 
hands away from your heads. 

BP 

Before the Pen gives way to its succes- 
sor, it is going to reveal to you the secret 
of success at Aggie,— namely, not only 
aspiration, inspiration, but perspiration! 

BP 

Blots from the Pen 
To all events, the Freshmen and Co-eds 
seem to be the sole sufferers in the waiter's 
paradise this year. Undoubtedly, such 
meals to the wise were sufficient. 

BP 

The only visible and noticeable evidence 
of the increasing wealth of the College is 
the shining array of ash cans placed at 
useful intervals. 

BP 

The easiest job on campus goes to the 
census-taker of the Senior moustaches. 
BP 



FROSII ELECT OFFICERS 

CContlnued from Puftr 1 1 
elected to the pt)sitions of the class officers 
for the coming term: 

President- Kenneth E. Hodge of 

Monson. C ' J 
\'ice- President— Barbara Wood 
Treasurer Richard H. Mcrritt of 

VVilliam.sburg 
Secretary- Mabelle L. Anderson of 

Southwick 
Captain Fldward Samoriski of Millers 

Falls 
Sergeant-at-Arms- J. Louis Wilson of 

Ashland 
Historian— Lois M. Hale of Cireenfield 



FROSII HAVE PROMISING 

(Continued from i'ai^e 1) 
have had previous exfHjrience are L. 
Costanzo of Stamford, Conn., who made 
a record for himself by participating four 
years in athletics while attending that 
high school, and John Foley who starred 
as a half back for Amherst High, \intent 
(Jagliarduci has had experience as a 
football player in Springfield while Robt. 
(iorey of South Deerfield, William W. 
Libbey of Westboro, Patrick O'Donnell of 
Abington, Douglas Roach of Provincetown, 
and Erie \endt of Worcester North have 
been prominent in football at their re- 
spective high schools, and should add 
much strength to the frosh team. A. 
Willard Smith was captain of Northamp- 
ton High last season and George Sylvester 
is a very promising candidate from New 
Jersey, where he has had valuable experi- 
ence as a backfield man. 

Other candidates who are competing 
for positions are RoI.ert Uiggs, Ozro Fish, 
Clifford Foskett, Nathan Hale, Edward 
Hickson, Carey Howlett. C.eorge King, 
Richard Merritt, .Americo Sala, Edward 
Samoriski, Willard Smith, John Tikofski, 
Edwin Thomas, Elmer Thompson, Robt. 
Tetro, Harold Waite, Melvin Wanegar, 
Frederick Welsh, C. Whittier, and Louis 
Wilson. Many of these men have had 
exjierience and are fighting hard for 
places on the freshman aggregation. 

Besides the Deerfield game on Sept. 28 
a schedule arranged by the varsity foot- 
ball manager includes the following games: 
Oct. 5 Northampton, here (tentative) 
Oct. 12 Williston Academy (tentative) 
Oct. 20 Adams High, there 
Oct. 20 S. Deerfield (tentative) 
Nov. 7 Sophomore-Freshman game 



STOCKBRWGE 



About fifteen men of the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture are exjHfCted tu 
answer Coach "Red" Ball's call for 
candidates for the short course football 
team with the first practices scheduled 
for this week. The number will be 
greatly increased as soon as the school 
opens, and Captain Windsor Brown is 
expecting to have a comparatively large 
scjuad due to the unusual size of the 
enrollment. The schedule is not as yet 
complete. 



CADET OFFICERS FOR 

iConllnuetl from I'afte I; 

To he Cadet l-'irst Lteuteiumts 
Cadet Paul D. Isham, Adj. 1st Squad. 
Cadet Roy S. Tarr, Adj. 2nd Scjuad. 
Cadet Evan C. Richardson, Troop .A 
Cadet Arthur H. (iraves. Troop E 
Cadet Frank I. Howe, Trwip B 
Cadet John S. Woodbury, Troop F 
Cadet John Chadwick, Tnxjp C 

To he Cadet Second Lieutenants 
Cadet Leroy O. Jones, Troop A 
Cadet Donald A. Davis, Troop E 



AlVMNl NEWS 



If "Safety in Numbers" means any- 
thing, then who'll win the night-shirt 

parade? 

BP 

At the Annual Battle of the String, 
something of interest to all was displayed. 
Everyone enjoyed the pull, but the stu- 
dents of biology could delight at the 
entomological and botanical curiosities 
which gradually covered the selected 
clothing of the Frosh at each yielding tug 

of the Sophs. 

BP 

The Afibey alarm clocks are having their 

annual rest. 

BP 



Till OFFER OF A COLLEGE 

Dr. Willi.im De Witt Hyde of Uowdoin 
College some time ago (iresented the 
following words which are most appro 
priate at the beginning of every college 
year. His analysis is brief, but every 
word carries a wealth of weight. 

"To be .It hdiiie in all lands .md .i^es; 
to count Nature ,i familiar ,u(juaintaiue 
and Art an intmi.itc friend; to gain a 
standard for the appreri.ition of other 
men's work, .uui the criticism of your 
own; to carry the keys of the world's 
greatest librar\ in Nour (xuket, and feel 
its resources behind you in whatever you 
undertake; to make hosts of friends 



LARGER GROUP OF 

(Conllnueil from Pufte I) 

Robert S. Snell, Walter E. Southwick, 
Phillips B. Steere, Dickran Vartanian. 

Class of l'.t:>() Harold V. Campbell, 
Margaret P. Donovan, Herbert A. Good- 
ell, Hermon U. Goodell, John B. Howard, 
Fred W. Jones, Theotlore Marcus, Isiibel 
E. Morgan. Wilfred G. Purdy, Spencer C. 
Stanford, Cecil H. Wadleigh, Marie E. 
Wells. 

Class of lO.n Walter T. Bonney. Sally 
E. Braillcy, Richard W. Davis, Edmund 
L. Frost, Emory B. Hastings, Gertrude 
A. Meade, Allen S. West. 

Third Honors Group — 80 to 85 
Class of 1929 Harold S. Adams, 
Francis D. Alberti, Olive E. Allen. Armand 
L. Arnurius, Irene L. Bartlett, Flleanor 
Caldwell, Laurence A. Carruth, C. Shepley 
Cleaves, Martin G. Fonseca, Arthur H. 
Graves, Guila (.. Haw ley, Walter C.. 
Hunter, Miriam H. Huss, Leroy O. Jones, 
Robley W. Nash, Earl C. Prouty, William 

B. Robertson. Grace G. Slack, John A. 
Sullivan. .Alexaniler C. Winton, and 
Harriet Proctor. 

Class of 1930— Raymond C. -Allen. 
t)sman Habson. .Sergius J. Bernard, 
Richard II. Bond. -May F. Buckler, 
Charles B. Cox, William B. Drew. Fred 

C. F:ikrt, Charles F. Frame, Lucy .A. 
Grunw.iUlt. Richard .A. Hernan, Thomas 
Hetherington, Alfred G. Hillicrt, Kenneth 
W. Hunt. Catherine G. Johnson. Ralph F. 
Kneeland. M.ibel -A. MacCausland, Ray- 
mond S. Mann, Her\ 1 F. Morse. Donakl 

F. Murphy, -Arne E. I'ottala. Raphael 
S,iraceni, liric Singleton, Leon Stani- 
siiwski, I'eter II. W.iechter, Jr.. Priscilla 

G. Wood, and Alway K. ^ e.itman. 
Class of 1931- F:\elyn .A. Beaman, 

John II. Brooks, .Alfred A. Brown, John 
(\il\i. WyiUon R. D.ingelmayer. Herbert 
1). Darling. Anna K. Digney, Paul R. 
FitzGerald, John R. Gucnard, F"rancis M. 
nines, Margaret E. Koerber. Clyde W. 
Nash, Gertrude K. Pierce, Arthur G. 
Priest, Anna M. Renter, Ruth E. Scott, 
Frank R. Shaw, Paul A. Smith, John 
Somes, Robert E. Stuart, and Lionel L. 
Vincent. 



Sheep from goats,— Hoover or Smith? 
BP 

The Pen here pushes its last stroke. It 
recognizes the fact that it might have in- 
creased the Side of the pai)er and earned 
more iKipularity had it been able to give 
advice to the lovelorn or establish a 
dating agency, but it dutifully and con- 
scientiously followed its true purpose. 
BP 



Resquiescat in pace. 



FOOTBALL SQUAD 

(Continued from PaHe 1) 
upper-classmen who show promise and 
are out for the first time are Bernard '30, 
L. Howard '30, Magnuson '30, and True 
'30. The class of 1931 has a comparatively 
large group of able men from last year's 
freshman team including the following: 
Danglemayer, Frey, Hicks. Hines, Kane, 
Kimball, Little. Lorrey, Manty. Mink- 
stein, Myrick, Salenius, and \'incent. 
Several of this grtiup ha\e been doing 
excellent work and can be counted upon 
to press the men from last year's squad 

closely. 

The club is particularly fortunate in 
having a number of transfer students who 
are pro\iding very good material to help 
\\h'\p the varsity squad into shape and are 
taking all the knocks and hard work 
despite the fact that they will be unable 
to pl.iy this year because of the one year 

rule. 

The number of men from the two upper 
classes who are fighting for berths on the 
team is r.ither discouraging and it is to 
be hojied that more men will show 
interest in the club to the extent of 
working with them. A junior varsity 
schedule has been arranged but as yet 
there is not sufficient material for that 

team. 

The first varsity game is scheduled for 
next Saturday when the team journeys 
to Brunswick to play Bowdoin. The 
completed schedule is as follows: 
Sep. 29 Bowdoin at Brunswick 
Oct. Bates at M.A.C. 

13 Middlebury at M.A.C. 



NOTES FROM THE CLASS OF 1928 

David C. Bradford is working in the 
drafting room of the Little Tree Nurseries 
in F"ramingham, Mass. 

Joseph H. Forest, who has been con- 
nected with the Department of Agricul- 
tural Economics on the campus during 
the past summer, will soon begin statisti- 
cal work in the Division of Markets at 
the State House, Boston. 

J. Stanley Hall is a chemist with the 
Proctor & Gamble Co., which is located 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Ethan D. Mo<ire has been acting as a 
foreman for the Lane Construction Corp. 
of Meriden, Conn. He is at present work- 
ing on the Amherst-Hadley road construc- 
tion work. 

Walter Howland is a bee insjjector in 
Rhcxle Island. 

Newell A. Schappelle is teaching at 
the Everett High School, Everett, Penn. 

Walter R. Smith is a graduate assistant 
in the Dei>artment of Chemistry on this 
campus. 

Frank Stratton is enrolled in the Yak- 
Medical School. 

Howard Thomas is teaching and coach- 
ing at Suffield School in Suffield, Conn. 

Edwin A. Wilder has accepted a posi- 
tion close to Amherst, teaching and 
coaching at Williamsburg High. 

Arnold I. Redgrave recently made his 
way back to the campus from Charleston, 
N. H., where he is both a teacher and 
head coach. 



M.A.C. is especially well representeii 
in the July number of Landscape Archi- 
tecture. The number opens with an illus- 
trated article by Prof. Frank A. Waugh, 
entitled "Notes on Outdoor Theatres." 
The next article, also illustrated, is 
entitled "A Modern Country Club De- 
velopment," John Nyes '09, landscape 
architect of St. Louis, being joint author. 
Eddie Conncli '27 contributes an extencled 
article on "The Design of a Golf Putting; 
(ireen." This article is illustrated by 
several drawings by Roger Chamberlain 
'27. A. D. Taylor '05 contributes the 
25th section of his famous "Landscape- 
Construction Notes," illustrated. There 
are also some interesting book reviews 
by Stephen F". Ilamblin '12. 



MILITARY NOTES 



During the recent horse show held .it 
the Eastern States Flxi)osition in Spring 
field, the entries from this College secured 
nine ribbons against one of the largest 
gatherings of thoroughbred horses in the 
eastern part of the country. The follow- 
ing is a list of the classes in which prizes 
were taken, together with the names ol 
the horses winning them: 

Heavyweight Polo Ponies Class 
High Jinks, 4th place 

Lightweight Polo Ponies Class 
Mollie, 1st place 
Duchess, 4th place 
Lassie, 5th place 

Green Hunters Class 
Bonnie, 3rd place 
Duchess, 4th place 

Hunt Teams Class 

Hunt Team from M.A.C, 5th place 

Polo Team Class 

Two entries from M.A.C, 2nd and 3rcl 



Ernest J. Schmidt is an analyst for the 
.Atmospheric Nitrogen Co., of Syracuse. 
N. Y. 

Richard Davis is travelling for the 
.American Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Leonard Thompson has returned to his 
old alma mater, (ireenfield High, and is 
teaching as well as serving as assistant 
coach. 

Blanche D. Avery is teaching home 
economics in Fairfield, \ t. 

Lora M. Batchelder was married in 
June and is now Mrs. Clifton Ewing. 

Cornelia Church is technical assistant 
of the Home Economics Experiment 
Station here on the campus. 

Dorothy M. Cooke has taken a position 
handling dictionaries in the scientific de- 
partment of the Merriam Publishing Co. 

Carolyn Dean is at her home in Utica, 
N. Y. She plans to enter landscape 
gardening work soon. 



Under the present re-arranged system 
of hours. maj)ping becomes a junior 
subject instead of a sophomore subject. 
and hygiene is shifted from the sophomore 
year to the freshman year. 

(Continued on Pafte 4) 



20 Norwich at Northfield 

27 Worcester Tech at M.A.C. 

Nov. 3 Amherst at M.A.C. 

10 Springfield at Springfield 

17 Tufts at Medford 



Julia R. Lawrence has received a 
fellowship award from a western uni\t'r- 
sity and has gone there to resume hir 
study in botany. 

Dorothy L. Leonard is employed a^ 
hostess in a tea shop on Cape Cod. 

Margaret K. Little has entered her 
leadership career in 4-H Club work "?. 
Caj^n; Cod. 

Elizabeth A. Morey is at the Jordan 
Marsh school for College Graduates. 

Josephine Panzica is teaching Home 
Economics and English in Vineyard 
Haven, Martha's Vineyard, Mass. 

Sarah T. Plantinga is assisting in the 
Agricultural Education department on 
the campus. 

Marjorie J. Pratt is teaching EikIi?^' 
in Vermont. 

Barbara W. Southgate is doing ^'^''^ 
in Animal Husbandry in Fairfield, Con" 

F. Dorothea Williams is doing library 
work in the Waltham Library. 



nOSTONIANC 

^ Shoes JorMin 



Correctly Styled 
Comfortable 
Guaranteed long wear 
— $7 to $11— 
Imported and Domestic Leathers 

BOi-L-ES SHOE STORE 




M.A.C. Stationery and Banners - A Snappy Pennant with 

a Cane . 25c. 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

AMHERST, MASS. 



AH the latest Books 



iQ^^^^^i 



James A. Lowell, Bookseller 



INDIA PRINTS 

Candlesticks, Pictures, Etc 

FOR YOUR ROOM 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 

Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

High-grade Shoe Repairing 
Also Hats Cleaned and Re-blocked 

(Next to Bolles Shoe Store) 

.\inherst, - - Mass. 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

Now situated at 15 1-2 Pleasant St. 
EXCELLENT SHOE REPAIRERS 

V. CRONDOXICO, Prop. 

jCollege Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH 
Reg. Pharm. 

AMHERST, - - MASS. 



SrUDENTS! AHENTION! 

Make a day's wafteo for one hour** work 
after ClaHnra. No eiperlenceor InveHiment 
necessary. We have an opening at M. A. C. 
Appllrailons considiietl in order of their 
receipt. Write today for free particulars. 
BRADFORD & CO . Inc. St. Joseph. Mich 



Best in Drug Store Service 
Rest in Drug Store Merchandise 

'Henry Adams & Co. 



A DARK OUTLOOK 
FOR FALL 

We're referring of course 
to the colour of 

Fall Clothing 

For Young Men. 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

J PLEASANT STREET, (up one fllftht) 

I Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 

accurately replaced 

Bir; BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 



Dark Colours in Ox- 
ford mixtures. 

Silver Blacks and Sil- 
ver Blues. 



ASK FOR 

"MLNSINGWEAR" RAYON 

and SILK 

Bioomere — Step- Ins^— Vests 

Slips — Bandeau — Pajamas 

Night Robes 



SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

G. Edward Fisher 



Carl H. Bolter 

Incorporated 
EXETER AMHERST HYANMS 



•<3J^^p?!i£)i 



OVER IWO HUNDRED 

(.Continued front Haite I > 

Cain, (ieorge H. S. liraintrce 

Caird, Wynne K. Dalton 

C'artiT, Forrest K. Waketuld 

Cliapm.iM, Kiniieth \V. Si)rin>;rielil 

Chart, S. A. Dorchester 

Chase. Ileri.ert M. Jr. Newport, \< \. 

Chtiu\, How.irtl .-\. Sprinj;tkltl 

C"hurch, (lertrude .N. Amherst 

Cl.irk, \\Vl>ster K. Jr. W . Deerfield 

COhen, Wilhaiu Sprinntield 

Connell, I'hilip J. .Sprin^lield 

( iM)ley, l.aiira Sunderl.md 

C(jssar, ilollis F. .\. Siidlmry 

Costanzo, L. V. .Stamford, Conn. 

Costello. John I*. Franklin 

Cox, irederiik I".. J.im.iii.i IM.iin 

Crawford, Forrest V.. Waveries 

D.iley, l<()l)ert D. .-\rlinKfon 

I).t\ is, Henry I). Boston 

D.ivis, Willi.im 1'. Waltham 

Dean, .Merritt N. I'ownal, Vt. 

DeCalUke, I'eter Moonton, N. J. 



Delisle, .\li)ert L 



•S. Il.ullev Falls 



Dickinson, Thelma L. Cireenwieh 

DiUKf. Hdliert I.. Krinhton 

Dohhins. Wilbur Hurlinnton 

Dods, Annes M. Montanue 

Doerpholz, Funire lU-lehertown 

Don.inhy, F:. J. New liedford 

Doyle, James E. Northampton 

Dunn, .Albert C. Acton 

Durkee, I'auline. Mrs. Amherst 

D\ar, C.eorge W. Waltham 

F;dmond, Stuart D. Amherst 
FIdwards, I). C. Morgantown, W.Xa. 



Fltinu henko, Hasil M 
Fldred^e, Josephine 
FIdridge, Richard A. 
I'lverson, Hettina L. 
Fahyan, Warren 
Fannin, Nancy 
Fell, James K. 
Fish, Ozro, Jr. 
Fisher, Wm. S. Jr. 
Flavin, Fid ward W. 
Flet( her, Kolurt W. 
FIcmkI, Cieorne .\L 
Foley, John J. 
I'olger, Richard S. 
F(mtaine, Arthur L. 
Forest, Herbert L. 
Forrest, An^eline 
Foskett, Clifford R. 
Fraser, Richard A. 
( ia^liarducci, \'. ,N. 
< iarvey, Jerome J. 
Cierrard, |{arl)ara K. 
Ciohiltlatt, Louis 
(ioldenln-rn;, Louis 
(iootlell, ik-rtram C. 
C.oo«lall, Leslie D. 
(ioo<lwin, Azor O. 



Cairo, l-gypt 

Chatham 

S. Chatham 

Amherst 

Weymoutii 

Ph(K-nix, Ariz. 

Fall River 

Waltham 

Mt.iCpliraim, N.J 

(ireenfield 

Worcester 

N. Adams 

Amherst 

Roslindale 

Fall River 

.Arlington 

l'ro\incet(jwii 

V\ey mouth 

Lowell 

Spring; field 

llolyoke 

liolyoke 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

.SouthliridKC 

Winthrop 

Marlileliead 



NEW FALL STYLES 

ON DISPLAY 
WATCH OUR WINDOW 

Shoe Repairing Department. 

JOHN FOTOS SHOK SToKi£ 



Town Hall, Amherst 

AMHERST AMUSEMENT CO. 



KTIIAN HOI,I>I:n. 



(ikSEHAI. MaNA 



Wednesday, .Sept. 26th 
Laura LaPlante & (;ienn Tryon in 
"Thanks For I he Bufifty Ride." 
From the play by Byron .Vlori^an. 

The plot Is funn> Held toaethcr by a 
charminft love interest. The Company, 
all funmal(ers-~lhe action fast and Lau- 
ra's puntomitnlnit beyond description. 

►ables I reel fjimedy 



Thursday & Friday, .Sept. 27 & 28 

Lon Chaney in his ftrealcM film 

•LACCH, CLOWN, LAI CII." 

Helasco's famous Miifte play at liisi in pic- 
lures. The tears, the launiiter. the Joys of 
life the lure of the sawdust rinft made 
inm a film masterpiece by aftrcal diret tor 
»ith theiireatesi of all screen charai ler 
sliirs. News C<>mc>l\ 



Saturday, Sept. 29 

William Boyd in 

"THE COP." 

With Jacqueline Logan. Alan Hale. The 
entire New ^ ork polite force cooperated lo 
malte this the ftrealesl ptiliie picture ever 
filmed. AM) 

\ technicolor production 

"CLEOPATRA." 

The World's ftrea I est love story with Dor- 
othy Revler and Kohen Lllis. 

News 2 r».,.| r.'imiedv 



* lordon, Laura F-. 
< «ore\ , Robert V . 
CiraystHi, William R. 
Clunness, Robert C. 
1 1. ill'. Keiiiuth I". 
Il.ile, Nathan S. 
Il.ilc. I.ois M. 
1 I.I 11, Frnest S. 
Il.il/iibic, llenrs 
ll.iiiiilton, Ormond 
ll.itih. M.irnuerite 
1 1. IN lies, .\inold C. 
Iiers,im, Alfiedd.i K. 
Iluksoii, i-.dw.ird 
llilihcix k, John D. 
Undue, Kcniuth V. 
Ih.lliu.iii, Mildred I'. 
Holder, Fben D. 
HolmberK, Oscar K. 
Howe, I'.li/abeth \'. 
Howe, v.. C.u Iton 
Howlett, Carey 11. 
Hiibb.ird, Catherine N 
Humphreys, (irace \. 
Hunter, .M.irion \\. 
Ish.ini, Beatrice C. 
Izzi, l-anil 
Johnson, Wm. \. 
Jorczak, Joseph S. 
Kaylor, John D. 
Ke\es, Curtis ( .. 
Killeen, John H. Jr. 
Kinn, ( ieor^e 
Kwoka, John V.. 
Lake, Susan (1. 
I.anib, Francis !L 
l.iwrence, F'dwin.i 
l.avine, Anna 
I.evine, Harry (). H. 
libbey, William C. 
l.(H)iner, iulward .A. 
I.opie, J. \\. 
I.yims, J. Carlefon 
Macl.ean, John D. 
.Mama(|ui, Nusrer 
Margolin, Oscar 
.M.irkus, Christine \'. 
Martin, John 
M.istm, Donahl M. 
McHride, Lawrence .S. 
.Merritt, Orris V\. 
.Merritt. Richard H. 
•Miller, IVank i:. 
Mitchell, F. W. Jr. 
Mitchell, Robert I). 
Morn,in, Lillian M. 
Murphy, iCdw.ird W. 
()'Conn<»r, Thomas I*. 
O'Donnell. P.itrii k F. 
Chlwiler, .Marnaret A. 
Oliver, Thomas J. 
()s^;o()<|, (ire^ory \ . 
I'arker, William if. 



Ipswu ll 

S. Deertield 

Milloid 

.'\inlierst 

Toll.ind 

Rowley 

(ireeiifielii 

Worcester 

N. .Aiuloxer 

Ikooktield 

W. Ncuton 

SpiiiiL;lield 

.Stoiieli.im 

Wcslti.ld 

W. Mcdw.iy 

.Monson 

I .iwicnce 

Hudson 

Waltham 

S. .\cton 

Norfolk 

■Siiutli.impton 
. Sundi'rI.ind 

.Am hirst 

i loKoke 

Ludlow 

S. M.ure 

Haverhill 

Chico|K'e 

!".ill River 

W hiiinsviile 

Cambrid((c 

Metliuen 

N. H.idley 

i'lainville 
While Plains. N.V 

.Spring; field 

I lolyoke 

•Spring; field 

Westboro 

Abington 

Dorchester 

Putney, \'t. 

Kridnewater 

Lynn 

Newlonville 

Monson 

Sprinnlii-ld 

.S. I-Iaston 

W.itertowii 
Sheffield 

Williamsburg 

Lynn 

Newbury|M)rt 

liolyoke 

I )unsl;d)le 

llolyoke 

liolyoke 

N. .Abington 

S)uthl)ridne 

( iloucester 

llverett 

( iorhain, .VL'iine 



Brunswick, Columbia and 



- RECORDS - 



Columbia and IvarJohnson 

- BICYCLES - 



Typewriter Headocarters 

Authorized Remintiton, Rf)yal and 

Corona 

Sales and .Service 

Radio Equi'^ment f;eneral Repair Shop 

H. E. DAVID 
35 Pleasant St., juit below P.O. Amherst 



I ive Hundred Different Trunk 

• • • JV ^ V S • • • 

What is the Number on your 
Lock? 

(;()LF Clubs at reasonable 
prices. 

New llifth (irade (;olf Balls 
three different makes, each .50c 

Old (;oIf Balls for Practice, 
Six for ... 75c 

Barjiains in Electric Lamps 

REPAIR SHOP 

"Thompson Repairs everything 
but Umbrellas." 

T Y P L VV W I T L K S for sale and 
to rent. 



THOMPSON'S SHOP 

Rear Bank Block 



I'.irsoiis, .Anna T. 
Peek, H.i/el It. 
Poll.ir.l, Robert L, 
i'ollin, l.illi.in P. 
Post, Kenneth I".. 
Potter, Slu.itt II. 
I'rince, Carlton (i. 
Purdy, ll.uris ij. 
\<<.y^. FliAibeih R. 
Reed, \ ii^mi.i 
Rlio,ides, Olive 
Rue. t l.ir.i R. 
Riif, (ieoiKc C. 
Rixkin, Julius M. 
Ro.ii ti, I >ouKlas 
Rolfev, Robert C. 
Rollins, Fmily C. 
Ronk.i, ( irorv;e R. 
Rii\\li\ , Rii h.ird 
Rn.iii, John W. Jr, 
.S.iHer, R.ilph .M. 
S,il.i. .Anuiiio P. 
Salisbury, .Alston M 
Silo, \ iiior \ . 



Southampton 
Sprinnheld 
.N. .\il.ims 
Shelfu'ld 
M.it Iboro 
I i.iMiiii^h.im 
.Ad.ims 
.Amlicist 

I >.llloll 

W.dtli.im 

W illi.iiiisliiir^ 

Nce.lh.iiii 

Neeilli.iiM 

Chelsea 

Prov iiici'toun 

Rot kpoi I 

Jamair.t I'I.mii 

( iloiicister 

liolyoke 

.Sw.llllpM Olt 

.Sprin^jlield 
I ee 

M.hos,. Hlds. 
.Millbiny 



Sailer, l.i'on.ird .A. Jr. Spi iiiKlielii 

Samoriski, Falward Millers Falls 

St boon maker. J. W. S. .Amherst 

Shea, Willi.mi R. Ware 

Smart, Harry II. Waltham 

Smith, .Aleck FAerett 

Smith, A. Willard Northampton 

Smith, (.ilman C. Leb.mon, N.ll. 

Smith, Roland W. Providence, R.l. 

Soja, .Stephen .S. N. Wilbraham 

SpriiiKer, Irank L. Arlington 

Stiles, Robert ll. Amherst 

Storey, Carl H. .Springfield 

Stii.irt, W.ill.iie W. Littleton Common 

Sylvester, ( ItHR^e .S. Cden Rink. N.J. 

laylor, Avis Dedhain 

I aylor, Fred ( irolon 

league, Lynwooti P. N. Weymouth 

Tetro, Robert Willi,imsburn 

Thomas, ICdwin H. .Atlleboro 

Thompson, i;imer J. HnMikline 

Tikofski, John VV. WaliK.le 

TipiH), Oswald Janiaii,. Plain 

lowle, (.ilford II, llolden 

TupiHT, Deane R. Orange 

Twiss. Mildred Hudson 

I'tley, Waller S. Chesterfield 
Van Leer, 11. L. Hilversum, Holland 

\endt, Fric C. Worcester 

\'lk, Henry Wakefiehl 

\'<K)rneveld, Wm. Jr. Nantucket 

Waite, Harold \. M. Northampton 

Wanegar, .Melvin II. MonlaKiie City 

Warner, iailu II. S. Amherst 

Warren, Philip W. W. Auburn 

Waskiewiiz, i:d. J. 'Three Rivers 

Watson, Fdward VV. Plymouth 

W.itson, I'hilip S. Arliii^;ton 

We.ir, William H. W.ilth.im 

Webb, P.iuline A. Swift River 

Well h. Frederii k J. .N. AbiuKton 

Wendell, Chas. H. Jr Melmont 

\\i Itirlow, lirii H. Jr. .Mam hesler 

Wheeler, Kenneth M. (;t. Marrington 
(Otnllnued on Pafte 4) 



( 



A 



M HE RS 

THEATER 



T 



M.AT Daily. 2 .«» 
Kvery Kveninii. I nhow.. 7 and H..»0 

Wednesday, Sept. 26th 

Kirm VALDKVlLLi: 

5 ACTS 5 

— ANI>— 
Irene Rich, Audrey Ferris in 
"WOMEN IIIEY I ALK ABOUT.' 



t^artoon 



Newi 



I hursday A Friday, .Sept. 27 & 2H 

I Janice (;aynor and Charles Farrell in 

"THE .STREET ANCiEL." 

t.'oniedy Neww 



Saturday, 


.Sept. 2'nh 




Richard Dix in 






"WARMINC, IP." 




Oimt'dy 


Nfws 1 


.Monday 6i 'Tuesday, Oct. 1 j 


tnd 2 


The (;reatesl ol 


r Them All! 




"LOLR 


SO.NS." 




2 reel (:onie«iy 


N 


•ws 



■ GARAGES - 

FOR RENT 

Amherst Nurseries 

Just .North of M.A.C. 



^N COI^I^EOE STORE 



BASEMENT OF "M" BUILDING 



.\i33vs oa 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1928 






OVKR IWO lll'NDKKI) 

iConliniu-il friiin l'att»'.»( 
Whittrii, (iillurt \. MilrosL- 
Wilson, J. I.ouis Ashland 

Wilson, RolKTt A. I.owt!! 

Wright , \ir;i I. NortliticM 

Transfers 
Ahlrich, (ieorKi- K., to class of 1'.>:J2 from 

W. V. i. 
Calkin, Lois I.., to class of I'.Ktl from 

Univ. of N. H. 
Cliast-, lU-rlurt M., to class of I'Xi'J from 

Rhode Island Stati- 



C'ornilius, Ruth \ ., to class of lU.U) Irom 
Washington I nivcrsity 

Costanzo, I.ouis I'., to class of \W2 from 
DartnuHith Colk-Ke 

Costello, John i'., to class of l'.>:{2 from 

liates College 
Davis, Mcnry I)., to class of IH.i'J from 

Clark Collc({c 
Kdwards, Donald ( .., to class of HK52 from 

I'niversity of West \ir«inia 
Cold, Harold, to class of IMl from M.I.T. 





Siie for Site any 

Chilton Pen holds 

Twice the Ink 



AvcraKi" capacity I'f 
5 well-known r^n* 
($7 «:<•'. }H drops 
— Chill. .n Ten ($7 
•lie), 81 drops. 

CeHifitdhu 

Blgel'itv, KenI 

& WlHatd. 

Comullinj En- 

$lntr$, Boiton 

14t 



Two Moves . . . arid a 
Chilton Drinks in 



( 



HERE'S twicc'Es-Kood pen-service 
for you . . . invented by the 
oriijinator t>f the sclf-fillinn pen. 

The Chilton pen drinks in at each 
filling cnouKh ink to till other self- 
fillinu pens ttco times and more. Re- 
member that when your olJ pen 
tjoes 1.1 ry. 

Trv this pen at any pen-counter . . . 
all standard styles, new leather-cov- 
ered pens and pencils and luxurious 
gift-sets. . .$J.50 to $30. 

CHILTON PEN COMPANY 
287 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 

C/iiCfon 



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REG. U.S. PAT. OFF. 



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CARRIED IN STOCK BY 

NEW COLLEGE STORE 



WELCOME- 

Wc're ftlad to welcome the upper clusstnen back and hope to wel- 
come the Freshmen to this store that has catered to M.A.t:. men for 
over forty years. 

Rest assured that we will c«»ntinue to ftive you the utmost in style, 
service and quality at prices that will consistently save you money. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes, Mallory Hats. Interwov- 
en Sox. Oakes Bros. Sweaters, Magregor Sportswear, 

Arrow Shirts 



EVERYTHING IN 

HARDWARE 



A N D 



Radio Equipment 



(.oodall, Leslie D., to class of W-Vl from 

Boston I'niversity 
I lit kson, Kdward C, to class of 19:J2 from 

Holy Cross 
llolway, .•\lfred M., to class of I'.KU from 

\V. V. I. 
King, Marc N., to class of HKU from 

Boston University 
I. oar, Russell K., to class of KKJl from 

\\Vsle>an I'niversity 
.Massolini, Andrew R., to class of I'.CiO 

from University of Maryland 
Miller, Donald, to class of l<,t29 from 

Uucknell I'niversity 
O'Connor, Thomas P., to class of l<.t."i2 

from St. Anselm's 
Rooncy, Robert C, to class of Htol from 

Tufts College 
Roper, Marion I.., to class of W.i\ from 

Boston University 
-Soja, Stephen S., to class of 1*»;{2 from 

Polish National Alliance 
Stiles, Alice ('.., to class of liKU) from 

Wellesley College 
Tucker, Robert B., to class of WM from 

University of N. H. 
TupiK-r, Deane R., to class of 1932 from 

Norwich University 
Vichules, Marguerite M.. to class of W.W 

from Ratlcliffe an<l Snuth Colleges 
Waskiewicz, Kdward, to class of Bt.'{2 
from Providence College 



.MILITARY NOIES 
Conllnuvd (rum I'uile 2) 
The military unit this year is to con- 
sist of five troops and the band. This 
latter organization has forty men trying 
out up to date. 



The first mounted drill takes place next 
Monday, Octol>er 1st. 



During the time at Camp Ethan .\ll(n 
this past summer over 5()? of the grou|i 
from M.A.C. qualified as either marksmtn 
or sharpshooters. 



Kingsbury Box & Printing Co. 

JOB PRINTERS 



NORTHAMPTON 



MASS. 



Phone 554 or 555 




ATWATER-KENT AND MAJESTIC RADIO 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



suits my taste 
like nobod/s business 



I KNOW what I like in a pipe, and what I like 
is good old Prince Albert. Fragrant as can be. 
Cool and mild and long-burning, right to the 
bottom of the bowl. Welcome as the week-end 
reprieve. Welcome . . . and satisfying! 

No matter how often I load up and light up, 
I never tire of good old P. A. Always friendly. 
Always companionable. P. A. suits my taste. 
1*11 say it does. Take my tip, Fellows, and load 
up from a tidy red tin. 

Fringe albert 




The tidy red tin that's 
packed with f»pe-joy. 



— no other tobacco is like it! 



© 1928. R.J. Reynolds Tobacco 
Company. Wiiuton-Sal«m, N. C. 



®l|? iiaBfiarl|U0?tt0 



llr. Basil 6. Wood. 



•• .. • 



— ^ • v^«^.. 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS.. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1928 




Number 2 



Freshmen Victorious in 

Razoo Night Activities 

Nightshirt Parade Goes To Yearlings By Score of 115 to 68. 
Interesting Bouts and Matches in Arena. 



Revenging themselves for the recent 
defeat sutTered in the annual rupe-pull 
the freshmen showed a complete su- 
premacy over the sophomores last Fiiday 
night in the boxing and wrestling matches 
and in the nightshirt parade. The first 
portion of the double feature opened at 
7.'M) in (irinnell .Arena when Albert Nash 
of (ireenfield, a sjjphomore, outpointed 
Chester Waite of Northampton in a 
three-round boxing bout. The next event, 
.1 wrestling match between Jack Kolonel 
;il of (irand Falls, Newfoundland, and 
<ieorge Sylvester ';}2 of (ilen K(xk, N. J., 
was declared a draw. 

In the next bout the freshmen evened 
up the score when (ieorge King ",i2 of 
Methuen won over John .Sandow '31 of 
.Natick. The yearlings then proceeded to 
take the lead when Carey Howlett '.'{2 
of Southampton got the fall over John 
.Somes '31 of Otis. In return Norman 
Myrick '31 of Springfield evened up the 
total by outpointing Rol>ert Daley '32 o( 
.Arlington. The freshmen again went 
ahead when in the next contest Warren 
Fabyan '.32 of Weymouth threw Fouren 
Tashjian '31 of Paris, France, in the first 
minute. 

The next bout caused a flurry of excite- 
ment when it was found that Jack 
Kolonel was entering the ring again. 
This time as a boxer against John Con- 
stanso '32 of Franklin. The judges, how- 
ever, ruled Kolonel out as he had already 
entered one event, an«l a hurry call was 
set up for a sophomore to take his place. 
Robert Lorrey of Watertown responded 
and stepped into the ring. During the 
next minute, however, he stepjx.'d out 
several times. This was because of the 
onslaught of his determined ojiponent, 
who furnished the sjiectators a thrill 
seldom experienced at these events. 
Referee Grayson finally had to put a 
(Continued on Page 2) 



FRATERNITIES PICK 

NEW CANDIDATES 



Over a Hundred Pledge Pins Being 
Worn by Freslimen 



Portraits And Pictures By 
Prof. Waugh On Display 



Photographs of Faculty Members and 
Others As Well As Kxquisite "Ktch- 
craft Prints" in Memorial Building 



Aggies Lose To Bowdoin 
But Show Potential Strength 



OUTING CLUB SCHEDULE 



The M.A.C. Outing Club is planning a 
busy fall term, dividing its interests be- 
tween hiking, monthly and special meet- 
ings, and work on the Club's cabin on 
.Mt. Toby. The last two activities were 
discussed at the meeting Tuesday night, 
the report of which will apjK-ar in next 
\Neeks' Collegian, but the hiking schedule 
has already been submitted by ( ieorge A. 
Harrus '.30, chairman of the Trails Com- 
mittee. It is as follows: 

The Orient. 

Mt. Sugarloaf and the In<lian 
Museum at Old Deerfield. 

Rattlesnake (iutter (All day). 

Mt. Toby Caves. 

Mt. Tol)y, with luncheon at the 
M.A.C. Outing Club cabin. 
(All day.) 

Holyoke Range. 

Open date 

()l>en date. 

Open date. 



Taking stwk after the close of the 
rushing season shows more than a hun- 
<lred pledge buttons being worn on the 
campus, with a few bids still to be heard 
from. The number pledged is slightly 
higher than last year, though there are 
many freshmen who have stayed non- 
fraternity for the time being at least. 

The following is a list of pledges to the 
various fraternities: 

0. T. V. 

1932— Lewis E. Bates, Forrest K, 
Carter, Webster H. Clark Jr., John \\ 
Costello, Mollis F. Cossar, F:dward Hick- 
son, F:ben D. Holder, John Martin, 
William P. Shea, Henry Vilk. 
Phi Sigma Kappa 

1931— Alfred Brown. 

1932— A. Daws<jn Bray, Arthur ¥.. 
Brown, John A. Burrington Jr., Henry 
D. Davis, Arnold C. Haynes, William C. 
I.ibby, (ieorge R. Ronka, (ieorge S. 
Sylvester, FIdward VV. Watson, Charles 
R. Wendell Jr., Robert A. Wilson. 
(Continued on Pag* 2) 



ENLIGHTENING TALK 
GIVEN IN ASSEMBLY 



Reverend Edwin Robinson of Holyoke 

Recounts Experiences of Recent 

European Trip 



(:)ct 



N 



l>e 



c. 



I 
20 

28 

4 

12 



1,S 

24 

8 

15 



NEW COURSE IN MUSIC 



A new course has recently been added 
to the curriculum under the name of 
^'I'-H T.j. This course will consist of 
'"•' i < stral work under the direction of 
I'r Miles H. Cubben, and two credits 
*in be given to those who elect it. ( Uhers 
^fifi are interested are welcome to take 
ft"" 'ourse without credit, securing only 
'trrhestral experience. .Members of 
'hf faculty or staff who play instruments 
3n r ordially invited to join the orchestra. 
^^■''- next meeting will be held Thursday 
tvcnngat r)..30. 



F^urojie takes on a different asf)ect in 
the light of the talk given by Rev. F:dwin 
Bradford Robmson ol Holyoke, in Assem- 
bly last Thursday. In his survey of his 
trip, Rev. Mr. Robinson told of the con- 
ditions in the F^uro|)ean countries, es- 
pecially Italy. 

Italy has the most perfect military 
machine in the world since the Prussian 
system, according to Mr. Robinsfm. 
Hlvery |)erson in the country, even down 
to the smallest child, has been taken by 
the Facisti and comixflled to give some- 
thing to that cause. Fiverywhere in Italy 
the slogan is "Preiwre for the next war!" 
The Italians are confidently expecting to 
overrun France the minute that war is 
declared. 

(Continued on Pafte i) 

Discussion of Rushing 

At Conference Meeting 

Deferred Rushing Topic of Discussion. 

Committee to Investigate IVIerits 

of Various Systems 



Of sjK'cial interest to the undergradu- 
ates and faculty of the college is the 
exhibition of photographs which is now- 
being shown in the lounge of the Memorial 
Building. These |)hotographic prints were 
all made by Professor Frank A. V\'augh 
and represent for the greater part charac- 
ter studies of .M.A.C. professors, including 
such men as President Thatcher, President 
Olds, Sir Wilfred C.reiifell and other in- 
teresting |)ersons. In addition to these 
|X)rtraits there is an exquisite group of 
outdoor scenes which Professor Waugh 
terms his "etchcraft prints." 

FIven the most indifferent and casual 
observer is taken with the outstanding 
(|uality of the group representing the out- 
d(H)r studies. At first glance they seem 
to be very delicate etchings, and one is 
(juite surprised to find that they are actual 
photographs, photographs treated in a 
s|)ecial way untler Professor Waugh s 
direction. In every case there is a sub- 
dued, and even mellow light suffused 
throughout the scene and the subject has 
no sharp contrasts or glaring lines to 
emphasize any one part. The result is a 
picture which would do credit to any 
master of the most modern photography. 
In this group there are such subjects as 
flowers, |KX)ls of water in the sunlight, 
quaint old villages, and modern buildings. 

In many of the (portraits of the faculty 
and staff the photographer seems to have 
caught some characteristic expression or 
IKjse of the subject, some little thing by 
which the man is known around campus. 
To those of us who know most of the 
|>ersons whose pictures appear in the 
exhibit there is something extremely 
natural to nearly all the (xirtraits. 



First Came Lost to Polar Bears, 13-0. (ireat Comeback 
Last Quarter Nearly Scores For Maroon and VVIilte. 



in 



SO. DEERFIELD DOWNS 
FROSH IN FINAL PERIOD 

Frosh (Jo Well Until Final Quarter 

When South Deerfield .Scores 

On Straight Football 



HIGH HONORS GO TO 
JUDGING TEAMS 

Outstanding Work at Eastern States 

Exposition Will Mean Trip to 

National Dairy Show at 

Memphis, Tenn. 



Showing a strong offense in the final 
quarter, the Si>uth Deerheld High eleven 
nosed out the freshman team by a score 
of <i to on the freshman field last Friday. 
The three preceding siorele.ss |H-riods ha<l 
seen a slightly stronger yearling s<|uad on 
the field, but in the last |x>rio<l the line 
weakened, and by coupling line bucks 
with short end runs, the visitors pushed 
over their score. 

At the o|)ening of the game the fresh- 
men showed a deal of .strength. First 
downs were frecjuently nia<le, but they 
were not simultaneous, and the ball con- 
tinually changed hands. During the first 
half the op|>onents scarcely |x>netrated at 
all into yearling territory. 

During the third quarter clever defen- 
sive play on the part of Roiich, the frosh 
left end, and Cheney, left half back, kept 
South Deerfield to momentary gains, but 
in the final |K-riod the visitors carrie<l the 
ball «lown the field and across the line for 
the score. Cady plunged over the final 
marker to give his team the only ixjints 
of the game. 

From all apfiearances the freshmen 
should develop a strong team before the 
interclass contest is 8che<luled with the 
sophomores. The line is husky and hard 
to move while the backfield hx>ks fairly 
fast. .Sylvester's ball-carrying featured 
the offense of the team. 

The summary: 



Among the active groups of the college 
are the dairy pro<lucts judging team and 
the animal husban<lry team. The dairy 
prwlucts team won the annual juflging 
contest held at the FLastern .States F-xjk)- 
sition at Springfield, and the animal hus- 
bandry team won thir<l place in the cattle 
judging contest there. On October 1.') 
and 17 resfiectively, the dairy products 
team and the animal husbandry team will 
(Continued on Pafte i) 



Tl 



THE OUTSTANDING EVENT 
OF THE WEEK 



1-xcellent singing and an interesting 
message from President Thatcher com- 
''ined to make the chapel service of 
■Mdriday morning an inspiring meeting 
'"' ' one to be remembered. 



At the meeting of the Interfraternity 
Conference last Thursday evening the 
members deliberated lengthily on the 
subject of deferred rushing. This issue 
has been the object of considerable com- 
ment among most of the fraternity houses 
and the Conference has taken upon their 
shoulders to remedy, if [xjssiblc, any evil 
conditions which now prevail. 

In behalf of this [iroblem, Arnold Dyer 
'2.S, Edward II Nichols '28, and William 
B. Robertson '2S were chosen as a com- 
mittee to investigate the matter. It was 
decided that they get in touch with the 
Interfraternity Conferences of other in- 
stitutions as to the manner in which 
rushing is carried on in their resjx'ctive 
colleges. As likely methods are brought 
to light the Conference will refer them 
to the various fraternities for their 
opinions. The system must be suitable 
to all houses and, in this resfiect. the 
Conference has embarked to devote the 
greater part of the year in improving the 
present unsatisfactory conditions. 

It was also decided at the meeting 
that, during future rushing seasons, no 
fraternity pins will be given out in the 
place of pledge buttons. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

This Fritlay the first dance of tin- 
College year will be held under the 
auspices of the Informal Committee. 
Music for dancing will be furnished 
by a College orchestra and will be 
played from eight to eleven. Tickets 
will lie seventy-five cents a couple, 
with the same price for stags, and a 
large attenflance is expected. 



.South l>e«rAeld 

Ml TX-riiuitt. Ic 
Sok<ilijHki. It 
Otto, CiiniiinK. Ik 
I* Klinkcr. i 
\i<*< koHki. rK 
Charlrs l'icl<K'k, it 
Marilwi'll. .Mi'dcy, re 
S. Klinkcr, iit) 
\\'u)tklii-wi>z. Ihb 
( lirstrr I'li-Unk. rhb 
( ady. fl. 
•S ore by |H'ri(Klg 
S>utli l><rheld 
.M.A.C. !«:« 

TotK li<t(>wn -Cady 



M.A.C. I«.U 

r<", Wilwui 

r(. MhIi 

rK. Biirrinnltm. Smith. ili< kwui 

c, TlioiiiuM. CaKliardiK I I 

Ik. LitiU-y. () IJonmll 

It. Kosket 

li'. Koai h 

<|li. Sylvfstrr 

rhb. W.I. h. K.»l.y 

Ibb. ( In-iiry 

lb. DlKKi 

1 -2 :« I 

n () tv <i 

(I )l (V o 
Rcfi-rcp Tiilcnko. I'm 



[lire — Miller. Head linesman KuHworlh Time 
two S-minute and two lO-minulr periods. 

EVEN BREAK PREDICTED 
IN SATURDAY'S GAME 

Bates and M.A.C. Both Defeated in 

Opening (iames Although Visitors 

Will Outweigh Maroon 



CAMPU.S CALENDAR 

"l>ii\l thiiu liivf life, then dn ni,i ■.■luiimlfr 
time. Jar thai ts the >,luff life is made <ij." 

— 1^. Franklin ( I'txir Hichardi 



Index MeetinR. 

Tryout lor Mens' Musical ( luh 



Mu-ii 7.") m>TtinK 

Mr-* I-U( la Allies Meari, 



IK'.iker. 

ejition 
.N(jrtli- 



Wednesday 

7.1.') p. m. 
H(K) I,, m. 
Thursday 

ti.iO [. m. 
Aisembly . 
Friday 

Sl'M kbriduc S luxjl of .\K'ii uUure r 
Freshman I'liotball: Freshmen vs 

aniptDn HiKh. here. 
H (HI II m F'riday NiKlit Dame. 
Saturday 

2.:«»i). m. Xar-'ity football-. M.A.C. vs. 

Bates. .Munini Field 
H.(t() i> m. Co-nioiKilitan < hib meeting at 
.Mount Holyoke. 
.Sunday 

OiitinK (lull Hike to f)rient SjirinKs. 



This coming Saturday afternoon Mass. 
.^ggie will play its first home football 
game of the season against the strong 
Hates eleven on Alumni Field. The 
visiting team has a heavy line averaging 
approximately 1S() pounds to ihe m;jn. 
The backfield weighs about 17.1 |K)unds 
(K-r player, making the team superior as 
far as weight isconterned. Last Saturday 
while M.A.C. lost to Howdoin, Hates met 
iltfeat in itso|H'ning game with Wesleyan, 
the store being 14 to in favor of the 
Connecticut team. 

(Continued on Pafte 2) 

Noted Internationalist 

To Speak In Assembly 

.Mrs. Lucia Ames .Mead an Authority 

On Peace .Subjects and 

International Affairs 



I'anilty and students of M.A.C. will 
ha\e the unusual ofiportunity tomorrow 
afternfxjn of hearing an address by .Mrs. 
Lucia Ames .Mead, iiittrnation.iiiy known 
lecturer and writer on |xa< e problems, 
who comes here as the regular assembly 
sfK-aker. Mrs. Mead will present the 
latest asiKt ts of the peat c tjuestion 
(Continued on Pafte 2) 



the 



Mass. Aggie o,HM.ed its ll)2S football 
season h.st Satur.lay afterntM,,, al llruns- 
wick, Maine, by losing to a heavy Mow 
«lo.n team in a har.l fought game which 
endetl with the .score l.J tod. 11,,. home 
aggregation, betause of its excellent con- 
'I'titm anti 8U|.erior weight, manage,! to 
t.jke a.lvantage of scleral breaks which 
netted twt) touch.jowns. "Fretldie" Fllert 
the star halfback for the M.A C te»m' 
feature.1 i„ a twenty five yar.l run an.l 
several pa.sses which carried the ball to 
Mowdom's five-yard line in the fourth 
<|uarter. 'Ni.k" Nitkiewicz, at fullf.ack 
was a substantial grou„,| ^Jailu-r for tht!- 
Agg.es by n.aking sfea.ly gains of s.x or 
M'ven yartis through the line. Captain 
Mob How.e tliti creditable work at left 
end, while •Herm" Magnuson held down 
h.s ,H,s,tion at left guard in a praise- 
worthy manner, (hapn.an, the How.Ioin 
left halfback, was the star of the Maine 
team by scoring both touchtlowns. while 
Larcom. his running mate, kicked the 
extra point. 

M.A.C. kicketl off to Howtloin, and 
SftHie was st,)p,H.-tl after ruiining the hall 
back three yar.ls. On the secon.l play 
Stone fumbletl and Cox recoveretl for the 
Agates. Alter being heltl for ,|„wns on 
the Mowtlo.n forty-yarti line, \u,^^l^. ,ric.| 
to punt, but the kick was I.I.k ke.l an.l the 
ball was recoveretl by a How.Ioin „,a„ „„ 
the Aggie twenty five yard line. A series 
t)f line plunges lutte.l the home team a first 
tlown, and after being stop,K'tl s,^^veral 
I'MHs with.,ut gain. Chapman carrie.l the 
ball acr.m the goal for a L.uch.lown. 
Larcom failetl to kick the extra point. 

In the Mt .,n.l tpiarter b.»th teams fought 
on an even basis with neither team being 
m a jKisition to score. Ib.wever, in the 
th.r.l ,,„arter How.Ioin gained another 
t.>uch.l..wii an.l an extra |H,int. making 
the count l.J to (). MAC. was (H-nalized 
fifteen yar.ls an.l a lateral pass nia.le the 
se<.)n.l s<<>re .,f the game. Larcom ki.ke.l 
the goal. ()„ the following kick-off 
Nitkiew.cz ran the ball bat k twenty yar.ls 
bef.jre he was st..p,H-.|. Then, in several 
attem,)ts t.» gain, tat h team was heltl for 
successive tlowns, neither club being able 
to make mut h progress. 

As in last years game. M.A.C. came 
back strong in the fourth .|uarter and got 
within the shadows of ,he op,«,sing goal, 
only t.i be hel.l for tlowns. FJI. rl Hashetl 
through the left si.le of the line f.,r 
tw.nty five yar.ls b.f.,re Uing stop,)ed 
by the H.w.loin ftillba.k. Then, Nit- 
(Conilnued on Pugu i) 

LEADERS IN SPORTS 

FOR HIE FALL TER.VI 

Varsity f.Kjtball: 

(",i,h Cl.arl.s H. "( l.i.k" .M<(,...Kh 

C,if>lani Robert L. "Hob " Ht.wi.- 

Mami^er HaroM S. A.lams 
Freshman f.)olball: 

(.ixtih Lawrence L. "Larry' 
St.xkbri.lge Scho.j| f.xjtball: 

Couth L.jrin F:. "Re.T" Hall 

Captain VVinsor C. Hrowii 

Afanager Le.jnar.l U Parkinson 
\arsity cr.>ss .ountry: 

Couth Llewellyn L. D.rby 

Capiatn Carl A. H.rg.io 

Manager Frank .\L Hisiiop 
Freshman cr.>ss country. 

Cnaih Llewellyn L. Derby 



CHEMISTRY VACANCY FILLED 

l'rof.ss.>r J.jseph S. Mutts lA the Iniv. 
of Morida has been . hosen to fill the 
varan, y in the .M.A.C. chemistry .lepart- 
ment which was ma.le by the resignati.>ii 
of Dr. Wilbi.- S. Ilinegar.lner, wh<; has 
left to go to N.ile (Diversity. .Mr. Mutts 
re.fived his .M.S. from Fordham Iniv. 



: 



Mriggs 



OPPONENTS' SCORES 

VVtsleyan 14. Iialr<. 
Dartmouth .i!., Xonmh fi 
Amhfrst Ml, XJvldlrhury 7 
SprtnyJiHd li."., |„,st Stroudsbern 7 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1928 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

6ftuial ni'\vsi);ii)fr of tlu- M.issachnst-tts 
Agriiultural Colligv-. I'ul.li^hcd i-vtry 
WidiHsday by the studtnts. 



BOARD OF KDITORS 



Shbi-i EV Clbaves '29 
Edwahd H.Nichols '29 



Kclitor-in-tliii'f 
ManaiiiiiK Kditor 



DEPAKTMKNT EDITORS 
Editorial Smf.i'I.kv Cleaves '29 

Pealure Maucakei 1'. Uonovan '30 

Alumni & Short ( oiirses Sally K. Uradley '31 
Athl.-iic i.EWisM.LYNi>s':}() 

I'KANK T, DotX.LASS ".U 

Campus Jo"N B. HowakdJb. '30 

Cecil H. VVaulek;h '30 

Rial S. I'oi ii-.k Jk. "M 



mSINKSS UKl'AKTMKNT 

ruDBBicK D. Thayer. Jr. '29 Husim-as Managir 

• • '• •• AdvfrtisiiiK ManatjiT 

Lawrence A. Cabbuth '29 C inuUniou MaiiaK-r 

K<'11|:KI ('.. (■IM'DMAV, :\\ 

WiNTHRop C. Smith '30 
John R. Tank '30 



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Fnl«-re<l as BPiond-class iiiattii at tin- Aiiilivrst 
Post Ofticp. Accei.t.-! fc.r mailii.K •'' '^l*^'*' Vl**^ 
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tobcr. 1917. autlK.ri-tiil Aunusl JO. 191H. 



LOYAL OR DISLOYAL? 



Any rasiiai oliservei* at I lie mass meet- 
inK last Thursday niKht woulii have been 
impressed- but not by the show of any 
spirit, kalher, it would be from the lark 
of spirit that was evident, a situation 
that no worthwhile student body would 
countenance. In brief, the showing was 
the worst in onr experience and deserves 
more criticism than it will receive in this 

column. 

There are any number of reasons that 
may have causi-d the small attendance, 
but these should never have f)een con- 
sidered. The meeting was called to prove 
to the members of the fcM;tball team that 
their fellow students were interested in 
the contest they were anticipating. The 
proof was decidedly not com lusive. 

What are those who ditl go— mostly 
freshmen, co-eds, and a handful from 
each of the three older classi-s to think 
the student binly as a whole? In the 
it place, it is incimsiderate. Moral 
>port is needed by any team, ami es- 
|H-cially by one that is fi^htinK under 
adverse conditions. Those chaps who 
went to Howdoin did not play sixty 
nuniites merely lor the sake of the "M" 
sweater they may have at the end of the 
season. There is sonnthin^ deeper than 
that, and every member of the student 
boily should appreciate it. To let a mass 
meeting slip by with only an inkling of 
that .ippreciation evident is far too m- 
considerate. 

In the second place, it is nothing short 
of tra^edv to show the freshmen such a 
lack t>l interest in the cause- of the team. 
Their stan<lards are still plastic, and need 
to be moulded carefully if they are t 
accept the reins when the upperclassmen 
have graduated. Beginning in this way 
causes one to be skeptical about the 
future of the stmleiit body and the insti- 
tution itself. A l.uk of spirit brings 
deteri»)ration to any org.inization. It 
never pays to leave things in the h.inds of 
fate, and encourage th« individuals to 
each pull his string in a ditTerent direction. 
This is enough, for we dislike preaching 
through these columns. Before the term 
is over, there will have been more mass 
meetings. We sincerely hope that the 
thoughtfulnessand energy that prompted 
the participants in last Thurs<lay's meet- 
insj to attend will have |Krvaded the rc- 
maiiuler of the students so that the foot- 
ball team, whether it be successful or not, 
may feel that the b.mging th.it it receives 
for the benefit of Aggie is not overlooked, 
and that the student body is not guilty 
of the disloyalty it showed last week. 



because the latter makes a good appear- 
ance, either through his clothes or his 
physical size. 

These reasons for pledging are logical 
and every year are iini)ortant factors in 
signing uj) freshmen, 'i he trouble is that 
human nature plays funny tricks, and not 
everything turns out as is exjx'Cted. The 
fraternity man goes back to his former 
friends after the pledge pin is safely on 
the neophyte's lapel, while the freshman, 
awed by the idea of being in college, often 
turns out to be a dead-head to both the 
fraternity and the College. Often he 
overd<jes the amusement side of college 
life to the detriment of his studies, a case 
which is dirticult to anticipate. 

In other words, a single week in which 
to get actpiainted is unfair all around. It 
also brings the evil of setting the entering 
class members up on pedestals that the 
remaining weeks of the year seldom see 
displaced. 

Deferred rushing is, of course, the 
alternative. Its advantages are infinitely 
greater than its disadvantages. The most 
important detractive feature that is al- 
ways mentioned is that the so-called 
stronger fraternities will stjueeze out the 
weaker ones. The distinction now is hard 
to make between strong and weak fra- 
ternities, for every one on campus has a 
strong nucleus of men. However, this 
condition of which we have suggested a 
possible inhibition can be found to exist 
under present rushing conditions. In 
fact, one fraternity has within recent 
years droinied out of the race which 
conclusively shows that a tleferred rush- 
ing season is not alone responsible for too 
keen and too selective competition. 

In passing, it might be well to mention 
the greatest benefits deferred rushing 
offers. For the fraternity, it allows the 
prospect to show his worth and charac- 
teristics, so that the stniety may know its 
man. To the freshman, it gives an oppor- 
tunity to see fraternities in their natural 
state without opening the College year 
with the artificialities of hand shaking 
and forced entertainment. 

Reports from the recent meeting of the 
Intcrfraternity Conference are suggestive 
that the members favor a change in the 
rushing season. If a change is efTected, 
the feeling among fraternities will not be 
s») likely to go cm the rocks annually be- 
cause of broken tlates, false statements, 
"back biting." etc. This past rushing 
seascm has left a bad taste in the mouths 
of many, including freshmen, and the 
further we can get away from such a 
condition, the better will be the spirit 
among the undergraduates as they work 
together for the College as a whole. 



ALVMNI NEWS 



STOCKBRIDGE 



DEFERRED Rl .SUING 

Now lluit the opening week of College 
is a thiiii; of the past we shouM be ready 
for some M)li(l thought with which to begin 
the year. Nothing is more worthy of dis- 
cussion than the recent rushing season, 
for it is still fresh in our minds and if any 
change is to be made, uow is tlic time to 
ln;;in i)lanning for it. 

.\t present the rushing system under 
wliid) our fraternities work has the fail- 
ing ol leading both freshmen .iml frater- 
nity men into Mmd .ilieys. The former 
pledge themselves on the strength of a 
single friend in m.iiu (,i-(- I he older 
students urge the pledging ot a new man 



FRESHMEN VICTORIOUS IN 

(Conlinufd from I'afte I) 
Stop to the bout because of the terrific 
hammering I.orrey was receiving. This 
bout ga\e the freshmen the hrst portion 
of the night's events by a score of 4 to 2. 
Following the ind(K)r part of the pro- 
gram the upi>er classmen and sjwctators 
left the Arena and went out to the field 
roped off for the nightshirt i>arade. The 
sophomores formed two lines from the 
Arena to the field ami compelletl the 
night-shirted freshmen to leap-frog their 
way the entire distance. Once at the 
field the freshmen formed one ring while 
the sophomores formed another around 
them. At the first gun shot the two classes 
started revolving in opposite directions. 
At the second shot each st)|.homore 
closed with a freshman and attempted te) 
drag him to the sophomore \n-\\, at the 
siime time ripping off the other's night- 
shirt. The freshman in his turn attemp- 
ted to i)en his opponent in his own [K-n. 
This man to man fight continued for the 
first two minutes ot the cemtest. 

At the thirel shot two men were allowed 
to close with one man, an<l from this point 
on the battle went to the freshmen who 
with their superior numbers easily handled 
the sophomores. At the closing group of 
shots the two rival factions separated and 
the final check up began. It was found 
that oS sophomores and i:^ freshmen had 
been caught and brought to the liens. 
.\fter the nightshirts h.id been figured in 
the final score was 11.") for the freshmen 
and ()8 for the sophomores. 



Prexy Says 

"The 'duty of inte ligence' was never 
so pressing as in these days of eiuestion- 
ing of faiths." 

CD 

Others Say That 
Three courageous and enterprising 
Northwestern University co-eds with a 
knowledge of applied psychology and 
command of the mother tongue, have 
ofxned a Letter Shop. They offer to 
write for you that difficult letter to Dad, 
to Her, or to Him,— for "just a certain 
amount." Custom-made love letters are 
.'$10 with no money-back guarantee of 
results. And they earned their way 
through college. 

—CD 

Among the Mt. Holyoke regulations of 
17;i4 was: "No young lady is expected 
to have any acquaintances unless they 
are returned from missionaries or agents 
of benevolent societies. Daguerreotypes 
and plaster busts are also prohibited." 
Those were the days! 

CD 

"Blame It on the Waltz" 
After years of investigation, 

(The problem really was absurd), 
The solution was found at the mass meet- 
ing: 
An insignificant five-letter word. 
Why do 1 get elected every year? 

Why am I out of the game this fall? 
Why am I almost flunking out of college? 
— This little word answers them all. 
A-B B-K-V 

CD 

Etcs. 
'Dja remember the mass meeting last 
fall? Nothing, but we had a mass meet- 
ing. 

CD 

/•V(*5/i-"Say, what's the name of that 
house- with the retl bricks?" 
Soplt.— "V\u Sigma Kappa,— why?" 
l-'rosh (registering self-disgust)— "Of 
course, that's where Theta Chi is." 

CD 

Fannie Frosh, the belle of the class, 
considers Razoo Night a flat failure 
because it failed in its purpose; for just 
as she arrived, someone announced that 
there would be no razzing. 

CD 

Speaking of Razoo Night, these fea- 
tures shmild not go un mentioned: 

1. The dramatization of Joe Humphrey. 
•J. Compliments are <lue the galleries 
for holding intact under the howling mob 
of Frosh. 

:}. The "low-brow" sport was ma«le 
more collegiate by the snappy l)athrobe 
of one of the freshman contestants. 
4. No posts disturlH'd. 

CD 
South College lit the way for another 
victory for the yearlings in theii mis- 
nomed "parade" which was duly ap- 
plauded by some enthusiast's non-stop 
horn . 

CD 



Hugh K. Harris, graduate student last 
year, is now employed with Lambert 
Landscape Co., at Shreveport, Louisiana. 

W. W. Kennedy '28, has accepted a 
position as instructor in landsca|)e garden- 
ing an<l floriculture at the Mississippi 
.Agricultural College. Kennedy was on 
the campus several days during the 
summer getting data for use when the 
term ojK-ned in September. 

Karl F. Williams '27, is leaving his 
work in Cleveland to become assistant 
sui)erintendent of Greenwood Cemetery 
in Chicago. 

Irving C. Root, M.L.A. from M.A.C., 
is now engineer and landscape architect 
for the Maryland National Capital Park 
Planning Commission, and is making ex- 
tensive plans for the improveim-nt of the 
environs of Washington, D. C. 

(iilbert S. Watts, former member of 
the faculty here is author of a new book 
entitled "Roadside Marketing" recently 
published by Orange Judd Publishing 
Co. Mr. Watts is now a successful grower 
of vegetables and small fruits in Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Professor Lawrence .S. Dickinson '10, 
is author of an extended article on the 
work of the greenskeeper, published in 
the September number of Golfdom. 

Thomas W. Ferguson, Jr. '28. is em- 
ployed with Carl Stanton, landscaije 
architect, at Peterboro, N. H. 

Victor H. Cahalane '24, is now engaged 
as field naturalist with the Roose\elt 
Wild Life Station, connected with the 
State College of Forestry at Syracuse, 
N. Y. In the Bulletin of this station he 
has recently published an extended illus- 
trated paper entitled "A Preliminary 
Wild Life and Forest Survey of South- 
western Cattaraugus County, N. Y." 



Fifteen candidates for the football 
eleven of the Stockbridg School of Agri- 
culture reported to Coach "Red" Ball on 
Tuesday, September 25, and are a part 
of the promising squad of twenty-eight 
men now practicing. Many veterans have 
returned, and prospects for the team are 
better than in any recent ayer. During 
the past week, i)ractices were held three 
times a day, fundamentals being stressed. 
X'etcrans who played regular last year 
are Captain Brown, tackle, Cheney, end. 
Dibble, guard, and Silvia, a former back 
who is being converted into a lineman this 
season. .Secoml year men who were sub- 
stitutes as freshmen include Clraf, quar- 
terback, (ireen, guard, J. Hall, end, and 
Skovern, center. Chase, a regular end 
two years ago, has returned to complete 
his course and is on the squad. Thus 
Coach Ball has a line almost wholly of 
veterans, and there are many first-year 
men for backfield material, including 
Frost, Hakkinen, Heyward, Hill, Parks, 
and Tomkinson. F'reshman line candi- 
dates are Curran, Hart, Hirst, Mann, 
and Oksanen. The squad is completed 
with B. A. Hall '2<.», and Caldwell, Fan- 
ning, Haley, Harris, Honian, Leonard, 
and .Sawyer, all of the class of '."iO. The 
schedule is as follows: 
Oct. 12 Newburyport Highat Newbury- 
port 
20 X'ermont Academy, here 
2(> M.A.C. Freshmen, here 
Nov. :} Keene Normal at Keene, N. 11. 
10 Pittsfield High, here 
If) South Deerfield High, here 
22 Deerfield Academy at Deerfield 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1928 



AT THE ABBEY 



So the freshmen know "Aggie. My 
Aggie!" Well. Well! 

CD 

The first assembly-speaker has safely 
departed without slander and such at his 
heels. 

CD 

Between the Yells 
I-irsI lI/».<//«T— "Referee, no fair, his 
arm is under my chin!" 

Second -uTc.s7/<T (small voice from the 
depths)— C.wan. my arm's all scratched 
up now. Are the barbers on a strike?" 

CD 

All in. 



EVEN BREAK PREDICTED 

ConllnuctI from Pafte li 
Local fans will have an excellent oppor- 
tunity to witness a closely contested game 
in which both teams will lie anxious to 
break into the winning column. Last 
year the local club met its first setback 
of the se.ison against Bates with the 
score 7 to <», so it is hoix-d that the score 



will be reversed this Saturday afternoon 
when the final whistle blows. 

There will be but few changes in the 
M..A.C. lineup. Practically the same 
team that i)la\ed Bowdoin last week-end 
will start the game against Bates unless 
unforeseen injuries cause Coach "Chick" 
Mct.eoch to make a change in the lineup. 
Magnuson. the 1«.M) j)ound guard, may be 
shifteel to fullback in order to furnish 
some much needed weight in the backfield. 
Sullivan. True, or Dangelmayer, will 
probably be used in the line to take 
Magnuson 's place at left guard. 

following is the probable lineup for 
M \.(". in Saturday's game: 

Iji.ls, Bowie and Cox; tackles. Little 
and Minkstein; guards, Brackley and 
Sullivan, True or Dangelmayer; center, 
Mann or Mills; quarterback, Howard 
or Kimball: halfbacks, Ellert and Plum- 
mer or Hicks; fullback, Magnuson or 
Nitkiewicz. 



FRATERNITIES PICK 

(ContlnueJ from Pafte I) 

Kappa Sijima 
1932— John F. Banten, Howard A. 
Cheney, Richard S. Folger, Leslie D. 
(loodall, Ornumd Hamilton, Carey H. 
Ilowlett, (Jeorge King, Donald M. Mason, 
(Iregory \'. Osgood. Roland W. Smith. 
Elmer J Thompsem, C.itTord Towle, W'm. 
\o<jrneveld Jr. 

Theta Chi 

1932— VVm. F". Batstone, Forrest E. 
Crawford, Merritt, Dean, Albert C. Dunn, 
C.eorge W. Dyar, Ozro Fish Jr., Robert 
R. Fletcher, Ernest S. Hall, E. Carlton 
Howe, Wm. A. Johnson, John D. Mac- 
Lean, Eric C. \enilt. 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

HKH — Marc N. King, Robert C. 
R(K)ney, Stephen S. Soja. 

l<.t:{2 Herbert L. Bishop Jr., Kenneth 
W. Chapman. William P. Davis, Lawrence 
S. McBride, I eon.ird A. Salter Ir., Wallace 
W. Stuart, John W. Tikofshi, William 
Ware, Phillips W. Warren, (iilbert Y. 
Whitten. 

Alpha Sljima Phi 

1932- Charles Barlier. L. P. Costanzo, 
Edward M. Flavin, William R. Grayson. 
Alfred R. Hersan, Robert D. Mitchell, 
Kdward \V. Murphy, Thomas J. Oliver, 
Patrick H. O'Donnell, Kenneth E. Post, 
George C. Rice. Rolnrt C. RolTey, John 
B. Ryan Jr., .\merico P. Sala, Edward 
Samoriski, Harry H. Smart, A. Willard 
Smith, Lynwood P. Teague, F;dwin H. 
Thomas, Frederick J. Welch. 

Sigma Phi Epsllon 

1932- Benjamin 1). Belts, Kenneth F. 
Bonney, Wilbur Dobbins, Win. S. Fisher 
Jr., Robert F. Corey, Kenneth F. Hale. 
Thomas P. O'Connor, J. W. Schoon- 
maker. Carl H. Storey. 

.\lpha Gamma Rho 

1932— Thurl I). Brown, George H. 
Cain. Robert D. Daley. Henry Halzubie, 
Frank E. Milles, Silman G. Smith, Frank 
L. Springer, Kenneth M. Wheeler. 

Delta Phi Alpha 

1930 -Theodore Marcus. 

1932— Stanley A. Chart. William 
Cohen, Joseph E. Lepie, Harry O. H. 
Levinc, Julius M. Rifkin, Ralph Saflfer, 
Alex Smith. 

Kappa Epsllon 

List incomplete. 



Y.W.C.A. HOLDS TEA 

The Y.W.C.A. of M.A.C. held its 
initial gathering last Sunday afternoon in 
the Abbey Center in the form of a Tea 
Reception to welcome the freshman girls. 
Presiilent Carmcta S;irgent '29 le<l in a 
short devotional service and Miss Edna 
Skinner. Miss Margaret Hamlin, and 
Miss Helen Knowlton each gave a message 
to the girls. Miss .Marion Tucker, Mrs. 
Curry Hicks, .Mrs. Paul Williams, as well 
as the Abbey's new House Mother added 
greatly to the enjoyment of the stx-ial tea 
that followed. 



.^n examination, based upon the ruh s 
of the Woman's Student (iovernmeiit 
.Association, was given to all the M.A.C. 
co-eds in Gmssman .Auditorium last 
Monday aftern(Km. This is the first 
exam of its kind ever given by the W'..S. 
V...\. here on campus, and its purjrase is 
to bring about a better understanding of 
the organization among all those who 
come under its guidance. 



MILITARY NOTES 



The band has started most auspiciously 
with an unusual cornet section headed by 
David M. Nason '31, and George M. 
Flo<j(l '31, two members of last year's 
band. There is also a very large sa.xo- 
phone section. F>om the ranks of tlie 
freshmen have come nine excellent musi- 
cians. A brilliant year is prognosticated. 

A nund)er of the seniors in the R.O.'I ( • 
are riding this afternwMi in Nor;hamptiin 
at the horse show. There are also sev> ral 
co-eds. 

Plans are rapidly being finished for tbe 
building up of a student polo team. 

The instructor's jxjlo team has rccened 
an invitation to go to Turkey Hill on 
Octoljer 12 for a polo game. 



NOTED INTERNATIONALIST 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
Kellogg Proposal, and similar important 
considerations before the world today. 

Mrs. Mead is a widely recognized 
authority and lecturer on peace subjects. 
She has been in Eurofie sixteen times 
studying these questions and spent the 



past summer at Geneva. In these jour- 
neys she has had opportunity to meet 
the leading workers for jieace in England- 
France, and Germany. In addition she 
has taken part in many educational and 
peace conferences throughout the United 
States. She is the author of "Swords and 
Ploughshares", "Milton's England", 'I'-'; 
triotism and the New Internationalism • 
"Law or War", and many educational 
and political pamphlets. 

George Foster Peabody has sai«i oi 
her, "She has perhaps the best informed 
mind respecting international relations ot 
any woman in the United States, and 
few men are better informed." In ^^^ 
words of S. Parkes Cadman: "We have 
the highest regard for the character, 
ability, and Christian spirit of ^'^r 
Mead, and believe that any message from 
her merits respectful attention." 



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I \(m situated at 15 1-2 Pleasant St. 
EXCELLENT SHOE REPAIRERS 

V. GRONDOMCO, Prop. 

College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH 
Re{J. Pharm. 

\MHER.ST, - - MA.SS. 



Best in Dru{i .Store Service 
Best in Drug .Store Merchandise 

lenry Adams & Co. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

J PLEASANT STREET, (up one Bljlht) 

[>culitis' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 

accurately replaced 

BIC BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 



When University 
Men forcast a 
change in mode, 
you will find it 
here correctly ex- 
pressed in 
Bolter's Clothes. 



ASK FOR 

I "MLNSINGWEAR" RAYON 

and SILK 

Bloomers— Step-Ins— Vests 

Slips — Bandeau— Pajamas 

Night Robes 



SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

'. Edward Fisher 



Carl L. Bolter Inc. 

EXETER AMHERST HYANNIS 



HHJII HONORS (;o TO 
(Continued from Paite I) 
coiii|)fte ill the National Dairy Show, 
which will Ik- hfhl in Mi-mphis. Tinn. 
1 lit' dairy ti-am is i»>mi)osoil of Harold .S. 
.•\dams, Stephen Achinis and lluntin>;ton 
Kutan. all '!".»; while on the animal hiis 
haiidry team are Chesley 1.. Hlack 'J*», 
I'restott I). Voun^; '2«», William K\. I'ills 
i>ury '.{() ami Krank .X. Sko^shurn '.'«). 

Winning all tive first places, the dairy 
team j>ains possession ol the tropin lor 
the coming year. This trophy is ^iven hy 
the Kastern .States KxiMisition d.iirv 
interests. The team also reieixi-s four 
lianners for finishing first in judKiiiK milk, 
luitter, cheese and ice cream, .-t silver 
medal was also t;iven to each man on the 
team for i)utter scoring- 

llniitiii^jtoii kiitan won first pl.K i-s in 
scoring all products. .Stephen .Xd.ims was 
third and Harold S. Adams ranked hftli. 
I'or his standing in all proilucts, Hunting- 
ton Kut.iii received a c.ish prize of $1."); 
while .Stephen .■\dams won !$.'>. Stephen 
Atl.ims finished first in cht-ese scoring, 
winning $.'>, a siKer lo\ inn <'iip and .1 
w.itch fol). 

lollowinK lire the final rankings of the 
coiitestiii^; teams: 1st, .Ma.s.s.u hiis»t ts 
.\K'i< nitiiial College; L'nd, I'niversity of 
\ ermoiit ; .'{rd, I'niversity of New Hamp- 
shire; 4th, C'onneetirut .•\nri<ultural Col- 
le^;e; r)th, .Syracuse I'niversity. 

The cattle jud^inK team st<MMl third of 
line competing teams. The teiim r.;ip- 
tured second in ju<lnin>; .Xn rsJiires, tied for 
second in jutlning Jerstys and took tliinl 
in judginK ilolsteins. tinsley 1.. Jilack 
L'it, won first place in the judninn of 
Xyrshires and recei\ed a yold iiied.il. He 
ilso took second place in judging; Jerseys 
ind won a silver medal and %'1'\. l'res«-ott 
I). X'ounn '2'.t, also won a lash prize. SI.''). 



DRY CLEANIN(; 



PRESSING 



SING LEEl HAND LAUNDRY 



No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy (iuaranleed 
KLPAIRI.M; AND ALL KIMKS OK 

wa.siiim; ijo.ne at rka.sonaklk 

PRICJK.S. 

OppoNlle I'oHt Office 



TW 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Offers Expert Hair Cutting 
Service for Men and Wionen. 

"POP" DEUEL, Pr^. MEMORIAL BUILDING 

AMHERST FRUIT STORE 

Will Kl \V,{:,\V. Ml N .\n I 1 

\vm \ DOWN TOWN 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGARS 



For Prompt Service IMione 8iS 

AMHERST CLEANERS & DYERS 

1 1 MAIN STREET NEXT TO TOWN HALL 

One Day .Service on l)r> Cleanlnft Work Called for and m>liverfd Dally 

REI>AIRIN(; LAINDRY DYEINC; 



THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

Special Sunday Night Dinners 



Temporary quarters in the rear of the new block. 

Watch for our opening announcement. 

THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"nil. iM .\( 1; 01 K nil-; coi.i.ik.k m.\n" 



NEW FALL STYLES 

ON DISPLAY 
VVATCII OUR WINDOW 

Shoe Repalrlnft Department. 

JOHN FOTOS SHOE SH^kt 



Town Hall Theatre 

Ue art- in.slallinti the laieHl type of Syn- 
chronized MiiMic and hop«- to have it 
rt-ady within a few days to he UKed with 
all our fealurcN. 



THURSDAY AND FRIDAY, OCT. 4 anJ 5 
WILLIAM BOYD in 

''THE SKYSCRAPER'' 

with SUE CAROL 

NEWS COMEDY 



3ATURDAY, OCT. 6 DOUBLE FEATURE 
TIM .McCOY l.\ 

'T//£ ADVENTURER'' 

AM) 

LYA DePlTTI in 

''THE MIDNIGHT ROSE" 

WEDNESDAY. OCT. 10 ONE DAY ONLY 
MALCOL.M .Mc(;RE(;OR 
and LYA DEPL 11 1 in 

"BUCK PRIVATES" 

FABLES ODDITY COMEDY 



Typewriter Headolarters 

Authorized Reminfiton, Royal and 

Corona 

Sales and .Service 

Radio Kqulrment f;eneral Repair Shop 

H. E. DAVID 

35 Pleasant St., just below P.O. Amherst 



Dr. Jones, Indian Missionary 
To Speak At Mt. Holyoke 

Will Spi>akon "Chrislianily May Fail, 
but Christ Will Win, in India" 

Dr. K. Stanley Jones t)f Siulia, will speak 
liefon- representatives of the four colleges: 
.\lt. H(>l>(>ke, Smith, .Xnilierst, and .Mass. 
.Annie, on October t», l'.»2K, at .Mount 
HoKoke College. His siihjeet will lu- 
'■Christianity May Fail, Imt Christ Will 
Win, in Indi.i." The |>.ira(lo.\ is expl. lined 
liy a missionary who has himself been 
it)M\ertfd from Chrisli.inity to Christ 
.ifter attempting to hold the Inn^ line 
from Cenesis to Revelation. The |K-ople 
of India are aeeeptin^ Christ, but not 
the forms (jf W'estirn ( hristianity. I he> 
.ire making an amazing and remarkable 
disiovery, namely, that Christianity and 
Jesus are not the siime th.it they may 
have Jesus without the system that has 
been built up around Him in the West. 
"( hrist," as Dr. Jones puts it, "must 
not seem a Western I'artisiin <tf the While 
Uule, but a Urother of .Men." In carry- 
ing his messiine. then, this missionary 
talks of Christ and leaves theology to 
take care of itself. 

This man has a lalH>ratory religion, h.is 
.ib.indoned creeils as ends in tliems<'l\es, 
is convinced Jesus Christ tifTers fulness «»f 
life for men and s<Miety, and tests his 
faith in real life. He has refused ect lesi- 
asticul honors to remain a man of the 
pe(»ple, as he was ele<le<l bishop of the 
.Methodist Church, but resigned prefer- 
iiiK to rem.iin a missionary, and is to re 
turn to India, althoiiKh he is speaking for 
three months in this country. He is a 
m.in to v^ll<)m intellectuals in three con- 
tinents, of many faiths, turn for religitnis 
leadership, bec-ause he wehoines (|ues- 
tions, is not afraid of honest diiiibts, and 
lalls every si-archer for truth his brother. 
Dr. Jones is known to stmlenls around 
the world through his books: "Christ 
of the Itidi.m Road", 4I)0.(MNI <'opies; and 
'Christ at the Round fabU", (i\e e<li- 
ti<ins in six months. Sliidenls .ire reading 
this<- books in Knj{lish, (ierinan, Kremh, 
Sp,niish, .Swfdish, .Norwegian, Japanese, 
Kortuin, Chinese, Syri.ui, .ind several 
\ern;u'ul.irs of liulia. M\'eryone is invitc^l 
to hear him s|)eak at .Mt. Holyoke ( olicKe, 
at einlit o'clock, next Satur«lay evening, 
when he speaks to the students of the 
four ( <)llej;«'s. 

Carl Hern-in "2'J .ind John W'rK)dbnry 
'!.".♦ are re|)res<ntiiij; this ( «)l|ene (jii the 
(ominittee of general arrangements and 
flirt luT iiiforiii.itioii m.iy be gained from 

tllCIll. 



EM.ic;inENiNc; talk 

'(^•nlinued from I'afte li 

.Mr. Roi)inson ^avc several interesting 
in( idents of the voyaxes across and bai k. 
.\((ordinK to his statements, life f)n ship 
board is not all serene. He told an ini i 
d( tit of an eirlerly lady who insisted tli.it 
he w.i- o((upyinn h«'r deck chair, an«l of 
the sn<(<<dinn flurry. .Another thin^ that 
he flifi not like- was the |<resen(e of c.ird- 
sharps. He relatc<l the story oi a man 
who was fleecefl of a lar^e sum by thos*- 
men, and who came to him for sympathy. 
.Mr. Robinson then sweetly asketl him 
whether he wished to be ^iven lessons in 
l)oker or a contribution toward his lost 
monev. 



Ac;c;iEs LOSE ro kowdoin 

(t:ontlnued from I'aite ll 

kiewicz, Kimb.ill, and {•".llert carrietl the 
b.ill for two first downs. A forward, 
Mowie to I'Jlert, netted ten yards. Nit- 
kiewicz crashed through the center of the 
line for repeated ^ains. The Annies con- 
tiiiui'd to lollow the overhead type of 
f(M)tliall with much success. A forward 
p.iss, Kimball to l^llert ni»i"*'<l another 
twenty-rue y.irds. Howie's passes to 
Kimball ami llllert netted ten and 
hfteen y.irds respettively .ind brought 
the b.ill into play on the Howdoin five 
y.ird mark. Here the I'ol.ir Hears put up 
.1 stubborn defense. The M.A.C. team 
kept at the .lerial type of tool ball, but 
the passes were incomplete and the b.ill 
w.is lost on downs. The Maine team 
punted «)ut of the ilan^er zone, and in a 
few minutes the whistle blew, eiidiiin the 
name with a l.'t to victory for Howdoin. 
The summ.iry: 

liowduln Mass. AiUieii 

Miiri.liy.il- rr, < ox 

Inild. ll.iyiiH k, ll It, l.liilr 

'••'•''•• Hiill<i, Ik tti. Hra. Iil.y 

lldwl.iiiil, ll.iil.,w,. c. Mann. Mills 

''"""'''. IK Ix. M.IKIIIISI.M 

lliitli-, t li.ilin.iH, II I,, MiiiksKin 

.\il.iins, ( ilininins. ir |,., |i<,wii- 

I..iiii.inI('|. Kiainaii. <|Ii (jIi. IIdw.ikI. KiiiiImII 

< li.ipin.in. Hill rhl., i'lnininrt. lli. kn 

1 .111. .in, ilil, 11,1, |.;||,.„ 

^'""'•. 11' fli. Nitkicwitu. .SiLniiis 

Son- Kowiliiiii i;i 1 oiii hilowiis Cluiiiniaii 
-' I'ointo afii.f tiiiii IiiJdwii Larciiin. Kt-lrii-*- 
U. (»•( nnii.ll riiipiti- A. K l)<iiMi.in l.ln«ii. 
man <;. II. \ iiial. I'i<l<l jii<Ik<' J J. Itiitlii. 
Tiini- hour Hi iniiiiitc im-ihkIs 

INTERCOLLE<;iATES 

/'/;<• I'nivrrstty N,it,ltrl, weekly piibli- 
catitMi of (ieor^e Washinnlon L'ni versify, 
has a circulation Lir^er th.ui (KMKI, more 
than that of any other lolliv;.- weekly 
publication in the United States. 



I 



A 



MH ERS 

THEATER 



T 



M MINI IS Dally. 2 W 
l.ver> l.\iiilii^. J shown. 7 and N <0 

Wednestlay. Oct. ^ 

Keith-Albee Vamleville 

5 ACTS 5 

AND— 
MAY McAVOY & CONRAD NAGEL in 

"CAUGHT IN THE FOG" 



kariooti 



Pal he .Sews 



Thursday & Friday, Oct. 4 ik F> 
I ERICH VON STROHEIM & FAY WRAY in 

rThe WEDDING MARCH" 

Ketiuhir Prices News 

.Saturday, Oct. h 
SUE CARROLL in 

"WIN THAT GIRL" 

I'ool Kali So.ry ll|.|iit|. 

I Paramount C:«,me<ly Pathe News 

J Monday & Tuesday, Oct. H anil '> 
I DOLORES COSTELLO & CONRAD NAGEL in 

"TENDERLOIN" 



2 Keel t;om<'d\ 



New' 



- GARAGES - 

FOR RENT 

Amherst Nurseries 

Just North of -M.A.C. 



isl:b:yi coi^i^eoe: store: 



BASEMENT OF "M" BUILDING 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1928 



A New Store 



THE HOUSE OF WALSH 

New Fixtures - New Stock - but the same old policy. The Best at Prices You Can Afford. 
HICKEY-FREEMAN SUITS are the best. Ask Tom to show you one. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



LOWELL RESTAURANT 
CATERS TO AGGIE TEAM 

Page Company's Restaurant Makes 
Special Menu for Ajjjjle (irid Men 



'lVii)s to Maine are never complete for 
athletic teams of AKgie unless they in- 
clude in their itinerary stop-overs at I). S. 
Page Co.'s restaurant in Lowell, Mass. In 
the course of the recent trip to Bruns- 
wick for the IJowdoin game, dinner was 



tiijoytd l)<>th Friday noon an<l Sunday 
noon at Panic's \>y the team. Sunday's 
meal was accompanied by a menu which 
is printed below. 

Fresh Tomato a la Amherst 

Native celery Kose radishes 

Roast young fresh killed Chicken 

Agricultural gravy Country dressing 

Cranberry sauce Mashed |K>tato 

Mashed campus squash 

Sophomore salail 

Collegian ice Varsity cake 

Coffee 



FKATERMTY DIRECTORY 




theJ/Ink. 



O. T.V. 

President Roman A. Kreienbaum 

Secretary Russell E. Nims 

Treasurer Lucien W. Dean 

Telephone 2S() 

Phi vSi&ma Kappa 

President Phillips \i. Steere 

Secretary William H. Rol)ertson 

Treasurer Eniory D. Hurgess 

Telephone 2iM) 

Kappa Sigma 

President John R. Kay 

Secretary Fldward H. Nichols 

Treasurer Frederick I). Thayer, Jr. 

Telephone 170 




Site for Sit* any 

Chilton Pen hold* 

Twice the Ink 



Averane capacity of 
S well-known prni 
l$7 iiJc), J8 dr.. Pi 
— Chilton Prn ($7 
liie), HI Jropi 

CtrtifieJhu 

nigeloif, Kent 

& Hlllard. 

Comulling En- 

gtnttn, Bodon 



. . . and all of the cheering 



THi; Chilton Tteiic ihc Ink Ven 
ha» won a champitm's acclaim 
from coIleKc men and women. 1 hat 
Tiiice the Ink gets all the cheering! 

Think of this when your old pen runs 
dry . . . tlio same size Chilton Pen 
would hold enough to fill your old- 
style pen ttt'icc and more. 

Stop and ItHtk at them at any pen- 
counter ... all standard styles and 
points, new leather-covered pens and 
pencils and gift-sets. . . $3.S0 to $)0. 

CHILTON PEN COMPANY 
287 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass 



I CfiiCfon 



REG U-t. ►AT Of* 



,ic6 



'^^V'^Pen 



J3S 



CARRIED IN STOCK BY 

NEW COLLEGE STORE 



Theta Chi 

President Arnold W. Dyer 

Secretary Ralph E. (iunn 

Treasurer Eric Singleton 

Telephone (MUiM 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

President Kenneth W. Perry 

Secretary William A. Flgan, Jr. 

Treasurer Theodore C. Burns 

Telephone KVMS 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

President Prescott D. Young 

Secretary Leroy O. Jones 

Treasurer John S. Chadwick 

Telephone K\2T^ 

Alpha Sigma Phi 

President Robert L. Rees 

Secretary Vincent Riley 

Treasurer Frank M. Bishop 

Telephone 8.i70 

Alpha Gamma Rho 

President Clifton R. Johnson 

Secretary John T. Lawler, Jr. 

Treasurer Kendall H. Marsh 

Telephone 720 

Kappa Epsilon 

Boleslaw Nitkiewicz 

Walter E. Southwick 

Treasurer John E. Paulson 

Telephone 8792 

Delta Phi Alpha 

President Martin d. F'onseca 

Secretary Maurice Suher 

Treasurer Milton I. Cover 

Telephone 87r)8 



sive and makes many demands. 1 have 
to rent lodgings, buy necessaries, and 
provide for many other things which I 
cannot now s|jecify. Wherefore I re- 
spectfully beg your paternity that by the 
promptings of divine pity you may assist 
me, so that I may be able to complete 
what I have well begun. For you must 
know that without Ceres and Bacchus, 
A|)ollo grows cold." 

Certain excuses were popular with 
medieval students. Prices were high in 
the college town because of crop failures, 
on account of a siege, or because of a 
great increase of students. Or the last 
messenger bearing money from home had 
been robbed, or had run off with the 
money. One model purports to be 
written from a debtor's prison, where the 
student is eating mouldy bread and drink- 
ing water salted with his own tears. A 
particular student writes to his married 
sister that he is sleeping without cover- 
ings on a pile of straw, going without 
shoes or shirt, eating unmentionable 
things. The lady answered with a 
hundred sous, bedding and ten ells of 
cloth, sent without her husband's knowl- 
edge. Still, the college life must have 
been fairly pleasant, for many letters beg 
the parents to allow the student to ex- 
tend his studies, for ingenious reasons. 

Yet the man who paid the bills was 
not forgotten in the "complete letter- 
writer." Epistles to be sent to spend- 
thirft sons were provided. Thus: 

"To his son residing at Orleans, P 



course teaching him how to rake the 
collegiate si)endthrift over the coals in 
matchless, dynamic prose. 

— The Wesleyan Argu^ 

WHAT A LARGE 

NEWSPAPER MEANS 

A broadside of interesting facts con- 
cerning the tremendous scope of the 
business of a newspaper was given in 
The Nation for Sept. 2(1 in a discussion 
of the New York Times. The article 
says: "Its gross income in 1927 was 
$27,424,829.55 and its weekly payroll 
$154,240.98. It used up just under 
KXJ.CMK) tons of paper in 1927 and 4,4'.U 
593 pounds of ink. No less than '.i,'M\4 
employees produced the daily which has 
grown in average circulation since Wm), 
when Mr. Ochs took hold, from 21, .")U) 
to 406.707 in 1928, with a Sunday cir- 
culation of 700,925. During the same 
period its advertising has increased from 
something more than two millions of 
agate lines a year to nearly thirty millions 
The newspaper receives 100,000 words of 
news a day by cable, radio, and telegraph, 
at an annual cost of $500,(X)0. It owns 
real estate assessed at $5,984,000, and is 
half owner in a paper mill in Ontario 
which produces 550 tons of newsprint a 
day and is capitalized at S:i70,0(K),(Nl0 
No less than 4,700 square miles are 
covered by the plant's timber-rights and 
over fifty miles of private railroad are 
used to haul spruce to the mill." 



President . 
Secretary . 



of Besancon sends greetings with paternal 
zeal. I have recently discovered that you 
live dissolutely and slothfully, preferring 
license to restraint and strumming a 
guitar while others are at their studies, 
whence it happens that you have read 
but one volume of law while your more 
industrious companions have read several. 
Wherefore I have decided to exhort you 
herewith to re[)ent utterly of your disso- 
lute and careless ways, that you may no 
longer be called a waster and your shame 
may be turned to good repute." 

Doubtless the modern student would 
vociferously welcome such a course in 
Practical Comjiosition. But just to give 
Dad a fighting chance, the universities 
ought also to offer a correspondence 



ENTERPRISING CO-EDS 

RUN LETTER SHOP 



INTERCOLLEGIATES 

Amherst College is sponsoring through 
its Student Council the formation of a 
band which is to be professionally con- 
ducted and exploited at the fall football 
games. 

Students at Boston College are enjoying 
a new and thoroughly mo<lern cafeteria 
which was installed by the College during 
the summer at a cost of $U),IKK). It is 
interesting to note that the lunchnwra 
concession has been let to the Industrial 
Division of the Waldorf System, Inc., 
whereas on our campus the administra- 
tion assumes the res|K>nsibility of ap- 
pointing a dietician and financing tht 
project through the Treasurer's Office. 



THESE CHILLY MORNINGS 

mean somethingt a little warmer than you have been 
wearing. A wool ski coat, a leather jacket of suede or 
horsehide or a good heavy all wool sweater will answer 
the question. Priced from $5 to $15. 

Pleanty of gloves for riding. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

P. S. The best line of topcoats in town. 



EVERYTHING IN 

HARDWARE 



AND 



Radio Equipment 



ATWATER-KENT AND MAJESTIC RADIO 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



Three enterprising Northwestern Uni- 
versity co-eds, with a knowledge of 
applied psychology and command of the 
queen's English, have oix-ned a Letter 
Shop. They offer to write for you that 
difficult letter to Dad, to Her. or to Him 
for a certain amount. 
Custom-made love letters arc $10, with 
no money-back guarantee of results. 
Ordinary thank-you notes to relatives 
are *2. Dunning letters to Dad. however, 
are written on a commission basis — ten 
()er cent of the resulting check, if it 
comes. The girls reixjrt a flourishing 
business. 

Evanston folk are smiling broadly at 
the venture. They would be still more 
amused if the University English De- 
partment offered a course in "Applied 
Kpistolography: Amorous and Parental." 
Vet there is ancient precedent. The 
universities of the Middle Ages were only 
too gla<l to help their students comjxjse 
letters that would loosen the paternal 
purse-strings. In the good old days even 
rhetoricians could be practical. 

In a day when the teacher received his 
fee directly from the student, the pro- 
fessor of rhetoric hastened to supply his 
scholars with model letters fit to move 
the veriest skinflint of a father. "Com- 
plete letter-writers" were published in 
most of the universities with models for 
every need, addressed to parents, brothers, 
uncles, or clerical patrons. One model 
offered over twenty diplomatic methods 
of asking an arch deacon for cash. 

A typical letter, differing from the 
1928 version in details more than in 
spirit, follows: 

"D to his venerable master T , 

greeting. This is to inform you that I 
am studying at Oxford with the greatest 
diligence, but the matter of money stands 
greatly in the way of my promotion, as it 
is now two months since I spent the last 
of what you sent me. The city is expen- 



Kingsbury Box & Printing Co. 

JOB PRINTERS 



NORTHAMPTON 



MASS. 



Phone 554 or 555 




CLOTHES 

And Cut to Ord«r 

eSTABLISHED ENGLISH UNIVERSITY 
STYLES. TAILORED OVER YOUTHFUL 
CHARTS SOLELY FOR DISTINGUISHED 
SERVICE IN THE UNITED STATES. 




Ill 



I I 



;oi:Kwtetii| 



Svlts 



BeaHy 

Camals Hair 

C«at 




Ovarcaata 



Bearly 

Camels Hair 

Caat 



Sl?g jMaBBarlyttggtlfi fflolbxitatt 



Vol. XXXIX. 

FROSH WELCOMED 
AT RECEPTION 

Pres. and .Mrs. Koscoe W. Thatcher 

Formally Welcome Freshmen in 

.Memorial Building. Faculty 

Members Fntertain 



AMHERST, MASS.. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1928 



I ast Saturday evening in the Memorial 
Building, President and Mrs. Koscoe W. 
Thatcher formally welcomed the fresh- 
iiiiii to .M.A.C. Assisting to make the 
iiieiiibers of the class of 11KJ2 feel at home 
was a large group of the staff and the 
faculty together with their wives. 

Mrs. Enos J. Montague ojjened the 
riieption with several selections on the 
violin, accompanied at the j)iano by 
Miss Pierpont. Then Prexy told of his 
trip through the west this summer, giving 
Niiiiie interesting incidents that he hati 
iidliced on the way. 

Prof. Delmont T. Dunbar told of the 
hull fights and the customs pertaining to 
tliiiii, which he saw on his trip to Spain. 

Dr. and .Mrs. Alexander E. Cance 
imiicd through Norway and Sweden this 
^ulll^H•r, and Mrs. Cance told of the way 
111 which food is serxeil there and of the 
.jiversity of kinds. She said that the 
.Norwegians ate boiled eggs for breakfast 
iwry morning, with anything or every- 
iliiiig else conceivable. 

.Next came Dean William L. Machmcr. 
telling of his tra\elb in tiormany. Accord- 
mi; to him, the best way to travel is alone, 
a^. one of the interesting incidents that 
lie had o\er there was sleeping in the 
dining room of a large hotel, after he and 
his friend had been refused a room there. 

Dr. Cance then told of the Midnight 
Mill. He described it as going down 
practically due north and coming up in 
the s^ime place about half an hour later. 

Mrs. .Montague favoretl onie more with 
uolin selections. The last s|>eaker, Prof. 
Frank P. Kand, talked about S.m Fian- 
cisio and the trouble that he had to ke« p 
v\arni there. His most interesting remi- 
iiiMcnce was of the cable cars that r.in 
up liie iiiils iheie. .Aicoiiimg lo I'rolessoi 
k.iiid they ha\e no regard for personal 
Mtety, and an accident was a common 
murrence; so common that when the car 
on which they were riding struck an auto- 
mohiie, the auto was merely pulled to one 
•''e :md the car continued on its way. 



TWENTY MEN TAKEN 

INTO GLEE CLUB 



Largest Number of New Men to be 
Taken on in Recent Years. 
Successful Season KxiK'cted 

Twenty men, the largest number to be 
taken on in recent years, successfull> 
tried out for the Men's (.lee Club last 
Wednesday evening in the Memorial 
liuilding. This list includes a large num- 
ber of freshmen, so that the Club will 
not want lor good material for the next 
few \cars. 

A special «'tf()rt is being made this year 
to have all the concerts come on the same 
evening in the week, as this will be more 
coineiiient for the particii>ants. The 
schedule will soon be comi)leted and will 
appear at that time. 

.Some g<M)d selections have been chosen 
t<jr the Club this year, and .i very success- 
ful season is predicte<l. 'Tlure are several 
places f(»r g<Mjd s(H'cialties on the pro 
gram .it iircsent, and .mybody who has a 
novelty lunuber is urged to come out and 
show his talent. 

F'oliowing is a list <>( the luw members 
of the .Men's (.lee Club: 

First /cHwri— Paul A. Smith 'HI. Ken- 
neth K. Hodge '-.i-J, Ralph M. Satfer ';iL'. 
(iiltord II. Towle '.{2. 

Sciofid lenors—Clydv W. .Nash '.'U. 
Donald M. Mason '.{2, Kdward J. \Vas- 
kiewicz '32. 

Iirst bases - John S. Woodbury '!.'«», 
Walter H. Hacker ';n, Kenneth W. 
Chapm.m ';{2, .Arnold C. Ilaynes ';i2, 
iMlward .\. Loonier '.■{2, John W. .S hooii- 
maker ';)2. 

Sitoihl hasis .Alfred (.. Ililbert '.Id, 
Raymond 1". Smith '.{(», Nathan i:. 
C.reene '.il, William P. Davis '.•{2. Win. 
.A. Johnson '.{2, Harris IL Purdy '.•{2. 

JUDGING TEAMS GO TO 
DAIRY EXPOSITION 

Teams Leave 'This Aftern<H)ii an I To- 
morrow lo IJompete in .N.itlonal 
Dairy bxposition 



Number 3 



COLLECil AN COM PK'HTORS 
REPORT 

Ulien the Collegian board made its 
annual call to the freshmen for prosi)ec- 
!'ve mcriibcrs of the editona! depart- 
ment, eight aspirants came forth to test 
iheir journalistic ability. Those members 
yf the class of l't:{2 who are com()eting 
iw a iK-rmanent |)osition on the literary 
tnd of the College weekly are as follows: 
Thurl D. Brown of Danvers, Phillip J. 
Coiinell of Springfield, Oscar Margolin of 
N''Atonville, Hazel B. Peck of .Spiinj.;- 
(Continucd on Pafte ij 

Outing Club Has 
New Policy 

Istensive Program Arranged and 
brive f(»r New Members Soon 
to be Launched 



At a meeting of the Outing Club held 

'ist week, an entirely new policy was 

s^Jopted. Hitherto, the iKjlicy has been 

''J wait for a good sized membership be- 

•'"■t undertaking wide activities; this 

' '!■ the Club is going right ahead with 

(Mensive program that it has always 

"I'i. This method, besides giving the 

"' !it members a busy gcxid time, will 

■inijoubtedly attra( t many more students 

I '<Jthc young organization. 

(Ck>ntinued on Page i) 



*^t I. STANDING PERFOR.MANCE 
OF THE WEEK 



•^Jttting into nearly every play, 
knifing the Bates line, and fighting 
^^rd all the time he was in the game, 
/^^y" Mann well deserved the ova- 
^•'Jn which he received when he was 
■tplaced in the last quarter of the 
•''tJtIjall triumph last Saturday. 



The Dairy Cattle judging team, con- 
sisting of C. L. Hla(k, .M. I.. Hlaisdeli, 
P. I), \ouiig. and I'. Skogsberg, left this 
iiKjrning for Memphis, Tennessc-e. 'The 
team is spending the afternoon in New 
N'ork and will board the train this evening 
and arrivi- in Memphis Friday morning. 
The judging will t.ike jdace Saturday the 
l.ith with thirty or more teams com|M;ting. 
After three days at the Kxf)ositi(>n, the 
team will lea\e for Washingt<m, D. C., 
arriving there Thurs(la\ noon. Thursday 
afternfKin and Friday will be sjH-nt in 
and about Washington. The last leg of 
the trij) home will be made .Saturday, 
October 2(1. Prof, \ictor A. Rice will 
acc'om()any the team. 

'The Dairy Products jiiding team will 
leave Springfield 'Thursday nocm. This 
team is made up of Huntington Rutan, 
Stephen .Adams, and H. S. .Adams and is 
accompanied by Prcjfesscjr J. II. Irancl 
sen. 'The team has made plans tcj go by 
way of Chicago where they will spend 
Iriday and .Saturday visiting the b>itter 
and cheese markets. By leaving Chicago 
Saturday evening they will arrive in 
-Memphis Suncl.iy nwrning. The ccjntest 
in which at least fifteen teams will com- 
pete is to be held Monday the l.')tli. 

After the contest the team leaves for 
the Dairy Industries KxiMjsition at 
Cleveland. Here they will attend meet- 
ings of the International Ice Cream 
.Manufacturers' AswK-iat iuii ami have an 
cjpportunity to see all the latest machinery 
used in the manufacture of dairy produc ts. 
From Cleveland they will go to Niagar.i 
falls and Buffalo, arriving huine Sunday. 
October 21. 



FACULTY HELP IN 
INVESTIGATION 

Faculty Members on Important Com- 
mittees Investigating Land 
(irant Colleges 

Three members of the faculty and st.ilT 
of M..A.C. have been chosen to serve on 
s|)ecial committees ot the Land (irant 
College Survey Committee which was 
a|)pointed by the I'mted St.itcs Bureau 
of Kducation. These nun .ire President 
Roscoe W. 'Th.Ucher, who is a member of 
the committee on ICxperiment .St.itions; 
Dean William L. Machmer, who is to 
serve on the committee on the Resident 
Indergr.iduate Instructors; and Professor 
Alexander .A. .Mac Kimmic-. who is to 
serve on the committee on the .Arts and 
Sciences. 

These s|)ecial committers are the result 
of the Bureau of Fducation's decision to 
m.tke a complete investig.ition of all 
Land (irant Colleges. Tin- Bure.iii re- 
<ei\ed a s|)ecial appropriation froiii 
Congres-, for this work, and org.mi/cci 
these conmiittees which are com|M)secl ot 
a number of s|H'cialists in their resi)ective 

fields. 

I he purpose of these committees is to 
Imd out the progress, methods used, costs, 
objectives, and simil.ir subjects of t he 
\arious institutions in the (»t) yc.irs since 
the .Morrill .Act of l.H(i2. At present the 
government is ex|)ending iiiin li money 
.iiinii.illy towards the upkeep of these' 
institutions and is inte reslecl in getting 
the best results in every way po.ssibU-. 

Ie)r example, if the c milte-es hnd that 

eerlaiii methoils are working well at one 
institution th.it could be us«-d .it others 
they will be tried. 

Sue h cpiestions as the loll.. wing will !«• 
wuestigated; How many men in tli«' 
dilferent departments? I low many enroll 
ill the various eourses.'' How is the sub- 
ject matter lianelledi' What are tin- 
salaries paid? What are the requirements 
'•••I tiici.i.,... ^,..1 K'.' 'nation. Wli.it is 
being clone to improve scholarship? Thes*' 
are representative cpiestions among the 
large number to be- .msweri-d. 

liie results of the investigations, when 
correlated, will, it is ho|M-d, .serve to raise 
the- stamlard e.f all the Land (.rant 
Colleges. Work on the .New I-aigl.iml 
section will be- started in the near future. 



Aggies Defeat Bates' Team 

In Well Fought Game 

Jinx Broken As Maroon and Wliitc Scores Touclulown For a 

6-0 Mctory In Second (;ame of Season. 

Agate Machine Shows Real Foot halt 



Football Team Primed For 
Game With Middlebury 



Maroon and While Expected to Hold 
Own .Against \ icilors 

This S.ilurcl,iy afterncMm will find the 
Middlebury College footb.dl le.tm on 
c-.impus ready for a grid b.ittle with the 
Massiichusetts aggregation. For thevisi 
tors it will be .in .iitenipt to bic-.ik into 
the winning column, while- the- home- te.iiii 
will light to keep up the excc-lleni type 
of g.ime- it pl.ivi-d 1. 1st week .ig.iinsi B.itc-s. 
Thus l.ir this se.isoii Middlebm y ll.is been 
defeated by Amherst l<) to 7 and b\ 
Willi.iiiis 20 to 0. The- M.irooii .iiid White 
pl.iyers h.ive ni.ide .i better showing, 
winning from B.Ues ti to and losing to 
Bowdoin l.l to (I. During the rem.iinder 
of the- week Co.ic h "Chick" Mc( ieoch 
will try to iron out the rough pl.u-es in 
last Saturday's combination in order to 
have an even more powerful team on the 
field this week end. Tiicre will be- ver> 
few changes in the lineup, .iiicl pr.ulically 
the siime team that defe.itc-d B.iies will 
oiieii the- >;.inic- ag.iinst Middlelpiu y. .A 
li.ird loiinht contest is anticipated for 
liolli c bibs .ire .mxioiis to win. Ilowever, 
it is hoped that .M..A.C. will add another 
victim to its list as a step in its climb to 
|>roniinene e- in football circles. 

FRESHMAN ELEVEN TOPS 
NORTHAMPTON HIGH 

Frosli .Score 'I'wo Touchilowiis in 
First Ouarter to Win H-7 



New Student Secretary 

Has Excellent Record 



Index Board Has Plans 

Formed For Year-book 



Schedule for Individual Pictures 

Drawn I p and Pictures will be 

1'aken Next Week 

Work on the "Wr.H) Index", the junior 
>ear-boc»k. has begun with the members 
of the boarel encleavoring to i»ublish a 
worthwhile bcMjk in the spring. 'The edi- 
torial board is compos.-d of Lewis .M. 
Lynds, editor-in-chief; Harold J. White, 
lite-rary editor, assisted by Frank .M. 
Bishop and fiertriide Maylott; statistics 
c-ditor, .Margaret P. Donovan aided by 
Rachel AtwoocI and Ninccnt J. Riley; 
iirt editor, .Archie II. .M.idden, assisted 
by Herbert A. Allen; and photographic- 
editor, Kenneth W. Hunt. 'The business 
boarcl is headecl by John R. 'Tank as 
ContinucHl on V.i&vAi 



Mr. Williams Has Had Much Experi- 
ence in Handling .Students and 
in Church Work 

Amcjng the newccjiners on campus this 
fall there is one man who lias already 
become quite familiar to the student body, 
(Continued on Pafte .); 



f:.\.MIM;S CALFAIMR 

/ ■ 'ir i:. human, U, j,,i,.i:c diitne." 
—Pope (hssay on CrUiciim) 

Wednesday, October 10 

7.1." J). 171 Inck-x .Meeting. 
Thursday 

:i.l.'i p. m. Assembly. Director I- . I. '-i'vi r-. 

.M .\.r. 
Friday, lliiliday, Columbus Day 

\ai-ity c ro<-.-( ountry. ^'pKul r;i( e wiih 

Amherst at Amherst. 
Frf«hrrian ff>otb:il!. (.rr-enln'M .il c .rfcnticlil 
Junior var-i':. . \Villi~tr,n ,it Uilli-ton. 
Saturday 

\':ir>ity f.jolb;.li. Mi.l-il.-ljiiry at M.A ' . 
StOfkbridKc foi)tt<all, .NewljiiryiMjrt at 
Xewburyjxjrt. 
Monday 

H l."i p ni. .McctiiiK of frc-^hiiian (.ompeiilur-* 
f'jr •■(Jitorial -tali cit ( :,llf.,vin. 



Showing a strong scoring punch in the- 
sc-cond period of their g.iiiii- with .North 
ainpton High School last I-'riday after- 
noon cm till- north eml of .Alumni Field, 
the freshman football eleven won l.'f to 
7. Diggs and Welch scored the tcmch- 
downs b)r the frosh in that cpiarter, anci 
the- visitors' secire came in the last jM-riod 
by Barnes. 

After having a little advant.ige- in the 
first cpiartc-r, the yearlings started sliun^ 
in the second |M-riod and Sylve-ste-r, Diggs, 
.mil Welch all hel|)ed to advane e the ball 
in preparation bir the- tone lirl.,wn by 
Diggs. The- try b)r point after tc»iii hdown 
was wicle. 'The attack continued ancI 
Welch ()iislH-d the ball over fcif the 
second time. Diggs rushed through llii- 
Hamp line for the extra jMjint. 

In the fourth period, a 4')-y,ird run by 
Nohle brcmglit the ball nejir the- fresh- 
man goal, but the visitors could not 
s<c)re. With less than a minute to pl.iy, 
North.impton IiIcm ked a freshman piiiil. 
aiicl a forward pass, Farn-ll to B.irm s, 
produced a touchdown. The extr.i point 
went to .Northampton when the trosli 
wc-ri- offside cdi the- pl.iy. 

On this week Fri'lay, the- freshmen 
I)lay (iri-en field High School. 'The- siiin 
(Continued on I'aHe 4) 



'•Mass.icliusetts" st.ige-d a gre.it conie- 
I'.n k to recover some of the respect it has 
lost cliiiiii^ the p.ist two years in the 
lootb.ill world, by h.inimering a powerful 
.mil he-.ivy B.ites team into submission 
list S.itiirc|.iv .ifternoon on .Alumni Field 
by the score (i to 0. The game was clos«-ly 
contested throughout, but the Bay 
St.ite-rs showe-d their suiH-riority ancI a 
lighting spirit tli.it could not be- dimmed 
bv .1 mill h he.ivie-r.inKrc-n.ilioii. "Iieddie" 
Kllert, the st.ir ol the- Bowdoin g.iiiie, 
came- iigain into the liiiic-li^;lit l.v cite hing 
.1 loiw.ird p.iss from .\lc Kittrii k, which 
p.ivc-d the- w.iv for the only MOre of the 
contest. "R.iy" .M.iim pl.iyed .i ^reat 
game- until he was foice-d out in the last 
lew miniile-s of play. His defensive work 
W.I-, oiii>,t.iiidinv;, and time after time 
.M.iiin tliii-w the opposing ball carrier bir 
.1 loss .IS he c.ime through the ce-nter of 
the line-. "He-rm" M.ignuson, who was 
converted from a guard ti> .i iiowerful 
liillb.ic k in .1 we-e-k. e.irried the ball .ic ross 
lor the only touelidown, while Captain 
"Bob" Bowie's hi^h cpi.ilily of punting 
i(;c>iiilnuecl on I'aUe 4) 

CROSS-COl'MRV MFi;i 
Wrill AMHLRST 

\.irsity cross-count I y c .indid.ites will 
run .1 tryout in the- biriii e>f a .si|u.icl race 
with .Amherst on the- op|M>nents' course 
this Friday. The- first seven to hnish bir 
.M..A.C. will constitute the team for the 
first meet, which is with St. .Stephens and 
SpiiiiKlield .It .Ann.indale, .N. \., on 
< »c tober LMI. 

.A i.reliminary tii.d was held l.i^i 
S.iturday. in which Captain Carl A. 
BerK.iii '-".I, ll.irold M. Robertson '.!(», .ind 
Albert .N,ish '.SI, tied b>r lirst with the 
veiy gcHjcf time oi 2h:<i.i. The biiowiiig of 
John W. Mc ( iiic ki.iii 'Ml, was promising, 
.mil it is expected tli.it Richard A. I Urn. in 
• iit, letter man last year, who finished 
hlth, will improve-. .Milton I. ("oven ".U), 
is out with .1 heavy cold, and it is not 
known when he- will resume practiee. 
'There is a possibility that tlw- Worcester 
mi-ct hi-re- on October 27 m.iy become a 
tii.ingular meet, with Amherst as the 
tliircl compe-titor. 

Junior Varsity 

Defeated 19-0 

Cushing Academy To«» Much f<)r 

Junior Varsity Team. Only 

Thirteen .Men Make 'Trip 



INKLK;inLLS SHOW (;OOI> .SPH<I I 

During the past few weeks a grciup of 
men wIkj are ineligible for the varsity 
grid scjuaci has f(*rniecl a football team c)f 
its own accord to give the varsity grid 
sters some opposition in scrimages and 
practice sessions. S<>mc- c)f tlies*- mc-n are 
recent transfers who are not eligible to 
represent this college in athletics until ,i 
year has passed. 'logcflier with a few 
men who arc- off (In \,ii-it;. -,'jii.id Im- 
cause of stuclies, the tc-aiii li.is done- soim- 
very c rc-dit.ebk- work on the filed. .Much 
credit Is due thcin for their college sjjirit 
and interest in athletics. .Among the 
meinhers who compejse the te.uii are (,. 
.A. H.irni^, .A. K. Brown, O. F. I'.urit.iiik, 
Jr., J 1'. ( .,,tell„, I. I,. Cox, O. I-:. Holm 
berg, .\1. .N. King, L. S. McBride, J. I' 
Paks.irian, W. II. Parker, P. T. Phinney, 
R. ( . kooney, R. .M. Saffer, and II. \. 
Waite. 



Whih- the .M.A.C. varsity football 
te.im tioimcecl Bate-s last S;iturd,iy, the 
junior varsity was defeated by (Pushing 
.Ac .iclemy at Ashburnham by the s«:ore of 
\U tc> 0. Because of the number of pl.iyers 
kept in reserve- ii»r the- home- game only 
thirteen iik-ii iiiacle the trip to Cushing. 
Myric k w.is the- star of the visiting bai k- 
field, getting off long punts which lic-l|>e-d 
the junior tt-.im considerably. I-Jliot, 
Sullivan, and Hine-s w«-re outstanding in 
the line-, furnishing a barrier to the 
opposing linesmen of Cushing team. 
Sheldon and Scully of the home aggre- 
g.ition made the- longest runs of the game, 
the fcirmer running back a punt forty 
yards before he was stopped while the 
latter went arouiul the ericl for a thirty- 
five yard gain in the first few minutes of 
play. Captain Broadbent , ,ii c|uartcr- 
bac k fcjr the .Ashburnham elub did some 
excellent wcjrk until he was forced out of 
the game with a sprained ankle. Jcjrdan 
made the three touchclowns of the game 
while (!orre.ile kic ked one goal. 



OPPONF:,NiS' .SCORKS 

A mhirst 7, Jiiru'doin '.i 
Williams 20, MtddUbury 
Siiruuh Ti, Providence U 
Brown .'{2, Worcester () 
Harvard .'JO, Spnngfield 
'J ujl-. 24, Colby 



I 



THE MASSACHUSE1TS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10. 1928 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Offirial newspajH-r of the Maftsachusetts 
Agricultural Collige. Putjlishcd every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 



treatment of oi)i)on(nts. Let's not only 
maintain that impression, but improve 
on it. 



Ehplbv Clbavm '20 
iDWABDH.NicaoLt '20 



Editor-ifi-( liir* 
Managing Editor 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial Shipley tL«AVBS "29 

Feature Mabcaret I'. Donovan '30 

Alumni & Short Courses Sallv E. Bradley "31 

Athlnic LiwisM.LvND«'30 

Frank Ti Douclasi '31 

Campus Jow* B. Howa«o Jr. •»0 

Cecil H. Wadikigh '30 

Rial S. PottkkJr. "M 



BUSINESS DEHARTMENT 

ruDBRlCS D. ThaTBB. Jr. '2» Businn* Manager 

<• '• " " Advertising fiauager 

Lawrbncb a. Cabbutb '» Circulation Manager 

ROBBRT G. GOODNOW. '31 

WiNTHBOP G. Smith '30 
John R. Tank 10 



While we are considering odds and 
ends of subjects related to the campus, 
we are reminded of the campaign that 
was started under the regime of the 1928 
leaders on the Colleguin Board in regard 
to liberating the College Library from its 
Itx-ked doors on Sundays. The exact 
results of the ballots distributed at that 
time is not here in our hands, but the 
sentiment expressed was decideflly not 
in favor of existing conditions. We 
suggest this for consideration by the 
student body so that at the first Student 
Forum positive action may be taken. 
The Collegtan has no legislative machinery, 
and therefore cannot go further than to 
register the sentiment of the under- 
graduates. 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber 
will please notify the business manager 
as eoon as possible. 




STOCKBRIDGE | 



FRANCIS J. CORMIER '27 WINS 

IMPORTANT FELLOWSHIP 



Entered as serond-clasi matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. AcceptrcJ for mailing at special rate 
o( posUie provided for in section 1 103. Act o« Oc- 
tober, 1917. authorized August 20. 1918. 



CAMPUS COMMENT 

It is always more or less difficult for 
the new students of the College to settle 
immediately in their proper places accord- 
ing to campus traditions and to act in 
accordance with Aggie customs. Several 
items have been noticed this past week, 
and we shall endeavor to give the offenders 
a bit of information about their mistakes. 



Charles Eliot Travelling Fellowship 

in Landscape Architecture Goes 

to "Joe" Cormier 



At all student assemblies in Bowker 
Auditorium, it has always been the 
custom that seniors should leave the hall 
first, followed by the juniors and sopho- 
mores, and lastly the freshmen. Perhaps 
the more serious difficulties have come 
from the haste of the former two classes 
rather than from the freshmen. Without 
trying to pin the blame onto any one 
group, however, we wish to urge the 
respect of this custom. It is a mark of 
respect to the seniors, and the leadership 
that the class exercises throughout the 



F. J. Cormier '27, who recently took 
the M.L.A. degree at Harvard University, 
and who is now employed with Olmsted 
Brothers, landscape architects of Brook- 
line, Mass., has won in competition the 
Charles Eliot travelling fellowship in 
landscape architecture. The stipend in 
this fellowship enables him to take 
approximately one year of travel and 
study in Europe. 

Joe writes: "The problem was interest- 
ing and to my liking. It was for a private 
estate on the coast (Cape Cod) for an 
American portrait painter and a family 
of three. The topography was very 
rough and very interesting with sugges- 
tions hanging on every contour, so to 
speak. Requirements were: general plan 
in water color; complete grading plan 
including sewage disposal system, water 
supply, sub-drainage, etc.; planting plan 
in part; four sections in water color; 
three construction details; and five 
sketches. I did my sketches in pencil." 

Joe expects to leave America about 
Christmas time and work first in Portugal 
and Spain, later in southern France, 
Italy, Germany and England. Joe will 
be remembered on this campus as a 



CampusDeDrfs 



Prexy Says 
"The desire to win is laudable and a 
winning team is an asset to any institu- 
f'tnn; but best of all is a good, clean game, 
well-played to the end." 

CD 

IntercoUeftlates 

The New Student states that New 
Jersey has legislated against hitch hiking. 
A traffic law went into effect on Sept. 1 
making it an offense for anyone either to 
ask for or offer a ride on the open high- 
ways of that state. This is bad news for 
the hundreds of college students who are 
accustomed to pass through New Jersey 
on their cross-country trips. 
CD 

For the first time in two years a co-ed 
has registered in the agricultural course 
at Rhode Island State College. 
CD 

A rather amazing statement was re- 
cently made by Dr. Herbert N. Shenton, 
the new chairman of the Sociology de- 
partment at Syracuse University. "Stu- 
dents who are the best guessers get the 
A's," declared Dr. Shenton. "Those who 
cannot guess quite so well get the B's, 
and those who guess, but not with any 
degree of accuracy, do not pass." 
CD 

A Colgate psychologist has studied 



COMMUNICATION 



nOSTONIANC 

*• Shoes Jor Men 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1928 



College should be given at least this much ^,3gp^,a^l player antl leading landscaper 
recognition. Sacrificing a half minute of 
time for such a custom is not too much 
to ask, and we urge the student body to 
live up to it. 



Chapel is to all intents and purposes a 
religious service as serious as that held in 
any church. Because of this, the stu<lent 
body has rather consistently refrained 
from handdapping during the service. 
When one i^rsoii starts to applaud, the 
inclination is for others to join in, aivl 
so it happened last Friday. Chapel has 



CHANGE IN STAFF 

A change in the editorial staff of the 
ColUf'tdn has recently been necessitated 
by the resignation of one of its memlwrs 
from the boartl. Eric Singleton, of the 
class of V.i'M). who has been on the edi- 
torial staff since his freshman year, has 
found it necessiiry to resign from the 
Colh-nian and also from the huUx. Single- 
ton has done excellent work since he was 
taken on to the Colkginn, having ad- 

• I'.i .„.r -,n,l it i« iii> to the vanced to the position of athletic editor, 

improved this year, ana it is up lo tnt i "^ . 

' . . , ■■ L I f w ith DOSS 1)1 It les of becoming etiitor-in 

student body to establish an idea „f|wiin posMi.imic t, ^^ 

reverence about the s«Tvice that will 
insure its success. Avoiding noisy ap- 
plause will help materially to strengthen 
the spiritual value of our bi-weekly 
morning niectings. 



cheaters secretly and says that they are 
"dumb, but good mixers." 

CD 

Prelude 

Now you all may wonder 
What this is all about. 
But Joe is the boy to tell you, 

For he has found it out. 
He's a figure on our campus. 

He's everywhere you go. 
For he has a nail on the end of his stick 
That picks up all this below. 

CD 

Joe Found That 
The annual senior boast is on:— 

Assembly has starte<l in Bowker Hall, 
I'm still in form— slept thru it all. 

CD 

Fannie Frosh six-nt s<inie time in 
serious meditation watching the telephone 
girl in Stockbridge and then concluded 
that the work of a telephone girl was 
neither a profession nor a business, but 
a calling. 

CD 



Reception 

At the Memorial Building last Thurs- 
day evening, an informal get-together 
was held in behalf of the 135 new-comers 
to the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. 
Mr. J. Paul Williams of the M.A.C.C.A. 
presided. He welcomed the freshmen in 
the name of the Association, told some- 
thing of its work, and emphasized the 
spiritual side of college life. 

Rev. G. Bates Ives of the Unitarian 
Church was the first speaker to be intro- 
duced. He extended a message of friend- 
ship and a cordial invitation from all of 
the churches of Amherst to the new 
students, inviting them to make the 
churches their homes. 

Don Tiffany then obliged the gathering 
with several numbers at the piano, in- 
cluding the ever-popular "Duna". Im- 
mediately following. Miss Margaret Ham- 
lin urged all of the incoming class to 
broaden their field of activity in order to 
obtain a well-rounded education. Mr. 
Williams then introduced Mr. Roland E. 
Verbeck, Director of Short Courses, who 
recalled memories of the World War and 
spoke of the dedication of Memorial 
Hall to those Aggie men who gave their 
lives "over there". 

W. C. Brown, president of the Stock- 
bridge Student Council, spoke on the 
value of athletics and asked for support 
in football and other sports. The last 
speaker to be introduced was President 
Roscoe W. Thatcher. He addressed the 
gathering on the subject of the oppor- 
tunities to grasp preeminence offered to 
college men who were able to take ad- 
vantage of them. He also spoke of the 
influence which leaders may have on their 
followers. 

After the President's speech, refresh- 
ments were served and the rest of the 
evening was spent in making acquain- 
tances. 



The Collegian accepts no responsibility for opin- 
ion* voiced in "The Forum." It aims to serve as 
a means of giving expresnion to student opinmu, 
and will print any views expressed rationally anj 
sanely, unless ttie editors feel that they are justi- 
fied in suppressing them because of unfair jxt. 
sonal attack. Communicatioiw roust be limited to 
5U0 words. 



To the Collegian: 

1 would like to express my appreciation 
and thanks to the band for the admirable 
spirit of co-operation and sacrifice dis- 
played by them on Alumni Field last 
Saturday. I feel that the leader, Charlie 
Cox, deserves much credit for his en- 
deavors in recruiting such a goodly 
number. 1 realize that many of the nun 
gave up appointments so that the band 
might be well represented. We will get 
somewhere with spirit like that. 
Signed : 

"Chick" McGeoch 



AT THE ABBEY 



Miss Edna L. Skinner invited all the 
officers of the co-ed organizations to a 
banquet given at Draper Hall last Wed- 
nesday night. Miss Margaret Hamlin, 
Miss Helen Knowlton, Miss Marion 
Tucker, and Mrs. Curry Hicks joined 
over twenty girls representing the vari- 
ous organizations including the Athletic 
Association. Delta Phi Gamma. Honor 
Council, House Committee, S.S.A., Short 
Course Sorority, W.S.G.A., and Y.W.C.A. 

Following the banquet Miss Skinner 
opened a discussion involving suggestions 
for making the twenty-eight "off campus" 
I Aggie co-eds feel more at home with those 
in the dormitory and it was also voted 
that a committee of one member from 
each organization should be chosea to 
plan for a real freshman co-ed week next 
fall. 



Better look into Bostonians 
if you don't already know 
them. There's a bit of mon- 
ey you'll never regret spend- 
ing. 



BOLLES SHOE STORE 




\ 



Every year conK<'Stion outside the 
"Hash House" seems worse and worse. 
During the first two or three weeks of 
the year, the frcshnu-n were lining the 
walks in disorderly array, and now the 
group from the St<Hkbri<lge School is 
added to those through whom one must 
watle to reach the cafeteria. Out of 
courtesy to those who use DraiHT Hall 
merely for an eating place, we Y\o\)c that 
those who find it necessary to wait 
before or after imais will try to do it 
somewhere else than in front of the 
doors. TI)Ost> freshmen from the College 
and from the Sttxkbridge School who are 
eating on double tables should plan to 
reach the buiitling later than the rest, 
unless they eat with the first group. If 
this is practiced, much of the undesirable 
confusion outside the "Hash House" will 
be done away with. 



chief in the coming elections. Those cm 
the Collegian staff feel that they have 
lost a valuable member. 

Singleton's place as athletic editor has 
been taken by Lewis M. Lynds, also of 
the class of WV). who has worked in the 
athletic department for the past year, 
lie will be assisted by Frank T. Douglass 
19;n, who also wrote up athletics last 
year. The rest of the board of editors 
remains unchanged. 



Someone said- 



CD 



We might be a singing college. 

CD 

.Maybe, — some day —oh yeah? 

— -CD 



To give emphasis to the statement 
niadt by announcer Hosworth at the 
bouts in the Anna Kazoo Night, we 
want to rejx^at his uka here mainly for 
till- l.tinlii of the new students. The 
spirit tluit i)revaiis on this campus is one 
of friendly rivalry between classes, and 
derision of .my kind is taboo. This 
attitude is, and has Ijeen, characteristic 
of the majority of Aggie men concerning 
otlni (dllii^i-s with whom Wf iii.i\ he in 
competition. .\1..\.( . has always had a 
reputation for fairness and decency in its 



GIFT OF $1500 RECEIVED 

The Horticulture and Landscape Car- 
dening sections of the M.A.C. Library 
are the beneficiaries of a recent fund es- 
tablished by Mrs. Ellen I'omeroy Moore. 
This fund, which consists of a gift of 
$1,.">(K), is given in memory of Mrs. 
M<H)re's brother, Robert F. Pomeroy. a 
member of the class of 1.S94. The in- 
come from thie sum is to be devoted 
entirely to the Horticulture and Land- 
scajK' hardening section of the Library, 
in order that the latest books and peri- 
odicals may be available to students 
studying those subjects. 



When nursery rhymes come true, i.e.: 
Now that the game is over. 
We can ring the bell. 

CD 

One feature of our fall games was 
missing -those refreshments between the 
many halves. 

CD 

But then we had— Oh, shucks! 

CD 

When will the Mascot apjiear? 

CI) 

All in. 



Football 
With the opening game this Saturday 
against Newburyport High at Newbury- 
port. Coach "Red" Ball is shaping up a 
promising Stockbridge School football 
team. Twenty-five men are on the squad, 
with plenty of line men, but a scarcity of 
backfield material. 

During the past week, the squad has 
been handicapped by injuries incurred in 
practice. Captain Brown has a bruised 
leg, and Tomkinson, promising backfield 
candidate, has a bruised shoulder which 
will probably keep him out for a week. 
Graf, first-string quarterback, received a 
blow on the head which may keep him 
out of the ojiening game. 

Captain Brown, who played tackle last 
year, has been shifted to center. For the 
tackles, Oksanen is a former Fitchburg 
High player, and Curran has had experi- 
ence in Danvers. Dibble, Sylvia, and 
Skovron are exi)erienced guards, and with 
Cheney, Durkin, Heart, and Homan for 
ends, a strong defensive line seems 

probable. 

To bolster the backfield. J. Hall and 
Ashworth, former ends, have been con- 
verted into ball-carriers. Kakkinen, Hey- 
ward. and Hill, halfbacks. Chase, a full- 
back, and (iraf. a quarterback, will prob- 
ably be the principals in the Stockbridge 
offense at Newburyport. 



Tennis matches promise a close rivair) 
at the Abbey. Good weather allows an 
exciting tournament this fall. 



Fifteen lusty co-eds from all classes 
report for basketball twice a week regu- 
larly. What will be the outcome of the 
interclass games in the high school audi- 
torium this year? 



Just watch the M.A.C. Girls' Glee Club 
this winter! 



MILITARY NOTES 



Requisition has been made to 
United States W'ar Department for 
new pieces of music for the R. 
band. In this group there are induu 
many fine marches as well as some stn- 
classical pieces. Captain Sumner alst 
went last Saturday to Boston to coiiir 
with the manager of Oliver Ditson^ 
regarding the latest marches and popuU: 
numbers that are published. 



New Features 

Extra large enrollment in the Stock- 
bridge School of Agriculture caused the 
introduction of several new features in 
the S.S.A. freshman week. Most notable 
of the innovations were the Freshman 
(Continued on Pafte 4) 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITORS 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

field, Le(»nard A. Salter Jr., of Springfield, 
Frank L. .Springe of .Arlington, Wallace 
W. Stuart of Littleton, and Oswald Tippo 
of Jamaica Plain. 

These competitors will be given weekly 
assignments to perform in regard to 
writing up various occurrences on and 
about campus. Election of members of 
this group will be based on these assign- 
ments which are to be gradeil by certain 
disinterested parties. 



POLITICAL DEBATE PLANNED 

Plans are being formulated for a debate 
to be held during the latter part of this 
month on the presidential candidates 
who are comijeting for the privilege of 
occupying the White House. The si)onsor 
of this debate is Constantine P. Ladas. 
graduate assistant in the Department of 
Sociology. Leonard VV. Morrison and 
Dennis M. Crowley will present the 
strongest argument for .Alfred E. Smith, 
Democratic candidate. Taylor M. Mills 
an<l Shepley Cleaves will defend the 
Republican candidate for office, Herbert 
W. Hoover. 



ALUMNI NOTE 

The marriage is announced of Miss 
Bernice Pierce to Mr. D. 1.. Calanie '27, 
on August 30 at Falmouth, Mass. Mr. 
Galanie is now engaged in lamlscape 
construction work on Cape (oil. 



FALL TRACK NOTICE 

Owing to the large number of men 
electing fall track for physical education 
credit, beginning the week of October S, 
(this week), freshmen and sophomores 
who are taking track for physical educa- 
tion credit will be required to take this 
work on Tuesday and Wednestlay after- 
noons between the hours of liMO and 5.30. 

.As usual all men will be required to see 
that their attendance is taken. Attend- 
ance from now on will be taken at the 
track instead of in the Drill Hall. At- 
tendance will be taken by Woodbury '29 
instead of the track managers. Everyone 
must revK)rt to Mr. Woodbury at the 
start of practice. Everyone must get a 
definite assignment from Mr. Woodbury 
for the day's practice. After completion 
of the work each man must personally 
report back to Mr. Woodbury for a final 

checkup. 

L. L. Derby 



Several prizes were taken by MAC 
horses at the Three County Fair hor-f 
show hehl last week at Northamptor 
The following is the list of prizes won 
with the names of the horses that wc 
them: 

Lightweight Polo Pony Class — Duclic>:. 
1st; Mollie, 2nd; Lassie, 3rd; Aggie, 4th 
Tlie Hunter Mares Class— Vritz Shnyiler 
1st; Bonnie, 2nd; Duchess, 3rd; Dollie4th. I 
Open Jumping Class {twice over /ov | 
four-foot jumps)-— lionnk, 1st; Duche*v 
2nd; Blackie, 3rd. 

Lady's Hunter Class— lionme, 1st, w- 
Bessie Smith riding; Jack D., 4th, *it=| 
Grace Slack riding. 

Heavyweight Polo Pony Class—frm 
Shnyder, ridden by Major Hubbard, '2ni\ 
Bonnie, ridden by Sergeant Warren, :irii; 
Blackie, ridden by Captain Sumner, 4tfc 

Polo Pony Mares C/(i5.s— Bonnie, If' | 
Duchess, 2nd; Mollis, 3rd; Lassie, 4th 

Pair Saddle Horses C/d55— Bonnie, on«| 
of third prize pair; Prince of Wales ans| 
.Agmas, 4th. 

Polo Pony, any weight— Mo\\k\ 1^ 
The Bootlegger, 2nd; Fritz Shnyder, :W | 
Bonnie. 4th. 

Combination Horse Class (driven •i'^-j 
riVf'ffw)— Barnaby, 2nd, shown by Bett)| 
Foord. 

Pair Jumpers Class— VxMz Shnydcr.I't> 
one of pair; Bonnie and Duches?, -"' 
Mollie, 4th, one of pair. 

College Student Jumping C/ass— Fresco 
D. Young. 2nd; Dennis M. Crowley. ;'f''[ 
Leroy O. Jones, 4th. 



1929 CALENDAR PADS and DIARIES 

With every 1929 Detk Calendar you get balance of 1928 FREE 
A. J. HASTINGS NEWSDEALER AND STATIONER 



500 Sheets 

Yellow Scratch Paper 
45 cents 



500 Shceu 
Typewriter Paper 
89 cents 



NEW FICTION 

OLD PYBUS 

By Warwick Deeping 
Author of SORRELL AND SON 

SILAS 
BRADFORD'S BOY 

By Joseph C. Lincoln 



James A. Lowell, Bookseller 



BOXB) STATIONERY 

With 

UNINGS and PRICES 

Equally Attractive. 

MISS CURER'SGifT SHOP 



STUDENTSI ATTENTION 1 

Make ■ day'a wagM (or otM hour'* work 
after CUmm. No •ipwicnceor Invcatmwit 
nocoMMT. W« have an opening at M. A. C. 
Application* contldcred In order of their 
receipt. Write today for free particulars. 

BRADFORD * CX>., Inc. St. Joaeph. Mich. 



Amherst Shoe Repair Co. 

Master Shoe Rebuilders 
NEXT TO BOLLES SHOE STORE 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

.Now situated at 15 1-2 Pleasant St. 
EXCELLENT SHOE REPAIRERS 
V. GRONDONICO. Prop. 

College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH 
Reg. Pharm. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



Carl L. Bolter Inc. 



EXETER AMHERST HYANNIS 



Twenty-Two Out For 
Freshman Cross-Country 

Promising Material Out. Time Trials 
To Be Held Soon 

Although no trials have yet been ht-M 
to ascertain the faUest randidates for the 
freshman cross-country team, twenty- 
two men are now practicing on the 
freshman course. A time trial will prob- 
ably be held this week, and on Wednes- 
day, October 17, the s(|uad will race the 
Amherst harriers on the Amherst course. 
A team race with the Amherst freshmen 
has been scheduled for Friday, November 
9, on the home course. This is the only 
meet now scheduled, but if the team is 
strong, it will probably go to the New 
F.ngland Intercollegiates at Boston on 
November 19. 

Those reporting for practice are Retts, 
Chase, Cossar, Crawford, Daley, Dean, 
Dobbins, Dyar, Forest, Halzubic, Mitch- 
cock, Mowlett, Johnson, MacLean, Mason, 
Post, fiala. Storey, Towle. Vilk, Wear, 
and Wilson. Of these, Herbert L. Forest 
has had experience in Arlington, and 
Carey M. Howlett has run for Mt. 
Hermon, while others may have had 
experience. 



DRY (;le.\nin(; 



PRK.SSIN(; 



For Prompt Service IMione H2H 

AMHERST CLEANERS & DYERS 

1 1 MAIN STREET NEXT TO TOWN HALL 

One Day .Service on l>r> CliunliiU Work Called for and IVIhered IHilly 

REPAIRING L.\liNI)RY DYEING 



THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

Special Sunday Night Dinners 

Temporary quarters in the rear of the new block. 

Watch for our opening announcement. 



THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"THE PLACi: FOR THE COLLlitiK M.AN" 



Best in Drug .Store Service 
Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co, 



s. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one fliftht) 

I Oculi«tt' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable make* 



ASK FOR 

"MUNSINGWEAR" RAYON 

and SILK 

Bloomere — Step-ins— Vests 

Slips — Bandeau — Pajamas 

Night Robes 



When University 
Men forcast a 
change in mode, 
you will find it 
here correctly ex- 
pressed in 
Bolter's Clothes. 



NEW STUDENT SECRETARY 
(Continued from Page 1) 

His name is Mr. J. Paul Williams and he 
takes the place o( Elmrr Barber as Inter- 
church Student Secretary. Mr. Williami 
is married and has one son. lie received 
his A.B. at Balcer University and his 
M.A. at the same institution also. Be- 
sides, he has received a B.D. degree from 
Sarrett Theological Seminary and has 
done advanced work towards a doctor's 
degree at Union Theological Seminary 
and Columbus University. 

He had large experience with students 
when he was assistant to Dr. James 
Baker of Champaign, Illinois. During the 
f)ast two years, he has been on Dr. 
Fos<lirk'8 staff at the Park Avenue 
Baptist church in New York City. The 
church's student contacts were made 
through Mr. Williams. He has made 
remarkable headway with his academic 
training and has had much experience 
with church and student work. Also, 
Mr. Williams has been a fellow of the 
National Council, picked out from a 
large number i4 a~r>licante through a 
searching investigation made by a com- 
mittee of which Dr. Fosdick was a mem- 
ber. 



BULBS rOR rAll PLANTING 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter 11. Harrison, Prop. 



SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

G. Edward Fisher 

|TYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorisied Remington, Royal 
and Corona Sales and Service 

X^iiU, I quirment General Repair Shop 

,-, H. E. DAVID 

|« Pleasant St., juil below P.O. Amherst 



Carl L. Bolter Inc. 



EXETER AMHERST HYANNIS 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AM) ALL KINDS OF I 

WASHING DONK AT REA.SONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Post Office 



Town Hall Theatre 

Miillnt-ex al .»:00 KvenlnilN at h:4.S A M:.«0 
Vie are inHtsillinit thr liitoNl type iif Syn- 
chronized Mufilc and hope to liave it 
ready to uni- with the followinti features 

THURSDAY AND FRIDAY, OCT. 11 uid 12 
Fox Drama "HONOR BOUND" 

E.STKLLK TAVI.OR & (.KORtiK 0'HKIK.\ 

A PRISON REFORM STORY 

And HARRY LA.\<;i>ON in 

"THE SO LDIER MAN" 

SATURDAY. OCT. 13 

The famtiUN I auith Team 
KARL DANK <;E0R(;E K. AK Till R in 

"CIRCUS ROOKIES" 

Meet two (^ir< UN Rookies in tliree rlnftH 
crammed with Fun, Push and Kt-alhtTH. 
and Sl'E CARROLL in 
"WALKING BACK" 

WED., THURS., FRL, OCT. 17-18-19 

Hiftftedt i'lcture on the Screen Today 
.SENSATIONAL THRILLINti MAMMOTH 

"UNCLE TOM'S CABIN" 

In all the wi>rld-on Ntafie or screen you 
have never seen anything like It. Oist 
)2.(H>0.00n and was two years in the makinii. 
-See ".Simon LeUree", "Tupsy", "Ell/.a" 
i "Uncle Tom", and "Little Eva". 
NEWS COMEDY 

Shown each niftht at 7:00 MatineeNal ^■.m 

CHILDREN 25c. Adults 50c. 



Kingsbury Box & Printing Co. 

JOB PRINTERS 



NORTHAMPTON 



MASS 



Phone 554 or 555 



OUTINC CLUB HAS 

(ContlnuMl from Page 1) 

Five main objects are in view: 

First, to dedicate tlie cabin on Mt. 
Toby. There yet remains to he built a 
fireplace and chimney, which cannot be 
done in freezing weather, and will take 
concentrated work next spring. 

Second, to maintain the Toby trails. 
This is the principal responsibility of the 
M.A.C. Outing Club, and deserves the 
co-operation of everyone in college. At 
present, some trails are in rather bad 
shape and it is up to the Club to restore 
them. 

Third, to explore the Telhani Hills. 
The l>eauty of the Orient is well known; 
but those hills have many other l>eauty 
8|>ot8 that should afford some fine hikes. 

Fourth, to continue and enlarge tlic 
annual Winter Carnival. This custom, 
in vogue at the College before the war, 
was revivied last year, with ski-ing com- 
petition, ski-jorinK, antl skating races on 
February 22ii(l. 

Lastly, to impart real signifirance to 
iiuiiilxrship. All who pay the ye.irly 
(lues of fifty tents are iiicmlttrs, of course, 
and will \nt given a club emblem in 
recognition of this, but a set of rules surh 
as prf)fKieniy in woodcraft, kiiowU-dKc of 
.Mt. Toby, etc., is bein^; drawn up for a 



THE 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Offers Kxpert Hair Cuttinit 
Service for .Men and Women. 

"POP" DEUEL. Prop. MEMORIAL BUILDING 

AMHERST FRUIT STORE 

Will KK AGCilK .MKN MM T I 

Will \ DOWN TOWN 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGARS 



more selective circle of active memlK-rs 
The students in this inner circle will re- 
ceive recognition in tlie Intiex as for 
other college activities; will be entitled 
to wear the Outing Club badge; and, if 
their number warrant it, will hold a 
banquet at the end of the season. 

Nineteen attentled the first hike held 
last Sunday. At the end of the route the 
party Sfjent a jolly hour around the camp- 
lire, relishing hot cocoa and roasted 
marsh mallows. 

Next week will see a membership drive 
which will give ever>one a chance to 
join who is interested. Authorized repre> 
sentation of the Club will be as follows: 
U T- V A 11 Gravr-i 

I'lii Sigma KajHM 1' A .Sinitli 

Kuppa Siuma K. W Hunt 

Theta (111 k \V. Tatr 

Sisiiia I'lii TpMlon .IB llowaid 

l^mlxlii (111 Alpli.i li S. Il.mlef«iii 

Alplia Mkiii.i I'hl ,\ H .Mart<l.n 

Alpiia <;aiiiiiia Klio Ariiril.l I>avi« 

KapjKi KpHilon \V. E SmthwK k 

Soiitli ColleK.' . ..M I. ( ovrn 

North ( iillei;.- HA Allin 

Till- .M.Im-v .NfiHK < attmta Saraint 

All olli'H Mr. J. I'aul WUlianii 



FACt'LTY NOTE 

The .August numlicr of Journal of In- 
dustrial ami EngifM-ering Chemistry pub- 
lished liy the .Aineric.m Cfuinical Stniety 
(ont.iinsan artirle by Or. ( arl K. Fellers 
antl Mr. Frant is P. (.rifliths of the De- 
part nicnt of lloitii ultiiral .Manuf.it tures. 
Tins deals with ■Jtlly Strength .Measiiie- 
inents of I'ruit Jt.liics by the Hlooiii 
<.eloiiHter" and is based upon fxiK-ri- 
ments carrieti ui\ at M..'\.C. 



NEW FALL STYLES 

ON DISPLAY 

WATCH OUR WINDOW 

Shoe Repairing Department. 

JOHN FOTOS SHOE STORE 




A 



MHE RS 

THEATER 



T 



\l \IINEES llal|\. i Mt 
E\«T.v E\enina. 1 xhi.wii. h AS and 8. tO 

Wednestlay. Oct. 10 

Keith-AIbte Vaudeville 
5 ACTS 5 AND 

I Jack Ifolf :in«l Ihttv (wimpsoii in 

"COURT MARTIAL" 



READY NOW- 

All good leathers 

$5.00 - $10.00 

THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 

275 HIGH STREET HOLYOKE 



(.'omedy 



I'athe News 



Thursday & Friday. Oct. II & 12 
KMIL JKNN I\(;S in 

"THE PATRIOT" 

with Lew Is Stone \ Florence Vidtir 
Rt'ijular Prices News 



Saturday, Oct. ^.^ 
Kll IV DOVK in 

"THE NIGHT WATCH" 

2 Keel (Jtimedy I'athe News 






Monday & Tuesday. Oct. 15 and 16 
CLARA BOW in 

"THE FLEET'S IN" 

2 Reel (;<»medv News 



NE^W^ COIvI^EOE STOBE 



BASEMENT OF "M" BUILDING 



{ 



o 

v^ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WRDNKSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1928 



EXCLUSIVE AGENTS FOR KNOX HATS FIRST IN FASHION- FINEST IN QUALITY 

FROM their tapering crown to the pronounced roll of their slightly narrower brim, these KNOX Hats are NEW! 
Jaunty' Trim! But each still possesses the old Knox traits of long wear and lasting good looks. 
THE HOUSE OF WALSH A COLLEGE INSTITUTION 



Assembly Speaker Discusses 
International Questions 

Mrs. l.ucia Ames Mead (iives Kn- 
lighteniiifi I alk on World I'robkms 



War is «ausf<l by inadeciuatc world 
orKanization, (krlart-d Mrs. l.ucia .Xim-s 
Mrad ol IJrookliiu', in a talk on [Hacf 
and war. in Assembly last Thursday. 
Acc()r<linn to Mrs. .Mead, the rountrii-s 
shoul<l fo-o|)erate with ont- another, just 
the s.nne as the xarious states of the 
United States are d(»in^; toda\ . Men ns«'d 
to fight anions themselves, then they 
ori^anized into tribes. The tribes loii^iit 
each oilier for a while, then gat lured 
together to form states; n<)W the states 
have formed naticins. The natmal tiling 
would seem to ha\e the nations form a 
world Ixxls . 

Mrs. Mead siiid that force is reliitl on 

at the present time J)y the \arious nations 

to keep ihemsiUes iiitarl. This reli.mce 

on force is wrong, as it does not help 

them .iny mori' than peace measures .md 

costs mucii more, f-'or instance, in tlu- 

United States, since Washington's time 

the area of the ii)untr\' has increasi'd tour 

times, the population twenty-eight times; 

but the increase in the approi)riations for 

armaments is six hundre<l and I'lltN' times. 

To get riil of war, one must get rid of 

the idea that disputes arc war and that 

war is ine\itable. According to Mrs. 

Mead, man is the oidy li\ing thing th.it 

ttghts its own kintl. All the other .uiimals 

kill for f(M)«l and do not attack others of 

their own kind. W'e should follow the 

examph "f the other animals and cease 

killing uur kind. 

One of the methods of stopping w.ir is 
by orKiinizing an intern.it ional police 
force and Mrs. Mead felt that this could 
be done through the League of N. it ions. 
She said that in 1920 the people of the 
United States did not understand the 
l.ea){ue, so they di<l not wish the country 
to join, but that the time was fast .ip- 
proaching when the non-particip.itioii of 
the U. S. in such an f)rganization would 
be extre«n»;ly unfortunate. 



S'lOCKBKlDCifc; 

(Continuea from i';ifte 2) 
Class Supijers held October 1st and 2nd. 
The i)urpo.-.e of these gatherings was to 
a«(iuaiiit the students with the different 
divisions of Agriculture an<l Horticulture 
here at M.A.C 

I'oultry, Dairy, and Animal Husbandry 
departments were explaine<l by their 
rei)resentatives Monday night. The IMace 
ment Training system was also discussed. 
On Tuesday these divisions held "open 
hoii>c" for freshman visitors. 

Tue.sflay night members of the Pomol- 
ogy, \egetal>le (iardening, Horticulture, 
and I'loriculture departments si)oke and 
they also kept "oj)en house" the following 
day. .\ large percentage of the school 
took advantage of these excellent opi)or- 
t unities to get actpiainted. 

.Mental tests wire stheduled in the 
daytime because of the increase in enroll- 
iiunt, thus classes for the Stoikbridge 
students did not begin imtiiriuirsday I'.M. 
Notes 
Helen (Gottfried of Tryon, N. C, after 
completing her junior year at \ass;ir and 
h'-r summer vacation in ICurope, has 
enrolled in the SttM-kbridge School of 
.Agriculture to take up fruit growing. 

Marco Constain of Columbia, South 
.\merica, has entered the S.S.A., to major 
in .\iiimal Husbandry. 

John r.irker, Stockbridge '29, who 
s\Kin his summer assisting at a poultry 
h.itchery in Nashua, N. H., recently re- 
tured to his home in Urimfielil with a 
bride. His college course has been 
temporarily interrupted. He will not 
return this yearl 

W illiam Kobistm, Stturkbridge '29, while 
on |)l.icement training with Henry A. 
Dn.r, Riverton, N. J., competed in two 
marathon races; July 4, in an .S-mile 
mar.ithtm, and on Labor Day in a lO-mile 
marathon; winning both. Sprinting in the 
10-mile nice, he outran a I'riiueton com- 
petit<jr. 

lll.cn Holtlen and Thurl Brown both 
Stockbridge '29 have enrolled in the 
four year course this fall. 

Holland W. Smith. Stockbridge '27. 
has joined the M.A.C. class of ".^2. 



INDEX BOARD HAS PLANS 
(Continued from i'afte 1) 

business manager, assisted by Ralph I". 
Nickerstm and Davis H. Klliot. 

Pictures of the members of the junior 
class will be taken next Monday, Tues- 
day and Wednesday at Kinsman's studio. 
It will be abs(jlutely necessary that each 
l)erson i)ay $l.M at the time of his first 
sitting. In order to avoid confusion and 
diituulties it is necess;iry that each one 
be at the studio at the time s|)ecified. 
I 'lease abide by the schedule because it 
saves trouble for you as well as for the 
photographer. If anyone finds that he 
(annot keep his api)ointment notify K. 
W. Hunt ';}0, at the l\ap|)a Sigma house 
that another arrangement will have to be 
made. For those who wish to patronize 
the HotTman studio in Northampton 
special arrangements will have to be 
made. See the photographic editor for 
inft)rmation before the time of appoint- 
ment at Kinsman's studio. The schedule 
for individual pictures is printed behjw . 
I'leasc keep your appointment! 



Monday, Otiober I.S 



Allen M .\ 
.Mli'ii K C 

.\II1C.S 
.\ll(llfW 

AiiiistroiiK 

U;il>-iiii 

ISrdfoMi 

KciKiil 

Hiriuird 

Killiims 

KUhnp 

Komi 

Itiittomly 

liiiibaiik 

Hiiins 

( ;.ll 



a. iii.'.t.U«J 
.10 
.20 
.30 
.40 
.50 
10.00 
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.40 

11, (M) 

.10 

.20 

tJO 

.40 



(aiiiplx'll 

( Icvt'land 

took 

( 'oven 

fox .\ \V 

(ox C B 

I>an 

Ui-nton 

Drew 

IClUrt 

Klliot 

I''iame 

t;<K>.i.il 11 A 

(;(K>iitii 11 1; 

(;iiiiii 

11.1II 



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p. m. l.(M) 

.III 

.20 

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.40 

2.00 
.10 
.20 
.:w) 

.40 
.50 

111 
.20 



Tuesday, October 16 



— JACKSON & CUTLER — 

DI.AI KK.S IN 

DRY AND FANCY (iOODS READY TO WEAR 

AMHERST, MASS. 



THESE CHILLY IVIORNINQS 

mean somethini* a little warmer than you have been 
wearing. .\ wool ski coat, a leather jacket of suede or 
horsehide or a ftood heavy all wool sweater will answer 
the question. Priced from S5 to S15. 

Pleanty of gloves for riding. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

P. S. The best line of topcoats in town. 



II.iiiiiiioikI 
II mis 
Ihiycs 
lli'rnatl 
ll<'tliriinttli>n 
Mow.ird J H 
Ilowar.l L A 
Howard M S 
lliiiil 
Jiiwn 

Jcllli'3 

.lov 

Kni'i4anil 

l.aharm- 

Uiwlur 

I, > lids 

M.idden 



a. 111. 0.00 
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MaKiuisou 

Mann 

Marrii-i 

Mazzolini 

Met hf.-'iu-y 

Ml- Isaac 

Muriiliy 

Niikerson 

Ninis 

I'atjiiaro 

Paksarian 

I'liiiiiK y 1* T 

IMiinn.y \V R 

i'illsbury 

I'ottala 

I'ray 



.71 
p. ni. 1 (HI 



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.20 

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2 (HI 

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.2(1 
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. Ill 
.2(1 



Wednesday, Octolwr 17 



I'mdy 

I'yU- 

Kil.-y 

Kiiliiit-on 

Kmliiuiii 

Kiitan 

Ninurni 

S-iliTiiuisl 

SiiiuU-ton 

Miiiili 1< !•' 
Siiiitli \V ('. 
SiKMinor 
St.uy 
Stanford 



a. iii.S>.(H» 
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.10 
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.30 
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..VI 
(HI 
.10 
.20 



11 



Siani^ii'wski 

Siitliir 

Sullivan 

.Swill 

Tafl J A 

Taft K S 

Tank 

Tonifohrdc 

True 

N'aiiuliiin 

W.idlriKli 

Wai-iliter 

Wliiic K T 

White H J 

2u«ir 



30 

.1(1 
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p. in. 1 (HI 
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.20 

.:•.() 

.40 
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2.(10 
.10 
.20 
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AGGIES DEFEAT IIE.WY 

(Continued from Fufte 1) 
and "Lou" Howard's end runs deserve 
favorable comment. Kvery man worked 
in perfect co-ordination and played a 
faultless name. For the losers Secor 
starred at halfback, while Captain .Nelson 
was outstandin); in the visitors' line. 

In the o|)neinK period Hates kicked <jfT 

to M..A.C. Kimball received the kick and 

ran back five yards before beinjj stopped. 

Then, the home team started a march 

down the field to the Hates twenty-five 

yard line where it was held for downs by 

the strenjjthened defense of the heavy 

visiting team. .After the local j^ridsters 

lost the ball on downs Secor, the Bates 

halfback, made a ijain of twenty-five 

yards <jn the first |)lay and carrieil the 

ball to midlield. On the next |)lay Mann 

brcjke through the line and nailed Maher 

for a five-yard loss. A pass K^'ve the 

Hates team a first down, but a five-Nard 

penalty forced the .Maine team to i)unt 

to Howard on the home team's ten-yard 

mark. The local aKUregatioii was not able 

to nain consistently so Howie punted to 

midfield as the quarter ended. 

Hates gained seven yards on the first 
two plays in the sc-cond finarter, but 
Howard stop|)ed the visiting backfield on 
the next attinipt with a five-yard loss. 
An incomplete pass followed, and .M..\.('. 
was again in jK^ssession of the ball. .An 
exchange of punts was next in order, with 
neither team being able to gain the upper 
hand. A fumble and a recovery by a 
visiting player put the ball in a tlire.iten 
ing iM»sition on the .Massachusetts twent>- 
five yard line. The local defense streng- 
thened and Kimball intercepted a pass on 
his own ten-yard marker. .After a futile 
attemjit to i.irry the ball out of the 
danger zone, Bowie punted to his own 
fort\->ard line w lure B.ites was hehl lor 
downs as the half ended. 

After a brief jwriod of rest the Aggie 
team came back onto the field full of 
fight and determination to win. Htnvard 
kicked (j»T to the Hates left halfback who 
ran the ball back to his ten-yard line. .A 
strong defense stot»ped the visitors from 
gainin,, ^,i.i the> were forced to kick. 
Having possession of the ball, the M.issa- 
chusetts club started a powerful drive 
down the field that was finally sloj)ped on 
the Hates twenty-eight yard line. Howard 
maile several short gains, and on the 
next play a pass from Bowie to Howard 
placed the ball on the Hates for«y-five 
vard mark. Line bin ks by Kllert .md 



Howard, together with a forward from 
Magnuson to .McKittrick, gained thir- 
teen yards and a first down. Here the 
opptjnents were successful in stopping the 
drive and Howie was forced to punt. U 
was a well-placed kick, the ball going to 
the sideline on the Bates sixteen yanl 
mark. The Lewiston team was not able 
to penetrate the home club's defense, aiicj 
they kicked to Howard in mitlfield. 
Kllert carried the ball for a five-yard gain 
two times in succession for a first down. 
McKittrick threw a pass to the star hall- 
back for a thirty-two yard gain and 
placed the home aggregation within eight 
yards of the goal. Nitkiewicz gained oiie 
yard and a penalty of five yards put the 
ball two yards from the last white line. 
Nitkiewicz again hit the center of tlie 
line and the team was within six inches 
of a touchdown. On the next pl.u 
Magnuson, the he.i\y line plun^ir, 
crashed through left tackle for the only 
score of the game. He tailed to kick the 
goal, and the score remained •> to ,is 
the \\ histle blew. 

In the last period Hates started ;iri 
unsuccessful aerial attack which nettt I 
no gain against the sturdy Mctietxii 
team. The Maine club carried the batik 
into its opponents' territory, but Howie\ 
excellent punting together with a stroll^; 
line cjf defense .stopped the visitors in 
their final attempt to e\en the score. 
B.ites punted to the Massachusetts tin- 
y.ird line, and a fi\e-yard penalty found 
the victors with their backs to the w.ill 
Nitkiewicz went through center fur 
thirteen yards. Bowie then kicked Im 
midfield, but a fumble put the ball in 
Bates possession on its own ihirty-tivi 
yard line. A forward netted eighteen 
yards, but here the visitors were held for 
downs. With the ball «mi the forty-yard 
mark Nitkiewicz made three yanls 
through right tackle as the game ended, 
giving the Maroon and White a well 
earned victory that will not be forgotten 
this season. The lineup: 



Monday. October 22 

.\i\MM)d Miss a.m. :5(l MacCaiisland 



EVERYTHING IN 

HARDWARE 



AND 



Radio Equipment 



Bertturfn 

Hmwn 

MuikliT 

( oinelius 

ll.ivis 

ll.-.ker 

1 liiiiiy 

IJonovan 

r>.uinii>nrl 

Cniiiwaldl 

lIaulwnrins<T 

Ilim liry 

l.oiid 



.40 

.r>o 

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.30 
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11. (H) 
. 10 
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Manwell 

Maylott 

.McKay 

Morse 

Pollin 

Sandstrnni 

StilfS 

Stone 

Tliatclur 

Williams 

Wood 

Wood in 



p. ni 



.">il 

1 (10 
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.:{ii 

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.:a) 

2 (HI 

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I'll 

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40 

. .VI 



Massi. Aiiilie 
Bowii-, If 
Minksti-in. It 
Kidton. Ik 
Mann. Mills, c 
Kracklc-y, True, rg 
W.ilkd<-n. Little, rt 
Cox. re 

Howard. Kllert. <ilj 
riuiiK-r. Ilii ks, llil> 
kinihall, MeKiltriik, rhb 
Nitkiewicz, Mannuson, fb 

S«ore — Mass. Aruics (j, Uatc-i 0. Touchdown 
MaKniison. Referee — ('ari>enter. rnipirc 

U li.d.n. l.imsiii.tn-rarri'U. TiiiiL— 4 rjm.'i u.iit': 



Rutes 

re. Kt-nnison, JcwU 

rt. Ant h' my 

fK. .Appleby, Li/zotic 

c, Chavmu 

Ik. Sntdl. Ericton 

It, NcUin 

le, Pealiix!;. 

nb, ("arn:r 

rhb. S-cor. Kuk- :■ 

Ihb. .M.a.T 

fb. Spon.^:! 



ATWATER-KENT AND MAJESTIC RADIO 



FRESHMAN ELEVEN TOPS 
(Continued from PaRe I) 
mary of the Northampton game: 

Frestimen Northampton 

Roach. ll.ile. ODonnell. le_ re Klliot 

Whitlen. Foskctt. It rt,'_N(>v,ik()\v-ki, .\. Yoiinn 
Burrinston. 1g ^K' ^'i":* 

Thomas, c i'- B""*' 

.\ W.Sniith. S.ib. Ubl«'y. rn Ik. Kyan. Bucknian 
l<i,(>. rt It. Donahue. Bliss 

Wilson, re U-. S(. John. J. VounK. Iloilnf 

( heney, .\1 Smith, (ib Qh. Farrell 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



rhb. J. VounR, Noble 
Ihb. Barnes 
fb, FoKK 
Northampton 7. Touch- 
Barnes. Point by Koal 
.ilt.r touchdown— DiKRs. Point awarded to 
North. impton when Freshmen were offside on the 
try for jxiint. Referee— Miller. lmpirc--Bowie. 
Linesman— h>sworth. Time— two 8 and two Id 
minute periods. 



Sylvester. Foley, Ihb 
Welsh. Tikofski. rhb 
DiKtfs. tb 

Store — Freshman Ki 
downs — DisRS, Welsh. 



13S 




Slie for Siie anv 

Chilton Pen holds 

Twice the Ink 



Average caraclry of 
5 well-know n r< ni 
($7 si:e). 3S dr. r» 
— Chilton Pen ($7 
•ize), SI drops. 

CeriifieJ hu 

Rigelnii', Kent 

& Wiltatd. 

Conttttling En- 

glnmn, Botlon 



No bigger .... but better 
and 



thePJnk. 



FASCINATINGLY simple, the 
way it's done! Only one moving 
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No levers, buttons, springs or press- 
er-har'-- . . . nothing to get »>iit 
nf orifer , . . n«>thin<,; inside the 
pen-barrel but an over-size ink-sac 
and Titicc the Ink. 

Remember that when your old pen 
runs \.\r\\ Pen counters are showing 
them now . . . standard styles, new 
leather-c»>vered pens and pencils and 
gift-sets $}.50 to SiO. 

CHILTON PEN COMPANY 

287 Columbtis Ave., Boston, Mass. 

CfiiCton 



REG. U.S. MX orr. 



<<«!'■* 



Pen 



CARRIED IN STOCK BY 

NEW COLLEGE STORE 



{g||^ iMaBgari|«B^tlB fflolbgtatt 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS.. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1928 



Number 4 



Scholarships And 

Total Over $290,000 

Small Sum, However, .\s Compared To Many 
State Colleges 



That M.A.C. is a college where philan- 
thropic persons of means may bestow 
gifts for worthy purposes or as memorials 
is a fact of which relatively few |)eople 
are aware. While the College has not 
been lavished with gifts conn)aral)le to 
those received by many other State col- 
k■^;es, she has received from her alumni 
and friends many bequests which, in the 
aggregate represent contributions from 
private sources of more than $21H),(KK). 

The beautiful .Memorial Mall, which 
cost fl50,00() and Alumni Field costing 
$J(),(XK) are outstanding gifts, both being 
the contributions of alumni and a few 
friends. 

Gifts for Scholarships and Loans 

Several trust funds have been estab- 
lished by private bequests for the pur- 
(Mise of making possible scholarships antl 
loans to worthy students. These mem- 
orials to public-spirited citizens interested 
in the cause of education are briefly de- 
scribed below: 

4-// Club Loan Fund for Girls— $U)(). 
The first contribution to this fund is 
from Mrs. J. J. Storrow of Hoston, Mass., 
and is for use as a loan fund for girls 
desiring a general education at M.A.C. 

.\fiissachuselts Af^riculturat Collide Fund 
- %'iM. This fund was given by the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College Club 
for use as a scholarship loan fund to help 
deser\ing students, who intended seri- 
ously to go into agriculture, interest on 
loans not to be charged until after gradu- 
ation. 

l^^ll Club Loan Fund for Boys—imH). 
(.iven by the Massachusetts Society for 
the Promotion of Agriculture to be used 
as a loan to help worthy Ijoys, espjecially 
those formerly members of 4-H clubs, to 
obtain a general education at M.A.C. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



WORLD AGGIE NIGHT TO 
COME OCTOBER 20th 

Tenth Anniversary of the Kstahlish- 

mcnt of This Ciisioni Which lias 

Spread Rapidly Throughout 

the World 



Outing Club Membership 
Campaign Underway 

(;iub Representatives to Enroll Mem- 
bers in Various Fraternity Houses 



Exp. Station Is 
Subject Of Talk 



Director F. J. Sievers Informs Stu- 
dent Body of Purposes and Work 
of Experiment Station 



Since the M.A.C. Outing Club is con- 
ducting a meml)ership drive this week, a 
few words about the Club are appropriate 
at this time. The Outing Club was 
organized for the pur|)ose of promoting 
interest in hiking, camping, mountain 
clind)ing, skiing, snow-shoeing, hunting, 
fishing, skating, and all other out-d<X)r 
activities. The center of activity is the 
Mt. Toby Reservation, a tract of 7.'').') 
acres of wild wootllanti owned by the 
College. The activities, however, are not 
confined to Mt. Toby but include such 
places as Orient Springs. Mt. Sugarloaf, 
Rattlesnake (iutter, Molyoke Range, Mt. 
Lincoln, and the Pelham Hills. Hikes to 
these places, the Cabin, winter trails, 
the winter carnival, classes of instruction, 
skiing and Snow-shoeing, ma|»le sugar 
parties, possibly organized overnight 
hikes all are asjiects of the work of the 
Outing Club. 

Thurs<lay, October 2'>, is to be the 
date of the next meeting. At that time 
all members will receive an arm band to 
be worn as an insignia of membership. 
The procedure then is as follows: each 
person enrolled as a member shall pay 
(Continued on Piige i) 

CHANGE MADE IN 
SOCIAL UNION PROGRAM 



First Concert by Boston Women's 
Symphony Orchestra, October 28 



.Munini in cities and towns throughout 
the I'niled States and other countries 
are busy |)reparing for World .Aggie 
.Night, which is scheduleil this year for 
S.itur(lay, October "JO. This year's cele 
hratioii is the tenth event of its kinti to 
he held, and accortling to the manner in 
which preparations are being completed, 
promises to be the greatest success of any 
thus far conducte<l. 

These dinners and reunions started in 
l'.)l'.» and have been held annually ever 
since. Each year has seen the additi<jn 
of new groups throughout this country, 
and also in Kurope .md other lands many 
miles away. .At these gatherings alunmi 
are able to get back, at least in retro- 
S|R'ction. to .Aggie, and t(» live over the 
good times they once had here. They 
alsfj afford chances to renew old friend- 
ships and to begin new ones. 

To these meetings not only alumni, 
but friends and relatives of alumni come. 
Lveryone who comes is assured of an 
evening of go<j<l cheer and fellowship. 
.Aggie spirit, and all that Aggie spirit 
typifies an<l ever has typified, |)ervades 
these groups, and as a result they have 
become more popular year by \e.ir. 

The following meetings have already 
been definitely scheduled, and the names 
and adiiresses of the various tlistrict 
chairmen or secretaries are given in 
order that alumni may communicate at 
once with those in charge of arrangements, 
making known their intentions to Im; there. 
(Continued on Puge i) 

Promising Outlook For 

Girls' Glee Club 

Forty Girls Make Places in the C:iub 

Which Anticipates a Successful 

Season 



M.A.C. Defeats Middlebury 

7-0 In Interesting Battle 

Third Quarter .\ttack Too Much For Middlebury Team. Kllert 
Catches Pass .\iul Fights Way To (ioal. 



Talking on the Experiment .Station, 
Director Frederick J. Sievers, of M.A.C, 
showed the students last Thursday, the 
importance of that function of the College. 
He started with a brief resume of the 
history of the Station, telling of the 
beginning, through legislation and appro- 
priation of the government. Several 
times the appropriations have been in- 
creased, as the field has widened. 

The fundamental idea of the Experi- 
ment .Station, says Mr. Sievers, is just 
as the name implies, experimentation in 
all branches of knowledge, for finding 
true facts, instead of using guesswork. 
Formerly the students were given all 
sorts of gross inaccuracies in the class- 
room, but now, thanks to the Experi- 
ment Stations, the correct statements are 
taught. 

On this campus the experimental work 
is done in agriculture and related sub- 
jects, the Station continually making 
tests on all branches of that field. Direc- 
tor Sievers illustrated this by several ex- 
amples, among which were the develop- 
"lent of insecticides, experimenting on 
the effect of different kinds for different 
speries of pests; and the application of 
fertilizers to the soil, the Station making 
extensive investigation into the nature of 
the fertilizer needed for barren Soil. 



OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE 
OF THE PAST WEEK 



Hy winning a 7 to victory over 
the Middlebury College eleven, and 
">' holding its opponents scoreless in 
the past two games, the Massachu- 
setts football team gained its second 
consecutive shut-out triumph last 
Saturday— a feat that has not been 
'^"plicated for many years. 



-Social Union entertainments this year 
will open with a concert of the Boston 
Women's Symphony Orchestra on Sunday 
afternfK)n, October 2S. This is a change 
from the date originally scheduled and is 
made necessary by a change in the 
orchestra's itinerary. The orchestra is 
one of fifty pieces conducted by the 
famous Ethel Leginska. 

There are also, in the program for this 
year, many other features which should 
prove very interesting. The schedule 
follows: 
Oct. 28— Boston Women's Symphony 

Orchestra, Ethel Leginska, Conductor. 
Dec. 7— Cornelia Otis Skinner, Character 

Sketches. 
Jan. 4 — Gilbert McClurg, illustrated lec- 
ture, "Fly With Me Above Pike's 

Peak." 
Jan. 11 — Aggie Revue. 
Jan. 25 — Edwin Whitney, reader. 
Feb. 1 — Polly and Her Pal orchestra, 

concert and dance. 
Feb. 15 — M.A.C. Musical Clubs. 
.March 1 — Commander Fitzhugh Green. 
March 8 — Terhune Light Opera Co. 



New Club To Be Formed 
In Near Future On Campus 

International Relations Club Hopes 

to Hare Organization of 

Fifty Members 



Over forty co-cds, the largest number 
to be taken on in recent years, have bet-n 
enrolled in the dirls' (llee Club. This 
list includes a large nuniber of freshmen 
and olT-campus girls which means that 
the Club will not want for goo<l material 
for the next few years. 

One rehears;d a week for the entire 
Club with additional rehearsals for the 
separate parts is the pl.in adopted this 
year. It is felt that by much fewer and 
more intensive rehearsals greater results 
can be obtained. 

Excellent new songs have been chosen 
for three part chorus work by (Juila G. 
Hawley '29, and Mrs. A. B. Beaumont, 
the coach. Miss Hawley was leader of 
the Club last year and has been re-elected 
to that position. There are several good 
Continued on Page 3) 



Norwich Presents Real 
Problem In Coming Game 

Norwich Kleven lias (Jotul Record, 

But Aflfties Have Delorminution 

to keep in Winning Column 

This week-end the Maroon and White 
gridsters will journey to \<>rthfield, \'l.. 
where they will meet the tormid.ible 
.Norwich University f<K)tball team. The 
contest sliouUl be ,t close, hard-fi)ugh( 
battle between two strong sm.ill college 
elevens which are desirous of seeking 
heights in the football worhl. As in past 
years Norwich is represented this season 
by a strong gri<l team, winning from 
Colby 1«> to 0, tying Proviilence t> to «», 
and losing to the unbeaten Dartminith 
team .{It to (■). The .Massitchusetts warriors 
have fared better, winning from Bates 
ti to and from Middlebury 7 to 0, but 
losing to liowdoin I.J to in the first 
game of the season. Thus far "Chick" 
McGe<Hh's followers have s<-ore(l thir- 
teen points against their oppcment's 
thirteen, while Norwich has gained a 
total of thirty-one against fifty-four for 
its opponents. 

Among the men who will be .s«en in 
action for the horsemen are ilourin, star 
left tackle; C^ane, right end, and Kane, 
a fast ba( ktield man. The team is he.ivier 
than the Mas.sitchusetts aggregation, but 
the invaders' lack of weight will be otfsi-l 
by a fighting spirit that will furnish any 
opiHinent with much trouble. It is 
probable I hat few changes will be- m.icle 
ill the line-up of the Bay State college 
team. As demonstrated in last week's 
encounter, the line is able to strengthen 
on the defense in a crisis, while Howard 
and Ellert have proved very valuable men 
on the offense. An evenly matched battle 
is anticipated, and it should be a game 
that is worthy of a large group of visiting 
8|)ectators. 

WILLISTON RUNS WILD 
WITH JUNIOR VARSITY 

Speedy Academy Team Outplays 

Opponents and Runs Up A 

33-0 Score 



Coach "(hick" McCh-ocIi's \.irsity 
foolb.ill te.im continued to keep in the 
winning colunm by overcoming the 
.Middlebury College eleven last S.iturd.iy 
.illernoon on .Alumni Field by the score 
of 7 to ((. In spite of the threatening 
weather a fairly large crowd witnes.sed 
the .Vlass.uhusetts victory which was a 
nip and tuck b.ittle from beginning to 
end. As in the previous victory over 
Mates, the Bay Staters storetl their lone 
touchdown in the third cpiarter. Up to 
that time the two teams were evenly 
m.itched with neither club able to atlvance 
the ball consistently. Again "Freddie" 
l.llert i)layed an im|Kirtant part in the 
viclcjry, this time scoring after he carried 
.1 p.iss from Cox for twenty y.irds and a 
touchdown. Captain "Bob" Bowie's 
playing was another big factor in the 
g.ime. Several times his high long punts, 
one of which traveled fifty-five yards, 
got the home team out of |M)ssible danger. 
"Lou" Howard shared gaining honors 
with lillert by making one gain of twenty 
yards and sever.d shorter runs. "Tim" 
Minkstein was the outstanding defense 
man in the line, stopping the- op|M>sing 
backs time after time without g.iin. 
r.uarnaccia was the leading back in the 
visiting lu.kficld. His broken field 
running was sjk-c t.nular; and the ease 
with which he ev.ided tacklers gave the 
home- tc-am some trouble, (iruggel played 
well on the defense, being an im|M)rt.int 
• log in the forward visitc»rs' line. 

Middlebury o|)ened the game by kick 
ing off to .\la.ss.ic hu.sc-tts, and Hicks ran 
the ball bac k fifteen y.irds before he was 
tackled. Howard made three yards off 
left tackle. Hicks gained two more and 
Bowie punted to midfield. The Wrnionters 
were not able to gain so they kicked to the 
Massachusetts twenty yard line. An ex- 
change of punts followed with the Middle- 
bury kicker having a slight advantage. 
Toward the end of the quarter, with 
(ContinumI on Page 4) 



t 






The first meeting of the International 
Relations Club, which is being sponsored 
by Mr. J. Paul Williams, Interchurch 
Student Secretary, and Constantine P. 
Ladas '28, will be held on Thursday, 
October 18, in the M.A.C. C.A. Room in 
North College. To this meeting a selected 
group of students from the four classes 
will be invited and it is hoped that these 
students will form the nucleus around 
which an active club of around fifty 
members can be built. 

The club is helped materially by the 

Carnegie Endowment for World Peace, 

which sends books and periodicals once 

every fifteen days, to the various organ i- 

(Coatlouad on Pa«« 2) 



FRIDAY NIGHT DANCE 

Arrangements are being completed for 
the second Friday Night Dance of the 
year, and the Informal Committee headed 
by William B. Robertson '29 promises 
that it will be as successful an event as 
the first one. A large crowd is expected 
to dance to the usual good music since 
the football team is playing too far away 
to draw many students from the campus 
this week-end, especially after last week's 
vacation of three full days for many 
students. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



" Humility is a virtue all preach, none prac- 
tice, and yet everybody is content to hear." 
—Selden (TaUt Talk) 



Williston Academy scored a .'1.3 to 
victcjry over the .Massachusi-tts junior 
varsity football team last Friday after- 
noon at Easthampton. The game was 
rather one-sided with the speedy Williston 
backs, supported by a heavy line, making 
long gains throughout the encounter. 
Kliot did some very gwxl work in the 
line for the losers until he was forced out 
of the game in the second perirnl with a 
severe shoulder injury, while (i<KKlrich 
and Salenius were outstanding in the 
backfield. (iaudette featured the game 
by running back a punt seventy yards in 
the second quarter. Heller, the academy 
(Contlnuod on Pag* 4) 



WedncMlay 

6..'J0 p.m. Mu»ic 75 meetlnf. 
Thursday 
'.iAH p. m. Asaembly. Spealter. John Mills, 
Bell Telephone Company. 
Saturdity 
Varsity Football: Norwich at Northfield. 
Freshman F(x>tball: Ac]ams at Adams. 
Vartity Cross Country: St. Stephen's anci 

Springfield at Annandale, N. V. 
12..'W) p m. Outing Cluh Hike to Mt. 

Sugarloaf. Mert at East Experiment Sta. 
1.00 p.m. Stockbridge Football: Vermont 
Academy, here. 



Harriers Lag In Opening 

Race With Amherst 

Captain Herman Ineligible for Open- 
ing Meet, While Others are Out 
on Account of Injuries 

In a varsity cross country squad race 
last Friday afternoon, Amherst College 
defeated .M.A.C. lib to 20 on the Amherst 
course. Captain Snyder of the Purple 
combination led the field for the four- 
mile run, and he was followed by Morris, 
Cobb, and Clarke of Amherst. F'or 
.M.A.C, Snell and McGuckian were tied 
for fourth, and Hernan, Carpenter, and 
Pease came after them in the order 
named, while White and Tourtellot 
came in eleventh and thirteenth, re- 
spectively. These seven men will con- 
stitute the team for the first meet, at 
Annandale on October 20. 

(Coatliiuod OB Pag« A) 



INTERCLA.SS TRACK MKET 

On Tuesd.iy and Wednesday, Oc toln-r 
2:i and 24, there will Ih- held a fall inter- 
class track meet. ConqM-tition in this 
meet will l<e restricted to candidates for 
the varsity and freshman tra'k teams 
who are ap|»earing regularly on the 
attendance lKX>ks for track, and members 
of the two il.i».^-s of the Stockbriclge 
SchfKjI. Thus, there will be six teams in 
the meet. Practically all the New Eng- 
land Interc-ollegiate Athletic AswHriation 
events will be held. Five place will 
count for points and ribbons and numerals 
will be given to winners. 

Freshmen Hold 
Greenfield O-O 



Uneventful Game Played at Green- 
field with Neither Team Showing 
Any Unusual Football 

Greenfield High and the M.A.C. fresh- 
man frxjtball elevens battled to a score- 
less tie in an uneventful game last Friday 
afternfx>n at (.reenfield. The frosh were 
strong defensively, breaking through re- 
(x^atedly to thr.iw the (irecnfield backs 
for a loss, and allowing few first downs 
to be made. In the final peri(xl, when 
the visitors were on the (ireenfield four- 
teen-yard line, a costly fumble enabled 
(ireenfield to recover and bring the ball 
out of danger. F"oley and Sylvester in 
the backfield, and Gagliarducct in the 
line starred for the yearlings. 

(Continued on Paga 4) 



OPPONENTS' SCORES 

Canisius 6, Sprinifield 0. 
Williams 20. Bowdotn 6. 
Haverford 2.'}, Amhent 1.3. 
Tufts 1.3, Batfs 0. 
Norunch 19, Colby 9. 



THi: MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1928 



THE MASSACIll SETTS COLLECHAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, I«)28 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Ofiuial newsi«i)tr of the Massiuhiisetts 
Agri.ultural ColliKv-. riiblishcd ivory 
Wednesday by tlie studints. 



BOARD OF EDITOKS 



Smsplbv Ct.BAVES '29 
Edward H.NicHOLi '20 



K(litor-in-( liief 
Munauing Kditor 



DEPARTMENT EDITOKS 

Editorial Shepi-EV Ci-eavks "29 

Feature Marcaket I'. Donovan '30 

Alumni & Short Coursea Sally E. Bradley '31 

Athletic LtwisM.LYNDs'30 

Frank T, Douglass '31 

Campus John B. Howard Jr. '30 

Cecil H. Wadlkigh '30 

Rial S. Potter Jr. '31 



BUSINESS DICI'ARTMENT 

ruOBRICK D. Thaybr. Jr. '29 liiisiness Manager 
• • •• •• " Advertising Manager 

Lawrence A. Caerittm *2fl Circulation Manager 

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WiNTHBop G. Smith '30 
John R. Tank '30 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Singh- 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In rase of change of address, subscriber 
will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 



Entered a« Berond-class matter at tlif Andierst 
Post Oflice. Accepteil lor mailing at siiccial rate 
of postage provided for in section 1103. Act ol Oc- 
tober, 1917. authorized August '.20, 191H. 



INTRODUCING TENNIS 

Of all the rumors that have been 
current this fall, the latest one is in 
reference to a tennis tournament that 
will be run as an interdass champion- 
ship affair. This tournament will be 
staged if enough interest ran be aroused 
in the student body, and the Ccllcjiuin 
believes it worth while enough to set 
forth a few reasons why it deserves 
support. 

Every fall, the athletic interests of the 
College are centered around football 
which eclipses cross-country in its domi- 
nation. Both these s|)orts require a type 
of stamina that requires solid weeks of 
training, but neither sport is one at which 
a person can play all the time. This con- 
centration on sports that tend to inhibit 
a large number of students from partici- 
pating is not desirable, f<ir we kn()w that 
the active part one plays in a sjmrt 
means everything when one measures the 
enjoyment and physical benefit he re- 
ceives. There is a real need f<)r some 
interclass sport that will offer a chan<e 
to a large number of students for actual 
coiniietition. 

Perhaps one wontlers why we are 
taking the time to discuss a tennis 
tourn.iment when a track tournament 
has already been plannetl. In the first 
place, the latter has restrictions as to 
entries, and in the second place, tennis 
as a sjKjrt promises to become an integral 
part of the athletics of M.A.C., for 
courts are to be erected within the next 
few years. The make-up of a good tennis 
team cannot be decided in a short time, 
and interest in the sport will help ma- 
terially toward building such an organi- 
zation when we have the facilities. Track 
is already established and needs no word 
of encouragement at present. 

Another attractive feature of tennis as 
a sport is the fact that it can be played 
when one is through college. It is a form 
of competition which does not require 
teams, but can be enjoyed by as few as 
two people. Organized teams that com- 
pete in intercollegiate athletics may have 
a lasting effect in the perfection of a 
man's physique, but the actual partici- 
pation ceases in nineteen cases out of 
twenty when the athlete leaves college. 
It is because of this fact that tennis and 
golf ha\e become so popular with older 
men and women. We can readily judge 
the nationwide interest in the former 
from a casual inspection of the number 
of courts we may see, both municipal 
and private. 

Winter is not far distant, but there is 
still time to stage this tournament. We 
hope that those students who have insti- 
gated the movement will find a ready 
response among the undergraduates, and 
that the affair may be made an annual 

event . 

STUDENT OPINION 
Student opinion is usually a most im- 
jKjrtant factor on every college campus. 
Its evidence can be seen in student 
government transactions, in inter-fra- 
ternity relations, in the attitude that is 
taken toward the administration, and in 
hundreds of other ways. Those who 
control it are regarded as the whip 
holders of the institution in which the 
student opinion is guided. Their power 



(an be dirceted toward improveiiient of 
conditions or towanl degradation of 
ideals, and the possibilities of coping 
with the latter situation are difficult. 

Those obsc-rvations which we have 
recorded are merely generalities because 
the intensity of student opinion varies 
detidedly. Naturally, we are interested 
l)rimarily in our own campus, and we 
shall try to direct our discussion to Icx-al 
application. 

I'erhai)s the most effective way of 
presenting undergraduate sentiment is 
through these columns. It has always 
been the duty of the editor to select 
topics that jwrtained to our institution 
and to treat them impersf)nally insofar as 
his ability allowed him. To complement 
this column, the Collegian has maintained 
a certain space in the sheet for com- 
munications, but for the past few years 
this has not been used satisfactorily. 

In other words, the students have had 
a tendency to let the editors of the 
(W/«'/jMH express views on student matters 
that to the minds of the latter are worthy 
of discussion. Too much flattery has 
been heaped upon these editorials through 
the lack of difference in opinion among 
the undergraduates, and the result is 
that the College jiaper is registering the 
ideas of one side of every question, that 
stutlent opinion is falling into a lethargy 
to which the Colleen is asked to cater. 
Paradoxically, although indications 
point to this lethargy, it is obvious that 
there is no such state of mind prevalent 
throughout the student body. We know 
that there is contradictory sentiment re- 
garding second term rushing, library 
hours, chapel, afternoon assemblies, the 
cutting system, the Honor system, and 
any number of subjects. 

One can easily see that this is the 
annual reminder that communications 
are acceptable by the Collegian, but we 
have tried to put it forcefully by pointing 
out the great disiidvantage that a lack 
of ccmtributing ideas has on the student 
who does not think, namely, that his 
mind is full t)f (me-sided arguments. Your 
editor earnestly requests anyone who 
desires to say something to jot his ideas 
and send them in to the office. It is not 
laziness that inspires this request, but 
rather a desire that the Colleguin may 
more etfectively serve as a transmitter of 
student sentiment. 




STOCKBRIDGE 



COMMUNICATION 



CompusDoNls 



RECEPTION TO FACULTY 

Last Friday evening, the annual Presi- 
dent's Reception was helil in the Memorial 
Building. It was the first social event of 
the year for the faculty and nearly every 
member was present. Mrs. Alexander A. 
M.icKimmie was in charge of arrange- 
ments and she succeeded in i)roviding a 
very delightful evening for all who 
attended. Tbos who were in the receiving 
line includetl President and Mrs. Koscoe 
W. Thatcher and the following new- 
comers to the faculty during the past 
year: Director and Mrs. Fred J. Sievers, 

Miss Rena I.. Barton, Mr. Joseph S. 

Butts, Mr. Charles R. McC.eoch, Mr. 

and Mrs. Clarence 11. Parsons, Mr. and 

Mrs. Donahl E. Ross, Mr. and Mrs. 

David Rozman, and Mr. and Mrs. J. 

Paul Williams. 

Refreshments in the form of ice cream 

and cake were served. 



Prexy Says; 

This week, on "World Aggie Night", 
more than :i(KK) alunmi will be thinking 
of things which happened on this campus 
in years gone by. What memories are 
you who are now here storing away for 
enjoyment in future years? 

CO 

Intercollegiate 

The university man, acknowledged 
oracle in the world of men's wear, has 
returned to sanity in dress according to 
surveys of three witlely separated edu- 
cational institutions. 

The investigators agreed that the 
college man realizes that he is a poten- 
tial wage-earner and that he is judged by 
his habits in clothes as well as in his 
other practices. He considers he is not 
attractive to his colleagues, the co-eds, or 
to his future employer in his silly-looking 
clothes. 

This looks like the death-knoll for 
plus-fours and up. 

CD 

At Trinity College in Hartford, the 
college paper issues rushing information 
to freshmen and gives them sound and 
unprejutliced advice concerning the choice 
of a fraternity. 

CD 

Night football is becoming more than 
a passing fad in Dixie. William and 
Mary of \'irginia played several games 
last season at night and found the ex- 
fK-rience so successful that the practice 
will be continued. 

Perhaps such conditions will be con- 
ducive to the appearance of more stars. 

CD 

More football gossip! Marion Broad- 
stone, a promising candidate for a line 
|)osition on the I'niversity of Nebraska 
football team, has to wear glasses all of 
the time, but that won't keep him out of 
the game, lie has had himself fitted up 
with a special helmet, in which are built 
a pair of shatterproof glass spectacles. 

Success! - CD 

Joe Found That: 

Fannie Frosh from what she has read 
thus far has decided that Flducation is a 
subject taught in normal colleges by 
abnormal professors to subnormal stu- 
dents. CD 



Newburyport Wins First Game 

Pushing the ball across for a touchdown 
after having blocked a kick on their 
opponents' five-yard line in the third 
period, .\ewburyport High defeated the 
Stcjckbridge School football team last 
Saturday afternoon at Newburyport by 
the score of (i to 0. The defensive work 
of the visiting eleven was the feature of 
the game, only two first downs being 
made against them, although Newbury- 
port had the better of a kicking duel. 
With the regular Stockbridge center out 
with sickness, the lack of exj)erience 
among the other players of the position 
resulted in ptxjr handling of the ball on 
the offense. In consideration of the fact 
that they have been practicing only two 
weeks, the showing of the short course 
team gives promise of a strong club. Next 
Saturday N'ermont .Academy will optwse 
Coach Ball's charges at one o'clock on 
the home field. The summary of the 
Newburyport game: 



Newburyport 

Hrownc. Corey, le 
KoKK. It 
Blaki-ly. Ig 
Kimball, c 

Tufts, Pluncinski, rg 
VVhalen, rt 
Huglies, re 
Lanaiiian, (ib 
Gallagher. Ihb 
Traster. rhb 
Ogden. fb 

Score — Newburyimrt 6. Touchdown— Kimball. 
Referee — Iliggins. t'mpire — C'ronin. Linesman- 
Regan. Time — 12-niinute (luarters. 



Stockbrldfte 

re, Hirst 

rt, Oksanen 

rg, Sylvia. Greene 

c, Mann, Dibble 

Ig. Brown 

It, Curran, Greene 

le, Durkin, Hall 

qb, Graf 

rhb. Hakkinen 

Ihb. Hall. Heyuard 

fb. Chace 



Tfie Collegian aciejxs no res[x)n>ibility for opm. 
ion* voiced in "The Koruin." It aims to serve aj 
a means of giving expression to student opinion, 
and will print any views expre^tsed rationally an 1 
sanely, unless the editors feel that they are justi- 
fied in suppressing them because of unfair per- 
sonal attack. Communications must be limited to 
500 words. 

To the Editor of the Collegian: 

It has been called to my attention 
that the Collegian of October lOth reports 
me as a prize winner at the Northampton 
Three-County Fair. Never shall I object 
to publicity of a worthy sort, but this 
time I must raise my voice in protest. 
Not once in my equestrian career have I 
piloted a horse over a barrier. And yet, 
the Collegian, in its error, notes me as 
third prize winner of the College Student 
Jumping Class. It is unfair to the student 
who won honors for his college that one 
so inefficient in horsemanship should he 
given credit for the noble deed. Let the 
brilliant cowboy have his honor and 
please keep me on the ground where 1 
feel more at home. 

Yours till the political debate, 
Dennis M. Crowley 

Ed. — We are sorry that Mr. Crowley 
was so wrongly represented, but we feel 
that the error must go uncorrected in 
order that the slight touch of irony in 
our corres|)ondent's note may not In- 
directed through our columns toward any 
particular person. 



Notes 



44 



FACVLTYLOGS " 



The enrollment figure to date of the 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture: 

Seniors 105 

Freshmen 136 

Total 241 

Leonard Parkinson '29, manager of the 
S.S.A. football squad was taken with a 
sudflen attack of acute appendicitis during 
the past week and was rushed to the 
Northampton Hospital through the kind- 
ness of Professor Harold .M. tiore. The 
operation was successful and Parkinson 
is resting comfortably. 

Students in (iolf Court Management 
are making a special stutly of the South 
Hadley (iolf Course this week. 

Director Roland H. N'erbeck represented 
the S.S..A. at a Conference of New Elngland 
summer schools held at Orono, Maine, 
last Friday and Saturday. 

All Stfxkbridge freshmen have had 
tryouts in running a tractor, one of the 
required features of the course. 



By way of introduction to this column, 
let it be understood that it has for its 
primary purpose, entertainment with per- 
haps a little of educational value on the 
side. This past summer many of our 
faculty have traveled in America and in 
foreign lands and from week to week we 
hope to learn of some of their exjieriences 
at home and abroad. This week the 
series is opened by an interesting narra- 
tive by Professor Delmont T. Dunhar 
who traveled in Spain during the vaia- 
tion months. 



NOTICES 



INTERESTING ASSEMBLY 
PREDICTED 

There is promise of an interesting talk 
in Assembly this Thursday as Mr. John 
Mills of the Bell Telephone Laboratories 
will be the s()eaker. lie is director of 
publications for the company and will 
have an entertaining subject. 

Mr. Mills is interested in the personnel 
services of colleges and has spoken several 
times before the Eastern Colleges Per- 
sonnel Officers Association. This subject 
has recently berome one of prominenre 
in college circles throughout the country, 
and a chance to hear about it from one 
who has been connected with the work 
is indeed fortunate. 



NEW CLUB TO BE ORGANIZED 
(Continued from Pafte I) 

zations of this sort in the United States. 
At present there are seven such clubs in 
Massachusetts. To them there are also 
sent from time to time speakers who are 
furnished by the Carnegie E;ndow mcnt. 

The purpose of the club is to acquaint 
the students with the great domestic 
problems of the day, and to bring to their 
attention matters of world importance. 
It is hoped that speakers can be exchanged 
with Smith and Mt. Holyoke Colleges in 
the future. From this group there will 
be chosen those who are to represent the 
college at the Model League of Nations. 



A thief commits a wrong and knows it, 
but who is more blameless than the man 
telling the joke we've been hearing all 
year? The same effect as cold colfce. 

CD 

And so another walking-ticket was 
issued,- jx-rhaps this is one reason why. 

The unfortunate frosh told a story like 
this below: 
My first quiz in college appalled me, 

The first question read like this: 
"What was America's production of cotton 

In any year up to this?" 
Statistics were always my failing. 

But I count myself right on this one: 
The answer I worked was "None," 
And the year-— "fourteen ninety-one." 

CD 

Which reminds us— Columbus became 
famous by discovering something ahead 
of somebody else. So would the one who 
discovered the correct date for Mountain 
Day,— but who? 

CD 

Newspaper men may have proof by 
axiom, but why do they jeopardize their 
lives? 

Here are the facts: 

1. Aggie? Yes. 

2. In the town of Amherst? Yes. 

3. Therefore, Amherst Aggie? No! It 
just isn't. 

CD 

The sophs told the frosh to get busy on 
the bell, — and how they tolled it! 

CD 

Ncwspajjer accounts burst with tales of 
what the "Panthers" did last Saturday, 
but had to describe us with the same 
"Aggie." Hear Ye! The time has come 
for unfolding to the public your hidden 
thoughts for a mascot. 

CD 

All in. 



1 1 was noticed at last week's ftxitball 
game that although the music was good 
the band lacked a large number of 
players. Of course this was due to the 
holiday last Friday which gave many a 
chance to go home over the week-end, 
but it is ho()ed that at future home games 
the band will turn out 1(K):J. With the 
large membership that there is this year 
the band should be able to produce both 
volume and melody. 

BANDSMEN, TURN OUT lOOJ AT 
ALL HOME GAMES. M.A.C. WANTS 
YOU! 



The author of this artiilc fully realizes 
the boretlom inflicteil upon a long-suffer- 
ing public by a constant reiteration of 
one's jK-rsonal travelogues and interesting; 
(so-called) exi)eriences. In fact I mystll 
have proferred them, unsolicited, only to 
find the audience merely tolerant to the 
very end. Such a trifling detail as my 
having omitted certain necessary ex- 
planatory matter, and misquoted the 
word-play at the crisis seemed insuflicitnt 
cause that 1 should forgive my auditors 
for not registering at least a smile, es- 
pecially since they had been given the 
cue by my own uncontrolable outbur^t. 

Be that as it may, 1 have not hesitated 
to submit this article, as a fore-runner ol 
others by my colleagues, since it was 
directly requested by none other than 
the managing editor himself. I am, 
furthermore, willing that it should go to 
press under my own name, as I have 
been guaranteed that few, if anyone, will 
read it. This, 1 am assured, is a sacred 
and inviolable custom. 



The next meeting of the College orches- 
tra which constitutes the personnel of 
M'lsic 75 will be held Wednesday in the 
Auditorium at 6..'«) p. m. The entire 
orchestra is requested to be present. 



POLITICAL DEBATE 

On Thursday, October 25, at 8 p. m., 
a political debate will be held in the 
Memorial Building. It is promulgated 
by Mr. Constantine P. Ladas '28 of the 
department of sociology and will be 
concerned with the following proposition: 
Resolved, That the candidacy of Alfred 
E. Smith for President of the United 
States be supported in preference to that 
of Herbert C. Hoover. On the affirmative 
side, Dennis J. Crowley '29 and Leonard 
E. Morrison '29 will be the principals, 
while C. Shepley Cleaves '29 and Taylor 
W. Mills '29 will support the negative. 
The debate will be carried out on the 
American system which consists of four 
twelve-minute constructive arguments, a 
three minute intermission, and two five- 
minute rebuttals. In this debate the 
questions of religion or other men better 
for the position will be considered irreve- 
lant. 



"Nearly all experiences of an extra- 
ordinary nature in a foreign country are 
generally due to an inability to speak or 
understand the prevailing language. This 
was the lot of a (ierman friend of mine 
who arrived in this country three years 
ago unable to utter or comprehend a 
single word of English. In as much as 
New York is a city of unusual projKjrtions, 
in fact somewhat larger than Northamp- 
ton, he deemed it advisable to secure a 
map of the city, and for this purpose he 
entered a general store. At the counter 
he consulted his pocket-dictionary and, 
having gained the desired information, 
he asked for a map. In so doing he gave 
the "a" a broad sound native to him. The 
clerk excused himself for the moment and 
soon returned with as fine a map, as he 
himself admitted, as could be secured at 
any store in the city at a similar price- 
Such misunderstandings are, of course, 
everyday occurences under like condi- 
tions, and 1 do not deny (nor will I admit 
except under duress) that I have not 
had my full share of them. Such, how- 
ever, is not the nature of the master 
stroke of intelligence to which I p'^^*^ 
guilty during my stay in Spain this 
summer last. 

I had settled to my satisfaction aU 
negotiations in Burgos and had returne 
to Madrid for two days of recreation. The 
morning of the first day was spent visit- 
ing the various bookshops and making 
(Continued on Pafte 4) 



OOSTONIANC 

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Better look into Bostonians 
if you don't already know 
them. There's a bit of mon- 
ey you'll never regret spend- 
ing. 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 




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Amherst Shoe Repair Co. 

Master Shoe Rebuilders 
NEXT TO BOLLES SHOE STORE 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Now situated at 15 1-2 Pleasant St. 
EXCELLENT SHOE REPAIRERS 

V. r.RONDONICO, Prop. 

College Drugstore 

W. 11. McGRATIl 
Reg. Pharm. 

AMHERST, - - MASS. 



Best in Drug Store Service 
Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one fliftht) 

OculUtt' PreMTlptlona Filled. Broken lenses 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 



ASK FOR 

•MUNSINGWEAR" RAYON 

and SILK 

Bloomers— Step-ins— Vests 

Slips— Bandeau — Pajamas 

Night Robes 



SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

G. Edward Fisher 

I TYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Remington, Royal 
and Corona Sales and Service 

I "'"llo fqulrment General Repair Shop 

,,,„ H. E. DAVID 

I " Pleasant St., juit below P.O. Amherst 



Speaking of Candidates 
perhaps you re for 
Hoover, perhaps for 
Smith for president 
— but you'll he for 

BOLTER'S SHOES. 

Their platform, long 
term footwear sat- 
isfaction, gets the 
vote of every well 
dressed man. 



Carl L. Bolter Inc. 



EXETER AMHERST HYANNIS 



SING LEIE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amhsrat, Mas*. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING IK)NE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES 

NEXT TO THE TOWN MALL 



WORI l> AGGIE NKiin 
(Continued from Pai^e li 

C.ilifitrnia Los An&eles t Umiui- il (liilViii 

• M. -Jill S. San IVilio .^t.. lx)S AuKi-li-s. 
Ctinni-i-tiiui Storrs— Will iiuct uiili Knuip n 

I l.iilluul 
IK-luwure Newark— James K.. Adams 11, li.iv 
VJ.'t, Ni'wark. llniup will iiu-ot willi I'liil.i 
clel|ihia, I'a. aluiniii. 
Indiana Lafayette^ (lydt- M. I'aikaril lii. 
I-M 1.111/ Ave, W. Uifayt-Uf. Will i.iobaMy 
nitft ,11 till- lioiiif o( Mr I'ackaid. 
Iowa— Ames ~ Henry II. Richardson 'M. Mtrt- 
inn at home of Mr. Richardson, \\Ar> Wesft 
St., .Ames, at «>.:I0 p. m. (tentral time). 
MuHsachuseltH Fitrhburft Thomas Casey 01, 
-'tie t edar .S., HitchhiirK. 
Concord James W. I>ayton 'i:\, Midilles<x 
t ounty l':xt. .Seryice. Kverett St., Concord. 
.Meeiinu at Colonial Inn. loncord, at 7.;iO 
II. ni 
New Itedford Kriord W I'lnde (M), I" () »<.x 
llMt. New Bedlord Meet ins at New Bedford 
Motel .11 t\A:> p m 
Norlhamplon - Allen S. Leiand '24, 49 ilixh 
St., NutihampKm. Meetin« at Hotel North- 
unipton at 7 p m. 
Sprinftlivld lloyt I). Lucas 11, S7 C.arli. Id 
St . Spnimlirld. Me<-tint{ at IliKld.iiid Hotel, 
llilliii.in Si . Spiinnlield, at ») p. III. 
MinneNolu Minneapolis I'aul W. Latham 17. 
h')17 Diexel Ave.. So. MinneaiKilis. Mi-eliiin 
at \,iiikin Cafe al (i.HO p. in. 
New Hampshire <:oncord William K. C.lavin 
H*. Simons l-ie.- Hinh S. IhmiI, Warner. N.ll 
Meetinit at K.inle Hotel, t omonl. at 7 p. m 
New York Buffalo Milford II. Claik. Jr. (17. 
■I 1(1 West I tica St., Hutfalo. MeeliilB .it 
Mand.iiin ( afe al 0..'M» p. m. 
(;eneva Lewis M. Van Alstyne Ms. N. Y 
.\Kric. Kxpt. Sta. Meeting includes alumni 
uroups from Ithaca, Syra» us*-, Rochester, and 
t ieneva. 
Ithaca -l>rof. Kdward A. White ».'>. 2lt) The 
I'aikway, Ilhaia. Ithaca and vicinity alumni 
meet at C.eni-va. 
Syracuse Kred K. Zerchor •21. 5.39 Colunihiis 
Ave., Syracuse. Syracuse and vicinity alumni 
meet at C.eneva. 
Rochester l<..»;er C ( c»>nibs '21. Box fiS. 
SiK iuetiK)rt. Kinhesler and vicinity alumni 
will meet at C.eneva. 
North C:arolina ilinh Point -Charles C.. Mack- 
intc»h 21. IKK.t {.reeiiway Drive. HiKh I'oint 
.Mt-eiiiiK at the home ol Mr. Mackintosh. 
IHft (ireenway Drive, HiKh I'oint. 
<>hl«» Ct>lumbuK Muiray IJ. Lincoln 14. 12:il 
W. I'ir>l .Ave, ( (iliiiiilius. MeetinK at < »hio 
State 1 iin . l-.u ult> ( !ul> at 7 ji. m. 
Pennsylvania Philadelphia— Dr. Thomas J 
t;ass«'r "19. Warren Ave., Malvern, I'a. 
MeetinK at Arcadia Cafe, Broad and Chestniil 
Sts., al 7.U0 p. ni. (.roup imludes alumni 
ftDiii Newark. I>elaware and vicinity. 
Reudinft ( harles M Itoardman '20, Weis<r 
r.iik Uciiiiilsdoif. I'a. 
Rhode Inland Providence — Brooks F. Jakeman 
'L'O, ,s| Wollaston St.. Auhuin. K. 1. Meetinn 
.11 \en Noiii Restaurant, 20.') Weylxisset St., 
I'ruvidemc at ti.'M) p. m. 
Vermont Brallleboro William I. Mayo 17, 
Kurn llaltiii Home-., Westminster. Vt. Meet- 
ln^; i.i(ili.d)l\ .it HiattlelKirti, at 7 p. ni. 
WiM-onnin Appleton kalph J. Walts '07 
.MeeiJUK al home ot Mr. Watts, 712 Kast 
John .St . .\ppleton at »> p. m. 
New Meiico l^s Mochis, SInaloa- H.irolil 1". 

JOII.N 'l.i. 



DRV CLEANINt; 



H2H 



I'RESSINC; 



THE 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Offers Expert Hair C^utting 
Service for Men and Women. 

"POP" DUWELL, Prop. MEMORIAL BUILDING 



Town Hall Thea tre 

WED., THURS., FRI., OCT. 17-18-19 



CIIILDRKN 2Sc 



Matinees al .t:00 



ADULTS SOc 



Evenln^H al 7:00 
ALL SKATS .SOc .Shown once each nifthl 

''UNCLE TOM'S CABIW 

With .Synchronized Music 
NEWS COMEDY 

SATURDAY, OCT. 20 

.Matinees al .^:00 Eveninfts al 6:45 & 8:.M 
DOi Bf.E EKATCRE BILL 

'THE GOLDEN CLOWN'' 

PARIS AND THE CIRCl'S-THE WORLD 
OF FASHION AND BOHEMIA 

''TEA FOR THREE" 

with LEW CODY. AILEEN PRI.NGLE and 

OWEN MOORE 

Newg 

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24 

''THE PLAY GIRL" 

With MAD(;E BELLAMY 
Evenings at 6:4.5 and H:iO 

Synchronized Music will be used with all 
our features 



Ft)r l>roni|>( .Ser\ice IMuuu- 

AMHERST CLEANERS & DYERS 

1 1 MAIN STREET NEXT TO TOWN HALL 

One l»ay Ser\lce on Dry C.leaiiInU Work Called for and l>ell«ered Dally 

REPAIRING lAlNDRV DVIINCJ 



THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

Special Sunday Night Dinners 

Temporary quarters in the rear of the new block. 

Watch for our opening announcement. 



THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"THK IM.ACK rOK TIJH t'OI.I.Ii .i: MAN" 



WELL LAUNDERED CLOTHES 

are an Asset. 
Why not make an investment? 






THE AMHERST LAUNDRY CO., Inc. 

*Dick" Adams '29 M.A.C. Agent TeL 720 



oiniNc; c.Lvn mk.mbkksiiip 

(Ctmllnued Irum Pafte I) 

yearly dui's of fifty (t-nts (o one of tin- 
C'lu!) representatives listed below. 

O. T. V Arthur II. Craves '2« 

I'lii SJKiiia KapiKi I'aul A. Sinilli '111 

Kappa SiKiiia Kenneth W. Iliiiil ':10 

Theta (hi Riiy W T.iir liil 

SiKiiia riii ICiksilon John H. Iliiwaid, Jr. M) 

Laiiilxl.i ( hi .Mpha K. S. Ilemlersoii ':il 

.Mpha Siniiia I'hi An hie II. .\l.i<l.len :n 

Alpha (•annua Kho Arnolil M. Davis ':U 

K.ippa Kpsilon Walter E. .Soiilhwii k 'Jd 

Siiith Colleue Milton I. ( oven 'ItO 

Norlh ( olIeKi- Ilerls'rt A. .\lliii ':mi 

The- .MiIm'v . Miss Carniela K. SttKent '2<t 
All others. Mr J. I'aul Williams 



'.U. Kulh i:. S<„U ';;|, livelyn M. I.yni.in 
'.■{|, Wynne K. Caird '.i2, AnKclina lorrest 
•.'12. Orris K. Merritt ':i2, Margaret A. 
Ohiwiler '.{'J, VIhtuv Taylor '.'tj. 

Altos Irene I.. Hartletl '2!», Cuija C. 
Hawlcy "Lx.l, Doris K. VVIullle -M. Jean 
<".f>rdon 'M, i.ois I.. Calkins '.'!1, I'aiiline 
A. Spiewak '.'{1, Sus.in C. | akc ':i2, Anna 
T. Parwms •.{2. Lillian I'. |>o||in •.{2, 
Hazel n. IV, k ':i'2. Mildnd Twiss •;(2. 
.MarKUetilc M \ idiules ':;2. 



PROMISINt; OUTLOOK FOR 
(Continued from Pafte ij 
si)ecialty nunihers, sut li as readings, 
dantin^;, and instrumental solos wliidi will 
add to the variety of the projjrani. 

Mary C. Kane '2U, the nianaKer. is 
planning an extensive series of concerts 
for the (Iiil) this winter. I'dilowinn is a 
list of tiie ineinliers of the ('lul»: 

/'ianisi Vera I. Wright •.'{2. 

I'irsI Siifnanos I'dith I,. Uertenshaw 
'2<«, Ali(e .S, Chapin '211. (.ladys K. 
Sicvert '29, Evelyn A. Heanian ';{], 
Catherine A. liurnhani '.'{1, Janet A. 
C.riffith '.'{|, (iertrude A. Mead '."il, 
Mahelle I.. Anderson "A2, Nancy Fannin 
'.'{2, H.irbara K. < lerrard '.'12, Anna 
I. (vine •:i2, Klizahetli K. Reed '32, Grate 

.\. Muinphreys '.'J^i 

Second Sopranos Eleanor Caldwell '2'.>, 
Alice L. Johnson *2<.». Ruth II. I'arrish '2't, 
(.race (;. Slat k '2'.», .Myrtle A. Dcnney '.'id, 
.Sally E. Mradley '.U, Emily (.. Rollins 



AMHERST FRUIT STORE 

WMI RK AGGIE MEN MEET 

WHEN IXJWN TOWN 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGARS 



MILITARY NOTES 



Five inemhers of the Military depart- 
ment went List Irid.iy to the Tiirkey Hill 
I'olo (liil) K. play a n.ime with the polo 
team of ili.it uroup. These men were 
Major hris((K\ Major lliil.h.ird, Captain 
Sumner. .Ser^;l■allt Warren, and Sr^ ant 
(iain. The first three played in the Kaintr 
itself, while the others rode in the jump- 
ing and ra( iiiK events. Ihe foiiiih mini 
her of the |miIo team was Mr. Hirn.ird 
Reardon of rrovidem c, R. I. The 
Turkey Hill le.im won liy .1 wore of 7 to I. 

In the open jumping 1 1.iss Itonnii!, 
ridden hy .Sermant W.irnii, look (irsl 
pi. lie. 'Third place went to I )iirjn-,s, 
ridden liy Srve.inl (..liii In the Toil' h- 
and-Out (lass, secoinl pine went to 
Monnie, with SerKc.mt Warren up. 
Duchess secured tittrti plarr- with Ser- 
Keant (iainridin^. S-rRcant ( .ainalsoiook 
first place in the niilcand-one (jiiarttT 
steeplechase, with Diiihess .is .imoiinf. 



NEW FALL STYLES 

ON DISPLAY 
WATCH OUR WINDOW 

Shoe Repairing Departnneot. 

JOHN FOTOS SHOE STORE 




READY NOW- 

All good leathers 

$5.00 - $10.00 

THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 

275 HIGH STREET HOLYOKE 



A 



M HE RS 

THEATER 



T 



.MAII.NKK.S l»ally. i.W 
h very Kvenina. i >i»iow», fc.4,S and 8..MI 

Wednesday, Oct. 17 

5 Acts Kejth-Albee Vaudeville and 

Antonio .Mareno & lielene Costello 



m 



it 



The Midnight Taxi'' 

Ctimedy — Pa the News 



Thursday & Friday, Oct. IK & Vt 

l>. W. (.RIKPITII'S 

"The Battle of the Sexes" 

with Jean llerHholt, Phyllis Haver 

Belle Bennet and Sally O'Neil. 

KK(,i i.AR prk;ks nkws 



Saturday, Oct. 20 
Harry Fangdon in 

"Heart Trouble" 

2 Reel C^omedy — .News 

I .Monday & Tuesday, Oct. 22 and 2.i 

MACK SKNNKT'SO RKKL C;OMH)Y 

"Good Bye Kiss" 

2 Reel (Jomedy — .News 

'WINC;.S" Will, SOON BF 1 1 FRF 



KE^IAT COI^IvEaE) S^OEE 



BASEMENT OF "M" BUILDING 



t 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 17, 1928 



SC HE] 







THOMAS F. WALSH 



M.A.C. DKFF.MS M IDDI.KIU RY 

'Conlinui-d frniii l'.iU»- I) 

Howard rarryiiin tlif li.ill, tin- I'xal rlul> 
KaiiH-(l t-ii;lil y.ii'ls. A fi\»- sard |)<ii.ilt> 
Kavf till' hay State tfain a first down. 
Howard made three yards and Kllert 
maile aimtlier first down. MaKniison's 
line l>n(k netted two yards, and tlien 
Kllert iiiaile two ^ains of seven and live 
yards respeetively to place the l)all on 
the X'erniont forty yard mark at the end 
of the first <iuarter. 

At the ojK'ninK of the seeond period 
the I 'ant hers were siueessfui in stopi)in>{ 
the M.A.C. drive and an exehanj^e of 
punts followed. Most of the play during 
this (|iiarter was in the visitors' territ(jry 
hut the home team was not ahle to siore. 
At the em! of the half MtKittrick 
launi lied a series of attempted passi-s hut 
they were iiuomplete and the half emled 
with hotli teams in a scoreless deadlock. 
Middlebury aRain kicked off, Kllert re- 
ceiviiiK the ball and hrinj^iiiK it back to 
iiis own forty-three yard mark. t)n the 
next thri-e plays Howard, Ellert, and 
Ma^nuson made five yards each. Ellert 
advanced the ball six more yards to place 
it on the opponents' thirty-seven yard 
marker. Here the \'ermont defense 
strengthened and Howie kicked. Another 
exhibition of punting was in order with 
the Imal warriors finally in possession of 
the ball on their own ten yard line. 
Ellert failed to gain around left end. I)ut 
on the next play Howard broke loose for 
a twenty yard jaunt before he was 
stopped. Kllert ma<le another six yartls 
and Magnuson carried the ball to mid- 
field for a first down. A penalty half the 
distance to the no:\\ carried the ball far 
into the X'ermonter's territory. Majinuson 
gained four yards and Howard swept 
around left end for two more. A forwaril, 
MaKiiuson to Cox, place the ball on the 
Middlebury seventeen yard line and gave 
the local gridsters a first down by inches. 
On the second play which followed Ellert 
snared a pass from Cox and raced across 
for the oidy touch<lown of the game. It 
was a pretty run with the star halfback 
evading several tacklers l)efore he reached 
the last white line. Magnuson kicked the 



extra point from placement and made 
t'ae score 7 tf> I). 

in the last quarter the Panthers started 
a drive that almost resulted in a touch- 
down. A series of runs by C.uarnaccia 
put the ball on the Massiichusetts forty- 
six yard mark. Tw<i f(jrward passes and 
a thirty-yard run by (iuarnaccia ended 
on the home team's nine-yard line. Mann, 
substituting in the line, threw the oppos- 
ing ball carrier for a loss on the next 
I)lay. On the following two plays the 
visitors advanced until they were only 
four and one-half yards from the gfial. 
On the last down an attempted forward 
l)as8 was knocked down by Captain IJowie, 
and the ball was punted out of the home 
team's territory after the Maroon and 
White players had failed to gain. During 
the remainder of the game the teams 
fought hard for the breaks but they 
were of no advantage to either side. On 
the last play Hicks cut through the line 
and nailed the ball carrier for a four-yard 
loss, sending the well-played game and 
the second victory for the Hay State 
college team. 



The summary: 

Malts. Aftttien 
Bowir. !«• 

.\linkst<-in. MilU.lt 
Kritoii, Ik 
Mills, Munn, c 
Brackliy. True, rg 
Walkdfii, rt 
(Ox, re 
Howard. >|1> 
Kllirl, McK.ttrick. Ihb 
Ilitks. rlili 
MiiKnu;«>n, Nitkicwiiz, fl» 

Store— Mass. AKHies 7. Touilidowns— KUerl 
I'oints by Koal after toutlulown— .Maunuson 
Rifcrtt— Johnson. SprinKlKl'l. I in|iirc— OBriin 
Holy Cross. Linesman— WliaU-n. SiirinKtield 
Time- two 12 and two l')-minute periods. 



Middlebury 

te, GriiKuel, Maynard 

U. Huntiniiton, Allen 

Ik, Ke«'nan 

c, Wliitni.in 

rg, Be<l«ll 

rt. WriRlit, Perry 

re, McNary, Weblx-r 

cil). Johnson 

I hi), Willis 

rhh. (iuarnai'i'ia 

fl). Smith, Milx-od 



HARRIERS LAC; IN OPENING 

(Continued from Pufte I) 

The ineligibility of Captain Carl A. 
Hergan "29 and Albert Nash ".n, fresh- 
man star last year, and the inca|)acity of 
Harold M. Rof)ertson "M, who has a 
pulled muscle in his leg. have crinii)ed the 
M.A.C. prospects considerably, as these 
men finished in a triple tie for first in 
the time trial on October ti. 



— JACKSON & CUTLER — 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS READY TO WEAR 

AMHERST, MASS. 



THESE CHILLY MORNINGS 

mean something a little warmer than you have been 
wearing. A wool ski coat, a leather jacket of suede or 
horsehide or a good heavy all wool sweater will answer 
the question. Priced from $5 to $15. 

Pleanty of gloves for riding. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

P. S. The best line of topcoats in town. 



EVERYTHING IN 

HARDWARE 



AND 



Radio Equipment 



ATWATER-KENT AND MAJESTIC RADIO 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



SC110I-ARSHH».S AND (ilFTS 

(Continued from Paft« 1) 

H'httin^ Street Scholarship Fund- $UHn). 
The gilt of Whiting Street of Northamp- 
ton. This fund is now used exclusively 
for scholarships. 

Mury Rohmsim Fund %UM). The gift 
of Miss Mary Robinson of .Medfield, in 
1S74, for scholarships. 

Gdssett Scholarship Fund - $1()(M). The 
gift of Henry Gassett of Boston. Mass., 
the income to be used for scholarship. 

Alvord Dairy Scholarship /•"»<«</- *4(MK). 
C.iven to the College by Henry E. Alvord, 
who was the first instructor in military 
tactics, 1S(>9-71, and a professor of agri- 
culture, 188.5-H7 at M.A.C. This fund is 
for the supixjrt of certain worthy students 
who are specializing in dairying. 

Endowed Labor /•"m«</-«5(XK). A gift of 
a friend of the College in 1»()1, the in- 
come of which is for the use of needy 
and deserving students. 

Danforth Keyes Batigs /•'««</— $0(XK). 
i.ouisii A. Haker of Amherst was the 
donor of this fund in 19<)*», the income 
of which is for use as a loan to needy 
and deserving students. 

J. I). W. French /•'««</— $U),()fK). C.iven 
by the Bay State Agricultural Society of 
Boston, Mass., the income of which is to 
be used where it will do the most good, 
in the interests of dairying and forestry. 
It may be used for scholarships, loans or 
prizes; especially, however, it is to help 
pay the ex[)enses of judging teams to the 
National Dairy Shows and to the Na- 
tional I.ivestock Shows. 

Frederick G. Crane Fund^$2^m). The 
family of Frederick O. Crane of I3alton, 
Mass., gave this scholarship fund in 
memory of Mr. Crane, to assist worthy 
undergraduate students of limited finan- 
cial resources, with preference being 
given to residents of Berkshire County. 
Porter L. Nricton Educational Fund — 
$2;{.4n.:5;<. This scholarship fund was 
given by Porter L. Newton of Waltham. 
Mass. The income is for the use of 
citizens of the United States, particularly 
young men who reside in Middlesex 
County, to assist them in obtaining an ed- 
ucation at M.A.C. along agricultural lines. 
The Wilbur //. Ward FJucation Trust 
is another substantial gift, the income 
from which is available for the assistance 
of certain worthy students who attend 
M.A.C. This fund is administered by a 
board of trustees not connected with the 
College. The State Grange, the New- 
England Branch of the Farm and Garden 
•Association, various garden clubs, fra- 
ternities, and similar organizations have 
also offered scholarships for students at 
MAC. 

Other Endowments 

There are also several trust funds, gifts 
to the College, which have been bestowed 
for other purposes than to endow scholar- 
ships and loans. These are: 

The Af.A.C. Investment Fund— $100. 

John C. Cutter Fwntf— $1000. Given by 
the late Dr. John C. Cutter of Worcester, 
Mass., a graduate of the College with the 
class of 1872. This fund is for the purpose 
of purchasing books on hygiene for the 
College. 

Library Fund— $10,375.52. This fund, 
given by alumni and others assists in 
procuring books for the College Library. 
The largest contributors to this fund have 
been William Knowlton, Elizur Smith and 
Charles L. Flint. 

Burnham Emergency Fund — $5000. A 
bequest from T. O. H.P. Burnham Bos- 
ton, Mass., made without any conditions, 
but used as a College emergency fund. 

Wm. R. Sessions Fund — $5000. Given 
by William R. Sessions in memory of his 
wife Clara Markham Sessions. 

Grinnell Prize Fund— $\Q00. This gift 
was bestowed by the Hon. William Claflin, 
to be known as the Grinnell agricultural 
prize, to be given to the two members of 
the graduating class who may pass the 
best oral and written examination in 
theory and practice of agriculture. It is 
a memorial to George B. Grinnell of 
New York. 

Hills fund— $10,000. The donors of 
this fund were Leonard M. and Henry 
F. Hills of Amherst, in 1867, to establish 
and maintain a botanic garden. 

CharUs A. Gleason Fund— $5000. The 
gift of Charles A. Gleason of North 
Brookfield, Mass., a trustee of the 
College from 1889 to his death, Sept. 



29, 1925. This fund is to be used as the 
Trustees of the College shall direct. 

George II. liarber Fund %iM)i). f Jiven 
by the late Rear-.Xdmiral (ieorge H. 
Barber, a surgeon in the U. S. Navy, the 
income from which is to fje used for 
permanent eijuipmtnt in the department 
of physical education. Rear-Admiral 
Barber was a graduate from M.A.C. in 
the class of 18X.'). 

Many gifts of books, paintings and 
other useful equipment which cannot be 
enumerated here, have come to M..\.C. 
from time to time from alumni and friends 
of the College. A conservative figure to 
represent the total value of private be- 
quests from all sources now available to 
the College would be approximately 
$29(),(XX). 



Crabtree Bequest for Alumni 

The will of the late Miss Lotta Crab- 
tree, whose estate has not yet been settled, 
will make available a sum variously esti- 
mateil at from $.5(KJ,tK)0 to $2,0(X),(HK) 
for use as loans without interest to M.A.C. 
graduates for the purpose of assisting 
them in engaging in agricultural pursuits. 
This fund will be administered by the 
trustees of the estate and not by the 
College. 

All these items, just as do similar 
bequests to other State Colleges, indi- 
cate the desire on the part of alumni and 
many private citizens that students at 
M.A.C. shall have either the means or 
equipment for proper training while in 
college and who take pride in other ways 
in aiding their State College. 



FACULTY-LOGS 

(Continued from i'aite i) 
[jurchases of such of their mcrchandij,. a, 
I deemed best suited to my needs. Aniun^ 
the books was one which immedi.u.l, 
caught my eye. It bore the proud in;,. 
"Libros y .Autores Clasicos" p<jr C.>ur 
I^arja. One hasty glance through th,, 
text and I was convinceci that not dh' 
was it a necessity, but that I iKJsitiv,:. 
would trust no agency of transport, nion 
other than myself. It was not that tli 
book was of any particular intrinsii or 
monetary value (the clerk repeated tim^ 
and again that the price, ab-urd though 
it sounds, was a mere eighteen peset.i-i 
$.'5. 12), but that should it become lost \,\ 
any ill stroke of fortune it would rcnuir^ 
fully six weeks before I should be ahlt 
to replace it. 

I carefully placed the treasure in nn 
suitcase among other valuable possessions 
anti almost tenderly placed it on ho.ird 
the Alfonso Trece when I embarked at 
Cadiz. I felt it in my hand at least onic 
a day during the ten day trip to reassure 
myself of its safety. I sent it by insured 
mail from New York to my Amhirst 
address. 

It was approximately one week ago 
that i was prompted to take down the 
volume. I seized it from its place on iIk 
shelf and wiped it clean of all dust the 
better to examine it. I opened to the fly 
leaf and read in bold type the following 
"Published by the Vermont Printing 
Company, Brattleboro, Vermont. I.i>t 
price, $1.25." Delmont T. Dunbar 



WILLISTON RUNS WILD 

(Continued from Page 1) 

fullback, maile a thirty-two yard gain 
for a score, and Akins carried the ball 
through center for thirty-four yards to 
another touchdown. The lineup- 

WilllHton M.A.C. Seconds 

(lark. Derviii. Ic- rr, I-rcy 

Kowan. Price. Hamilton. It rt. Damjelmayrr 

MiCowan. Ratlil)one, Satlii-s, Ik ru. Suhcr 

Preston. ShurtWff. c i . Minos 

Rapson. I>awp. Sturtpvant. rg \\i. Elliot. Davis 
Briiklcy. Price Rowan. Blixim. rt It. Richanlson 
Tylor. OriscoU. re le, Lorrey, Cleaves 

(;au<lette. Aldeman. WasserUeit. qb qb. My rick 
Munroe. (;aufl<-tte. llib rhb, Saleniiis 

.\kins. Reidy. Karrell. rhb Ihb. f.oodrich 

Heller. Haskell. DesRoches. fb fb. Purdy 

Score: Williston :1H. M.,\.C. Seconds 0. Touch- 
ilowns: Miinrcx'. (iaudette. Heller 2. .^kins. Points 
after touchdowns: Heller '1. Akins. Referee: 
Johnson. Umpire: Jones. Linesman: Smith. 
Time: 10 and H-minute jicriods. 



FRESHMEN HOLD 
(Continued from Page 1) 

The summary: 

Greenfield Freshmen 

Put nam, li- 
Uaker. It 
McCfann, Ig 
M<K)re. c 
Lalor. rs 
.Mus<:h<ivi< 
SIhetka. re 
Toomey. qb 
Hams, Ihb 
Tula, rhb 
Corsmlia, fb 

Referee — McDonnell, IJm 
Linesman — Welcome, Time- 
Substitutions — Krosh: (iorey 
Kan for (iorey. Lihby for B 
tor (J'Donnell. Cheney for 
Welsh. Petrin for Trela, 



rt 



te. Wil,- 

rt. Fi:L 
rg. GaRliardi J 

C, TIhIH],!. 

Ig, Buddiniit'f, 

It. Whilten 

le, O'Donwil 

qb, Welsh 

rhb. Gravi 

Ihb. Sylvfitri 

fb. FoW 

pire — Foley. Hcj] 

— lO-minule pj-riod. 

for Wilson, Wunn^- 

luddmKton. Mur!>h, 

Murphy, Trela ir 



Delta Phi Gamma has scheduled its 
Welcome Dance to the freshmen girls 
for October 20. 




Chilton Pens Hold 





A certified test by 

Bigelow, Kent and 

Willard, Boston 

consulting engin- 
eers, proved the 

average capacity of 

5 well known 

$7. fountain pent 

to be 38 drops, while the $7- Chilton Pen 

held 81 drops. Size for size, Chilton Pen* 

hold twice the ink and more — ladies' 

Chiltons 3 to 5 times as much. 

Rtmember THAT when yourOld PenRuns Dry! 

CHILTON PEN COMPANY 
287 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 

CMCfon 



Pen 



CARRIED IN STOCK BY 

NEW COLLEGE STORE 



Wl)t MuBBnt\:inBttts (UnlW^xm 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1928 



Number 5 



MOUNTAIN DAY GIVES LARGE 

NUMBER AN OUTING ON MT. TOBY 



Contests and Speech by "Dean" 
Burns Feature Program 



Long Awaited Mountain Day Comes 

At Last to Quell Unrest 

in Student Body 



With the ringing of the College bell 
last Thursday morning at 7.30 o'clock 
an inaudible but quite universal sigh of 
relief went up from the students and 
faculty of M.A.C, for it meant that 
.Mountain Day had at last arrived. The 
days and even weeks of anticipation and 
speculation were over, and preparations 
were made for a day's hike to Mount 
Tol)y, the goal of all past mountain days. 

The trip to the base of the mountain 
was made in busses in the case of the 
majority making the journey, although 
many went up in cars or on bicydes or 
even on foot. Guides furnished by the 
Outing Club accompanied the groups up 
Mount Toby by the various routes and 
the entire party met at the top for the 
main program of the day's events. Lun- 
cheon was served at 11.30 at the base of 
the tower and cider and apples were 
made available to everyone present. A 
large fire kindled by members of the 
Outing Club provided a means of cook- 
ing the "hot dogs." 

After the lunch had been consumed two 
spirited contests were staged, which pro- 
vided considerable entertainment and 
amusement to the onlookers. The first a» 
these was a tree climbing contest in which 
four students raced to see who could 
climb a certain distance and return in 
(Continued on Pag* 4) 



WOMEN'S SYMPHONY TO 
GIVE CONCERT SUNDAY 

Famous Organization Has Received 
Wide Acclaim At All Appearances 



ALUMNI HOME-COMING DAY 

Saturday, November 3, has been desig- 
nated as Alumni Home-Coming Day, and 
it is expected that several hundred alumni 
and their friends will be on hand to wit- 
ness ihe annual home-coming »iay loot- 
bail game, which this year is with an 
ancient rival, Amherst, on Alumni Field. 

Department luncheons at noon in 
I>aj)er Hall will give alumni an oppor- 
tunity to meet faculty mend)ers antl 
classmates. Alumni are urged to return 
to the campus in time to attend one of 
these luncheons. Reservations for seats 
at the football game should be requested 
tiirough the Physical Education Depart- 
'nent as far in advance as possible. 
Tirkets are $1.00 for general admission 
and *2(lll each for reserved seats. Checks 
should be made payable to Curry S. Hicks, 
•'ineral Manager of .'\thletics. 

Successful Hike 
To Mt. Sugarloaf 

Outing Club Plans Neit Hike for 
November 4 to Mt. Toby Caves 



Next Sunday afternoon, October 28, 
the Boston Women's Sympiiony Orches- 
tra, conducted by Ethel Leginska, will 
appear in Bowker Auditorium at 3 p. m. 
This orchestra is as far as can be deter- 
mined, the first orchestra in this country, 
the complete personnel of which, includ- 
ing the conductor, is entirely composed 
of women musicians. Wherever this 
orchestra has appeared during its entire 
existence, in fact from its very first per- 
formance, sold-out houses have been in 
order, and not without good reaaon. 
Every orchestral instrument to be found 
in any symphony orchestra ia the world 
is found in this orchestra. 

The Boston Women's Symphony Or- 
chestra is indeed fortunate in having as 
its conductor Ethel Leginska. Miss 
Leginska is the world's foremost woman 
conductor. She has been guest conductor, 
with the most brilliant success, of the 
London (England) Symphony Orchestra, 
the Berlin and Munich (Germany^ Phil- 
harmonic Orchestras, the New York 
Symphony, the New York I*hilharmonic, 
Los Angeles Symphony and the St. Louis 
Symphony Orchestras. Not only is Ethel 
Leginska the world's foremost orchestral 
conductor, but also, without question, 
the world's foremost woman pianist. She 
has appeared the world over as soloist 
and always, without a single exception, 
with the greatest success. As an orches- 
tral interpreter she has brought to the 
orchestral field all of the experience 
gained through years of playing before 
audiences in every corner of the globe. 



Dad's Day Plans 
Nearly Complete 

Interesting Program Arranged for 
Second Dad's Day 



ADAMS, '29 HIGH MAN IN 
ICE CREAM JUDGING 

Judging Teams Have Reasonable 

Success in Trip to National 

Dairy Exposition 



Dad's Day is again about to apjjear on 
campus. It is to be observed next Satur- 
day, October 27. This day was inaugu- 
rated last year and proved to be such a 
success, that the committee are planning 
to put on an even more colorful program 
for the benefit of the Dads of all the 
students. 

Such a day as this provides an un- 
paralleled opportunity for the parents to 
become better acquainted with the 
collegiate life of their sons and daughters, 
in that they will be able to meet the 
faculty and inspect the various build- 
ings. This will aid in increasing the 
interest the (arents have in the College, 
which is of highest value to the welfare 
of the institution. 

Interest will be promoted by an enter- 
taining program which is as follows: 
a. m. to 11.30 a. m. Registration and 
Tour of Campus (from Memorial Hall). 
11.30 a. m. to 12 m. Informal reception 

by members of faculty in Memorial 

Hall. 
12 m. Luncheon, Cafeteria. 
1.30 p. m. Six-man Rope Pull. 
2.30 p. m. Football game, Worcester 

Polytechnic Institute vs. M.A.C. 
6.30 p. m. Banquet, Draper Hall. Ad- 
dress by President Thatcher. 
7.45 p. m. Entertainment, Stockbridge 

Hall. 

AGGIENIGHTIS 
WIDELY OBSERVED 

28 Alumni Meetings on World Aggie 

Night. Alumni to Meet at 

Concord, .Mass., Oct. 26 



NORWICH AERIAL ATTACK TOO MUCH 
FOR MAROON AND WHITE GRIDSTERS 



AGGIES FAVORED TO 
TAKE W.P.I. SATURDAY 

Visiting Dads Should See Mass. 

Aggie Team Avenge Last 

Year's Defeat 



Over thirty students, including several 
«i-eds, made the Outing Club's Hike to 
^It. Sugarloaf last Saturday afternoon. 
The party took the 12.30 bus to the foot 
•^if the mountain, and then went directly 
tf the top. The weather was perfect for 
* hike,— clear and cool; and the Con- 
nttituct Valley, the Toby Range, the 
Holyoke Range, and the Berkshire Hills 
*ere all distinct and colorful. 

^Iter resting awhile at the top, every- 
one went on up the next mounuin. 
*l'i<^h proved to be a much harder and 
'*«'per climb, because of a slippery and 
treac herous layer of leaves and sticks. The 
Sfoup finally returned to the foot of 
^"Karloaf, where they had refreshments of 
J^woa and toasted marshmallows before 
itaving for Amherst. 

(Continued on Pa^e 4) 



Lasting ten days and proving to be 
one of the most interesting trips of the 
teams, the Dairy Products Team and 
the Dairy Cattle Judging Team travelled 
to .Memphis, Tennessee to conipclc in 
the contests there. The teams travelled 
by different routes, so saw each other 
only in Memphis. 

The Dairy Protlucts Team went by 
way of Chicago, arriving there Friday 
morning and staying until Saturday 
night. They took many side trips to 
see the environs. Leaving Chicago 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Phy. Educ. Building Fund 
Nears $40,000 Mark 

Excellent Response from Alumni 
Swells Fund 



The Tenth Annual World Aggie Night 
was celebrated last Saturday by several 
hundred alumni at twenty-eight |x»ints, 
including one gathering in Mexico. 

Messages and discussions relative to 
the College were presented at the meet- 
ings, thus keeping those who attended 
fully informed regarding their Alma 
.Mater and particularly the Physical 
Education Building Fund. .Special dele- 
gates from the College and the Associate 
Alumni brought these messages direct 
from the campus to all meetings in New 
England and New Jersey. 

The following is a complete list of the 
meetings: Massachusetts: Fitchburg, 
< ireenfield, Hathorne, Northampton, and 
Springfield; Berkeley and Los Angeles, 
California; Denver, Colorado; Hartford 
and New Haven, Connecticut; Wash- 
ington, D.C.; Lafayette, Indiana; Ames, 
Iowa; Minneapolis, Minn.; St. Louis, 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Worcester Tech will arrive on campus 
this Saturday ready for its annual grid 
clash with the Massachusetts eleven. 
This year the engineers have one of the 
best teams they Kave had for a number 
of seasons. It is the hope of the home 
aggregation to avenge last year's defeat 
at the hands of the Worcester gridsters. 
During all the years that these two insti- 
tutions have met on the gridiron the 
Maroon and White teams have rolled up 
a total of approximately ."{."iO points to 
their opponents' 37. Out of twelve games 
played the valley warriors have won 
eleven and lost only one. However, this 
year Tech has a shifty, well-balancetl 
aggregation. The line is heavier than 
usual while the backfield is fast and 
promising. Such a combination will give 
any team trouble. On the other hand, 
Coach "Chick " McGcoch's team will be 
out in full strength to give the invaders 
a battle. Brackley, Howard, and Mann 
will again be seen in the lineup for the 
Bay .Staters. Hicks, a sophotnore on the 
squad, will be kept out of the game 
because of an injured foot which he re- 
ceived in the Norwich game. Thus far 
this season the Tech eleven has lost to 
Brown and Colby by the scores .'{2 to 
and 12 to «i, and tied Trinity to U. The 
IVlas-sachusetts players have made a 
l>etter showing by winning fr«ini Bates 
and Middlebury and losing to Bowdoin 
and Norwich. Therefore, it is antici 
pated that the home team will add 
(Continued on Page 4) 



UNBEATEN ADAMS TEAM 
NOSES OUT FROSH 60 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



IHE OUTSTANDING PERFORM- 
MANCE OF THE WEEK 



Competing with forty-five students 

roni fifteen leading agricultural col- 

'fRes, flarold S. Adams '29 scored the 

'Khest in the judging of ice-cream at 

'^^'I'phis, Tennessee last week and 

*•'> awarded a gold medal. 



There has been an encouraging response 
from alumni classes during the past few 
weeks in the form of new contributions 
toward the Physical Education Building 
Fund. Since October 1 total receipts of 
cash and pledges have increased from 
$;W,.'}08.0«) to $;«,617.56. 

The class of 1928 continues to lead in 
the number of contributions toward the 
fund among the alumni classes; while '18, 
'16, '27, and '21 are next in order. From 
the standpoint of the largest percent of 
donors in any one class 1888 still heads 
the list. 

The total sum received now represents 
the gifts of 8.5.'J alumni, undergraduates, 
faculty and friends of the College, who 
have endorsed the project by giving or 
pledging something. There are some 1.500 
alumni who hold degrees from M.A.C. 
and who should be heard from during 
the next few weeks. November 1 will 
mark the closing of the regional cam- 
paign among the alumni. From that 
time on the campaign among the alumni 
Continued on Page i) 



"With filial confidence inspired, 
Can lift to Heaven anun presumptuous 

eye. 
And smiling say, "My Father made 
them all.'' 

— Cowper {The Task) 



Freshman Hopes Die When AdamH 

Team Uncorks Long Pass for a 

Touchdown in Third Quarter 

Alth((ugh they several times put up a 
stubborn goal-line defense, the freshman 
f<M)tball team was stored on once and 
defeated to by the strong Adams High 
eleven last .Saturday afternrxin .it Adams. 
The home team was sui)erior at all times, 
but it lacked the final scoring punch 
except in the third jwriod, when a for- 
ward pass, fienvenutti to Haggerty netted 
thirty-five yards and a touchdown. 
Mea<ham and Marshall starred for the 
winners, and Sylvester was outstanding 
for the visitors. The summary: 
(Continued on Page 4) 

Large Number Out For 

Fall Baseball Practice 

Thirty-live Reporting Bi-Weekly on 
Old Varsity Field 



McKittrick Scores Lone Touchdown 
fur Aggies 

Long Passes Put Soldiers on Top of 
18—6 Score 

After winning two consecutive games 
Massachusetts was forced to bow to the 
heavy Norwich University gridsters last 
S;iturday afterntx^n at Northfield, Vt., 
by the 8«-ore 18 to Ti. The successful 
aerial attack used by the horsemen 
proved very effective with the result that 
the Maroon and White aggregation was 
<jn the defensive during most of the game. 
Several offensive drives were started by 
the Agates who finally pushed the ball 
across for their only score late in the 
fourth |X'ri<xl. "Chet" McKittrick was 
the outstanding player for the Manoiichu- 
setts team. He stxKed the only tally for 
his teammates, and he carried the ball 
throughout the game in fine style, time 
after time making gains of three or four 
yards through the line. Captain "Bob " 
Bowie and "Deb" Cox did very good work 
on the wings, while the play of Henry 
True and "Blondy " Mills in the hue was 
consistent. Captain t>'Donnell, star full- 
back for the Norwich team, played a 
good game for the victors. His ability 
to run, pass, and kick, was the real 
feature of the day. Coane's work at 
right end also deserves favorable com- 
ment. 

Soon after the first quarter opened 
Mctieoch's gridsters started a ilrive down 
the field, but a fundilc marred their 
chances of scoring. Then, with the ball 
ni Norwich's possession the soldiers began 
an aerial attack that brought them to 
the visitors'ten yard line. Here the in- 
(Contlnued on Page 4) 



t 



FRESHMAN CROSS-COUNTRY 

In a cross-country squad race on the 
Amhtrst course Mimday lUicrniM).,, Oct, 
Hi, the Aggie freshmen were defeated by 
the .Sidjrina yearlings 40-71. Two Am- 
herst men Nash and Wells, tied for fkst 
place with a time of 10:4.3 for the three 
mile course. Robinson of Amherst was 
third. Forrest of M.A.C. fourth and 
(*wMlwin of Amherst, fifth. The other 
Aggie frosh wh«) did well in this first 
<omi)elition were Halzubic, Hit* hc«xk, 
.Mason, and Hfxlge, who finished sixth, 
.seventh, ninth, and eleventh, respec- 
tively. Amherst lan fourteen men, and 
M.A.C. nine. The only meet for the 
Aggie freshmen now scheduled will be 
held with the Andicisl yearlings here on 
November 11. 



Thursday — 

3.4.5 p. m. Assembly, .Speaker John 

Mills, Bell Tel. laboratories. 
8 p. m. Political Debate, Memorial 

Building. 
Friday— 

Stockbridge football: Hoi yoke High 

at Holyoke. 
8 to 12 p. m. Delta Phi Gamma 

Dance, -Memorial Building. 
Saturday — 
Dad's Day. 
Varsity frxjtball: Worcester Tech at 

M.A.C. 
Varsity Cross Country: Triangle 

Meet— Amherst, W.P.I., and 

.M.A.C, at M.A.C. 
Freshman football: New Hampton 

at New Hampton, N. H. 
Sunday 

Social Union Concert: Ik>ston 

Women's Symphony Orchestra, 

Ethel Leginska, Conductor. 



About thirty-five candidates for fall 
basel^all are working out Tuesday and 
Wednesday afternoons at four o'cUxk on 
the old varsity field. Prac-tices consist of 
games to discover the quality of men for 
next spring. 

Last year's varsity men rejxjrting are 
Horan '29 and Kneeland '.'Mi, outfielders; 
Zielinski '29 and Hall '30, pitchers; and 
Patch '.30, catcher. .Sophomores who 
played with the freshman team last 
spring include Kolonel, outfielder; Calvi, 
G. .M. Davis, (iula, and Lawrence, in- 
fielders; Wherity, pitcher; and Kane, 
catcher. With the men now on the foot- 
ball team. Captain Nitkiewicz '29. Bowie 
'29 and Ellert ':«), the new material looks 
gofxi for next year's varsity nine. Of the 
freshmen reporting, E. W. Mitchell, 
catcher, and Waskiewicz, shortstop, are 
outstanding. The candidates are: Horan 
and Zielinski, seniors; Hall, Kneeland, 
Labarge, Paksarian. Patch, antl J. A. 
Taft, juniors; Calvi, G. .M. Davis, Evans, 
Gula, Kane, Kolonel, J. F. I^wrence, 
(Continued on Page ^j 



Harriers Second 
In Triple Meet 

Springfield, M.A.C, and St. Stephens 
Finish in Order on Annandale Ckiurse 

Coach Derby's varsity cross-country 
team was second in a triple meet with 
Springfield and St. Stephens at Annandale 
N. Y., last Saturday. The score was 
Springfield 20, M.A.C. 34, and St. 
Stephens 72. 

Three Springfield runners. Captain 
firecn, Bennett, and Mitchell, tied for 
first place. Captain Bergan of Massa- 
chusetts was fourth, and Babcock of 
Springfield, fifth. Kolxrrtson, McGuckian, 
Pease, Hernan, Snell, and Carpenter of 
.M.A.C. took the next six places. By 
finishing all the men in a group, Aggie 
forced the Springfield and St. .Stephens 
scores to be comparatively high, and this 
team work was a feature of the race. 
Coa(h Derby's charges considered the 
Annandale course the stiffcst that they 
had ever run uyxm. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



OPPONENTS' SCORES 



L»\\,y 12. W-I' I. 
Amherst 18, Hamilton 
Springfield 13, Middlebury 7 
lujts 12, Bmvdotn 
Boston Univ. 7, Bates 



--f* 



D'iZ 



TIIK MASSACHUSETTS COLLKGIAN. WKDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1928 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students.] 



nOAKD OF EDITORS 



Shipi.bv Clbavbs '29 
Cdwabd H.Nichols '29 



f K<litor-in-t liitf 
MnnagiiiK Editor 



DEPARTMENT EDITOKS 

Editorial SHF.PtEV Cleaves "M 

Featurp Marcabbt 1'. U()K<jvan '30 

Alumni & Short Courses Sally K. Bradlbv '31 

Athletic Lewis M . LVNDS '30 

Fhank T; Douc;lass '31 

Campui John B. Howard Jr. '30 

Cecil H. Wadlkigh '30 

Rial S. I'oimhJk. '31 



Bl^SINESS DKl'ARTMENT 

Fbbdbbicb D. Thayer. Jr. *29 Business Managrr 
• • " " " AdvcrtisiiiKMananer 

LaWBBNCE A. CaBBUTH '29 Circulation ManaK«>r 
RollERT G. C.OODNOW, '31 

WiNTHRoP G. Smith *30 
John R. Tank '30 



Subscriptions 12.00 p«'r year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change uf address, subscrilxr 
will please notify the business manager 
as soon as ix)ssible. 



Entered a* serond-claas niattrr at the Amherst 
Post Ofiite. Arcepteil for mailing at sptnal rate 
of poUaBe provided for in section 1 lO.t. Act of Oc- 
tober, iyi7, authorized August '20, lOlH. 



DAD S DAY 

Saturday of this week is to be Uad's 
Pay, and is the second event of its kind 
to be held on campus. Last year the 
custom was inaugurated with the express 
purpose of making the alTair an annual 
custom. The success that the program 
achieved on the first attempt was marked, 
and the hope of the committee is that 
this year's entertainment will be even 
better. 

There was a two-fold result from the 
observance of the Day last year. In the 
first place, the fathers of many of the 
Btutlents became ac(juainted and had a 
chan<e to see the institution at its best. 
This, of course, was the primary object, 
but the second benefit that was derived 
was just as important. We refer to the 
friendly comiK'tition among the fraterni- 
ties and the sorority on the evening of 
! rtivity that will em- 

dent body is worth- 
combiner a spirit of 
e of co-operation, it 



the past years shows a preixjiiderante of 
f(M)thall men. Whether they were the 
logical leaders is not within our province 
to decide, but the fact remains that the 
student body electeel the men to the 
posts of responsibility. 

That, however, was in the past. Condi- 
tions today are materially different. We 
seem to be in the category in which Mr. 
Tunis places most institutions, lie says: 
"Colleges are waking up to realize that 
what they have on their hands is a first- 
class octopus which is strangling many of 
the legitimate pursuits of the educational 
institution." 

In the res|)ect that we have mentioned, 
this realization is to be encouraged, for it 
has meant a more diversified representa- 
tion of campus activities on such organi- 
zations as the .Student Senate. In another 
respect, it has worked harm, for seemingly 
it is killing much of the interest in foot- 
ball playing when the squad barely num- 
bers enough to make up two teams with 
only a sprinkling of substitutes. To 
plead for more nten seems futile, for 
football is the kind of a game that must 
be liked if one is to play. The Athletic 
|)e|)artment is, and always has been, 
willing to schedule games for a Junior 
\arsity to give everyone out for the team 
the enjoyment of a few trips and the 
siitisfaction of playing in regular games. 
This year Coach MtCeoth has been 
hard pressed to select a scrub team, and 
the result has been that the Junior 
Varsity has played two games and at each 
the number of players was only thirteen. 
We ha\e iie\er believed that football was 
over-emphasized here at Aggie, for it has 
always been an important factor in main- 
taining our position in intercollegiate 
sfK)rt. Now that interest in the team 
seems to be lagging on the part of those 
who might help in the building of the 
team, the intensity of the work must be 
all the greater for those who are out for 
practice. 

We are sorry to have to record these 
things, for they are no credit to the 
student body. Perhaps with the change 
in the results of the games this year we 
can look forwartl to larger squads in the 
future. 




AT THE ABBEY 



jut*'!;.? 



Campu5Dd)ris 



* iIliltlL'IC. 



This .Saturday we shall have a second 
opportunity to m.ike the most of Dad's 
Day. We should all make special efforts 
to invite our fathers to come to .•\ndierst, 
not only to see us and the College, but 
also to get acquainted among themselves. 
Special efforts are being made to enter- 
tain the parents, and they will appreciate 
their visit. 

In addition to having a large attendance 
we hope that the various organizations 
on campus will again stage their collec- 
tion of acts with an eye cm the cup that 
has been provided by the Acatlemic 
Activities Hoanl. Last year the co-eds 
won it with eas*-, but with the number 
of fraternities there are on campus, the 
competition should be keen, h little 
practice and some thought are both 
needed to make each unit of the program 
a success. 

Let's put Dad's Day over in the best 
manner possible, and show every visitor 
that we not only have a real college cam- 
pus, but that we have an active student 
bcKly. 



FOOTBALL 

In the current issue of Harper's Maga- 
zine there is printed an article by John 
K. Tunis that has much to s;iy about the 
over-emphasis of football in .American 
colleges. Mr. Tunis states that, "Strong 
and powerful as is the Great God FtKit- 
ball, signs are not wanting to show that 
American college undergraduates are be- 
ginning to doubt its divinity." 

This article deals more with conditions 
in the great universities of the country 
where football receipts are counted in six 
and seven figures, but it is always inter- 
esting to compare conditions on our 
campus with those that are treatetl for 
colleges that are much larger. Curiously 
enough the tenor of Mr. Tunis' article 
seems to describe the conditions that 
exist right here. 

We know tli.it pn-Mssion of a f(H)tball 
letter nicins .i Kr«at deal. In every 
college it is tlie athlete who is pushed 
ahead while the others have to fight for 
recognition. This has been true at 
Aggie, and a lonsidcration of iinijcr 
graduate leaders who have gradu.tted in 



A OOLLECJE MASCOT 

Once more, for the third time in fact, 
the cjuestion of a College mascot comes 
before the student body. What is going 
to be done about it? Of course, practi- 
cally every college in the country has 
already chosen a mascot, so there remains 
little op|M)rtunity for an appropriate 
original suggestion. However, we suggest 
the Collie as an api)ropriate mastot for 
si'veral reasons. First, the Collie signifies 
an animal that is very likeable and loyal 
as a companion. Second, it implies use- 
fulness. The collie is one of the most 
useful animals if its type in existence. 
Likewise, is not this College known as 
one of the most worthwhile institutions 
of today? Third, there are several collies 
seen frequently on campus, thus furnish 
ing the suggestion with an implication of 
something that is not unknown to the 
stutlent botly. Fourth, the adoption of a 
Collie as the College mascot means that 
a real live animal may be kept on campus 
without much exjx'nse and inconvenience. 
Fifth, to our knowledge this animal has 
not been adopted by any other institution. 
If the above suggestion does not meet 
with your approval, what do you think 
of the liobcat as the college mascot? Of 
course, the student l»ody of the Univer- 
sity of New Hampshire has recently 
adopt eti the Wildcat as its mase-ot, but 
there is a distinction between a bobcat 
and a wildcat although many people con- 
sider one a name for the other. It would 
not be very probable that the students 
could obtain a real ferocious bobcat, but 
the name implies a courageous fighting 
spirit that prevails in all athletic teams 
representing the College. 

Our third suggestion is the Indian 
because we believe that the student botly 
has a well founded reason for adopting 
this character for its mascot. In the first 
place, the State Seal, which is a part of 
the College Seal, contains the figure of an 
Intlian. In the second place, the "red- 
skins" were the first known inhabitants 
of the land on which this College ntjw 
stands. In their last endeavor to repulse 
the westward movement on the early 
immigrants the Indians of the Connecti- 
cut \'allcy played an imjxirtant part in 
history. In the third place, the word 
"Indian" signifies a courageous and 
active warrior characterized by his 
reddish appearance. Likewise, all ath- 
letic teams represent ini; the College wear 
(Continued on I'afte i) 



Prexy Says 

A college student may wear "plus 
sixes" while he is on the campus but had 
better leave them in the closet at home 
when he goes to apply for a job. 

—CD 

Intercolleiiiate 
Springfield College announces a Junior 
Dad system. The organization is com- 
posed of the Dad of Dads, to whom 
report the Departmental Dads, in charge 
of the Junior Dads, who are perstwial 
atlvisors to a freshman. In case an 
emergency situation arises in which the 
Junior Dad is not available, the freshman 
is at liberty to interview his Depart- 
mental Dad, or the Dad of Dads. 

All in all, this is quite the "daddy" 
arrangement. 

CD 

Wrestling is being introduced as a 
minor sport at Amherst College. 

CD 

From an article which appears in the 
Ohio Stale Lantern, it seems that the fair 
co-eds are tired of hearing the brunt of 
beauty contests, so are carrying on a 
beauty contest for men and the girls are 
the judges. 

Oh, Apollo, Apollo! 

CD 

University of Vermont has success- 
fully finished its first practice house and 
the girls have begun to assume their 
tlomestic duties. 

CD 

University of New Hampshire has just 
observetl its annual Datl's Day. Ex- 
President Lewis helped the day by 
addressing all the Dads in the Gym. 
— CD — 
Joe Found That 
Fannie Frosh has been in considerable 
difficulty lately and would like some 
clever man to invent: 

L A machine to automatically trans- 
late languages. 

2. "Elevators" to go horizontally— 

because it isn't the height of the buiUl- 

ings which troubles her, but the length. 

;i. Flexible, unbreakable, and explosion 

proof glass for use in the Chcm Lab. 

—CD 



Delta Phi Gamma plans to hold a 
Welcome Dance for the freshman girls 
this Friday night in the .Memorial Build- 
ing. Freshman co-eds and their escorts 
are especially urged to come. - J 

A reiJorter and photographer from the 
Boston Traveller arrived last Saturday to 
obtain information of the "Co-ed Riding 
Squad." Pictures of the girls riding, 
jumping and doing various stunts were 
taken in the King, at the sand bank in 
North Amherst, and on the Bridle Path. 
The girls riding were: 

Squad I. Edith Bertenshaw '29, Bessie 
Smith '29, Priscilla Wood ';i(), Shirley 
Upton '.11. 

Squad 2. Clara Dillaway, Stockbridge 
'29, May Buckler ".iU, Lucy Cirunwaldt 
';«J, Mabel MacCausland "M), Emily 
Rollins ':n, Vera Wright '32. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLECHAN, WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 24, 1928 



n 



FACULTY-LOGS " 



Co-eds of '32 featured an excellent 
"Abbey Show" last Tuesday evening in 
the "Center." Selections by the class 
band, solos by Vera Wright, a sketch 
"taking off" the various classes, and 
finally as evidence of their affection, '32 
broadcasted kisses and {x^anuts to the 
very appreciative audience. 



Alice Chapin '29, Ruth Faulk '29, 
Guila Hawley '29, Alice Johnson '29. 
Lois Hale '32, and Vera Wright '32, sang 
at the World Aggie Night held last 
Saturday night in the Weldon Hotel, 
Greenfield. 

Ciirls of '31 spent a very enjoyable 
week-end at the < o-ed cabin on Mt. Toby 
last week. Hamburg was featured! 



STOCKBRIDGE 



And the leaves come tumbling down— 

CD 

If to sjx'ak means to talk and to talk 
means to sjx-ak, then why is there any 
tlitTerence between speaking about people 
and talking about people? 

CD 

So we did have a Mountain Da> ! Like 
a ship without a sail, what would Moun- 
tain Day be without Dean Burns? 

CD 

At last the Dining Hall has been bereft 
of the rolls, doughnuts, etc. 

CD 

The class in Landscape Gardening 75 
explored Rattlesnake Gutter and learned 
many things: 

\. That "wild life" of ages gone by 
can be made realistic by modern charac- 
ters. 

2. That cave-men may have been big 
brutes, but the question is: How did 
thev sciueeze through the rocks? 

CD 

Just another of "What Others Think 

of Us": The Middlehury Campus said: 

"We wonder if Mass. Aggies 'Shorty' was 

greased. He certainly did some pretty 

work in slipping by our tacklers." 

CD 

Get out the old "rah-rah" spirit and 
come to the game Saturday but: 

1. Don't try to be a grandstand 
quarterback. Definition (Webster not 
consulted!: A soft-boiled egg with a 
debator's voice who calls each play 
before and after it happens and spends 
the time between explaining why it 
gained or lost. 

2. Refrain from taking it upon your- 
self to try to explain the hows and whys 
to a suffragette who for all you know- 
may think she's at a roller polo match. 

3. Bring your best lung and don't 
forget to sing. 

CD 

All the world loves a football hero, 



VER.MONT WINS 

Flashing a forward pass attack that 
caught the opposition unprepared, the 
\ermont Academy football team de- 
feated the Stockbridge Aggies by a score 
of 19 to 6 last Saturday afternoon on 
.•Xlumni Field. The home team opened 
the first quarter with an offense that 
soon carried the ball within scoring dis- 
tance, and Chase pushed it over the line. 
The Vermonters startetl a passing game 
in the second {xriod, and Cirady scored. 
The forward pass combination of Terro 
to Grady was broken when Grady was 
injured after a fine catch, but Terro 
scored on the next play. A third touch- 
down was made in the last period by 
Terro. Hall starred for Stcxkbridge. 
carrying the ball most of the time on 
the offense, an«l Chase anti .Sylvia also 
played g(Kxl games. The summary: 

Vermont Stockbridjie 

Carr, Grady, le re. Hirst 

Brown, Comstork, Hance, It rt, Brown 
.Mtavcsta. Ig rg. .Sylvia, Greene 

Davis, c c, Skovron 

Westogren, rg Ig. Curran. Dibble 

Temple, rt It, Oksanen, Dibble 

Comstock, White, re le, Durkin 

Mega. Scofield, qb qb. Hall 

Follet, Ihb rhb, Hakkinen 

Kendall, Brasky, rhb Ihb, Hill 

Terry, fb fb. Chase 

Touchdowns- (Irady, Terro 2, Chase. 
Point after touchdown — Terro. Referee 
— Sullivan. Umpire — Salman. Linesman 
— Markuson. Time — 10m. quarters. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Charles Parker, Stockbridge '26, after 
two successful years as greenskeeper at 
Woburn and Westport, Mass., has secured 
a very fine position as greenskeeper of 
the Belmont Springs Country Club. 
Parker was the one successful app icant 
of the one hundred applying. Belmont 
Springs is one of the leading golf courses 
in the Greater Boston district. 

Samuel Mitchell, S.S.A. '28 of Salem, 
Mass., is now greenskeeper of the Green 
Bay (Wisconsin) golf course. He is now- 
managing an eighteen-hole course and 
one equally as large now under construc- 
tion will soon be in his management. 

Harold Smead, S.S.A. '29, of Greenfield, 
has transferred to the New York State 
Agricultural College at Ithaca, N. V. 

Arthur J. Connell, S.S.A. '29, after a 
successful summer at the Littletree Farms, 
Framingham, has transferred to the New 
York State School of Forestry for Land- 
scape work. 



except his rivals. Moral: Watch the 

rivals. 

CD 

All in. 



hn unfortunate mistake crept into t he- 
text of the Incident related last week con- 
cerning the foreigner who wanted a map 
and who,— if there had not been a typo- 
graphical error, would have received as 
"fine a .MOP as could be secured at any 
store in the city at a similar price." 

This week we present another article 
by Dean William L. .Machmer who 
traveled abroad and particularly in 
(iermany this past summer. 



"To adequately describe my trip to 
Germany this summer would require all 
the space devoted to your entire issue. 
because every day was simply crowded 
with new and interesting experiences. 

"To begin with there was the planning 
of the trip and the noting down of advice 
so freely sought by and generously given 
to one who plans a first trip abroad. My 
memoranda covered customs, routes, and 
places of interest. They told one how to 
eat, exercise, and avoid sea sickness ami 
where to purchase at siivings sufficient to 
cover the exix-nses of the trip. But all 
my copious notes and memoranda failed 
to make it possible to get even my pass- 
port without considerable anxiety and 
difficulty. A heavy sea made ineffective 
all remedies prescribed for maintaining a 
condition of normalcy in eating. As to 
purchasing good merchandise at very low 
prices well, the average tourist fails to 
run across those bargains. 

"The booking agent of the steamship 
line with which I desired to engage 
passage was one of our former students. 
He not only saved me money and anxiety 
but also secured hir me excellent cabin 
mates. As a result my ocean trip was 
much more pleasant than it would have 
been without this helpful assistance. 

"One does not neetl to travel extensively 
in Germany without noticing: 

"1. The distinct effort which the 
Germans are making to win back, through 
hard work and real service, the high 
position and influence which was theirs 
before the War. 

"2. The cleanliness of their cities espec- 
ially the streets and public conveyances. 
"3. The unmistakable evidences that 
the nati(m is recovering from the crush- 
ing effects of the World War. 

"4. The philosophical attitude of the 
moulders of public opinion and their 
earnest tiesirc to have other nations, 
especially the Unitetl States, understand 
their situation and problems. 

",'). The burning desire of thousands to 
emigrate to the United States in order 
to have an opportunity to work and 
earn. There is still much unemployiiuiit 
in (iermany and wages are low-. 

"fi. The excellent crops raised by the 
thrifty farmers forced to work with a 
minimum of machinery and to practice 
the strictest economy. There appears n> 
be absolutely no waste. 

"7. The splendid results obtained hy 
a scientific forestry policy. 

"The country has much to offer the 
tourist and stutlent. The most magnifi- 
cent cathedrals I visited were at Koln. 
Freiburg, and Munich. The finest paint- 
ings were in the Picture Gallery at 
Dresden, the Durer exhibition at Nuren- 
burg and the Pinakothek in Munich. The 
best museums I visited were the old and 
new- museums at Berlin and the German 
Museum in Munich. The most delightful 
landscapes were the Black Forest, Bavari- 
an .■Mps, the Rhine country from Maintr 
to Coblenz with its vine clad hills, castles. 
Lorelei, and Mouse Tower and the 
stretch of country from Munich to 
Lindau. The quaintest village was 
Rothenburg, a charming medieval town 
with red-tiled, gabled houses and well- 
preserved fortifications. 

"The most interesting evening «as 
spent with a German university student 
whom I met in Nurenburg. He showed 
me the historic landmarks in that city 
and took me to his club in the evening 
Through his courtesy I had a rare oi)por- 
tunity to see how the Germans siiend 
their leisure hours. 

"The memorials erected in honor of 
those who served and died in the WoxW 
War are most impressive because of their 
dignified simplicity. Two of these found 
in different cities represent mothers 
meditating, sad yet resigned because the> 
had made a contribution to the Father- 
land. 'Die Toten' is the simple inscrip- 
tion on the one, and 'Das Opfer' the onl> 
phrase on the other memorial. T"^- 
stand out in strong contrast to t e 
memorials of other wars. 

(Continued on Pafte 4) 




BOLLES 



gOSTONIANC 

Shoes J6r Men 

Imported and Domestic 

Scotch Grain and Calfskin 

Brogues and Dress Oxfords 

$7.50 to 12.00 

SHOE STORE 



SPECIAL SALE ON M.A.C. STATIONERY 

Hampshire Vellum 49 CCntS pCF boX Die Stamped 

A. J. HASTINGS "^^^^r AMHERST, MASS. 



Home Economics Society 
Holds Meeting on Campus 

■Massachusett Home Kconomics 
Society .Meeting Well .\t tended 



DRV CLEANIN(; 



Hallowe'en ! Hallowe'en ! Hallowe'en! 



LANTERNS 
NOISEMAKERS 
NUT CUPS 
APRONS 
HATS 



MASKS 
FALSE NOSES 
CANDLES 
DECORATIONS 

Instruction Books 



JAMES A. LOWELL 



BOOKSELLER 



HALLOWE'EN 

Party Invitations, 

Place Cards, 

Tallies, 

etc. 

MISS CUTLER'S GIFT SHOP 

Amherst Shoe Repair Co. 

Master Shoe Rebuilders 
NEXT TO BOLLES SHOE STORE 



BULBS F OR m PIANTING 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter H. Harrison, Prop. 



Carl L. Bolter Inc. 

EXETER AMHERST HYANNIS 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Now situated at 15 1-2 Pleasant St. 
EXCELLENT SHOE REPAIRERS 

V. GROXDOMCO. Prop. 

College Drugstore 

W. II. McGRATH 
Reft. Pharm. 

AMHERST, - - MASS. 




The Takeout- 



Best in Drug Store Service 
Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

J PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 

Oeulitt.' PrMciiptions Filled. Broken leneea 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 

ASK FOR 

"MUNSINGWEAR" RAYON 

and SILK 

Bloomers — Step-in^— Vests 

Slips— Bandeau — Pajamas 

Night Robes 



SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

G. Edward Fisher 

I TYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Remington, Royal 
and Corona Sales and Service 

•'<*''> Kqulrment General Repair Shop 

„^ H. E. DAVID 

"^ Pleasant St., ju»i below P.O. Amherst 



When you're called 
upon to take your 
partner out in your 
best suit... 

You II naturally take 
her out in a 
Bolter Suit. 

A hundred aces all 
with two trousers. 

Carl L. Bolter Inc. 

EXETER AMHERST HYANNIS 



Mas&ichusctts Home EroiH)iiiiisS<M illy 
IhM its fall nurtiny Irti- on M.A.C". 
campus last Siiturciay. Ovi-r two hundri-d 
were in the tlelenatitm pn-seiit. Miss 
AKiies Craig, SuiK-rvisor ot llonie Ixo- 
nomics in Sprinnfield, and President ot the 
State Society. preside<l at this meeting, 
the aim of which was a distiission of the 
"Voeational and IVofessional Opportuni- 
ties for women trainetl in Home K; onom- 
ies." Members of the College statT takinn 
p.irt in the disius-sions were .Miss lltUii 
Knowlton, Miss Esther Davies. Mis. 
Annette Herr. and Mrs. Harriet Hanks. 
Mis. Edna L. Skinner presided a one 
session . 

ADAMS '29 IIKHI MAN IN 

iConlinued frtini Tufte I) 
Sijturday evening they reached .Mem- 
phis Sunday MorninK. Monday Oil- 
(jl)er I.''), w.is the <late of the judninn 
of dairy products, and hfteen teams re- 
ported at that time for competition. 
Each team was composed of three mem- 
bers, making forty-five contestants. The 
•M.A.C. team was com|K)s«d of Harold 
S. Adams "2{), Stephen Adams 'IH), and 
Huntington Kutan '2\). I'rofessor Julius 
H. i-rand.sen, Htad of the Animal Hus- 
handry and iJairy Husl)andry Depart- 
ments, accomi)anied the team an the 
trip. On the way liack, the fellows 
stopijed in Cleveland and attended a 
Dairy Industries Ex|)osition being held 
there. At Memphis the team secure<l 
fifth place out of the fifteen, and Harold 
S. Adams '2«> won first prize in Ice-Cream 
Judging, for which honor a gold medal 
was presente*! to him. 

Arriving at Memphis Er day morning 
the Dairy Cattle Ju.lging Team sjK-nt the 
day visiting the city. .Siiturday morning 
the contest was held, the M.A.C. team 
' findmg the competition too strong for 
them. The team s|Knt the next two days 
looking over the city. On the way back 
the men went through Washington. s|Kn<l 
ing all day .Saturday in sight -seeing 
around that historic city. Among the 
places Ihey visitc<l were Washington 
Cathc.lral, Mount \ernon, the Capitol, 
the Smithsonian Institute, Ford's Theatre 
and the house across the street. .Saturday 
morning the team started north, arriving 
that night, completing a very successfu 
and interesting trip. 



For Prompt .Service IMione 8i8 PRESS|N(J 

^ll^fSfET CLEANERS & DYERS 

1 1 MAIN STREET NEXT TO TOWN HALL 

One i»uy .Service on Dry Caeanlntf \V..rk tialled f.., ....U lUhwrod Ih.lly 

RK»*AIR1N(; LACNDKV „ykiN(; 



WELL LAUNDERED CLOTHES 

are an Asset. 
Why not make an investment? 



-0^ 



THE AMHERST LAUNDRY CO., Inc. 



'Dick* Adams '29 M.A.C. Agent 



Tel. 720 



IMIVS. EDUC. lUlLDINt; FUND 

CtAMilinued from I'uilf 4) 
will be conducted by class units. 

IVofessor Curry S. Hicks, Vice-Chair- 
man of the Campaign Committee, is 
urging that an endorsi-nient pledge in 
any amount frcmi every alumnus is 
essential to the success of the campaign. 

An up-to-date summary of contribu- 
tions foMows: 

Summary of Contributors 

I'ndergraduate Classes 

i'tiiss Amount I'.C. 

»»20 fine. csf 

m-'«i . . ii.w r,;n 

1*-»;51 959. r>7| 



'MH 



Total . . . . 


f.{24:J 




1<>2S 


\2-M 


.'■)() 


.Mumni including class 






of 1<»28) 


2748.'> 


m 


Stockbridge School of 






.Agriculture: .Alumni 






and undergraduates . 


9:j.5 


r/) 


la< ulty . . . . 


:2i2r, 




Others . . . . 


.')827. 


40 



C.rant Total 



$;«m;i7 ."v; 



THE 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Offers Expert Hair Cutting 
Service for Men and Women. 

"POP" DUWELL. Prop. MEMORIAL BUILDING 



Town Hall Theatre 

MalliK'cs m .\A\n Kvt-nlnitN iii t,AS ft K «0 

ONE DAY ONLY WEDNESDAY, 00X724 



tt 



Wiih Syn(hriini/«-cl Miihl« 

THE PLAY GIRL" 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 



No. 1 Main St. Ainh«rat, Mas* 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaianteed 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WA.SIIINC IX)NE AT REA.SONARLE 
PRICES 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



A C.lrl wiio Ihoufthl she louM play & dance 
forUelllnft lliHt the Fiddler had (o be paid 

With JOIi.N MACK KKOWN 
MAIK;E BELLAMY and JOHN Mi<;KAIL 

hables Oddity Comedy 

THURS. .Dd FRIDAY, OCT. 25 and 26 

''THE COSSACKS" 

With JOHN C;lLHERT. RKNKK AIM)RKE 

and ERNE.ST TORRKNCK 
"The RIA Parade" Slurs in a Tolsioi story 

News Rvftular Prices Comedy 
SATURDAY, OCT. 27 DOUBLE FEATURE 



A va)ia.vx:k mascot 

(Continued from I'afte 2) 

uniforms containing the m.iroon, n modi 
fication of red, as part of the College- 
colors. Then tcKi, dcH-s not "courageous" 

ind "adive" describe the .ithliti( teams 
representing the College? Oarlmouth 
College teams are so»Tietimes known as 
the Indi.ms. Iiut we believe that Massa- 
< husctts is justified in adopting the 
Indian, otherwise known as the Redskin, 
as its mas<:ot for the reasons mentioned 

d>ove. 

Which is it to be the Collie, Mobcat 

>r iTidi.in? If these three suggestions do 
not mi-ct with your approval, what are 
your better suggestions? Now that the 
ball has started to roll, give it a push. 
Now is the lime! Why not have a real 
mascot for the Tufts game? 

L. .\f. L. 



FKI.NCH CI.IIH 0R(;ANIZKS 

One of the first clubs to nu-el this 
college year is the Knn, h Club, win. h 
gather«-i| last Ihursday evening in the 
Memori.d liuilding. AIhmiI fifteen ..f 
those intc-rested in forming a club of 
(K-rsons desirous of learning and s|K,ik'ng 
French came tog,-ther for the pur|K)s<- of 
re (.rgani/ing the last y.ars' c lub. S-veral 
ch.mg.s in ilu- ( onsi it ution of the Club 
were suggested .ind ofhcers were elected 
for the- coming triiu \t was .h-< ide.i to 
hold m.-etings ev<-ry other week, the s.ime 
as last year. The next meeting is Thms- 
day, November I A very successful 
year is predicted by those interested. 

Officers elected were: President, John 
K. (iuenard '.M ; Vice-l'rc-sident, /en- E. 
Hickney '.{I; Secret.iry, Iris N. DeFal... 
"M; Treasurer, ( .eorge |;. Non •;<!. Tin- 
faculty adviser is Mr. Stowell C. (^.ding. 

I-arc;f: ncmkfk oui for 

(Conllnued rroin i'aile 1) 
Mason, Runvik ari.l Wh.-rity. sopho- 
mores; M.il.s, Mi.iMii, Clin, I),- 

Met. her, H.il.-, Ileis.ini, II. VV. Mitchell^ 
l<i«e, .Smith, lippo, Waskiewic z, E. \\ 
Watson, I', S. Watson, and Wear, fresh- 
men. 



t 



AMHERST 
THEATER 1 



M.\IIM.K.S Dully. 2 Mt 
hvery hveninit. 2 shows. h.4S iin.l h.m 

Wednesday, Oct. 24 

1 5 Ack Kejth-Albee Vaudeville and 

lleleiie Chadw jck in 

|"SAYITWITH SABLES'* 

Comedy— Piithe News 



Thursduy & Friday, Oct. 25 & 26 

I Clara Btiw, Charles Hofttrs 

Richard Arlen, C;ary Cottper in 



«< 



WINGS" 



AMHERST FRUIT STORE 

whf.kf; aggif, mkn mkkt 

VNHI.N IXJWN 'lOWN 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGARS, 



Shown 'iMlre Dally 

^''•""« » i «» KMiiiiitts at 7:.«l 

I llear the thrllllna drone of rhe propeller-. 
I Ihe /.ooiiiiim ot llie !i);iiies. rhe r;il - 1 it -en 
I of rhe tiuns on ihe Ml.r^eloll^ Mll^n.l^^oiM• 
ICiin.ere Or.heMrii Mallnee and Lienlnu 

1 Price .SO cents P;,||„. News 



'POWER" 



With WILLIAM BOV|>and ALLEN HALE 
The two star* of "The .SItystraper" in an- 
other comedy riot. They worii and flirt 

'WHERE TRAILS BEGIN' 

JOHNNIE WALKER & SILVERSTREAK 
A story of a dou's devotion In the North. 

News 

WED., OCT. 31 REGULAJTPRICES 

"Mademoiselle from Armentieres" 

"The Bill Parade of the British. The Hero- 
ine of that war song In a love-war film 

Fables Reitular Prices Comedy 



NEW FALL STYLES 

ON DISPLAY 
watch OUR WINDOW 

Shoe Repairing Department. 

JOHN FOTOS SHOE STORE 




Saturday, Oct. 27 
Thomas .Meifthan - Flvelyn Brent in 

"THE MATING CALL" 

2 Reel Comedy— News 



Monday & Tuesday, Oct.i'» and 



WflllAM |7#\ J^rc/e.t, 



Shoes for HALLOWE'EN 
and OTHER OCCASIONS 

THOMAS S. CHILDS, Inc. 

275 men STREET HOLYOKE 



HOT AS SAHARA 



Willi 

|(;RF:TA M.SSEN and 

CHARI.ES FARRKFI. 

I .STORY OF TWr> I'ASSUIN ML III MANS 
SON OF ARAit^llAI t.llTI R OF PARIS 
I WHO DARED A Kt)KillDI» N l<)\| 
2 Reel Comedy — News 



KE^W COI^I^E;aE; STOEE^ 



BASEMENT OF "M" BUILDING 






TUB MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1928 



HICKEY-FREEMAN STYLE LASTS AS LONG AS THE SUIT. 

Insist on the durability of the style of your new fall suit. It's important for style that is merely pressed in is quickly lost, - while true style - IIICKEY- 
FRFFMAN STYLE is born of careful designing, unstinted tailoring and adroit hand shrinking. That's why you get superb style - style that lasts as long as 
you wear the suit, when you get one that is customized by Hickey-Freeman ask Tom to show you one. THOMAS F. WALSH 



NORWICH AKKIM AITACK 

((^onllniU'U froiii i'afte I) 
vadtTs strenK'th«nfd tiitir defcnsi' and 
the drive was »iitcessfully stopiml. live 
times during the first (Kriod the home 
team not within liltfen yards of a toudi- 
dowii only to lie turned hatk by the 
splendid defensive work of tlie MassjJ- 
chuselts aKKieuatioii. The Vermonters 
started another aerial attack a few 
minutes after the sciond period oinned, 
and Kane finally tarried the ball across 
the goal for Norwich's first touchdown. 
Following the kick-off O'Donnell, the 
Norwich fullback, hurled a long pass 
from his ten yard mark to Co;me ni 
mid-field, who eluded two opposing 
tacklers and raced forty-eight yards for 
a touchdown. In the third quarter 
neither team was able to gain consistently, 
hut in the last |»eriod another O'Donnell 
|)a»s carried the l)all to the Massachusetts 
goal line where MacDonald added a third 
touchdown for the Norwich team. 

With only a few minutes left to play the 
Massiichusetts team opene<l an aerial 
attack that saved the visitors from a 
shutout . A forward from Bowie to Ellert 
brought the ball to the Norwich eight- 
yard mark, where on the next play 
McKittrick crashetl through the line for 
the final score of the game. The summary: 



Norwich 



Taylor, Pierce, le 
Hourin, Sipila, It 
rt, 
Tansey, Titus, Ig 
Fuller. Ring, c 
Oilman, Nell, rg 
MacDonald, (".ibbons, rt 
Co;n>e. Council, re 



Massachusetts 

re, Cox, Coukos 



Walkden, Danglemeyer 

rg. True 

c. Mills 

Ig, Kelton 

It, Minkstein 

le, Bowie 

qb, Nitkiewicz 



FACl I/I Y-LOtIS 

(CoiilinueU from Pafte i) 
"At Koln I siiw the (.erman 'Turner 
fest', a gathering of gymnastic organi- 
zations held in some (.erman city every 
hve years. Over 2()<),(KX) young iieople 
from all parts of (iermany took part in 
the exhibitions, contests and games during 
the four days of the meet. 

"It was also my go<jd fortune to attend 
the International exhibition called the 
'Pressa' while at Koln. The exhibition 
aimed at portraying the world of thought 
as represented and reproduced in print 
and picture. For such a pagent of civi- 
lization an appropriate setting was needed. 
Surely Koln met this requirement. For 
art and nature, the mighty Rhine, from 
which for two thousand years the vener- 
able and holy city of Koln has derived 
sustenance and life, the sight of the 
many-towered town, the stately cathe- 
dral—all these conspired together to stir 
the soul of the onlooker and to prepare 
him for the intellectual atmosphere of 
the exhibition, which was an inter- 
national pagent of civilization at which 
nearly all countries were represented. It 
was what the proponents hoped it would 
be 'a center for the interchange of ideas 
among civilized peoples: an instrument of 

peace.' 

"One could write with like enthusiasm 
about iHjautiful Heidelberg, Freiburg, 
and Leipsic. It is my wish that many of 
you may have the privilege of sjxjnding 
at least one summer in Germany." 



Water Colors Form Second 
Exh ibition Of Season 

Paintings Should Attract Much 

Attention. Excellent Collection 

Secured by Professor Waugh 

A most unusual and attractive display 
of water color paintings is at present 
being set up in the lobby of the Memorial 
Buihiing. There are over fifty pictures in 
all and the group was secured by Pro- 
fessor Frank A. Waugh for exhibition at 
the College. 

Each of the pictures to be shown has 
something unusual about it, either in the 
way of composition, subject matter, or 
rendering. For example one of the group 
is a picture in which nothing is in detail, 
and yet the whole is a colorful street 
scene. At one side of this picture there 
is a painting in which exactly the opposite 
method of treatment has been used. That 
is, each detail, no matter how minute, 
has been painstakingly worked out. Both 
of these pictures are types in themselves, 
and yet each is very attractive and well 
executed. 

One of the things to bear in mind when 
viewing this exhibition is to note the 
different types of paintings shown. As 
an example of this fact one has but to 
compare the picture entitled a "Bit of 
Maine Coast", with the painting of a city 
street light at night. This latter scene is 
well worth studying. 



Pcnnell. Waining, qb 
Buckman, Kane, rhb 

rhb, Micks, Plummer 
Cannon, Shapard, rhb 

Ihb, McKittrick, Salenius 

O'Donnell, Crandy, fb fb, Magnuson 

Store Norwich IS, Massachusetts <>. 

Touchdowns- Kane, Coane, MacDonaltl, 

ttrick. Referee — Young. Umpire — 

ey. Head linesman — Chalmers. 



HARRIERS SECOND 
(Continued from Pufte I) 

This Saturday, a three-cornered race 
will be held here with the Worcester 
Tech and Amherst harriers as the oppo- 
sition. Last Saturday at Worcester. 
Amherst defeated the engineers 27 to 28, 
and Amherst defeated Aggie in a practice 
meet earlier in the season. The fastest 
Amherst men are Captain Snyder. Cobb, 
and Norris. while Hall and Smith are the 
Worcester leaders. Last Monday after- 
noon, Amherst practiced on the M.A.C. 
course in preparation for the meet. 



— JACKSON & 

1>K.\LEKS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST, MASS. 



CUTLER — 

READY TO WEAR 



I 



Clothes For The College Man 

At Prices You Can Afford To Pay 

Strictly hand tailored garments that are a 
credit to your appearance and a saving to 
your pocketbook. It won t cost you a cent 
to see how much clothes satisfaction we 
can give you. 

F. Af. Thompson & Son 



Cl0ikts !•* c«/f«(« mum Im •»€r 
htty yemr* 



EVERYTHING IN 

= HARDWARE - 



AND 



Radio Equipment 



ATWATER-KENT AND MAJESTIC RADIO 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



MOUNTAIN DAY GIVES LARGE 

(Continued from Pafta 1) 
the shortest interval of time. This was 
won by Norman Myrick '31. with Walter 
E. Southwick '29 a close second. The 
other event consisted of a wood chopping 
contest, in which two students were given 
logs of equal diameter to cut in half. The 
first heat of this contest was won by 
Arthur H. Graves. Second place went to 
Albert Nash '31. First place in the second 
heat went to Clark, a Stockbridge stu- 
dent, and second place to George A. 
Barrus '30. 

The next event on the afternoon's pro- 
gram was a speech by the well-known 
college and university administrator, 
"Dean" Burns, of Aniherst, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural, Smith, and Mount 
llolyoke colleges. In this year's oration 
the "Uean" eulogized the virtues of the 
Democratic candidate, Alfred E. Smith. 
Then, in his own inimitable manner he 
ascen<led, or should we say dropped, to 
the theme that M.A.C. should have KMK) 
co-eds. This statement drew loud ac- 
claim from the audience. 

After making trips to the caves and 
cabins the party split up for the journey 

home. 

UNBEATEN ADAMS TEAM 

(Continued from Pafte I) 

Adams Freshmen 

Clarkson, Potter. Hathaway.le rt.Wilson 
Rash<lorf, It rt. Foskett 

McGrath, Ig rg. Libbey, Gagliarducci 
Bickford. c <-•. Thomas 

CarduflF, rg Ig. Burrington 

Meacham, rt It, Fish 

Rondeau, le le. Roach 

Haggerty, qb qb, Welch, IVince 

Marshall. Hershey. Ihb rhb. Cheney 

Sheldon, Dunn, rhb Ihb, Foley. Sylvester 
Benvenutti, fb fb, Gagliarducci, Diggs 
Touchdown— Haggerty. Referee — Ford. 
Umpire— McHane. Linesman— Fielder. 
Time — 9-minute quarters. 

AGGIES FAVORED TO 
(Continued from P»f 1) 

another victim to its list. 

Worcester has two good backfield men 
in Asp and Gill while Graham and Aiken 
are strong cogs in the line. The probable 
starting lineup for the Massachusetts 
team will be as follows: ends, Fiowie and 
Cox; tackles, Walkden and Minkstein; 
guards, Brackley, Mills, True, or Kelton; 
center, Mann; quarterback, Howard; 
halfbacks, Ellert, McKittrick, Nitkie- 
wicz or Plummer; fullback, Magnuson. 

Because of the fact that Saturday is 
Dad's Day a large crowd of spectators 
is anticipated. During the game Coach 
i:)erby's harriers will run a race with 
visiting teams from Amherst and Wor- 
cester Tech. It is expected that the race 
will end in front of the bleachers during 
the half, thus permitting the spectators 
to witness the game and part of the cross 
country race. 



AGGIE NIGHT IS 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

Missouri; Newark, New Jersey; Buffalo, 
(ieneva and Schenectady, New York; 
High Point, N. C; Cleveland, Ohio; 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Providence, R. 1.; 
Brattleboro, Vt.; Appleton and Madison, 
Wisconsin; and Los Mochis, Mexico. 

For several reasons it was deemed ad- 
visable to [Mjstpone the meeting at Con- 
cord, Mass. to Friday, Octol^er 20, when 
that meeting, attended by President 
Thatcher and Professor Hicks, will be 
held at the Colonial Inn, Concord, at 
7 p. m. 

Delegates from the College and the 
Associate Alumni who were present at 
eastern meetings were: Greenfield, Wil- 
lard A. Munson '05 and Philip F. Whit- 
more '15, Fitchburg, Dr. Clarence E. 
Gordon '01; Hathorne. Dean William A. 
Machmer; Northampton, Sumner R. 
Parker '04; Springfield, Prof. Frederick 
A. McLaughlin '11; Providence. R. I., 
President Roscoe W. Thatcher and 
William I. Goodwin '18; Brattleboro, 
Vt., Prof. William C. Sanctuary; New 
Haven, Conn., Prof. Frank Prentice 
Rand; Hartford, Conn., Robert D. 
Hawley. 

The M.A.C. Club at Washington. D.C., 
celebrating its twenty-fifth anniversary at 
the Cirace Dodge Hotel, Washington, 
gave other alumni gatherings an oppor- 
tunity to listen to a part of their pro- 
gram via radio, which comprised an 
organ recital by "Lew" White and in 
which were included several Aggie songs. 
The program was arranged through 
station WEAF, New York City. 

At Greenfield alumni were entertained 
by a group of six Aggie co-eds under the 
leadership of .Miss Guila Hawley, adding 
plenty of Aggie spirit to the meeting by 
their songs. 



FACULTY NOTES 



SUCCESSFUL HIKE 
(Continued from P»te 1) 
The hike to Rattlesnake Ciutter, 
scheduled for October 2S, has had to be 
cancelled, Ijecause of the Social Union 
concert t(} be held that afternoon. The 
next hike will be held November 4, to 
the .Mount Toby caves. The monthly 
meeting of the Club will be held at the 
Social Union Room, North College, on 
November 1. This is a very imjxjrtant 
meeting, and it is hoped that all the 
members will be present. Although the 
returns from the present membership 
campaign were not complete when the 
pai)er went to print, it is estimated that 
the enrollment is about eighty students. 
Students desiring to join may do so at 
the regular meeting of the Club. 



There have been comparatively f^•\^• 
changes in the faculty at the College; 
since June. Alumni who have been re- 
cently appointe<l to fill vacancies in the 
various departments are: Miss Cornelia 
B. Church '28, laboratory assistant in 
home economics; Maxwell H. (ioldbirg 
'28, instructor in English; Miss Majel M. 
McMasters '26. laboratory assistant in 
chemistry; Charles R. McGeoth '25, in- 
structor in physical education; Clarence 
H. Parsons '27. instructor in animal 
husbandry; and Donald E. Ross '2.'i, 
foreman in the department of floriculture. 
Kenneth E. Wright of the University 
of Illinois, is a new member of the staff, 
and is serving as assistant research pro- 
fessor of dairying. 

Miss Edna L. Skinner, head of the 
division of home economics, received the 
M.A. degree at the Teachers College, 
Columbia University this summer. 

Professor and Mrs. Alexander E. Canre 
spent a portion of the summer on a tour 
of Norway, Sweden and Denmark. 

Dean William L. Machmer had an 
interesting summer on a European trip 
which included most of the European 
countries, particularly Germany. 

Professor Fred C. .Sears reports that 
he saw plenty of whales and icebergs nn 
his visit to Dr. Grenfell's Mission, Battle 
Harbor, Labrador, where he made a 
survey of the possibilities of growing hardy 
plants in that region. 

Professor Frank Prentice Rand traveled 
west instead of east this summer and 
visited San Francisco and the Paci6c 
Coast. He attended the annual conclave 
of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 

Professor Winthrop S. Welles, head of 
the department of agricultural education. 
spent a part of the summer at Harvard 
in graduate study. 

Glen L. Dunlap, D.V.M., Kansas 
Agricultural College, 1928, has begun his 
duties as assistant veterinary pathologist 
in the department of veterinary science. 



IMPORTANT ENTOMOLOGICAL 

GIFT 

During this past year Mr. C. A. Frost 
of Framingham, Mass., a New England 
coleoptcrist of note, donated sjiecimens of 
beetles representing several hundred diff- 
erent species to the insect collection of 
the Department of Entomology of this 
College. As all these specimens were 
determined and named by Mr. Frost, 
they constitute a very important addition 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'85 Dr. Edwin W. Allen, chief of the 
Office of Experiment Stations at Washing- 
ton, D. C, recently participated in an 
important survey of the state college at 
Cornell University. 

'90 Frederic J. Smith, chief chemist 
with Amer. Agric. Chem. Co.. at Pierce, 
Polk Co., Fla., visited the campus and 
the alumni office during the summer. 

'15 Harold C. WiUey received the 
M.A. degree at Michigan State College 
last June where he took his major work 
in sociology and minor in economics. 



to the college collection. In addition, 
Mr. Frost has kindly determined un- 
named material in the College collection, 
which has resulted in making the collec- 
tion of beetles more complete than before 
through the finding of many species 
hitherto not thought to be represented 
This addition to the collection is probably 
the most important one that has been 
received for several years. 



Ma 

fi 
B 
B 

fl 

I 

B 
fl 
B 

fl 
B 
fl 



w 



E 






i 



are back in our new home on 

Main Street. The Dining Room ■ 

is decorated and furnished as attractively g 

as any New York Store. We are serving { 

Lunches, Dinners and Suppers. We make I 

our Ice Cream and Candy as well as our J 

Pastry - fresh every day. i 

We invite the Faculty and Students g 

to visit { 



9 

I The College Candy Kitchen 



Patronize our Pastry Counter for your home use 



KOiH 



®h 






\uv Z 



Vol. XXXIX. 



MuBmd^UBtttB (Hoiha 



Ag: ic uUural 



Colk'Ud* 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1928 



Number 6 



OVER A HUNDRED DADS ON CAMPUS 

SA TURD A YAT SECOND DAD'S DA Y 



PROGRAM SUCCESSFULLY 
CARRIED OUT 



Kappa Sigma Wins Cup for Best 
Stunt in Evening Entertainment 



Fair weather, a scoreless but hard 
ought football game, a triangular c oss 
country meet, the annual sophomore- 
rtshman six-man roj)e pull, and a 
banquet in the evening followed by 
a tudent entertainment were the out- 
standing features of the second annual 
Dad's Day, held last Saturday at M.A.C. 
C)ver one hundred fathers attended this 
year's events and had an opportunity to 
become acquainted with the College to 
which their sons and daughters come. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



PHI KAPPA PHI ASSEMBLY 

Phi Kappa Phi holds its annual Assem- 
bly this Thursday. At this Assembly, the 
names of those elected will be read, as 
usual. An interesting speaker has been 
secured for this occasion. Dr. Charles H. 
lierty, of the Chemical Foundation, New 
York City. He is one of the leading 
chemists in this country, and promises to 
be entertaining. At present he is an 
expert adviser of the Chemical Founda- 
tion, and he is a past vice-president of 
the Chemical Society. 



Record Crowd Attends 

Political Debate 



Affirmative Team, Supporting Gov. 

Smith, Wins Unanimous Decision 

of Judges 



Important Gift 
Goes To Library 

Ex-Pres. Goodell's Private Library 

Given to .M.A.C. Library. Over 

Five Hundred Volumes 



ALUMNI FIELD SCENE OF STUBBORN 

BAULE WITH WORCESTER TECH 



OUTING CLUB 

A very successful membership cam- 
paign has just been completed by the 
M..A.C. Out ng Club. To date there is a 
total of 10(5 members and there are 
possibilities of even more as reports 
from further groups come in. From such 
a large group much can be expected, and 
it is hoped that this year will be the most 
active and profitable season of the Club's 
existance. A complete list will be pub- 
lished as s<Kin as this can be compiled. 

.\ very important riceting of the C!i:h 
will be held in the Social Union room. 
North College, at 7..30 p. m., Thursday 
night, November I. New members are 
particularly urged to be present, and 
learn the plans for the coming season. 
.Arrangement are complete for a very 
interesting meeting. 

The next hike is scheduled for Sunday, 
Nov. 4. to the Mount Toby Caves. An- 
nouncement of the time for departure 
will be made in chapel. 



It is very seldom that the student body 
is given the opportunity to witness a 
debate of the calibre of the one which 
took place in the Memorial Huilding last 
Thursday evening. Since the members of 
both teams had a keen desire to support 
their respective political affiliations, the 
arguments were all the more interesting 
to the audience. Few intercollegiate 
debates display the persuasive argumen- 
tation and the desire-to-win spirit that 
was so evident in this contest. 

Professor Frederick M. Cutler, who 
was chairman, intrmluced the question 
which was as follows: Resolved, that the 
candidacy of Alfred E. Smith for Presi- 
dent be supj)orted in preference to that 
of Herbert C. Hoover. Dennis M. Crowley 
'29 and Leonard W. Morrison '29 put 
forth their efforts in behalf of the affirm- 
ative, while Shepley Cleaves '29 and 
Taylor VV. Mills '29 showed their deter- 
mination to prove the negative side. The 
debate was carried on according to the 
American plan which consists of four 
twelve-minute constructive arguments and 
four five-minute rebuttals. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Helpful Speech By Mr. 
John Mills In Assembly 

Excellent Talk on Points in Choosing 

A Life Work by .Mr. John .NHIIs 

of the Bell TeL Laboratories 



Inf|i\ -dual likes and dislike« dctormino 
the I n that one should follow as a life 
work, according to .Mr. John .Mills, of 
the Hell Telephone Laboratories, in a 
sjjeech to the student body in Assembly 
last Thursday afternoon. .Mr. .Mills is 
a so an author and many are familiar 
with a recent book entitled, "Letters of 
a Radio Engineer to His Son." Dealing 
in an intensting way with the infinite 
varities of the personnel service, he told 
(Continued on Pafte i) 



Dr. William (ioodell of -Springfield and 
.Mrs. John S. (ioodell of Amherst have 
presented to the library of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College a most 
interesting as well as useful gift in the 
library of Dr. Henry Hill Cooddl who 
had been connected with the College 
almost from its inception and was presi- 
dent from ISHti until his death in UK)"). 
As far as we are able to determine the 
library is nearly complete. It includes 
also some books that belonged to Mrs. 
Goodell, the wife of President (ioodell, 
and some that belonged to his son, John 
S. (ioodell, who was a graduate of \an 
Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute and pur- 
sued his profession as an engineer in 
Central America, China, and various 
parts of the United States. 

A library Iwlonging to a former presi- 
dent will as time goes on be of increasing 
interest to the students and friends of 
the College. It is exi)ected that though 
lack of space forbids projK-r treatment in 
the present library building, the books 
will be catalogued the same as other bo<jks 
but will be placed on shelves by them- 
selves and marked so as to show their 
origin. In our new library no doubt a 
small alcove may be found for them. 

The library is of interest also Iwcause 
it reveals the broad culture and varied 
interests of President (Joodell. A num- 
ber of the books are (ireek, Latin, French, 
and (ierman classics. Dr. (.oodell taught 
Latin in this College. Pure literature in 
English is well representetl, although there 
is almost no fiction. There are a good 
number of the poets and essayists. There 
are bo<jks of science and agriculture but 
these, by no means, outnumber the others. 
Dr. (ioodell's books have been well read 
by their owner. If text books are omitted, 
probably five himdred brK>ks remain. 

.Some glimpses of the genial man him- 
self are seen in a few IxHiks of humor and 
in stray srribblings. .Mrs. (whxIcII, who 
lived on in Amherst until her death last 
year, was interested in every development 
of the College. 



Trennendous Ovation Given To 

Boston Women's Symphony 



Inparallel Entertainment Presented 

by Social Union Before Packed 

Auditorium 



.Never before has the Social Union 
sponsored such an entertainment as was 
presented by the Boston Women's .Sym- 
phony Orchestra, conducted by Ethel 
lej^inska, last Sunday afternoon in 
Bowker Auditorium. It was unquestion- 
al>ly the best exhibition of musical talent 
that has ever appeared in this hall. This 
*as the first entertainment of the season 
presented by the Social Union and it is 
'0 be highly commended in being able to 
secure such well-known artists as those 
under the leadership of Ethel Leginska. 

Miss Leginska and her orchestra 
played before one of the largest and most 
appreciative audiences that has ever 
O'cupied the seats of the auditorium. The 
f^etnhers of the orchestra, upon their 
entrance, were greeted by a great deal of 
^Pp'ause, and. on the entrance of Miss 
Lf^n^ka, the audience certainly showed 



•>l I SI ANDING PERF(,RM ANCE 
OF . lit PAS i W EEK 



Lthel Ltgin.ska. leading the world- 
ian!ous Boston Womens' Symphony 
"Orchestra, provided a degree of enter- 
ta.nment never before reached in 
■^' ial Union programs in the concert 
8'^en in Bowker Auditorium last 
Sunday afternoon. 



its recognition of her well-earned reputa 
tion. However, the applause in both 
instances was trivial in comparison to the 
tremendous ovation that she and her 
co-musicians received after the completion 
of each composition and especially after 
the rendition of Beethoven's "Fifth 
Symphony"; her own excellent interpre- 
tation of Liszt's "Hungarian Fantasie"; 
and at the close of the concert when she 
was called back no less than five times. 

Miss Leginska showed her versatility 
by playing the piano solo in the "Hun- 
garian Fantasie" with the utmost accuracy 
and charm, while at the same time, she 
assumed the responsibility of conducting 
the orchestra. Her genuine happiness 
upon the successful completion of a 
selection greatly endeared her to the 
audience. After continual rounds of 
applause at the end of the concert .Miss 
Leginska said, "Thank you. Please have 
us again next year." 

The program: 

Glinka. Overture, "Russian and Lud- 
milla" 

Beethoven. Symphony No. 5, Opus 57 
(ai Allegre con brio 

(h) Andante con moto 

(c) Allegro ^Scherzoi 

'd' Allegro .Maestoso, Presto 

Liszt. Hungarian Fantasie for Piano and 

Orchestra, Played and Conducted by 

Ethel Leginska. 

Rtmshy- Konakaff. Dance of the Clowns, 
from the Opera "The Snow Maiden', 
Hai^ner. Overture "Rienzi". 



DEBATING RECEIVING 

MUCH ATTENTION 

Intere.st Keen and G(M)d Material 
Makes an Excellent Season Probable 



Freshman Easily Win 

Interclass Track Meet 

Interclass Track Rivalry Revived for 
First Time Since 192S 

For the first time since 1925, interclass 
track rivalry was reviveil last Tuesday 
and Wednes<lay afternoon with the fresh- 
men showing themselves superior to the 
five class groups participating in the meet. 
A good op|X)rt unity was given Coach 
Derby to size up the future candidates 
for spring track teams and their possi- 
bilities. The high stores of the two lower 
classes show that there are many pros- 
pects, and it is anticipated that M.A.C. 
will soon have a revival in interest in this 
type of athletics. 

Bartsdi '.U was high scorer of the 
meet by capturing fifteen |X)ints. He 
placed first in the distus throw, javelin, 
an<l shot put. His classmate, E. Frost, 
was second highest scorer with twelve 
|H)ints by gaining a first in the hundred, 
a second in the broad jump, and a tie 
for first in the high jump. Waihgren, 
another member of ',J1, scored nine jwints 
with a first in the 220 an«l a setond in the 
century. Webber '29, captain of the 
varsity track team, collected eight points 
by placing first in the broad jump and 
third ill the hundred. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



TEAMS LOCKED IN SCORELESS TIE 



Loosely Played Football BrinHs .Series 
of I'hrills to Spectators 



Cross-Counlry Team 

Wins Triangular Meet 

Superior Team Work by M.A.C. 
Harriers Defeats W.P.I, and Amherst 

Team work by the .Massac hus<'tts cross- 
country team again stoo<l out last Satur- 
d.ny in th*- dpfoii» of Amberst ami Worces 
ter Tech on the home course. As in the 
race of the preceding week, although 
.M.A.C. did not place either first orsecontl, 
the men were bunched enough to raise 
the opponents' s<ores, so that the final 
totals were: Massachusetts 27, Amherst 
r>2, an«l Worcester r,'>. The meet <rided 
between the halves of the W.P.I, foot- 
ball game. 

Forging ahead after about two miles. 
Continued on Pttge i) 



Although nearly scored upon five times, 
a stubborn goal line defense by "Chick" 
Mciieoch's football te.im held Worcester 
Tech to a scoreless tie last Siturtlay after- 
noon on Alumni FieUI. The g.ime was 
full of thrills ami dangerous moments for 
both sides, but the scoring punch was 
lacking. The ball was largely in Aggie 
territory after the first few minutes of 
play, except in the third perioil when 
Mann recovered a fumble at midfield and 
an advance to the visitors' 12 yard line 
(Conllnucti on Page 4) 



SUPPORT THE BAND 

Tags to s«iid the b.iiid to the Spring- 
field and Tufts games are to be 8<jld 
directly after ass«-iiibly on Thursday, and 
at the Amherst game on .Saturday It is 
hoped that enough money will be realized 
by the H.»le of thes«' tags to send the 
entire band, ex|>enses free, to -Springfield 
on the tenth .ind to Medford on the 
seventeenth. The student body has sup- 
|)orted thf band admirably this year as 
f.ir as spirit g<M-s. Now is the chance to 
sup|K)rt it in an even more material way. 

Let's see a tag on every student by 
Siiturday afterncMjn! Sup|»ort the band. 
It has practically 8up|H>rted itself so far. 



Organized debating at M.A.C. is now 

being undertaken with renewed vigor. 

An increased interest in this activity on 

the part of the student body has stimu- 

(Conllnued on Page i) 



CAMPLS CALENDAR 



I'Uaiurrs are like poppies spread, 
y'ou 5fi:« Ihe flourr. id hhmm is shed; 
Or. like the ittnu-fatl m ihe rtrer, 
.1 momenl white, then metis fijreter. 

— Burns (Tarn o'Shanler) 



Thursday, Nov. I 

;j.4.'j p m I'tii Kappa Phi AswinJiIy. 
SpeakiT. IJr. ( liiulcs H. Herty tlic 
Chemical Koun(iation. New V'ork City, 
v.."**) p. in. French ('lul* meetinn 
7.:{() p m. Outing Club mc^eting. 
Friday. Nov. 2 

Varsity Cross Country: Wesleyan at M.A.C. 
7.(X) p. m. Mass meeting. 
.Saturday, Nov. i 

V'araity Ffwttjall: Amherst at Alunmi Field. 

Home Coming Day. 

Stockbridge Football: Kecne Normal School 

at Keene, N. U. 
House Dane es. 
.Sunday, Nov. 4 

Sunday Chaijel: Dr. George R. Baker. 
Hoard of Education of Northern Baptist 
Convention. 
Hike to .Mount Toby Caves. 
Wedneaday, Nov. 7 

F'reshman-Sophomore numeral football game. 
Thursday, Nov. 8 

.■5.4.1 p. m. Assembly. Speaker. Mrs. Anna 
Oarlin Spencer. New York City. 
Friday, Nov. * 

Freshman cross country: Amherst freshmen 
here. 
.Saturday, Nov. 10 
Dean's Saturday. 

Varsity Football: Springfield at Springfield. 
Varsity Cross Country: Boston University 

at Boston. 
Stockbridge Football: Pittsfield High. here. 



DANCE AT MEDFORD 

After the Tufts' game, .S.iturday. Nov. 
17, there will be a tlance there in the 
Stixldard C>yiniiasiurii. Plans to have it 
in the Hotel Statler have Ixeii • hanged, 
so that the dance will be run in conjunc- 
tion with Tufts. All those wishing to 
attend this dame should notify either 
Arnold W. Dyer '29, John K. Kay '29, 
or Kf-nnctb VV. I'erry '29 an iinnn an 
possible. 



INDEX PICTURES 

I'ratcriiity group pii tiirrsare scheriuled 
for Sunday, Nov. .{, .n Kinsman's .Studio, 
as follows: 

10(KI,i. m. Alpha Sigma I'hi 
lO.'iO a. ni. Kappa Epsilrm 
ll.(K)a. m. Alph.i tiaiiim.i Kho 
ll.MO.i. III. Sigiiii I'hi Epsihm 
12.(M) III. Kap)>a Sigma 



Agates Hopeful Of Securing 

Town Championship Saturday- 



All Indications Point to Usual Buttle 
Between Two Rival ■> 



With poor pros|)ects at the start of 
the season, the Amherst fr>otball team, 
which will play on Alunmi Field next 
Saturtlay afternoon for the 1!>2S town 
chami>ionship, has <levelope<l into a team 
which will give the .Maroon and White 
plenty of opposition. Both teams will 
have their best material in the Ki»"ie, 
although injuries have hamiR-red them 
throughout the season. 

Hy comparative records, Amherst seems 
to have and edge. This season, Massa- 
chusetts has won two, lost two, and tied 
one, scoring 19 points against 'H for her 
opponents. Amherst has won three, lost 
one, an<l tied rjn game, aggregating 7H 
points against .W for their rivals. These 
figures indicate that the Purple has a 
strong offense, but a weak defense. The 
last victory for M.A.C. in the town 
series was in 1924, the score being 17 to 
7. Last year, Amherst won 20 to 0. The 
scores since 1921 follow: 

1921- Amherst l.'i 

1922 -M.A.C. 10 

I92;{-Amherst 7 

1924 MAC. 17 

192.> Amherst 27 

1920 -Amherst 21 

1927- Amherst 20 

Although having but few veterans, 
Coach White of Amherst has built up a 
strong 180-pound line. The forwards who 
will prf>bably start against .Massachusetts 
are Captain Brittain and Felt, end; Kirk 
and McFarland, tackles; Lott and 



are 



M A.C. 

Amherst (J 

M.A.C. .{ 

Amherst 7 

M.A.C. f) 

M.A.C. 7 

M.A.C. 



Stearns, guards; and K. Wilson, center 
As line substitutes, F.mgboner, Kellogg 
Kay, Turner, and Whitney, have al 
seen service this season. Amherst's 
greatest strength lies in her ba< kfield, and 
(.rosskloss at quarterbai k, lleisey and 
E. Wilson, halfba«ks, an<l Warren, full- 
bark, will doubtless be the starting com- 
bination, while Tener anfl (iottlieb 
dangerous substitutes. 

No first-string men on either team will 
be out beraus<- of injuries this Siturday. 
Amherst will have the s«-rvi(es of Kay, 
Stearns, and Warren, who were hurt 
earlier in the siason. "Lu" Howard 
and "Charley" Walkden will play for 
M.A.C, as the injuries they received in 
the Worcester game were not s<'rious. 
The line can«lidates who will probably 
play Saturday for Massiichusetts are 
("aptain Howie and Cox. ends; .Minkstein, 
."Vlills or Walkden, tackles; Brackley, 
True or Kelton, guards; and Mann, 
center. In the backfield, some combina- 
tion of Ellert, Hicks. Howard. Magnuson, 
.M( Kittrick .Nitkiewuz. an.l Plumer, all 
able players on offens<' or defense, will be 
used. With bf>th teams at full strength 
and eager to win the battle, 'a hard- 
fought game is expected Saturday. 



OPPDNENIS' SC:ORES 

New Hampshire li, Sprim^firl,! o 
Maine 40, Bales 
Wesleyan 20, A mhrrst 20 
Colby 14. linwdom 
Brown 19, Tujts 1.1 
Norwich I.'i, Middlehurs' 



( 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 31, 1928 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massarhusetts 
Agriruliuial Collet;^-. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 
Shkplbv Cleaves '29 



Kdward H.Nichols '20 



Kdilor-in-C'liief 
MunaginK Edllur 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Editorial Shf.pi-ky Ci.eavks '29 

Feature MAHc;AKiir I*. Donovan '30 

Alumni & Short Courses Sally K. UkADLitv "31 
Athletic Lewis M 1 vm« '30 

l-KANK T D<)I(M.ASS '31 

Campus John B. Hov»akdJr. '30 

Cecil II. Wai>i.ei<;h '30 
Rial S. I'otilkJr. '31 



HI SI N I>S DIU'A RT M IvN T 

Frkdrrick D. Tiiaykr. Jr. "M Business Manascr 

• • " " " AdverlisinK Manatitr 

Lawrence A. Carruth '29 t inulailon Manaucr 

RoHKHr C. (iooDNOW. '31 

Winthrop O. Smith "30 
JuiiN R. Tank '30 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In ( ase of change of address, biibscriber 
will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 



Entered as serond-class matter at the AnihiTsf 
Post Oftice. Arc<l>te(l for iiiailinK at spenal rate 
of postaKe provided for in section 1 10.{, Act ol Oc- 
tober, 1917, authorized August 20, 191S. 



A NEW <)R(;anization 

III the hope of perpetuating a spirit 
that touched this campus last year in 
connection with the organization of a 
grouj) of stutlents from several colleges in 
the valley which inauguratetl the League 
of Nations Model Assembly, an Inter- 
national Relations Club has been formed 
on this campus. 

That this Club will find a need for 
itself is evident. In the first place, we 
have only major clubs for the student 
body. Those who concentrate in I.and- 
sciipe Gardening meet with other land- 
scape gardeners. Physicists meet with 
others interested in physics. These meet- 
ings are broadening within the field under 
consideration, but they tend to be tech- 
nical. They place emphasis on the sub- 
jects that are offered by the curriculum 
and serve the purpose of bringing to- 
er, more or less informally, students 
faculty members with a common 
rest which is (entered locally. 
1 the second place, the majority of 
tiiv students come to the institution from 
this state. This tends to inhiliit a great 
many clashes of opinion that one expects 
when students from different sections of 
the country live and talk together. Ideas 
are localized because of this, and the 
breadth of thought which college is 
supposed to stimulate is necessarily 
limited. 

To offset these conditions is the pur- 
pose of the International Relations. The 
meetings will be organized discussions of 
current topics affecting international re- 
lations to give those undergraduates 
interested a chance to air their views on 
world affairs. 

Another purpose of the Club is to 
handle the part M.A.C. will play in the 
organization of the League of Nations 
Model Assembly, the second meeting of 
which is to be held next spring either at 
Smith or Mt. Holyoke College. The 
success of the affair last year on its initial 
appearance has shown it to be a worth- 
while project, and plans are already 
under way for this year's gathering. The 
personnel of the Aggie delegation to this 
Assembly will largely come from the 
membership of the new Club which we 
have explained. The obvious reason for 
this is that the Assembly has an inter- 
national aspect, and those who have 
been in contact with such questions will 
be able to participate intelligently in the 
proceedings. 

Interest in such clubs is high in the 
other colleges of the valley, and it is 
hoped that there is a similar interest in 
our student body. It will not be until 
after the first meetings that one can 
estimate the degree of interest in the 
project, but it is worthy of a determined 
effort to make it a success. 



week, it might be said that Dartmouth 
College athletes are often called the 
Indians, but that still leaves the title of 
Redskins. 

Contributions will be received until a 
time when student action can be taken 
on the matter, preferably in Student 
Forum. The Collegian's cash prize is oi)en 
to any one who registers his suggestion 
through these coiuiuiis, and it is hoped 
that a good many more students will file 
their itleas before final action is taken. 

FLORICILIIIRK CLUB 

On Wednesday, October 13 1th, the 
I'loriculture Club held its first meeting 
of the year. Ai)i)roximately thirty per- 
sons interested in flowers and com- 
mercial florii iilture assembled in French 
Hall. An eledion of otlicers for the 
coming year was held and the following 
were elected: Martin (".. Fonseca '2i), 
president; Arthur Craves '2',t, vice- 
president; and Mary Heaumont, S.S.A., 
secretary-tn asurer. 

Plans for the coming flower show were 
discussed, and it was decidetl that the 
Kl<)ri( iilture Club will co-operate in the 
Horticultural display to be held in 
French Hall on November 17th. The 
I'lower Show, as usual, will be given a 
|)lace of prominence in the large laboratory 
in I'rench Hall for that puriH)se. 

The next meeting of the Club will be 
held on Thursday evening, Nt»v. 1st, at 
7.;i(» [). m. in French Hall. Further plans 
for the show will be discussed. 




STOCKBRWGE 



i\ '%^ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 31, 1928 



4t 



FACULTY LOGS " 



COMMUNICATION 



J 



The Collegian accepts no respon.sibility for opin- 
ions voiced in "The Eoruni." It aims to serve as 
a means of givinK expression to student opinion, 
and will print any views expressed rationally and 
finely, unless the editors feel that they are justi- 
fied in .suppressing them because of unfair per- 
sonal attack. Communications must be limited to 
5U0 words. 



A MASCOT 

Suggestions to be added to those made 
last week in connection with the choosing 
of a mascot for the College have filtered 
into the Collegian office slowly. Those 
received this week are three in number 
and were not given any special recom- 
mendation. They are: Black Cats, 
Black Crows, and Beavers. 

Of the powibilities mentioned last 



To the Kditor of the Collegian: 

After reading the attempt of a few- 
verbose, uncotijH-rative, and captious 
braggadocios at producing a paper which 
was inteiuled by these pseutlo-tlemagogues 
to represent the general belief of the 
student Ixuly, I must state that I do not 
think that these few have the backing of 
the campus, especially so far as the article 
pertaining to the co-eds is concerned. 

Upon further thought, I cannot recall 
ever seeing any of the "spontaneous com- 
posers" being entertained by any of the 
co-eds, or having ever been invited to any 
of the co-ed functions. 1 think it could 
be safely statetl that Mt. Holyoke and 
.Smith never have been afforded the ex- 
treme pleasure of their effulgent presence. 
Perhaps the co-eds are not lieautiful or 
seducive enough to appease the taste of 
these few introverts. Yet, I wontler if 
the "hypercritical few" have so much to 
offer as far as "facial symmetry" is con- 
cerned? Or perhaps, since these esthetes 
may be lacking in the latter, they no 
doubt have other far-famed qualities 
which necessitate a balanced reciprtxation 
on the part of the co-eds. 

Still again, if they have, the writer of 
this communication must have enter- 
tained an attack of optical delusions 
during his stay on the campus. Another 
(juestion is in order. If aesthetics isn't 
the matter of concern, could it be the 
fact that these "poorly chosen few" do 
not wish to match their intelligence and 
ability with the supposedly weaker sex? 
If this is the case, I think that it is about 
time that these fault-finders, whom, no 
doubt, can't stand the intense competi- 
tion, pick up and leave. 

A few constructive comments about 
various activities and the subjects of 
common interest on campus would be 
warmly accepted and appreciated by the 
leaders of the different activities; but 
when such undue, ungentlemanly, and 
nescient derision is heaped, first, on those 
who strive to keep M.A.C. out of the 
shadowy depths, and second, on a group 
of co-eds who make this College more 
attractive than they are given credit for, 
proves that the hypercritics either hadn't 
done much reasoning before they pub- 
lished their officious paper, or if they 
supposedly had reasoned, they deserve 
nothing but derision in return for their 
perverted outbreak. 

B. J. R. 



Prexy Says 

Fvery student ; t a state college should 
have a special interest in public affairs 
and every ipialified voter should exercise 
the right and fulfill the duty. 

— CD 

Intercolleftlate 

As one of the many means of earning 
their tuition, two students of the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin are working their way 
through college as professional escorts. 
Apparently some men are so desirable as 
escorts that the ladies arc willing to pay 
for their presence. 

CD 

At the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology the staff members of "The 
Tech," the weekly newspaper of that 
college, will receive credit for written 
work in the course in Knglish and History 
for all copy written for publication. 

CD 

Forty football huskies at Wesleyan 
were served chocolate egg shakes by a 
colored caterer at practice the other 
afternoon. The special diet came after 
two hours of stiff practice and Coach 
Wood says this process will prove bene- 
ficial. 

CD 

Norwich University is to have a Radio 
Club if there are enough students inter- 
ested in such an activity. The radio 
station is WIYD. 

CD 



Close Game at Holyoke 

Although the visitors had the ball 
most of the time, and were distinctly 
superior, Holyoke High defeated the 
Stockbridge football team last Friday 
afternoon at Holyoke by the score of 7 
to t). The home team's score came on a 
long run by Cassidy after he had caught 
a forward. 

Stockbridge Sthool scored early in the 
first period after a steady march down 
the field. With Curran, Hall and Chase 
carrying the bail well on line plunges, the 
invaders made at least twenty first 
downs in the fray, but penalties prevented 
further scoring. Holyoke made but three 
first downs in the game, but score in the 
third perioil when Cassidy caught Zwirko's 
pass and ran sixty yards for a touch- 
down. On the next play, Cassidy kicked 
the |)oint that won the game. 

Ca|)tain Mrown did not play in the 
game, as he has an infectetl leg. Chase 
broke three bones in his f(K)t in Friday's 
encounter and he will not play again for 
three weeks. Next Saturday. Stoikbridge 
School will play again on a foreign fieUl, 
this time with Keene Normal .School at 
Kecne, N. H. The summary of the 
Holyoke game: 



This week we have a narrative by 
President Thatcher who believing in the 
slogan "See America First," spent his 
vacation in the northwestern part of this 
country. 



Holyoke 

Leary, le 
Ilickson. It 
Welsh. 1(4 
(jauth er, c 
Morrisscttu, Stone, rg 
DuKan, rl 
Makreyko, re 
Joliet, qb 
Zwirko, llib 
Cassidy. rhb 
Krause. fb 



Stockbridfte 

re, Durkin 

rt, Oksiinen 

rg Dibl.li- 

c. Skovron Smith 

g, Sylvia 

It, Greene, Hart 

Ic, Hirst, Cheney 

qb. Hall 

rhb, Chase 

hb. Hill. Ilakkinen 

fb, Curran. Hill 



Score: Holyoke 7. Stockbridge 6. Touchdowns: 
Cassidy, Curran. Point alter touchdown: Cassidy. 
Referee: Barry. I'mpire: Marchinik. Linesman: 
MarenRo. Time: 12-minute quarters. 



Joe Found That 

Fannie Frosh isn't all that she thought 
she was when she arrived on campus, for 
after reading some literature (?) and 
listening to all she's heard, she has come 
to the conclusion that woman is a nuisance 
an intellectual unfortunate, a hyix)crite, 
and a necessity. 

CD 

That "Honor may go where Honor is 
due," we pause to say that last week 
there appeared in the New Hampshire an 
editorial on "Deferred Rushing" by our 
worthy editor. Ex-President Lewis recom- 
mended the article to the students and in 
addition sent a letter to the Collegian to 
show us that he is still interested in the 
affairs of the college. 'Ray! 

CD 

Now that the "battle" and "rebattle" 
is over, and the all-important question 
has been settled, everybody is happy, and 
so would Mr. Malley be if he were here. 
The debaters should be complimented 
on their smooth treatment of "candidacy 
for the presidency," also for the million- 
dollar words. 

That "textbook" was some textbook! 

CD 

Who is there who has not seen "Wings"? 

CD 

Speaking of RED, did you go to the 
football game? And did you SEE the 
red! Ma-a-a-a-a-a-a-sa-chu-sctts! More 
power to the reds! 

CD 

All the infants will sit back next 
Mcnday and let the "real" men vote. 
Wet or dry, dry or wet? 

CD 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB 

A distinctly new club, with a new 
purpose, was organized in the M.A.C. C. A. 
Oftice last Thursday night, October IK. 
This club, known as the International 
Relations Club, will deal entirely with 
international questions. It is intended 
to fill a certain need of the student body 
and to offset the localization that results 
from large clubs. This year the organiza- 
tion will take charge of the part that the 
M.A.C. students will take in the Model 
League of Nations' meeting. 



LANDSCAPE CLUB 

Officers for the 1928-29 Landscape Club 
were elected at a meeting of the group 
held last week. Ruth A. Faulk '29 was 
elected president. Kenneth F. McKittrick 
'29 was elected vice-president, Beryl F. 
Morse '30, secretary, and Eric Singleton 
'.'JO. treasurer. 

Since the plans for the coming year 
include a series of good lectures and a 
two or three day spring trip all juniors 
and seniors are urged to join the club 
immediately. 



POMOLOGY SHOW 

A Pomology Show is to be held in 
French Hall on Nov. 17 and 18 under 
the auspices of the Pomology Depart- 
ment of M.A.C. The committee in 
charge of general preparation consists of 
Clifton R. Johnson '29, chairman; John 
A. Andrew '30, secretary; Jesse A. Taft 
'.30, Craig Wilson, S.S.A. '30, and George 
Herman, S.S.A. '30. Further information 
will be posted in the various buildings on 
campus during the latter part of this 
week, but may be obtained at any time 
from members of the committee. Entries 
are to stop by November 7. 



NOTICE 

Continuing their function of last year, 
the Glee Club Orchestra will accompany 
the Glee Club on its trips this year. Try- 
outs will be held Thursday, November 1, 
at eight o'clock in the Memorial Building. 
All those who are interested are urged to 
attend, as there is a chance for everyone 
with ability. 



And so the Dads have been duly enter- 
tained. 

Who was the rabbit? 

Miss Phi's Sig's imitation proved flaw- 
less until "her" masculine hand went up 
to brush "her" cheek, and then we had 
the secret. Girls will be girls, you know. 
CD 

Aggie finished up the busy week-end 
with the demonstration of Sunday after- 
noon. Madame did her "daily two-dozen" 
and then some. 

CD 

Between "us columnists", we found 
this last week. The Boston Globe printed 
it: 

"The girl students at Amherst Agri- 
cultural College have succeeded by their 
food-strike demonstration in getting 
enough so they could go back to the 
dining hall. The grateful Boy Aggies 
have adopted a new yell: 



ALUMNI NOTES 



'04 Sidney B. Haskell, former director 
of the Mass. Agric. Expt. Station, and 
now educational manager of the Syn- 
thetic Nitrogen Products Corp., N.Y.C., 
has taken residence at Orsini Drive, 
Larch mont, N. Y. 

'05 Harold F. Tompson, owner and 
manager of the extensive Tompson 
Gardens, Seekonk, Mass., is also manag- 
ing editor of the "American Produce 
Grower," published by the International 
Trade Press of Chicago. 



At-a co-ed, co-ed, co-ed, 
At -a co-ed, co-ed, co-ed, 
You showem how 
Fixa da chow 
Hash!" 

CD 

Cela suffit. 



A DAY'S FISHING IN .MONTANA 

".\t three o'clock one afternoon last 
.\ugust, I stepped off a train at Hozeman, 
Montana, and was met by a friend who 
had promised to take me for a week-eiui 
of 'real trout fishing.' After 'changing; 
clothes' at a hotel, we piled ourselves, 
our rubber wading boots antl fishin,; 
tackle into an auto and drove 95 miles 
over a beautiful mountain road to We>i 
N'eilowstone. There we s|>ent a comfon- 
able night in one of the log cabin 'lodges' 
which are so attractive to tourists. 

".•\t daylight next morning, we looked 
out upon lowering cloutls, through which 
we could catch occasional glimpses of 
glistening fresh snow on the surrounding; 
mountain peaks. 'It looks like rain,' said 
the lodge keeper. Hut we had come to 
fish and fish we would. So after a good 
hot breakfast, we drove eight miles to a 
landing on the upper Madison River just 
outside Yellowstone National Park where 
we found a rowboat which we could n iit 
for the day. We piled into the boat and 
IK)led it out into the stream where a 
swift current begin to carry us rapidly 
down toward the Lake which was to be 
our fishing grounds. 

"As soon as we reached 'still water' we 
began casting, one of us using a special 
gaudy fly which had been recommended 
to us, another using the standard brown 
'Cahiir moth fly and the third a shiny 
'spinner.' Soon I had a 'strike' on my 
special fly and after a few minutes 
brought a nice brown trout up near 
enough to the boat so that the landing 
net couUl be slipped under him. He was 
a nice pound-and-a-half fish. The others 
changed to my sjjecial fly and soon we 
were getting 'strikes' at frequent inter- 
vals, mostly brown trout with an oc- 
casional specially gamey 'rainbow'. In a 
little while we had a dozen or more. 
Then came the rain, a regular mountain 
downpour. The trout stopped biting and 
in a few minutes we were soaking wet. 

"We pulled to the shore of the Lake 
and climbed up the mountain side a 
hundred yards or so to a big thick- 
foliaged spruce where I gathered bark 
and twigs and built an 'Indian' fire. 
(The Indians say, 'White man builds 
heap big fire, can't get close to it, roast 
on one side, freeze on other; Indian builds 
little fire, squats over it, warm all oven.' 
Shortly we were warm and, after a little 
while, dry and comfortable. We sat 
there several hours, watching the rain 
grow gradually less. Wild ducks flew 
about in flock* nr single pairs. Occasion- 
ally a flock of geese went 'honking' past. 
One flock of 'sand-hill cranes' soared 
majestically high overhead. A beavrr 
went to work on a willow sapling in the 
Lake below us. Pipes, a lunch, and a 
siesta under the trees made the time pass 
very pleasantly till early afternoon. 

"The rain stopped. We dumped the 
water out of the boat, rowed across the 
Lake to an island where there were many 
'deep holes.' I climbed out onto the 
bank for some 'shore fishing' while the 
others went out into the Lake again. 

"At almost the first cast, there was a 
fierce 'strike,' the rod bent into a beauti- 
ful rainbow arc, the reel hummed and I 
knew that I had a 'big one.' Soon he 
'broke water' in a flashing leap and I saw 
him, a 'beauty.' After several minutes of 
wild dashings in and out, back and forth, 
he tired and I led him cautiously to a 
sandy spot on the beach and finally 
managed to draw him into shallow water 
and land him. He proved to be a three- 
and-a-half pound rainbow trout, the 
largest and most beautiful one I had ever 
seen. Later, I had other 'strikes,' some 
of which I landed, while others got away 
after fierce struggles. 

"A lowering sun warned us that it »'»* 
time to go home. We started back across 
the Lake tired but happy over the day s 
experience. Then we struck the swift 
water' of the River, and tug and pull a' 
hard as we might, we could not make any 
progress up the stream. Finally, we all 
piled out into the water, two to pull o" 
the leading chain and one to push at the 
back of the boat. Whenever we came to 
a bend of the River, so that deep w-it^^ 
threatened to go over the tops of our 
wading boots, we climbed in and after 
minutes of sharp tugging at the oars 
(Contlautd on r«t« 4) 



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SKETCH BLOCKS 
CANVAS BOARD 
OIL AND 
WATER COLOR PAINTS 



JAMES A. LOWELL 



BOOKSELLER 



ALL WOMEN 

LIKE 

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We have many the most inter- 
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I Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



I 



T "W-' 






THE 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Offers Expert Hair Cutting 
Service for Men and Women. 

- POP " DUWELL, Prop. MEMORUL BUILDING 





Collegfe Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH 
Reg. Pharm. 

AMHERST, - - MASS. 



Amherst Shoe Repair Co. 

Master Shoe Rebuilders 



NEXT TO BOLLES SHOE STORE 



Best in Drug Store Service 
Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co, 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

|OculUu'l>rMcr<ptioiM FUled. Broii«n I«ium 
mccunitely replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
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Slips— Bandeau — Pajamas 

Night Robes 



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IG. Edward Fisher 



fPEWRlTER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Remington, Royal 
. "nd Corona Sales and Service 
l*^lo Equlrment General Repair Shop 

„ H. E. DAVID 
' rleaiant St., jtut below P.O. Amherst 



IT'S THE 

CUNIK 



There once was a 
fraternity custom 
...the first man up 
was the man best 
dressed. ^^_^ 

We put an end to 
thaL 

Now ff«t^mlty 
men sleep pemntt 
(iilly through eight 
o*clocks knowing 
there are plenty 
of Braebums to 
go *round. 



Carl H. Bolter 

INC. 

EXETER AMHERST 
HYANNIS 



Unusual Occurences 

On Campus Last Week 

(•o-eds Strike for Belter Food. 
New Publication .\ppears 

Two events unprecedented at M.-^.C". 
for the past few yt'ars, at least, ttM)k plare 
last week in the form of a co-eil strike and 
the niipearanre of ii new publication. The 
first incident r.ime as a hunger strike on 
the part of the feminine (M)rtion of tlu' 
student luxly, wl)''h was ex|K'ited to 
l>rinn atiout a reform in the (piality of 
the food served at th<' College dininj; hall. 
.Ail day lon^ last \V»'dnesd.i\' the co-eds 
sid>sisted on sandwiches and other hearty 
foods at the Ahinail Adams Mouse and 
refused to entir Draper Hall at .ill. In 
the afternoon .i petition was presenteil to 
President Ros<(K' \V. Th.itcher in which 
the grievances were made clear. The 
next nxirnin^;. however, saw the co-eds 
demurely taking; their a<custome<l se.its 
in the dining hall. The "strike" was over. 
.Almost sinnill.ineousK- w'th this event 
ap|)e.ired the new puliiic.it io", a mime- 
oRraphed ^roup of sheets entitled "Mass 
.Action," which was distriliuted as I lu- 
st iidi ills hit Howker .Auditorium List 
IViday morninjj. In this jKiper certain 
more or less well rj-coRiiizt-d students 
found an opportunity to express their 
opinions on several minor topics. The 
net result of this puhiicatifin was a Hurry 
of interest which settled into censure on 
the part of the majority of the student 
body. 



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to those students who desire 
service at a reasoiiaMe cost. 



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quality 



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'Dick " Adams '29 M.A.C. Agent Tel. 720 






CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM 

(Continued from PaftF I) 

Cobb of Amherst finished first with the 
time of 27 minutes and 2.') seconds for 
the five-mile course. Trailin^j Cobb by 
about 7.') yards was Smith of Worcester, 
but llernan and Snell started the Mas.sa- 
chus«-tts attai k by tyin^ for third. 
McCiuckian followed to take fifth and 
White and Pease took seventh and eighth 
places. .Several pretty sprints were made 
at the finish, the feature bein^ the race 
between the diminutive fariK-nter of 
M.A.C and two Worcester men, in whii h 
"Cappy" was overtaken, but surceedeil 
in beating one of his op|)onents in a close 
finish. The summary: 

Won by Cobb of Amherst; Smith of 
W.IM., 2d; llernan of M.A.C. and .Sn.li 
of M A.( ., M; Mct.nckian of M A( . 
51 h; Clarke of Amherst, 7th; White of 
MAC, 7th; Pease of M.A.C, 8th: 
Duchacek of W.P.I. . Uth; Carj^enter of 
M.A.C. loth; Hlouin of W.IM., llth; 
Hall of W.P.I.. 12th; Herman of M.A.C, 
l.'lth; Jardine of Amherst, 14th; .Snyder 
of Amherst, l.'")th; Navin of Amherst. 
Kith; Morris of Amherst, 17th; Zara- 
velka of W.P.I. , IHth; Mace of W.P.I. , 
H»th; Deane of Amherst, 2()th. 

Next Friday, another race is scheduled 
on the M.A.C course aKaiiisl Wesleyan. 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

Now situated at 15 1-2 Pleasant St. 
EXCELLENT SHOE REPAIRERS 
V. GRONDONICO, Prop. 



The visitors won 2.t to .iO on their own 
coiirsi' in .i nuel with Tufts, Imt lost t<> 
Spriiinhrid List Irid.iy .ilteriioon at 
Sprinnliehl by the s»<Me of IS to ;{7. In 
these two meets, Cipt.iiii Kiiiey and 
l.indsey were the Wesleyan leailers, al 
though they did not win either race. 

For Massachusetts, Robertson and 
I Vase have been in.utive from supposed 
ivy poisoning, but the former is recover- 
iiiH and may run in the Wesleyan meet. 
If neither can race I'riday, Coven will 
substitute. 



HELPFUL SPEECH BY MR. 

(Continued from I'ltite l> 

of the two main classes of work that ran 
be entere<l. These are, briefly, dealing 
with men and deaiiuK with things. 

In dealin; with men, there are three 
kintis of lines to be chosen, namely: 
working with your suiieriors, working 
with your e<|uals and working with your 
inferiors. The salesman works with his 
suiK-riors, as his prosjK'i live customer has 
the powir to say "yes" or "no". He c ited 
his own job as an example of working 
with one's ecpial, as he meets eai h [H-rson 
on a basis of etpiality. The boss foreman 
and the bi^ business man are examples 
«)f men working with their inferiors. 

"Things" otfer a different line of 
endeavor. Here there are four fields 
offered to one enlertinK this line of work. 
Study, mental routine, physical routine 
and ( reation. Study rei)resents the mental 
effort of learning and imparting knowledge 
The teacher must study so that he can 
have something to K've to the pupil. 
Mental routine is doing the s.-inie things 
over and over again each day with one's 
brain. A clerk is «loing this day by «lay, 
working with figures all the time. Physi- 
cal routine is shown best in the Kor<l 
factories. There the machines are so 
complicated and specialized that the men 



ninninn tlicrii li.ivr to do oiiK one li(t|«- 
thill^; o\rr and over ag.iin. (re.ition is 
the inventing of new things. .An illus- 
tration of this is the inventor, i out inn. illy 
.It work <liscovering new prinesses .ind 
objei Is. 



I Town Hall ThMtrel 



i 



Mallnees 3:00 KveninftB 6:45 and 8:.10 Q 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amhsrat. Mmam. 

Our Laundry Flnt Clau 

Our Policy GuarantMd 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



THURS. ud FRIDAY, NOV. 1 ud 2 

''HOLD 'EM YALE" 

ROD LA R(K;Ot'K, JKANNKTTK LOFF, 
JO.SKPII CAWTHORN and IllXill ALI.KN 

From the book "Al Yale". Football Film. 

NKW.V COMKDY 

SATURDAY, NOV. 3 

'THE FLYING COWBOY" 

.See l{CH)T OIB.SON'S One-Man Wild West 

.Show. Bronco Butllnft-Bull I>o|tltlnil-Rop- 

Int and Tying. A Real Rodeo. 



ti 



TRUXTON KING 



t9 



JOHN CILBF.RT In a Drama of an Amer- 
ican who .Saved a Throne. A Foi Reissue. 

.Story by George Barr McCulcheon. 



Men's Sheepskin Slippers 
At Low Prices 

Shoe Repairinii Department 

JOHN KOTOS SHOE STORE 



DFBATINC; KFCFIMNG 

(C;onllnurd from I'liAe I) 

Litcd enrollmeiil (or deb.iting work. This 
year the team th.it will represent our 
('olle^;e in contests with other institutions 
will not be s<-lecled until late in December. 
I'ntil that time, all <aiididates will com- 
pete on an e<|ual basis. The large attend- 
ance at the politiial debate indie. iles that 
the sluchnt body is also si-riously intiT- 
ested ill intramural debates, and un- 
(hnibtedly more of that nature will b«: 
olTeied. There is also a possibility that 
members of the debating s<juad will go 
before outside organiz.itions to pres<iit 
arguments on subjects of current interest. 

Professor Walter K. Prince will again 
ccKiih the chlialing teams. He fc-els that 
prosiHi ts for this year are r,itlic-r good. 

Candidates for the team arc- Dennis M. 
Crowlc-y '2«», this year's manager, Theo- 
dcire .Marcus '.«», veteran of the- '27-'2K 
season, Leonard W. Morrison '2'.>. Flint 
Contest Winner, Arthur .Sedercpiist '.'M), 
member of last year's scpiad, Ariujld 
Olson and <i. K. Mac Kimniie, iiiemberH 
of the WrM fieshman team, and CharleM 
W.iikden '2<.», Arllinr I'yh- '.{O, and Jo-cph 
W(M)d '.'{|, all ol whom arc- ni-w to varsity 
d<-bating. 

Freshman debating candid.ilcs will 
meet for the first time in the Memorial 
Huilding on Thursday evening, Nov. 1st, 
at 7.1.'i p. ni. Freshmc-n who cpialify 
may be eligible for varsity ch-bafing. The 
schedule of freshman debates will depend 
upcMi the ability of the team that is 
s«-lerted. 



AMHERST FRUIT STORE 

WHERF AGGIF MFN MFFT 

WHFN DOWN TOWN 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGARS 



LANDSCAPE PLANTING 

NURSERY STOCK 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter H. Harrison, Prop. 



MHERS 



THEATER 



WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7 

''THE BLUE DANUBE" 

AN INTENSELY HUMAN COU>RFL'L 

STORY OF LOVE. INTRIGUE 

AND REVENGE. 

FABLES— ODDITY— COMEDY 



SyKkraM iNskUsed Witk All Feitire 




Our Styles and Values 
in Footwear for Fall will 
pleasantly surprise you 

TAKE A LOOK 

THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 

275 HIGH STREET HOLYOKE 



WedneHday, Oct. M 

VAUDEVILLE 

FIVE KEITH ACTS and 

"RUNAWAY GIRLS" 

|SIIIRI.i-.Y MA.SON * ARTIIIIK KANKIN 

Comedy — Pathe News 



Thursday and Friday, Nov. I and 2 

Ici.lVE BKOOK, MARY BRIAN. FRKD 
KOIII.KR AND WII.I.IAM POWI-II. IN 

"FORGOHEN FACES" 

"You'll Alwuyit RemrmlHT Them" 

2 Reel Comedy — New« 



»» 



I.Saturday, Nov. .1 

SAMMY COHEN in 

"PLASTERED IN PARIS 

Oimedy De l.uie In Ihla F»i Picture 

2 Reel Comedy — Pathe News 
I Monday & Tuesday, Nov. 4 and 5 

I William Fo» prenanln F^nu Ferher'a Story 

"MOTHER KNOWS BEST" 

iMADfiK BKI.LAMY A I.OIJISK DRK.SSKR 
2 Reel Ojinedy — News 



KE^^W COI^I^EOE^ STOEE 



I 



BASEMENT OF "M" BUILDING 



U. A. C. Library. 



i 



1 1 1 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1928 



RARE WOOLENS IN SUITS FOR MEN 

.J. 1 u *., «,« ohr^u/ti in our Fall di<inlav of Suits and Overcoats. Included among them are many rare woolens 

ized by Ilickey-Freeman. Have "Tom" show you one. THOMAS F. WALSH 



ALUMNI FIELD SCENE OF 

(Ontlnued from Pafte 1) 

followed, only to hv stoppid by the 
ojjposiiiK line. Numerous Dad's Day 
visitors and a lart{e cheering section from 
Worcester helpetl to make up the lar^e 
crowd that siiw the KAnw. which was 
played in almost ideal football weather. 

After Magnuson's kickolT, neither team 
was able to sain consistently. A punting 
<luel in which Massachusetts had the ad- 
vantage, put the ball on Worcester's l(i- 
yard line, and (iill kicked to Tech's 45- 
yard line. Kllert, after catching the punt, 
was tackled so hard that he lost the ball, 
and Worcester recovered. Profiting by 
this break, the F^ngineers advanced to 
the home team's lO-yard line by a fake 
pass, line plunges, and a series of cross 
passes, (iill leading the attack. The in- 
vaders were finally stopped on the eight- 
yard line by the tackling of Mann and 
riunier. At the beginning of the second 
period Howie punted, but an Aggie lines- 
man was offside and the ball was placed 
three yards from the goal-line. With the 
defense expecting a kick, Magnuson broke 
through the line for fifteen yards and a 
first down. M.A.C. continued the ad- 
vance and another first ilown was made 
by McKittrick's line bucks and a penalty 
against Worcester. Two more rushes 
netted little, and Bowie punted out of 
danger. A few plays later, "I,u" Howard 
made a twenty-yard run, but his knee 
was twisted when he was tackled, and 
he was out for the rest of the game. 
Another Worcester advance by Asp and 
(VGrady brought the ball to the Aggie 
ten-yard stripe, but on the next two 
l)lays, the ball-carrier was thrown for a 
loss and Gill was forced to punt. The 
remainder of the period was played in 
Aggie territory, but there was no great 
danger. 

Asp of Worcester kicked olT in the 
second half and Bowie soon returned a 
punt. Finney turned a line plunge into a 
UO-yard o|)en field jaunt, but he was 
tackled on the Massachusetts '25-yard line. 
Another first down was made, but M.A.C. 
held on their eight-yard line. Bowie again 



kicked, but Finney fumbled, and Ray 
Mann recovered the ball. Kllert made a 
short line buck, and then grabbed two 
slKjrt passes from Kimball for a total of 
thirty yards. Kimball faked a pass, and 
ran seven yards through tackle. Fllert 
made another line plunge for a first down 
l)Ut here Worcester put up a strong de- 
fense and st<>pi)ed the home team but 
ten yards from the goal-line. 

In the fourth period both teams fre- 
quently tried passes in an effort to score. 
One substantial gain for Massachusetts 
was made when Kllert caught a forward 
and went 25 yards before being tackled. 
After an exchange of punts, Nitkiewicz 
made a ten-yard plunge, but three downs 
gained no more and Bowie kicked. With 
but a few minutes to play, a pass from 
(■.ill bounced off an Aggie player's arm to 
Finney. With two line bucks, Finney 
continued to the Massachusetts 20-yard 
line. A fifteen-yard penalty spoiled this 
advance, and the Maroon and White held 
the visitors on downs when they were 
within twenty yards of a touchdown for 
the fifth time during the game. Bowie 
punted to Finney as the game ended. 

Besides the injury to "Lu" Howard's 
knee, "Charley" Walkden received a 
broken nose in the game. "Freddie" 
Kllert played a very clever game for 
M.A.C. while Captain Gill of Worcester 
together with Asp and Finney were out- 
standing for the Kngineers. 
The summary: 



AT THE ABBEY 



Delta Phi Gamma Dance 

Delta Fhi (iamma showed their ability 
in organizing social functions by the 
noteworthy success of their dance held 
in the Memorial Building last Friday 
evening. Cornstalks, pumpkins, and 
hemlock boughs furnished the main 
decorating materials. The pillars at the 
entrance of the hall were especially well 
adorned. Amidst this autumnal back- 
ground, the dancers glided about the 
hall to the splendid music of Canny's 
orchestra. 

Those who received the sixty-five 
couples present were Miss Guila G. 
Hawley '29, president of Delta Phi 
Gamma, and Alfred S. Hilbert '30; and 
Miss Kvelyn Dover '30, social chairman 
of the sorority, and Charles B. Cox '30. 
Much credit is due Klizabeth A. Barry 
'31, Catherine Bowlan '32, and Josephine 
KIdridge '32 for their untiring efforts 
in making this dance a success. Miss 
Kdna L. Skinner anil Mrs. Maude A. 
Marshall acted as chaperons and were 
also in the receiving line. Refreshments 
were served downstairs in the lounging 
room. 



Worcester 

re. Babbitt 
rt, Delano. Shakour, Rice 
rg, Rice, Toiielian 
c. Aiken 
Ik. I'nderhill 
It, Anderson. Carlson 
le. Freeman 
gb. Finney 
McKittrick. Howard. Salenius. Kimball, Ihb 

rhb. Gill 
IMuim-r, rhb 'hb. OGrady 

Mannuson. Nitkiewicz ib tb. Asp 

.Siore: Massiichusetts 0, Worcester 0. Referee: 
Mann. SprinKlicld finpire: Coogan. Yale. Lines- 
man: Wall. Springlield. Time: 15-minute quarters 



Massachusetts 

Howie, le 
Minkstein, It 
Kelton, Ig 
Mann, c 

Brackley, True, rg 
Mills. Walkden. rl 
re, Cox 
Ellert, Kimball, cib 



One hundred and twenty co-eds, off- 
campus and Abbey girls, gathered in the 
Abbey Center last Thursday afternoon to 
enjoy a Tea given by th ■ W.S.G.A. 
Council acting as hostess. Miss Kdna L. 
Skinner, Miss Margaret Hamlin, and 
Mrs. Maud Marshall were the s{>ecial 
guests of the occasion. Songs, dancing 
and a general get-together, gooti time 
followed the formal indulgence in re- 
freshments. 



'24 H. D. Stevenson is landscape 
gardener for the Cragholnie Nursery Co. 
at Greenwich, Conn. 



— JACKSON & CUTLER — 

UKALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS READY TO WEAR 

AMHERST, MASS. 



When You Watch That Football Game 
DON'T FREEZE 

Dogskin Coats $50 Ski Coats $8.50 to $10 

Heavy weight Shaker Sweaters $5 to $10 

All Wool Overcoats $25 to $60 

Leather Coats Si 3.50 to $22.50 

Wool Sox, Heavy Golf Hose 

Gloves in All Styles 

and Weights 

f. M. Thompson & Son 



Clothe* for colltge men lor over 
forty years 



Girls of '32 were the guests of Miss 
Kdna Skinner last Sunday night at her 
home on Fearing St. Miss Jane Crowell 
of Amherst added generously to the good- 
will of the occasion, supplying many 
interesting reminiscences of "Amherst 
Town." 



Klizabeth Barry '31 has been elected 
basketball manager of the (iirls' Athletic 
Association. She replaces Priscilla Wood 
';U) whose many interests call her else- 
where at the scheduled hours of practice. 
Class backetball teams are being formed 
for interclass games this fall. 



Members of the Girls' Glee Club 
sjionsored a "weenie" roast on Prexy's 
Hill last Saturday noon. A large "turn- 
out" proved the popularity of the occasion. 



OVER A HUNDRED DADS ON 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Registration of dads took place in the 
Memorial Building immediately after 
their arrival on the campus, following 
which they were conducted to the vari- 
ous buildings on the campus and had a 
chance to see the material equipment 
which the institution possesses. Kvery 
building was left open for this purpose. 
At 11.30 the dads returned to the Mem- 
orial Building where they had a chance 
to meet the members of the faculty 
informally. 

The first event in the afternoon was 
the six-man rope pull in which the 
sophomore class matched strength and 
skill with the freshmen for the fourth 
time this year. On one end of the rope 
was the sophomore team composed of 
John Burnham, Richard Kvans, Carl 
Holm, Marc N. King, Robert Rooney, 
and Kdwin T. White. Opposing them 
was the freshman team made up of 
Kenneth Chapman, Phillip J. Connell, 
Richard H. Merritt, Warren Fabyan, 
Hans L. Van Leer, and Henry Vik. At 
the very outset the sophomores showed 
a complete mastery of the situation and 
within the first minute had succeeded in 
gainin.; more than two feet of the rope 
and they held a substantial advantage 
throughout the contest. 

After the six-man rope pull the crowd 
adjourned to Alumni Field where M.A.C. 
and Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
played a well fought football game which 
ended in a scoreless tie. During the 
halves the spectators also had a chance 
to witness t. e finish of a triangular cross- 
country meet between M.A.C, Amherst 
College and Worcester. This was won by 
M.A.C. by a score of 27 to 52 to 52. 

In the evening the dads assembled in 
Draper Hall for a banquet at which 
prominent men from M.A.C. and else- 
where addressed the gathering. Follow- 
ing this gathering an entertainment was 
given by the stud nts in Bowker Audi- 
torium. Kach fraternity and the one 
sorority presented a short skit and the 
winning group was presented a silver cup. 
Professor Fred C. Sears, Professor Charles 
H. Patterson, and Director Fred J. Sievers 
acted as judges. Kappa Sigma won this 
year's contest with a clever act entitled 
"The Hunter— A Fairy Tale." Second 
place went to Delta Phi (Jamma. The 
^orority, which gave a typical evening 
scene in the girls' dormitory. Third 
place w.is won by I'hi Sigma Kappa 
which furnished music with an orchestra. 
The other five acts in the contest wer 
entertaining and showed considerable 
talent and ability. 



FRESHMEN EASILY WIN 

(Continued from Page 1) 

As a whole the meet was very interest- 
ing and afforded much excitement for 
the large group of spectators consisting 
mostly of students. Although it has not 
been definitely decided, it is though that 
numerals will be given to all men who 
scored five or more points. The summary 
of the meet is as follows: 

100-yard dash— Won by E. Frost ,31; •_'n'] 
Wahlgren "11; ;ird. Webber '29; 4th. Lewis S :iu 
Time: 10 4-5 

440-yard run— Won by Morrill S'aO; L'nJ 
Crawford '32; 3rd. Kaylor "32; 4th. Dunn Jij 
Time: 55 sec. 

Mile run— Won by Nash "SI; 2nd. Keene S:iO, 
,'lrd. Hunter '29; 4th. Coven '30; .'jth. Powers '31. 
Time: 4.4.S minutes. 

High jump — First, tie by Hammond '30, E 
Frost '31. and O. H. Davis 32; 4th. tie by b. 
Frost S,'10 and Hoyt S"29 Heiitht: 5 ft. 2* in. 

Shot put— Won by Bartsch "31; 2nd. Sala "32: 
3rd, Herman S 29; 4th Fabyan '32. D-stance: 36 
ft. 8 in 

220 low hurdles— Won by H. D. Davis 32; 2n(l, 
Dunn '32; 3rd. Pratt S'29; 4lh, Storey '32. Time; 
31 seconds. 

H«0-yard run— Won by Crawlord 32; 2nd 
Keene S 30; 3rd, Hunter 29; 4th. Dunn 32. 5th 
Forest 32. Time: 2 min 13 3-5 s. 

220- yard dash— Won by Wahlgren 31; 2nd 
l^wis S30; 3rd Potter '31; 4th. Cuenard '31 
.')th. Storey '32 No time taken. 

Running broad jump — Won by Webber '29 
distance. 20 ft. 6) in.; 2nd. Frost 31, distance 
20 ft. IJin.; 3rd, Morrill S'30. distance, IH ft 
10) in.; 4th. Crawford '32. distance. 18 (t. 3 in., 
5th, McCoy S'30, distance, 17 ft. 4 in. 

Javelin throw — Won by Bartsch '31, distance 
147 ft.; 2nd, Webber '29; 3rd. Fabyan '32; 4tb, 
Potter '31; 5th. Butler S 30. 

Discus throw — Won by Bartsch "31, distance. 
90 ft. H in.; 2nd. Shats S'30. distance. 82 ft 2 in., 
3rd, Sarres S 30, distance, 70 ft. 

Pole vault— Won by R Wilson "32. height. 9 ft 
tie for 2nd between Philbrick S''29, Teague 32, 
and Fabyan '32. height, 8 ft. 6 in.; 5th, Fraser '31. 
height. 7 ft. 6 in. 

Point Score 
'29 30 '31 



'32 S'29 S'iO 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 
MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



Bessie M. Smith '29 recently won the 
beautiful silver loving cup and blue 
ribbon awarded as first premium in the 
l.adies' Hunter Class at the Northampton 
Horse Show. This was against no small 
rivalry. 

Grace Slack '29 won fourth place in 
the same class at Northampton Fair. 

Organized again as the Girls' Riding 
Squad, the co-ed riders ever increasing 
in numbers, has unanimously elected 
Bessie Smith '29 as captain of the squad. 



Ix)w hurdles 








11 


3 




HHO-yard run 


3 






8 






2'2()-yard dash 






10 


1 






Broad jump 


5 




4 


2 






Javelin throw 


3 




7 


3 






Discus throw 






5 








Pole vault 






1 


11 


3 




IDO-yard dash 


3 




9 








4 tOyard run 








9 






.Mile run 


3 


2 


6 








HiKh jump 




4 


4 


4 


li 


11 


Shot put 






5 


6 


3 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




17 


6 


51 


55 


m 


■m 



ALUMNI NOTES ^ 

'02 Howard L. Knight, author of 
"Sons of Old Massachusetts" and editor 
of the "Experiment Station Record," 
U.S.D.A., is also editor of the 1927 
Proceedings of the Association of Land 
Grant Colleges and Universities, succeed- 
ing Sidney B. Haskell '04 in this work. 



"FACULTY-LOGS" 

(Continued from Page 2) 

managed to get across the current to 
the shallow side without losing too much 
headway. As I splashed along shoving 
the boat from behind and panting for 
breath in the rare atmosphere at that 
high altitude, one of the others said: "I 
wish your students could see you now. " 
I thought, 'Well, maybe this will be 
good preparation for a hard year's work 
at M.A.C 

"An hour and a half of hard struggle 
took us back to the landing, from which 
we had floated down in less than ten 
minutes in the morning. But we voted 
the day well spent, and that the rain, the 
fire under the spruce, and the struggle 
with the swift current were all worth- 
while parts of 'a day's fishing in Mon- 
tana'." 

R. W. Thatcher 



'16 "Pete" Simmons writes that he 
has joined the ranks of the Rotarians 
at Fresno, Calif. 



RECORD CROWD ATTENDS 

(Continued from Paftel) 

When the judges gave their unanimous 
decision, it showed that the affirm itivf 
team had won the conte-t. The jud^t* 
were: Professor Alexander E. Cance. 
Professor Walter E. Prince, and Professor | 
George R. Taylor of Amherst Colli ki. 

After the debate a referendum w- 
taken, the results being as follows: 

l.'U students voted for Hoover. 

44 students voted for Smith. 

12 students changed their minds from 
Hoover to Smith 

4 students changed their minds fron:j 
Smith to Hoover 

:i students voted for Thomas. 



'16 Harold A. Mostrom, former ^gg'•\ 
track star, reports nearly an "all Aggie 
faculty at Essex County Aggie, Hathornel 
Mass., with a total of ten M.A.C. gradu, 



iaa\ 



RESULTS OF STRAW VOTE 



Hoover 
Smith 



452 
122 



Thomas 11 
Will Rogers 5 



Ij Have your relatives or friends j 
I visit our new place. They'll j 
B appreciate Waffles with Pure j 

8 Maple Syrup. 
9 

9 Agents for Page & Shaw, Lovell & Co- 
S vel and Cynthia Sweets. j 

I The College Candy Kitchen | 



B 




WHERE STUDENTS MEET 



I 



,M3t<0"l 



^^iMn^ntl^nBHtB fflnlkgtatt 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1928 



Number 7 



Floriculture And Pomology 

Depts. To Have Shows 



ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW THIS 
WEEK-END 



Anticipate an Unusually Good Dis- 
play at Popular Fall Exhibit 



.^t the last meeting of the Floriculture 
Cluh on Thursday, November 1, plans 
for the I'lower Show to be held Noveml>er 
17. were completed. The show this year 
gi\(s promise of being the f)est in years, 
ah a result of the interest shown by the 
(lull, and the fact that the show is to be 
^uiililiiuented with exhibits by other 
branches of the Horticultural I)ei>artment. 

Several plans for the main feature of 
the :4iow were subntitted for approval by 
members of the Club. The one selected 
consists of a large vase of prize chrys;»n- 
ttitimims against a background of hem- 
|(«k boughs, the whole being lighted by 
several spotlights. The show will also 
iiirlude an informal garden and exhibits 
|i\ (lifterent classes in table decorating, 
.111(1 in arrangement of ffowers in vases 
.iiiil li.iskets as in former years. 

Much interest and co-operation is being 
shown by the students this year and this 
should enable the Flower Show committee 
to carry out the plans for the show with 
suih ease that the result will be a better 
,inil more complete exhibit than it has 
bti n possible to have in recent years. 

Most spectacular of all the activities 
carried on by the Floriculture Club in 
rwcnt years is the Flower Show. Its 
growing jKjpularity is shown by the 
inireasing number of visitors who come 
to the show each year. This year the 
^lidw will be complete<l Friday evening. 
November IG, and will be open to visitors 
on Saturday morning. 



NEW SHOW INTRODUCED liY 
POMOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

Several Unique Contests and Displays 
Add interest tu Show 



Eight Honor Students 
Elected To Phi Kappa Phi 

Elizabeth A. Stelnbuftler Awarded 

Scholarship for lli(>lu'sl .\verage 

in the Senior Class 



Steady Increase In 
New Gym Fund 

.Mur.ini Bift Factor In Fund's Passinft) 
$41,000 Mark 



One of the outstanding features of the 
fall term will be the I'omology Show, 
which is to be held in French Hall, Nov. 
17 and IS. As parts of this event there 
will be staged various contests for (iitler- 
ent groups, such as high school students, 
college students, and faculty members. 

rompetition in the high school judging 
contest promises to be very keen. The 
e.xhibits by the i)rofess<irs are sure to 
furnish (|uite a problem for the judges. 
A contest is also to be staged in which 
the wives of faculty members each enter 
an apple pie. A fourth c<mtcst is in the 
form of a senior class judging contest. 
There are also to be exhibits by students 
and commercial fruit growers. 

For the c<»-erls there is furnished a 
chance to see which one is the chamjiion 
ap|)le pie maker of the Abbey. This is a 
special feature and it is hoped that many 
will enter. A pair of silk stockings is to 
lie given as first prize. The jiies entered 
lid not have to be made .it the Abbey. As 
long as they are made by a co-ed they 
(<)mpl>' with the rules. Ilntries must be 
tiled by Thursday night with any mem- 
ber of the conimittee, whi< h is composed 
of Clifton John.s<jn '2U, John A. Anilrew 
'.«), Jesse Taft '.H), Craig VVilsc»n, Stock- 
bridge '.{(), and George Herman .Stock- 
bridge '2'.). 

The pies are to be auctioned off Satur- 
day night and the fruit will be auctioned 
off on Sunday night at approximately 
six o'clock. 

Kveryone is urged to attend this event 
,ind get an insight into what is being 
(lone and also what can be done in the 
field of Pomology. 



A steady increase in alumni support 
has marked the progress of the Physical 
Education Building Project during the 
past month. Since October 1 nearly two 
Hundred alunmi have added their names 
to the growing list of donors, thus adding 
more than $7.tO0 to the total amount 
sulisiribed during this period. The total 
amount pledged and contributed to date 
is marly $42,(K)0, almost half of which 
amount has already been received in cash. 

With eighty per cent of its graduates 
contributing, the class of 1H88 leads all 
others from the standjK)int of the largest 
I>fr (cnt of donors in any one class. The 
mxt lour highest classes figured on the 
per <ent basis are as follows: 1928, (JCi?; 
lH.S.i. ca'i: 189S, 44'J; IHSo, 4:i% 'gradu- 

■i!< > Hilly '. 

From the standpoint of number of 
rontrihutors the class of 1028 is in the 
i'a<l with 7.3 of its members supporting 
the project. The classes of l<t27, 1920. 
I'-'IS and 1910 follow in the order named 
fur secimd, third, fourth and fifth places. 

That the need for early endorsement 
of this project in some form cannot be 
'wj strongly urged was pointed out in 
the World Aggie Night message to alumni 
from Prof. Curry S. Micks, vice-chairman 
of the cani|)aign committee, in which he 
stated. "To those who may not enthuse 
•^^'r this project as the pressing need, I 
*'sh to say that this campaign, if per- 
"I'ttfil by your endorsement, will open 
new reservoirs of support for the College 
"1 Ktneral, just as similar efforts have 
promoted the general welfare of several 
^' our outstanding state educational 
'nstitutions in other states." 

Thi romplete summary o contributors 

(Continued on Pafte 3) 



HOME COMING DAY 
DRAWS MANY ALUMNI 



Various Factors, However, Make for 

A Smaller Number of Alumni 

Than Usual 

.According to estimates from the Alumni 
Office, about 150 alumni were on campus 
Home-Coming Day, Saturday, Nov. 3. 
It is the feeling of those in charge that 
the day was rather poorly attended be- 
cause of the inclement weather and the 
lark of sufficient attractions. 

For the alumni who visited the College 
this year, the main attraction was the 
.Amherst-Aggie ffK)tball game. This fact, 
combined with uncertain weather con- 
ditions undoubtedly caused many alumni 
to plan their visits so as to arrive just 
prior to the game in the afternoon. As 
a result, departmental luncheons arranged 
for returning alumni were successful oidy 
in the case of those (unducted by the 
(Conlinueti on I'atie i) 



On October 31 there was held in 
Kowker .Auditorium the annual Phi Kappa 
Phi .issembly, at which iiieetiiig the newlv 
elected members were publicly taken into 
the hont)rary society. At this meeting 
the following members of the senior class 
were elected to the society: Harry K. 
Copson of Kasthampton, William G. 
Fdson of FLa.st Braintree, Paul L). Isham 
of H.impden, Roman .A. Kreienhaum of 
Hridgewater, Kenneth F. MiKiitrick of 
Boston, kuth H. Parrish of tlreat Har- 
rington. Walter K. Southwick of Clinton, 
Flizabeth A. Steinbugler of Hr«H>klyn, 
New York. 

.At the s;ime time the Phi Kappa Phi 
S holarship. a sum ot $2r)(), was awarded 
to Miss Steinbugler as the one having the 
liinhesl scholarship record of the senior 
(lass. This is the second time that this 
award has been made. Last year it was 
given to Harold E. Clark of Montague. 

The speaker of the afternixtn was Dr. 
Charles 11. Herty, of the Ameri(an 
Chemical Foundation, .New Voik City, 
who delivered a S|>eecli on the subject of 
the v.iliie of research chemi.stry in deter- 
mining ways to utilize surplus products. 
Dr. Herty eini)hasize(l the fact that the 
im.igination has a very decided inffuence 
in life today, especially in research. He 
also stressed the im|>ortance of the factor 
of persistence in doing creative research 
work. He mentioned as outstanding 
examples of the v.ilue of this type of 
work produ(ls such .is artifi(i.il silk or 
rayon, coal-tar |)ro(lii<ts, and others of 
like nature. All of these he stated were 
but results of pure science leading the 
way for jmictical or applied science. Dr. 
Herty made the prediction that the time 
is (oming when cellulose will be as im- 
|K)rtant in our life as are coal-tar prcHJucts. 
He said that cellulose is, comparatively 
speaking, little underslcMjd but that its 
nature would be revealed eventually and 
.111 immens*' new field developed as a 
result. 

LARGE INCREASE 
IN OUTING CLUB 

Complete List Shows 125 New 
Members 



Amherst And Springfield 
Defeat Fighting Ag 



AM HERS r WINS. H-0. BUT ACJATES 
SHOW SUPERIOR FOOIHAI.I. 

Maroon and White (Jots I'hirteen 
F'irst Downs to Amherst's I'w** 



On a slippery field overhung by a 
heavy blanket of fog the Amherst College 
gridsters won their fourth straight town 
(hampionship on Home Coming D.iy l»y 
overcoming the .M.issachusc-tts eleven in 
a hard fought battle which ended l.'} to 
in their f.i\or. The ste.idy drizzle failed 
to (l.impen the S|)irits of the large crowd 
of siH-ctators. More than onic the 
spect.itors rose to their fit-t as a M.ir(K>n 
.111(1 White gridman ripped through the 
line for a long gain or as the Amherst 
tc.im carried the ball into its o|)poiient's 
territory where the home team held for 
downs. 

S<M>ii after the fust period o|><>ne(l the 
Jeffnun s(ore(l their hrst toiKlulown. 
The s(()re (.ime as a result of ,i Idot ked 
ki(k which rolled ItehimI the Massiichii- 
s(tls' go.il where Felt, the .Amherst left 
(11(1 fell on the b.ill for .i toin hdown. In 
the last fjuarter Groskloss, the Purple 
lia( ktield star, broke loose for an end run 
to (.irry the b.ili eighty-four y.irds for a 
s«'cond touihdown. He then kicked the 
extr.i point to m.ike the s<-ore l.'{ to 0. 

In spite of the fin.il score, the "little 
red machine" directed by Capt.iin Bowie 
did very creditable work. The team 
earned twelve first downs while the 
•Aiiilierst eh'ven got only two. The work 
ol the home team's forward line was ex- 
cellent. M.inn, the star (inter for M.A ( ., 
.ind Minkstein, a i)romising sophomore 
at tackle, did some outstanding work for 
the losers. In the biikfiidd Kllert, 
Kimb.ill, and M(Kittri(k did most of 
the ground gaining. For the visitors 
(iroskloss was, without doubt, the most 
(Continued on Puftc .)) 



AGGIE HARRIERS WIN 
CLOSE RACE WITH B.U. 



Team-work CJIves M. A. 
Victory Over B. U. I 



<:. 2.S— .M 
"eam 



'>V I STANDING PERFORMANCE 
OF THE PAST WEEK 



'^y selling 125 tags to send the band 
^0 the Tufts game. Evelyn Dover '30. 
"as won our choice for the outstand- 
'H performance of the past week. 



Rev. James G. Gilkey 

Gives Effective Sermon 



.Armistice Day Furnishes Theme for 
Excellent .Sermon 



Dr. James Gordon Gilkey of the South 
Congregational Church, .Springfie d, Mass. 
gave a very striking Armistice Day ser- 
mon at chapel last Sunday morning. He 
IKjinted out quite clearly what knowledge 
was gained from the last war. In the first 
place, he stated that we now know the 
cost of war in money and human life. 
Furthermore, we now know the menace 
of science and chemistry to non-com- 
batants by the use of gases and other 
death-dealing devices. Also, we now 
know the results of propaganda in regard 
to promoting ill-feeling between nations. 
All of these facts were brought out very 
vividly by the means of striking analogies. 
Dr. Gilkey made two proposals as to what 
we can do as individuals. First, postpone 
judgment about other nations and not 
jump at conclusions; and secondly, sup- 
port international philanthropy. 



Five inembers of the Outing Club 
spent the last week-end on .Mt. Toby 
making the Club cabin ready for the 
winter. On Monday they were joined by 
anotlu-r group who came up the long 
scenic Bull Hill Trail. The whole party 
joined in a dinner cooked in the o[)en, 
and then spent the afternofHi hiking 
about the mountain. 

Thursd.'iy evening, Nov. 22, is the d.ite 
set for the next meeting of the Club. .At 
this time Mr. V\'oo<l will give an illus- 
trated account of his experiences in the 
White Mountains and the requirements 
for advanced membership will be an- 
nounced and voted upon. 

One hundred and twenty-five student^ 
have enrolled as members in the (Jut ing 
(I lib. The list follows: 

Allen, It. A. I.<.ar, Russell 

Armstroni;, Robert I^onur. K A. 

'(>untlnuo<l on Pafte 4) 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



"The stern }oy uhirh warriurs feet 
In foeman wnrlhy of their steel." 
— ^coll {Lady oj the Lake) 



Friday 

Stotkbridgc Football: South Deerficid High 

vs. St(x:kbridKe S< lirK>l, hi-re. 
T.rjO p. m. Advisory Council ot Women of 

Mass., at .\biRail Adam!) House. 
Saturday 

Combination Sijow-: Flower Show, Pom- 

oloK>- Show and \egeUible Gardening 

Show. 
Varsity Football: Tufts vs. MA (\ ;.t 

Med ford 
Sunday 

Chapel: Dr. D. Hr'-wer VA<\y, American 

Board of Commissioners for Foreign 

Mission* 
Hike to Mt. Holyoke, by Outing Club. 
Monday 

New England Intercollegiate Track Meet, 

at Boston. 



Coach Derby's varsity harriers de 
feated the Moston University tross country 
team at Boston last Sjjturday by the 
score 2.') to 'M. Although two of the IJ. IJ. 
I uniiers placed hrst and third respectively, 
the Massachusetts men were able to group 
and s«ore enough points for a victory «m 
the |{. II c<jurs«', which is approximately 
five miles long but not s<j diflii ult as is 
the M.A.C. course. 

.Mctiukian, a Massju hus«-tfs sopho 
more, ran his best race of the s«'asoii to 
place second in the meet. In spite of his 
la(k of ex|)erience he was the first .Aggie 
men to cross the goal. T.irr, the winner 
of the rim, was forced hard all the way 
by the .M.A.C. hill .-md dalers who left 
four H. I!, men to pla( e .ifter the last 
(Continued on Paftu .\j 



Exciting Battle In 

Annual Numeral Game 

Sc«»reless Encounter Is Far From A 

Dull (^lash. Freshmen Thrcuten 

To Sc<)re Twice 

.Although the freshmen twice threat- 
ened to score, the annual numeral game 
with the sophomores ended in a s< oreless 
tie Wednesday aftertuxjn, November 7, on 
.Alumni Field. The contest w,i> h.ird 
fought and was exciting to the spectators 
of the rival classes. 

In the first period, a sophomore touch- 
down seemed imminent when "Charlie" 
Salenius slipped off tackle for 4f) yards 
before being downed by Foley, the fresh- 
man safety-man. This play brought the 
ball to the yearlings' .'JO-yard line, but 
the freshmen staved off further gains by 
the s<jphomores. In the second quarter, 
Diggs ripped through the sriphomorc line 
for s«:veral first downs, and the frosh had 
the f^all within seven yards of a touch- 
down as half time was called. 

(Contlnuad on Page 4) 



SI»RiN(;FIEI.D OUIIM AYS M.A.C. 
IN 14-0 MCIORV 

Defensive Strenitth Shown by 

Atlrarians. iJowie and Mann 

Do (hmhI W<»rk 

Springfield College with its fast and 
heavy eleven defeated the Mas«.icliusetf8 
lootb.ill te.iiii at I'r.itt Field, Springfield, 
l.i-st .Satiird.iy :>l|erii<Min by thi- store of 
14 to (». The first score c.ime in the second 
(lii.irter when Mloomensloi k blocked a 
|iuiil, ,111(1 thr other tou(h(lown came in 
the last period by Ni-ilsoii .iflcr .i m.iiili 
up tin- field. M.A.C. could iii.ikc little 
Ik idw.iy (hiougli the opposing liin , .md 
relied on IJowie's ex( clleiil pimling to 
keep them out of ilaiiger. With the ball 
iiiNidc their 2(1 yard line, .\I.iss.i( huM-tts 
showed defensive strength .ind lwi(e pre- 
vented touch(h)wns: in the first peiiinl, 
when the ball w.is adv.imed to the .S y.ird 
ime, .111(1 'II attempted field go.il I. tiled; 
.iiiil III I In- last minute of pl.iy, when four 
pl.iys f.iiled to net the y.ird lunlcd to 
siore. .Spiingfii-ld's shifty b.icklicld men, 
Duncan, .Neilson, .md Willi. iiiixin, fea- 
tured the g.ime with several long gains. 

Springfield kicked olT to M..A.(".. ,ind 
.\itkiewi(v r,iii b.u k (iffeeii y.irds belore 
being ta; kled. ,\ louple of plays gained 
no ground, ind Howie piiiilrd. The first 
period i out iiiiii'd to be ,i punting duel 
between Howie .md Williamson. AlMiut 
li.ilf w.iy through the period, Willi. imson 
r.iii b.K k .1 punt to (he .M.iss.ti husetts 
l'( y.inl bin-. I'"iv<' line plunge, by 
Ncilsoii bioiighl tin- b.ill to the .M.A.C. 
S yard stripe. Here the M.iss.i( hlis<'tts 
(Conlinuvd on PiiUe .<) 

Objective Game 
This Saturday 

Hard Rattle Anticipated with I'ufts. 

Aitities Will Fiiiht Hard to 

Win Last <;ame 

This Saturday the MariMtn and White 
gridsters under the flirection of Coach 
"Chi<k" McGeorh will journey to Med- 
ford, Mass., where they will wage b.ittle 
with the Tufts eleven in their objective 
game of the seasim. Tuffs wems to have 
the .id\. Ullage as far as vi< tories and 
[Kiiiits are concernetl. However, the 
Connect iciit \'alley warriors are working 
hard to give their best with the ho|ies 
that the last game of the season may be 
a victory. 

Previous to the f.ill of '2(i both teams 
had won an erpial number of the annual 
ginies between the two colleges. For the 
past two years the Jumbos have had the 
b«'st teams in the history of their college. 
Last season they were one of the very 
few te.ims which paHs<'fl through a season 
iind(feale<l. This year Tufts h.is been 
forced to bf)W to lirown I'niversity and 
to tic with the I'niversity of New ll.iinp- 
:iliire ill a II to (I d<-adlo< k. 

At least, il can be anticipated that the 
valley grid men are going to fight for a 
vi( tory. If Tufts has a heavier te.uii, the 
.M.A.C. aggreg.-ition can offset this ad- 
vantage liy .in unsurpassed fighting spirit. 
As a w hole the teams seem «:venly mati h(!d 
and the victory could be well «les«Tved 
by either of the c'>ntestants. 

During this week Coa< h McGeo< h in- 
tends to send his mj-n through a series of 
light workouts consisting of dummy 
t.ickling and |>ossil)le light scrimmage 
with the s«-conds using Tufts plays. There 
are very few injuries on the Mjuad. 
Mrackley has .i sore shoulder, and Kllert 
is bothered slightly with an injureij foot. 
H<jtli these men, however, will be fit for 
'C:ontlnued on Pat* S) 



OPPONENT'S SCORES 



Tufts 12. Middlrhury 
Maine 20, limvflnin I) 
W.J'. I. Vi, RhfKle Island 
Amherst .'{4, Trinity f) 
C.C. of N.Y. 19, Norwich 
Colby 20, Bates 



t 



THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15. 1928 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Official iitwspapfr of the MassachuseUs 
Agii«ultural CoUige. Tublishcd every 
Wedneeday by the students. 

HOARD OK EDITORS 



Bbbplbv Clbavbs '29 
BdwaboH. Nichols '29 



Editor-in-Chief 
Managing Editor 



DEPAKTMIiNT EDITORS 
Editorial bHHii.KV Cleaves '29 

Feature Margaret 1'. Donovan '30 

Aluniiii & Short Courses Sallv E. Bradi ev '31 
>^thletic Lewis M . Lvnds '30 

Frank T, Doi glass '31 
Campua John B. Howard Jr. '30 

Cecil II. Wadleich '30 

KlAL S. I'OITIiKjR. '31 



Inclutled in the list of topics this term 
are many which should furnish interest- 
ing (iiw ussion. Some of these are iilirary 
hours, mascot, the Student Senate, and 
new a|)pli<ati(ins of the Honor System. 
Since Student Forums are worthwhile 
only when bringinR forth intelligent dis- 
cussions, we suggest that everyone think 
about these topics in order that reason- 
able decisions may be reached. 



BUSINESS DETARTMENT 

Vkbdbrick D. Thayer. Jr. '29 Business ManagfT 

" " " " Advertisintj Manaser 

Lawrence A. Cabruth '29 Circulation ManaK^r 

roiiert g. goodnow, '31 

Winthrop G. Smiih '30 

John R. Tank "30 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscrilxr 
will please notify the business manager 
08 soon as [xjssible. 



Enlrred as sortmil-class matter at tlie Ainhrrst 
Post Oflice. Aiteiitid tor niailinu at spec ial rale 
of postaRr provided (or in hoclioii 1 103, Act of Oc- 
tober, 1017, authorized August 2(J, I'JIS. 



(-OURTKSIKS 

One of the hoius of all editors is that 
they may si-rve their year's term without 
dwelling on hackneyed subjects. This 
desire is almost always supercetled by 
existing conditions on cami)us caused by 
the ingress of thoughtless at t ion result- 
ing from a sunmier of intlependence as 
well as an egress of oitler and more re- 
specting minds which are U)st through 
graduation. 

This etiitorial has for its purpose the 
jiointing out of several ways in which 
meetings of the .stuilent botly at Assem- 
blies and Sunilay C'haiul arc showing 
signs of carlessness, an<l we apologize to 
our old readers for harking liack to the 
"sanu- old stuff", but there is good reason 
for repeating. 

Ill the first place, the n«)ise niaile by 
repl.icing the hymnals in their (oiitainers 
has addetl a touch to Sunday Chapel 
which tends to interrupt the wliole ser- 
vice. It requires almost no effort to guitle 
the book into its place easily, anil lakes 
away an undtsir.ibie feature of the meet- 
ing. Just a slight effort will make all the 
difference in the wi>rld, and lor the sake 
of those who appreciate chapel gatherings 
antl out of lourtesy to the speaker, we 
should be willing to impritve the services 
by co-operating in this rather unimportant 
iteiu. 

Thursday Assemblies have seen the 
most ffagrant violations of courtesv 
which we have noticed. This is no time 
to argue about the right or wrong of 
compulsoiN .itttndance. The regulation 
stands that we must attend, and there 
is no escaping it. What we must develt)p 
is a spirit of pride throughout the student 
body which will inhibit ostentatious 
noises and promiscuous sleeping when 
we have a sj)eaker who is lecturing to us 
and who is forming his opinions of Aggie 
and her undergraduates through his con- 
tact from the platform. We know that a 
large majority t)f the students have this 
spirit of self resiK-ct which is expressed 
as courtesy, but the minority who dis- 
regard it are too noticeable in their 
violations. It is up to these latter to 
remeiuber that the actions of individuals 
are the basis for judgment upon which 
visitors base their thoughts. For the 
sake of their college mates they must be 
willing to sacrifice the desire to express 
personal dislike when it brings the charge 
of rudeness onto the student body rather 
than themselves. 

Chapels and Assemblies constitute our 
contacts with the outside world to a 
great degree. Let's conduct ourselves in 
such a way that we can always hold up 
our heads and be rightfully called Aggie 
men. 



INDEX PICTURE SCHEDULE 

Following is the schedule for group 
photos for the 1930 Index. To avoid 
(liflirulties and conii)lications it is neces- 
ary that each grtiup keep to schedule. 
If >()u find that you cannot comply with 
the schedule, notify Kenneth Hunt "M, 
at Kai)pa Sigma. I'lease be at Kinsman's 
.Studio at time designated for your group 
picture. 

Sunday, Nov. 25 
10.15 Q.T.V. 
1()..'J5 Sigma I'hi Kpsilon 
11. 1 M) Lambfla Chi Alpha 

Alpha (■anima Kho 

Delta Phi Alpha 

Debating Team 

Women's Student Council 

(iirls' Athletic Association 

Y.W.C.A. 

Academic Activities Board 
Sunday, Dec. 9 

Cdee Club 

Collegian 

Index Hoard 

Interfraternity Conference 

Roister Doisters 

C.lee Club Orchestra 

Maroon Key 

Sunday, Dec. 16 

Junior From Committee 

Soph. -Senior Hop Committee 

M.A.C.C.A. 

Informal Ctjmniittee 

Honor Council 

Senate 

Adelphia 




JIM'}.? 



CLUB NEWS 



1 



12.00 
12.20 
1.4.'j 
2.00 
2.."{0 
."{.OO 

10.15 
10.40 
ll.(K) 
11.20 
11.40 
12.00 
12.20 



11.00 
11.1;') 
ll.:{0 
11.4.-) 
12.00 
12.1."> 
12..'J0 



NOTICE 

Mr. G. W. lennebresque, F'xport 
Manager of the Prophylactic IJrush Co. 
of Northaniptim, is to speak to the class 
in Siilesnuiiiship (Ag. Kc. S;i) on Thurs- 
day morning, Nov. 22, 1928 at S o'clock 
in Room 114, Stockbritlge Hall. Mr. 
Fennel>res((ue's subject is to be "Possi- 
bilities ill Fxport Selling" and all who 
are interested in any kind of selling are 
invited to hear him. 

IMERFR.VIERNITY CONFERENCE 
.MEETING 

At the meeting of the Interfraternity 
Conference last Thursday evening, Ray- 
montl E. Smith ';iO was elected as secre- 
tary to fill the vacancy left by Ralph F. 
Kiieeland, Jr. Kric Singleton "M was 
elected to represent the group at the 
National Conference which is to be held 
in New York City. John R. Tank was 
chosen as alternate and was also ajjiiointed 
as backetball manager for the inter- 
fraternity league. 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

COUNCIL MEETING 



At a council meeting held last Sunday 
afternoon at Alumni Hall, Springfield 
College, plans were formulated for a 
second Model League of Nations Assem- 
bly, which is to be held this year nt 
Mount Holyoke College. Seven colleges 
and universities were represented at this 
meeting, and there also was present a 
member of the Boston Non-Partis;in 
League. Students from Yale, Brown, 
Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Springfield, Am- 
herst, and .M..-\.C. were in attendance. 

As plans now stand there are to be 
three sessions to the Model Assembly, 
one in the morning, one in the afternoon, 
and one in the evening of the day on 
which the meeting is to be held. The 
exact date is not known. 

At this meeting Constantine P. Ladas, 
M.A.C. '28, was elected president of the 
executive committee. At the same time 
the chairmen of five other committees 
were also elected. 



Campus Det)ri5 

Prcxy Says 

Myths often come to be generally be- 
lieved as truths. An ostrich never hides 
its head in the sand. 

CD 

Intercollegiate 

The popularity of Hying has added a 
new prohibition to the list of "thou shall 
nots" of the Wellesley College Handbook. 
The dean's office issued the edict that, 
"no student while under the jurisdiction 
of the college may ride in an aeroplane 
unless permission has been granted from 
the dean's ofifice and the written consent 
of her parents secured." Wliat about a 
chaperon? 

CD 

Holy Cross requires its prospective 
students to answer the question: "Do 
you pledge yourself to give of your time 
and ability to the extra-curricular activi- 
ties of the college?" If the answer is 
"No," admission is denied until a satis- 
factory explanation is forth-coming. 
-^ CD 

The highest score in one game made 
last season was credited to St. Xavier, 
at Cincinnati, which defeated Lee Uni- 
versity, in Kentiukv , to the merry tune 
of 132-0, a score estimated to be about 
the limit possible in a regulation game. 

Well, anyway, we aren't that bad. 
--CD 

Harvard's enrollment this year is 2(X) 
larger than ever before in its history. 1 la- 
total registration is now S,i;j4. 

Well, well. 

CD 

Joe Found That 

Fannie Frosh says: "A British scientist 
predicts that, in time to come, all men 
will be born toothless. .And I thought 
in my ignorance that they were usually 
born that way." 

CD 

Reminiscing: The center on the foot- 
ball team needed previous knowledge in 
dish-wiping to keep the ball dry at our 
last home game, which some may re- 
member. 

Who said we weren't "in a fog" in 
that game? 

CD 

On the same day just mentioned above, 
what was there which the fraternity 
back-porches and closets did not hold? 

CD 

Springfield commended ^LA.C. lor its 
splendid display of sportsmanship but 
stated that Aggie men ttjok revenge later 
in the dance that was held. Why not? 
Remember? "Aggie men voted the best 
dancers." 

CD 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLKGIAN, Till RSDAY, NOVEMBER 15. 1928 



COMMUNICATION 



FRENCH CLUB 

Another successful meeting was held by 
the French Club last Thursday, .Nov. 8, 
at eight o'clock in the .Memorial Building. 
The meeting, with about fifteen present, 
was opened by John R. (juenard '.'U, 
president of the club. He introduced Mr. 
Stowell C. Coding, faculty adviser of the 
Club, who spoke on the Alliance Fran- 
caise and the necessary formalities that 
should be finished before the club could 
join the Alliance. A report was given on 
the Constitution of the Club, as it is 
nearing completion and will be ready for 
the ajjproval of the Club. 

The next meeting will be held Thurs- 
day, Nov. 22, at eight o'clock in the 
same place. Members are retjuested to 
be present, as important business will be 
brought up. 

PHYSICS CLUB 

At the opening meeting of the Physics 
Club, which was held last Wednesday' 
evening, plans for the coming year were 
formulated. Because of the fact that the 
notice announcing this meeting did not 
have sufficient time to circulate, the 
gathering was rather small. Refresh- 
ments were served antl the speakers for 
the coming meetings were discussed. 
Mr. Eli Ginsberg, gratluate assistant in 
chemistry, is preparing a very enlight- 
ening talk on the subject: "The Use of 
the Potent ioineter in the Determination 
of the Hydrogen Ion Concentration." He 
will present his viesvs on this topic next 
Wetlnesday evening, in the Physics 
Building, and everyone who is interested 
will find their time very well spent by 
attending. ^ 

•k.o." club banquet 

"K.O," the campus 4-H Club among 
the girls of ^LA.C., held its initiation 
banquet on Tuesday evening, Nov. 0, at 
Daveni)ort Inn. Over thirty college 
4-H-ers were iiresent and received real 
inspiration from this memt>rable "get to- 
gether," planned and siumsored by Mr. 
C.corge L. Farley. State Club Leader, and 
I'rist ilia WcmkI ':{(), presiilent of "K.O." 

After a most delightful banquet- 
complete in every detail — the twelve 
initiates present signed the club consti- 
tution. This was accompanied by a 
simple, unicpie, and very impressive 
candlelight ceremony typifying the pro- 
found meaning of the service and de- 
velopment of the Head, Heart, Hands, 
and Health— the primary aim of 4-H 
Club work. 

There followed an explanation of the 
purpose and meaning of "K.O." by Miss 
Wood and a complete report by the Club 
historian, Gladys .Sivert '29. 

The following guests were then asked 
to siiy a few words of advice and sugges- 
tion to the Club: I3irector of H.xtension 
Munson; Mr. George L. Farley, State 
Club Leader; Miss Marion Forbes, .-Asst. 
State Club Leader; Miss Helen Doane; 
Mr. Earl Nodine; Mr. Harry Leland; 
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Eastman, Club leader 
of Hampshire County; Miss Corine Petit. 



The Colleulan accepts no responsihility for oi>;ii. 
ioni voiced in "The Forum." It aitm to ser\.- ^ 
a means of Kivins expression to student opinion, 
anil will print any views expressed rationally ,,n | 
sanely, unless the editors feel that they are ju-;i. 
fii'd in suppressing thetn because of unfair i.'r. 
sonal attack. Communications must be liinite I 'o 
500 words. 

Two communications have been sub 
mitted to this column during the p,i,t 
week which we are refraining from pub. 
lishing because they are not signed. We 
wish to remind any prospective contribu- 
tors that all communications niu^t be 
signed. The signature that follows the 
article in the Collegian will be constructnl 
at the author's designation, but no anony- 
mous articles will be allowed publicaticjii. 

At the same time that we are tightening 
up on one restriction, we are taking 
liberties with another in printing a long 
communication from one of our faculty 
members. 



STUDENT FORUM 

The first Student Forum of the year 
will be held next week Thursday under 
the supervision of Adelphia. These argu- 
mentative sessions which are held every 
term often see many things of interest 
develop, and we are including this ad- 
vance notice in our columns this week in 
the hope that .^ome reader may start 
thinking about his favorite subject now 
in order to be prepared to discuss it 
when the opportune moment comes. 



ALUMNI NEWS 

The October number of the quarterly 
"Landscape Architecture" has as its 
leading article a contribution from 
Stephen F. Hamblin '12, entitled "The 
Quality of Planting." The same number 
also contains Chapter 20 of the famous 
landscape construction notes by Albert 
D. Taylor '05. This issue gives construc- 
tion details on playground and recreation 
areas. 

'24 Russell Noyes who now possesses 
an M.A. degree from Harvard Univ., is an 
instructor at Indiana Univ. this year. 



Well, all's well, and nobody was lost 
in the voting machine. 

CD 

One of the freshmen is waxing intelli- 
gent. He predicted that in another week 
or two there'll be ice for hockey, for he 
saw them plowing down by the pond the 
other day and is sure they were planting 
ice. 

CD 

It's ten years since the Armistice was 
signed and still some people don't know- 
that the war is over. 

Don't bother to see if you're on Dean's 
Board, for others will see that you don't 
remain in ignorance. The human brain 
is a wonderful worker, all right. It starts 
working the moment we get up in the 
morning and doesn't stop until we get to 
class. So say the Boarders. 

Who will be King and Queen of the 
Board this year? 

CD 

What could be more resplendent than 
the juniors in their new uniforms? 
CD 

If you've read this far, you've done 
nobly. 

Ceia sufiit. 



BASKETBALL PRACTICE 

Candidates for varsity basketball have 
been practicing on Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings since October 2li under the 
direction of "Larry" Briggs. The men 
on the first team are Hetherington, 
Kelley, Stanswieski, and Webber, while 
Burbank, (i. M. Davis, Kane, King, 
Oliver, Pyenson, Rudquist, and E. G. 
Smith make up the second squad. Two 
sophomores, Frank T. Douglass and 
Alwin W. Yeatman are competing for 
the position of assistant manager. Prac- 
tice has consisted of individual stunts, 
a few offensive plays, defensive work, 
and a little scrimmage. After Thanks- 
giving, the squad will be augmented by 
those men now on the football team, in- 
cluding Captain Ellert, Coukos, Dangel- 
mayer. Hicks, Mann, and Minkstein. 



FRESHMEN WIND UP 

FOOTBALL SEASON 



After losing to New Hampton Acad- 
emy 12 to 6 in the previous game, the 
Massachusetts yearling football team shut 
out the Deerfield Academy seconds in 
their last game of the season by the 
score C to 0. In the New Hampton game 
the freshmen were opposed by a heavier 
and more powerful eleven which has built 
up an enviable list of victories this 
season. Roach, at right end, starred for 
the losers. His work on both the offense 
and the defense is worthy of much credit. 
In the backfield Sylvester played a very 
(Continued on Page 4) 



To the Editor of the Collegian: 

It is with a kind of physical revulsion 
that I am impelled to protest against tlie 
recrudescence of an ancient evil whidi I 
had thought definitely abolished among 
decent men. Once more the stocks a 
relic of intolerance and barbarism has 
been trotted out by the self-appointed 
priests of the local clay gods. Just what 
siircosanct lulni has been broken I have 
no slightest idea. Neither is this article 
to be taken as in any sense perstjnai. 
None of the perpetrators of this last out- 
rage is known to me, but whether his a;;e 
be eighteen or eighty, such a man reveals 
himself as a muddle-headed child. Let us 
try to look steadily at the principles which 
underlie such outbreaks of savagery. 

Strange as it may seem, there are few 
communities so intensely conservative as 
an American college campus. A code of 
exterior action almost as rigid as that 
prescribed by Confucian etiquette, gov- 
erns the body, and the way of the tr.ina- 
gressor is indeed a difficult one. It is a 
code which rests largely ujKin the delicate 
sensibilities of those who are- to put it 
mildly — little gifted with imagination or 
brains. To such a nature any suggestion 
that his rose smells ol Tin-Pan Alky is 
the rankest kind of blasphemy, and his 
(miy reaction — the only reaction that his 
big child's brain can entertain —is to >tt 
the forces of physical coercion into action. 
Everybtxly shall eat, sleep, exercise, 
enjoy the same jazz, admire the siiine 
mawkish pictures, and, above all, think 
as he does. To rebel is to court a inmii 
party, or the stocks, or some other pun- 
ishment devised by the moronic nature. 
•And when it comes to slush and senti- 
mentalism ah, then he towers to superb 
heights in his devotion to the sacred bull. 
Every college campus drools with "ivied 
walls and siicred halls," with yearninsi 
and retchings for the "old elm tree." .\!! 
this is at its best when sung slightly off 
key and to the accompaniment of beery 
tears. For a college campus is a microcosm 
of the worUI outside and the ancient 
forces of Philistinism and vulgarity hold 
sway here as there. 

It seems never to have entered the dull 
minds of the devotees of standardization 
and mediocrity, that men and women ,ire 
changing beings, moving upward from 
stagnation through war to peace. 

The students on a college campus may 
be sorted roughly into two categories. 
First come the unawakened members of 
the group — slaves of tradition and herd 
prejudice. Their will is almost inactive 
and their reactions to stimuli can be so 
accurately predicted that a shrewd leader 
can i)Iay upon them as ujwn an instru- 
ment. They can be moved to passing 
enthusiasms by the canny voodoo dtxtors 
of the campus, but the stimulus must be 
perpetually jazzed up from outside since 
they have small sustained leverage withm 
themselves. I have been told in good 
faith that these methods of the mob 
psychologist are justified, and that the 
average student is capable of nothing 
better or higher. How do you like thij 
picture of yourself? I mean YOU! .\n 
I mean all of us, for there is no mothers 
son on this campus who is not m li'^ 
degree sunken in sloth and automatism. 
The only hope for us is that we may be 
jolted out of our besotted state. 

In a second group are those who ba^e 
begun to grow. Painfully and blindly. 
perhaps, they are struggling toward free- 
dom—struggling to substitute inner stan- 
dards of duty and right for outer stan- 
dards of formalism and compulsion. t,an 
you wonder that in this period of tea ' 
justment they sometimes go wrong. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Wherever well-dressed men gather, 
you see 





BOLLES SHOE STORE 



SPECIAL SALE ON M.A.C. STATIONERY 

Hampshire Vellum 49 CCIltS pCF BoX Die Stamped 

A J. HASTINGS "'^'J^'i^Xr AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOKS BY PAUL DE KRUIF 



HUNGER FIGHTERS 

The story of the men who 
struggled with nature to 
maintain and increase the 
North American food supply 



MICROBE HUNTERS 

The true story of the advent- 
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Man's worst enemy, disease 



JAMES A. LOWELL 



BOOKSELLER 



OBJECTIVE GA.ME .SATURDAY 

(Continued frum I'uite 1^ 

bcrvice Saturday. A few changes will be 
made in the lineup. Magnuson will prob- 
alily be shifted back into the line with 
Mann at center. McKittrick will l)e 
used at fullback in place of .Magnuson. 

On the Friday night preceding the 
game the Massachusetts football team 
will attend a "get together" baiujuet in 
Mi'dford. The coaching staff, managers, 
and sciuads of both teams will be present, 
lolknving the bancjuet the .M..\.C. team 
and coaches will attend a smoker given 
at the Boston Alumni Club by the 
Boston Chamber of Commerce at H p. m. 
This invitation was extended through 
thf kindness of Mr. Henry M. Walker 
It'i. .After the smoker the team will 
retire to the Hotel Huntington where it 
will spend the night. 



A(i(;iE HARRIERS WIN FROM B.U. 

(Continued from Pafte I) 

.^ggie competitor had finished the race. 
The time for the winner was 31 minutes, 
iO se( onds. The order in which the man 
finished is as follows: Tarr, B.L'.; Mc- 
Giikian, M.; Harmon, B.U.; White, M.; 
Brrgan, M.; Snell, M.; Earp, H.U.; 
Carpenter, M.; Robertson, M.; Hernan, 
M.; larwell, B.U.; Stacey, B.U.; Nichols, 
Bl .; Cantalonis, B.U. 



HOME COMING DAY 

(Continued from Pafte I) 
dej)artments of agricultural economics 
and pomology, and even these were 
rather sparsely attended. 

Following the football game fraternity 
house parties attracted many alumni of 
recent classes. 

It is evident that other plans or a 
change in program should be made in 
connection with .Alumni Home-Coming 
Day, sfj as to make the day sufficiently 
inviting to returning alunmi to inducf 
them to arrive on campus the day before, 
or at least during the morning hours, am] 
that an evening jjrogram other than 
fraternity house dances should be ar- 
ranged for the benefit of .tlunini of all 
classes, young and old. 



STEADY INCREASE IN GYM FUND 

(Continued from Puge 1) 

IniJiTgraduatc Classes 

t'«" Amount 

l!*29 $](»(«•,. 

UWf) iiL'.J. 

I'J'n IKH. 

1M2 20. 



PC. 

57 
1 



i&::^i 






• A/^ew and Alluring 
. Lamp Shades of 
f Distinction and 
^ Individuality, 

^ Miss Cutler's Gift Shop i 

THE 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Offers Expert Hair Cutting 
Service for Men and Women. 

">*0P" DUWELL. Prop. MEMORIAL BUILDING 



Total $.T.M.3. 

l!»->< 12."i<).,'i() 

.\lumni (inclmllnK "28) . . 2y335.C6 
Stockbrldgf School of Aiiri( ulture 

Alumni unci undcrKraduutes S»!)0..'<0 

Kiuulty 2246. 

Otht-rs .'■>,s;i2.10 



63 



Grand Total 



*4tR47 rrf( 



College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH 
Reg. Phartn. 

AMHERST, - - MASS. 



Amherst Shoe Repair Co. 

Master Shoe RebuIIdera 
NEXT TO BOLLES SHOE STORE 



I ASK FOR 

"Munsingwear" 

RAYON and SILK 

Bloomers - Step-ins -Vests 

Slips - Bandeau - Pajamas 

Night Robes 

SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

G. Edward Fisher 



TYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Remint^ton, Royal 
and Corona Sales and Senice 

Radio Equirment General Repair Shop 

H. E. DAVID 

35 Pleasant St., just below P.O. Amherst 



SI'RINCFIEI.D CAME 

<c:uiiilnued from Tufte |i 

hue held, and Williamson tried to drop- 
kick a field goal, but the kick was wild. 
.M.-^.C. took the ball on their I'll y.ir<l 
line. .An off-tackle drive by Kimball and 
a penalty on Springfield resulted in a 
first down, but Howie was again forced to 
kick when the next two i)lays gained little. 
In the second period neither team was 
able to advance very much. Another 
fuld goal was attempted in this ijuarter, 
but again it was low. The ball was 
brought out to the 2()-yard line, and after 
a couple of rushes, Howie dropped to the 
Mass^ichusetts 12-yard stripe to punt. 
Hl<K)menstock broke through the line, 
bliKked the kick, and, recovering the 
ball ran for a touchdown. Wolynec 
added the extra point on a drop-kick. 

The third period found both lints hold- 
ing well. .Neither team was able to gi-t 
within scoring distance, and the punting 
duel (ontinued. Howie had a slight ad- 
vantage in the kicking, but Willi.imson 
of Springtield jiroved clever at running 
ba( k the kicks, and so the ball was kept 
in Massichu.setts' territory. 

Si)ring(n.ld had possession of the ball 
nearly all of the last period. .After losing 
the ball on downs deep in .\ggie territory 
the home te.im starte<l an olftiisixc alt.uk 
with W illiamson running back a punt ;iO 
>.irds to the .Massaihusetts .'iO-yard line, 
wlure .Minkstein tackled him. Ouncan 
.Old Neilson, .shifty Springfield backs, 
sm.ished through the tired M..\.C until 
Neilson hnally scored. .Again Wolymc 
a<lile(l the point after touchdown. 

I.ate in the s;une period, .Springfield 
again rusheil (h)wn the field from their 
own 4()-yard stripe. .Simonsoii and \ .m 
lluysen, fresh k»d and White backs, 
plunged through to the .Massachusetts 
two-yard line. Hire the .M..\.C'. forward 
line tightened for a final stand, and four 
Springfuld lin<- plunge: did not yield the 
distance ne((ss.iry for a touchdown, the 
ball going to Massachusetts as the final 
whistle blew. 

Captain "Hob" Howie was the in- 
di\idual star for .Massachusetts with his 
long punts, while .Mann's flefensive work 
was also j^ood. The summary: 

.Spriniifii-ld MuKHUchuiteltM 

itluiiK-nstuik, ArkiTMian, Ic rt-, ( Hx, Coukos 

Uii-siiian, .\llfii. It 
\\iilynf< , Hooker. Ik 
l.iiiil>;iUKh, Thonii)!<on, <• 
Fowler. ( lark. Tozier, rK 

Ik, Kelton, llratkley, Sullivan 
Jeiikius, K.-.i, It It, Minkstein, UanKleiueyii 

llalliiway, llaiiitnoiiil. Ilirr, re j,-. |{.,«jf 

Wil iaiiison, Doglierty, Ocjiiifero, (ih 

i|l>. I'luininer, Hit k.s 
.\iils<,ii. DuiKaii, \an lluy.scjn, llilj 

tlib, Salenius, Dliert 
KitcliinK, I'in'leniun, rlil> 

llil), M. Kittriek, Kitnhall 
Bell, NeiKson, Simonson, lli 

fb, Nitkieuiir, MuKnusiin, Maiui 

Siore: SjirinKlieKI 11, .Mass. .\KKie> O. Tou< li- 

(lowns, HluinenstOLk. Neilron. J'olnt-< after toui li- 

downs: Wolynec 2 Referee: Swafl'ielit. Iniiiire; 

II. OuiiU. Liiu->lii.iii. W.iII. I"ielu jutlKe; Keene 



Who Does Your Laundry? 



Our new scini-finish process appeals 
to those students who tiesire ijuality 
service at a reasonable co.st. 



THE AMHERST LAUNDRY CO., Inc. 

'Dick" Adams '29 M.A.C. Agent Tel. 720 



Are They Good Looking? 

Well just come in and look them over. The 
finest bunch of overeats that you could ask for from 
the finest of domestic and imported woolens. Soft 
heavy fleeces, hard finished cheviots, all the wanted 
fabrics priced so you can afford to own them. 
$25 to $60 and the price doesn't mean they aren't the best 

h\ M, THOMPSON & SON 

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c. Mann, Mills 



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BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
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3 PLEASANTT STREET, (up one flight) 



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AMIIER.ST (;AME 

«:untinued frmn I'aite 1) 

spectacular player. In tho line .Sterns, 
Felt, ami I.ott rontrilxited a ^reat tieal 
to the victory for Amherst. 

In the first ({tiarter the invaders rarrieil 
the l)all into the Mas.sacliusetts territory 
where tlie superior line of the home team 
held for downs (m its own thirty ei^;hl 
yard line. .\i;ain, later in the period 
when the ball had reached the fourteen 
and six yard lines, respectively, the 
M.A.C. forw.irds proved to lie a barrier 
that could not be penetrated by even a 
heavier te.im. 

.•Mthoiii-li the .Massichusetts team did 
not score, the l»a«kfield did some very 
(onsistent line nainiiiK. In the third 
IH-rioil the M.;\.C team t<Mjk the ball in 
midfiehl and carried it to the Amherst 
three yard line. lillirt and Kimball did 
most of the Kaininn in this drive. On the 
first play with four downs to ko, the 
M.A.C. backfield fimibh.l the ball and 
I.ott recovered b)r Ainliirst. Throii^jh 
out the Kame the A^-ites scemi-d to make 
Kain after fjain thrcjuuh the line; yet, 
wlien the opponents' ^oal was within 
reach, the Amherst line strennlhened to 
furnish a wall to all line thrusts. 

Iie(aus<' of the wet condition of the 
field both teams were fort t-d to discard 
their aerial attacks. However, in the 
List few minutes of play an Amherst pass 
w.is illicit tpti-d by I'itiinmcr of .M.A.C. 



fi: 



Matinees .<:(•<» >.\enifi|is (.:4.S and K;.«ll 







Best in Drug Store Service 
Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co. 



WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14 

( II \ KI.I.S h A I , JA \ii:.s r,7,/;.i.s(»,\ ii,„i 

JOIiV.W \ AM/.S/VAV i« 

"THE COUNT OF TEN" 

,1 ilrnnu: .// l',:,- and ih> fri' '>"< filli'l u iih 

J hrilh ( <'mi'il\.Komiinri-. A nrfil Ian- \Uiry. 

SP()TI.K;riT FAHI.K.S f:()MI-.nV 

THURS. and FRIDAY, NOV. IS and 16 

117/././ 11/ //.!/ \/.s n, 

TELLING THE WORLD 

lie hiii ji(r/><iM<"<i nil prniiius rffiirl^ ix llm 
S't'lntr It f /)l^ /)<•!/. I hi ( iit<li"ii' tirf .-m 
\KWS <:<JMKi>V KK<.t i.AK I'RHitS 

SAT., NOV. 17 DOUBLE FEATURE 



DISCORD 



.1 drnmn nf n .\irlhrrii Litmhrr Cnmp nmt 

llu Itnlli.H!.' I hmilun it/l'r ,lnrl 

CHICKEN a la KING 

The hilnri'iu-, adventure', nf an nld lii\hu'ned 

husband ruined fcv -ihile luhl: i,n limaduay 

.NKWS 

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 21 

Good Morning Judge 

With RIA.ISAI.I) lil..\.\ i . .Shir: .%..,„„. 
Ihiriiihy Guiltier and (Jin lliirlan. 
FABl.K.S^ ODDITY -COMKI>Y 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Now situated at 15 1-2 Pleasant St. 
EXCELLENT SHOE REPAIRERS 
V. GRONDONICO, Prop. 




We invite the Co-Eds 

to our showing of 

Many Smart Models 

of 

College Shoes 

and 

Hosiery 

at 

Abigail Adams Hall 

Wednesday, Nov. 14th 

at 6.30 p. m. 

Thomas S. Childs 

INCORPORATED 

275 High St., Holyoke, Mass. 



The .M.iroon and While K'idsters then 
trietl their link .il p.issin^ but with little 
success .IS the ^;..llH• cii.h-d. As .i whole, 
tlu- M.A.C. te.im h.id .1 sliKliI advantage 
over its rival. The line w.,rk w.is superior, 
.ind for the most p.m Howi,.'s punliiiK 
W.IS bilitr th.iii ih.ii of his opponent. 
The summary of the uaine: 
'^•"•"•^'" Ma... AUttl... 

l-.l,.,..„..ll,le „.^,,^ 

MilMrl.111,1. Tiiinei, KelloKK. Api.liiiKli.n. It 

It. Mills 
l.'.tl. lMill.,n. I'l.ilt.lK ,K, llr.ukley. Tiiie 

Ste.ir.is. M„H.s. . , M ,„„ 

I'aike,. Ilonman. M, Akey. ,« i^., Keli.m 

Kelli.ni;. \\ hitlK-y, Maylier. rt 

It, MiiikHteiii, Kl.liaiilion 
I MllnlM.nri. Itiilti.i,,. ||,,ra, e. le |,., H,,„i,. 

K W ilx.ii. IVity, ,|(, 

'll>. Mlirl. Il.iw.ii.l. M, kittiitk 
•.n.skloss. 11,1, ,,,!,. KiinlMll. Nitkh wk* 

lleis.-y. W.iiir,,. ,1,1, 11,1,, iij.ks. n.imer 

''"'■'•"' lb. MaKiitis.,!, 

Score: Aii.lierst l.t. MasH. AKllic» ((. T..in;lt- 
<l..wii: Felt. (.roskloHs. |>„i,„ .,f„., t.„„ h.lown.: 
(.ro^kltiss. Refeiee: Swafl.el.| „( |l,„w„. Inipire: 
Mann of S|.iii,K(„l,|. UneMiiaii: W.ill ot Sponn- 
tiel.l. Kiel.l ,,„Ik, : K.ai,e of Haltfoi.l. Time. 
12 lliiliiite iN'liixts. 

AT THK AKIIKY 

The Ad\isory ((.until t>f Women (if 
.Masstithusetts. (omposed mostly of the 
Deans of Women of Various ( oIIckch, is 
to visit at the Abbey (enter tomorrow 
evening. 'Ihe co-eds, throu^;h the (oath- 
iiiK of Mrs. Curry lli(ks, are to niv( a 
very pleasing enterlaiiiment upon this 
occasion. 



{ 



A 



MHERS 

THEATER 



T 



AMHERST FRUIT STORE 

WHERE AGGIE MEN MEET 

WHEN DOWN TOWN 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGARS 



Wediiewliiy, .Ndv.. 14 

5 KEITH VAUDfVlllf ACTS 8 

"SINNERS PARADE" 

Comedy— I'athe .News 

Thursday ik Friday, .Nov. I.S ntul lf> 

NORMA I M M MX.I (.11 HKK I KOI \M» 

THE WOMAN DISPUTED 

<;an an oiiliast wotiian l>e as a Haiiil re- 

l>orn.> t.-.tn liie |>o»er of love eiall a life 

ertisiieil l.y tiien and itioralh.> .See (he 

Mfeen's lirealesl eniollonal aclresn In the 
lireatesi heart ilraiiia of her i areer. 

2 Keel Comedy — .News Kvi-nts 



.Saturday, Nov. 17 

(.IIARI.KS ltll.|,|^ KOf.f.KS in 



"VARSITY" 



MARV URIAN and (JIIKSIKR r:(>NKI.IN 
Kilmed on (he cani|>i,t of I'rintelon t nl- 
versily a ftreat story of a father's l<»ein 
a colleUe seltinii, 

2 Reel Comedy — Pathe News 



Monday & Tuesday, Nov. 19 & 20 
ja<;k mi i.hai.i. «, <,rkta .msskn in 

THE BUTTER & EGG MAN 

2 Reel Cometly — News 



lANDSCAPE PLANTING 

NURSKRY STOCK 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter H. Harrison, Prop. 



:n.^yi coi/iyEa© sotore 



They 



BASEMENT OF "M" BUILDING 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15. 1928 



DINNER JACKETS THAT ARE BEAUTIFUL, SMART AND CORRECT 

Our Dinner Jackets offer four things in particular. They are new in style; smart in appearance; comfortable in use; and customized by Hickey- Freeman. 

WE ALSO CARRY A FULL LINE OF TUXEDOS FOR RENT 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



COMMUNICATION 
(Cunllnued from I'ddv i) 

blunder liere and there; their speech 
becomes intemperate; they sutler mii( h, 
driven hy the (Dnflictinj; storms within 
them. Tliey meet with ridicule and are 
liailed to the stocks, or, in other ages, to 
the rack and the stake. Yet these vari- 
ants of tlie human species are the hope 
of tlie world; they are deservinij of all 
sympathy, tolerance and kindly help. To 
be sure the smaller fry anion^; them may 
run ofT into the absurdities of the "In- 
telli>;ensia"; they may develoi) a con- 
temptible and cheap poseur's attitude 
which is sorely trying to their saner 
fellows. But let us remember that we 
may be just as disgusting spectacles to 
our friends as these are to us. It is the 
rare man who knows his own faults. Let 
us overlook the gawky, half bake<l ailo- 
lescent and look forward to the man who 
is to be. A bit of kindly chafling and 
judicious neglect, or a few pin-pricks will 
do more t(j reduce these wind-bags than 
any amount of cor|)oral punishment. 

And one warning to you, pharas;iic 
Juilges of Israel: little do you know of 
the delicate machinery of the human soul 
and what iiavoc your clumsy, meddling 
hands may work there. This warning is 
for your own future good as well as theirs. 
Y(ju may stamp out heresy and freedom 
of expression by force. Hloody Mary did 
that and so tlid Cronuvell and his Round- 
heads. But you have provoked an uprush 
of fear and hatred; you h.ive attempted to 
thwart the de\tlopmc-nt ol a luim.m s<iul 
along its own lines and that is a heavy sin. 
And now, what is the immediate and 
practical conclusion of my gran<lfather's 
sermon. Well, let's put the st(xks in the 
furnace and try to cultivate a little 
humility, giving to the other fellow's 
opinions the same tolerance which we 
ask for our own. Let us try to realize 
that men may differ r.ulii.dly from us 
and still be |)erfectly honest that Truth 
has many facets an<l that paradox is its 
natural language. Let us all, conserva- 
tives and radicals alike, cultivate courtesy, 
manliness, chivalry, kindliness, patience, 
honesty, industry and the faculty of 
minding our own business. 

And tmally, let nte leave with you for 
your earnest consideration the following 
gohlen sentence: "When we give up our 
own self-will and bow to the Light in 
another we draw forth wonder and willing 
help; the Lord of the inmost fortress 
sees in us a friend and all d(jors are o|)en 
to us." 

R. K. Torrey 



OU TINC; CLUB 

(Continued from I'aHe 1) 



BartkU, Irt-ne 
Hutstonc. W. V. 
Ilurrus, G. A. 
I<<'ii»it, K. C 
lieruiiii, C. A. 
Ulack. Mary 
liomiry. W. T. 
Uostoii, Margarft 
ISuiiU'ii, Jolin 
(.."aird. Wynne 
I'amplK'll. II. V. 
CariH'HlLT. Henry 
farriith. 1-. A. 
Chapman, Kenneth 
Chart. Henry 
Clark, W. K. Jr. 
Clevelan.l, M. M. 
Cohin, William 

Costello. J. I*. 

Coven, M. 1. 

Cox. Charles 

Cox. F. IC. 

DavU, A. M. 

Dean, l.ucien 

Dean, Merrltt 

DeCelUk.-, Peter 

Denton. K. W. 

Doyle, J. E. 

Dunn, A. C. 

Dyar. G. W. 

Kdaon. W. J. 

Kl.lredKe. R. A. 
Fannin. Nancy 
Fitzu'Talfl, I'- V 
Frame. C. F. 
C.oodell. 11. A. 
C.oodcll, II. I'. 
Gooilnow. Robert 
Gower, A. II. 
(Iraves, .\rlhur 
Hamilton, Orinond 
Hamilton. Steven 
Henderson. E S. 
HotTiiian, Mildred 

Howard, J. I« Jr 

Howleit. Carey 

Hiimiihreys, Cirace 

Hunt. K. VV. 

Ish.im. B«:atrice 

Johnson. W. A. 

Jones, F. W. 

Kay, J. R. 

Keyes. C. W. 

Kinney. A. F. 

Kolonel, J ark 

I.ake, Susiin 

Levine. .\nna 

L^evine. Harry 



Madden. A. II. 
Maruolin, On< ar 
Ml Bride. U. S. 
MiKittritk, K. F. 
Macl.ean, J. U. 
Merrill, OrU 
Mills. Taylor M. 
Morse. Beryl 
Nash. Robley 
Nason, Uavid 
Ni( hols, K. H. 
Noll. F.dwin 
Oliver. Georije 
I'arrish. Ruth 
I'arsons, Anna 
l'al< h, E. K. 
Paulson, J. E. 

l'e(k. Hazel 

Perkini, Esther J. 

Phelan. Arthur 

Pliinney, W. R. 

Post, Kenneth 

Prince, C. G. 

Roffey. R. C. 

Rollins. Emily 

Ronka, Lauri 

Ronk;i, Georne 

Roiwr, Marion 

Sala, PitiT 

Siilter. L. A. Jr. 

Sargent. ( armeta 

Scott, Ruth 

Smith. Paul 

Smith, R F. 

Smith, W. li. 

Smith, v.. G. 

Southwick, W. v.. 

Stacy. Paul 

Stoddard, Herbert 

Stuart, R. E. 

Stuart, Wallace 

Sullivan. William 

Takahashi, Leo 

Tarr, Roy 

Tilfaiiy. Donald 

Touitellot. R. S. 

Van l-<-er, II I- 

Vilk. Henry 

Voornveld, William 
Wahlgren. Hanly 

Warner, L. H. 

Warren. A. J. 
Watson, E W. 
West, .\llen 
Wheeler, K. M. 
Whit turn, Kinsley 
Willi. tins, Inez 
W inlon. .\. C. 



Stockbridile School 

Andersion. Irving Hohmaini, C. F. 



Bailey, H F. 
Bancroft, F. V. 
Barlx>y, J. 
B<-. ker, C. 
Bolles. E. S. 
Brown. R. 
Brown. W. 
Chadwick. R. 
Chapin, S. 
Crwkett. E. M. 
Derby, C. 
Doiicettc. F. 
Durkin. H. C. 
Eager. R. 
F'rosl 

tileason. C. 
Hall. R. C. 



CkjIi. C. 
Lassman. N. 
Mctfibbon 
Milligan. K- 
PealMxly. C. R. 
Phelan. A. 
Rich 

Rounsvllle, R. 
Shells 

Stephansen, H. C. 
Stromwell, .\. 
Swan. D. 
Taft. William 
Taylor 
White. W. J. 
Wilson, D. C. 
Wood. E. ?. 



DRY CLEANING 



PRESSING 



For Prompt Service Phone 828 
••i.ET D.WE no IT" 

AMHERST CLEANERS & DYERS 

1 1 MAIN STREET NEXT TO TOWN HALL 

One Day .Service on Dry Cleaning Work <:aUeJ for and I>eUvcred Dally 

REPAIRINC; LAUNDRY DYEING 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DE.\LERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS READY TO WEAR 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



••Old Clothes Party" To 
Be Run By Sophomores 

Proceeds to Go to Buildinii Fund 

TuL'iMlay, Nov. 27, is the date the 
s<)i)homore rlass has elected for its first 
sorial event of the year. The committee 
ill charge has decided upon an "Old 
Clothes Party." They feel that at a 
party of this type everyone can find 
plenty of material to carry out any 
oriiiinal ideas of costuming that he may 
have. The Oriole Ramblers, that snappy 
orchestra which played for the first 
Friday night dance this year has been 
tnpiged and everyone is confident that 
they will do their share in "pepping up" 
the party. 

Every student of M.A.C. is invited to 
attend in his oldest clothes, and while the 
|)rice has not yet been disclosed, those in 
charge claim that it will be very reason- 
able. Proceeds from the party will be 
given to the Athletic Association to help 
swell the Building Fund. 

Tickets will be obtainable the first of 
next week from any of the follijwing: 
Pauline A. Spiewak. James J. Woods, 
William 11. Mosworth, Kdmuml L. Frost, 
and 11. I3aniel Darling. 

NOIES ON THE HOUSE DANCES 

On Saturday, November ,i, Fraternity 
Row presented a very cheery aspect as a 
result of the many house dances which 
were hehl on that evening. Kight fra- 
ternities held parties and everyone of 
them was a real success. 

g.T.V. opened their party with a 
<linner at the L)aveni)ort Inn, after 
which they dance«l from 7.30 to IL.'U). 
Music was furnished by "Art" Drinan's 
"Ramblers" from Springfield. Dr. and 
Mrs. Wallace F. I'owers were the chap- 
erones, and ."52 couples enjoye<l the affair. 
At Phi Sigma Kap|)a, the "Oriole 
Ramblers" were the musicians for a 
party of about :J() couples. Mr. and Mrs. 
Willard A. Munson chapenmed this 
affair which lasted from t)..'{U to 11. 

The "Music Weavers" from Worcester 
gave the '2,'» couples which atteniled the 
Kappa Sigma party a very enjoyable 
evening. The dance lasted from o to 
lO.HO and was chaperoned by Mr. and 
Mrs. C.uy \'. (ilatfelter. 

Theta Chi danced to the music of the 
Amherst "Serenaders". About 27 couples 
enjoyed this atTair under the chaperonage 
of Major and Mrs. Eustis L. Hubbard. 

Frank Maffe's "Rainbow Hoys" were 
the source of music at Sigma Phi Epsilon, 
Miss Stinchfield of Mt. llolyoke College 
an<l Mr. Ralph L. France chaperoned 
the :{() couples attending. 

Lambda Chi Alpha enjoyed the music 
(jf "Irv" C.uyer's Orchestra of SpringfiehL 
Thirty-five couples were present .md the 
chaperons were Mr. and Mrs. fknshaw 
and Mr. and Mrs. William L Goodwin. 

Marry Demers' Orchestra provided 
music for the 20 couples who attendee! 
the .Alpha Sigma Phi party. Mr. and 
Mrs. Rowe, Miss NLiry Foley, and Mr. 
Butts a -ted as chaperones. 

.Mpha Ciamma Rho held a party of 
about 20 couples with music furnished 
by "Vic" Kudla's Orchestra from Chico- 
pee. I'rof. and Mrs. (.eorge W. Alderman 
were the chaperons of the affair. 

WESLEYAN TOO MUCH FOR 

AGGIE CROSS-COUNTRYMEN 

Fast Time Made on Difficult 
Wesleyan Course 

Wesleyan's cross-country team turned 
back the Massachusi>tts harriers on Nov. 
2 by the score of 20 to '.W in a meet hehl 
on the \LA.C. course. The first ten men 
to place made what is believed to be a 
record. Their average time was better 
than that of any ten men to ever com- 
pete in a race over this five mile course. 
The first three places in the meet went 
to Wesleyan competitors while Captain 
Bergan and McGukian of M.A.C. won 
fourth and fifth places respectively. The 
time for the winner was 27 minutes, lo 
seconds, and is good time for the difticult 
Massachusetts course. The order in 
which the men placed is as follows: 
Kelley (W), Liveaey (\V). Knecht (VV), 
Bergan (M), McGukian (M), S. H. Jones 
(W), White (M), Gamer (W), Snell (M). 
Church (W), Hernan (M), Robertson 
iM), andS. F. Jones (W). 



FRESHMAN HARRHIRS LOSE 

TO AM HERS 1 FROSH 



In their last meet of the season held 
last Tuesday afternoon the Massachu- 
setts frosh cross-country team was de- 
feated by the Amherst College freshmen 
team 37 to 25 in a race over the M.A.C. 
three mile course. Even though the Aggie 
freshmen captured fourth, fifth, sixth, 
and seventh places, they could not over- 
come the lead of the three Amherst 
yearlings who placed ahead of them. 
The time for the winner was 14 mmutes, 
."32 seconds, very good time for the dis- 
tance covered. The order of placement 
IS as follows: Wells (A), Nash (A), 
Robinscm (A), Forrest (M), Hitchcock 
(Mj, Hodge (M), Halzubic (Mj, Sachs 
(A), McLean (A), Yeau (A), Lockwood 
(A), Montague (A), Goodwin (A), Huppe 
(A), Mason (M), Wheeler (M). 

FRESHMEN WIND UP SEASON 

(Continued from PuHe 2) 
good game. He received a pass from 
Welsh and ran for the only M.A.C. 
touchdown of the game. 

In the Deerfield Academy game, which 
was played on the freshman field, the 
frosh staged another hard fought battle 
against a heavier team. :\ punt blocked 
by Ffjskitt and recovered by O'Donnell 
behinil the goal, gave the yearlings their 
well-(leser\ed victory. The extra point 
was the result of a penalty. 

This season the freshman team lias 
won two games, lost three, and tied two, 
a good record when it is considered that 
this year the team has faced better and 
stronger opponents than any freshman 
i'K^iri'Kations have opposed during the 
past few seasons. 

NUMERAL GAME 

(Continued (rum Pufte I) 

Neither team g(jt within scoring dis- 
tance in the third period, although several 
first downs were made, (iagliarducci 
made many gains through the line in the 
final (juarter and the freshmen advanced 
to the sophomore 15-yard line, only to 
have a fumble spoil their chance f(jr a 
score. The last few minutes of play 
found the sophomores driving about fifty 
yards from their own 20-yard stripe, but 
the game ended before the frosh felt any 
real danger. A strong defensive game 
was playe«l by Foskett and Roach of the 
freshmen, while Rooney and Salenius 
starred for the sophomores. 
The summary: 

Freshmen 

rp, VVanegar. Wilson 

rt, Whitlen, Fish. MiBiide 

rg, Tikofski, O'Donnell 

c, Thomas 

Ik. I.iht>oy 

It, Foskett 

Ir. Koach 

My rick. Kolonel. Goodrich, qb 

qb, Chenry. Foley 
rhb, ixtmoriski. WVUh 




.Sophomores 

(iula. Cioodricti, le 
l.illU-. It 
iivans, Ig 
Hint's, c 

Wlierity, White, nc 
Dani!iImay»T. rt 
Frey, Hoswortli. re 



LoTTi-y, Ihb 
Sxilcnius, rhb 
Rooney, fb 



Ihh. Brown 
fb, GaKliarducci. OIkks 



# \ 

I5€LI) 

STI^irES 

HAVE 

G€NC 

To Leavenworth 
perhaps or, if you 
prefer a south- 
ern exposure., to 
Atlanta. 

Stripes for univ- 
ersity men this 
fall are subdued, 
soft rich blends 
which savor of 
gentility. 

Braeburn has ex- 
actly expressed 
this spirit. 



Carl H. Bolter 

INC. 

EXETER AMHERST 
HYANNIS 



SING LEE HAND I^AUNPRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

Rr.lVMRIM; AND ALL KINDS OF 
UASIUNG DONK AT RF.A.SONABLE 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 
NF.XT TO THE TOWN HALL 



Men's Sheepskin Slippers 
At Low Prices 

Shoe Repairing Department 

JOHN FOTOS SHOE STORE 



K^V^K ^^^M ^^^^ ^^^^ ^V^M ^^t^^ ^^^^ '^V^M' ^^H^btf ■^■^.tfh^^^i^ '^^■^M' k^i^htf k^H^W ^^i^ktf 'h^B^h^ .^■^h. ^^I^Wk^a^M »• 
'^^pt »^^K i^^K v^9t i^^R I^^Vt f^^PII^^Pc s^^Sf l^3()^^S(s^^H)^3vi^^9(I^^HI^^Kt^^3i9^3(l^3"7« 

5 UlD you ever try our New ? 

il Ice Cream with some of our 8 

9 8 

l fresh pastry.? 8 

8 . . . 9 

It is richest in cream and most de- 8 



B 
9 
I 
6 
9 






9 
{ 

under most sanitary fl 

9 
9 



licious in flav^or, it has been made in 

our new factory 

conditions. 



9 The College Candy Kitchen | 

I PRIDE OF WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS i 



SI|^ MuBBUtiinBtttB (HMtaxm 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1928 



Number 8 



Over Two Thousand Visit 

Shows In French Hall 



first fruit show was an 

unquestionable 

sucx:ess 

I'omology majors showed their ability 
to put on a first class fruit show by their 
display in French Hall last weekend. It 
was a big success and well attended. It 
is estimated that about 25(X) people 
visited it. There were many features: 
including a huge display showing the map 
of Massachusetts in Rhode Island (Jreen- 
ings surrounded by a solid border of red 
King David apples. Other features of 
till- show were (1) the comparison of 
fruits grown in Massachusetts and those 
grown in other states; (2) varieties adaptecl 
to different regions of the country; (."{j 
new and promising varieties of apples; 
4) varieties not adapted to Massachu- 
Htts; (5) pear exhibits; (G) applie pie 
contest; (7) faculty and student exhibits; 
and (8) a roadside stand featuring this 
novel sign: 

(Continued on Page i) 



OUTING CLUB 

Members of the Outing Club are urged 
to attend the next meeting, Thursday 
evening, in French Hall. This meeting is 
doubly important. Basil B. Wood will 
(.'ivo an illustrated lecture on the White 
.Mountains, and his talk should prove 
interesting and instructive to tho.se who 
are interested in nature. At this meeting, 
the requirements for advanced member- 
ship will be read and discussed, and each 
member should hear these, voice his 
opinion and vote upon them. 

Last Saturday, the Outing Club con 
(luited a hike to Mount llolyoke. The 
small party hiked along the range and 
spent most of the afternoon up there. 

I'riparation is being made for the 
winter use of the cabin. Next .Saturday 
the Club is putting in the windows so 
that it will be ready to be used. 

Noted Men On 
Chapel Schedule 

Complete Sunday Chapel Schedule 
Announced 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS AGAIN LEAD- 
ING MOTIVE IN EXCELLENT 
FLOWER SHOW 

One of the features of attraction on 
campus last week was the Floriculture 
Show which was an nnfuiestionable success 
and met with approval on all sides. The 
outstanding features in the main hall 
were a pretty rock garden, reminiscent 
of the summer, an educational exhibit, 
and a display of beautiful large crysiinthe- 
mums. In the large hall were tables con- 
taining two classes of basket arrangements 
in competition. The prize winners of 
Class B were Raymond C. Allen ';}0, first ; 
I-ucien Dean "AO, second; Peter Waechter 
'.iO, third. The ribbons in Class C were 
won by Margaret Herron, first; Keith 
Ehlridg«\ second; and M. L. Aseltine, 
thir<l. Room C was converted into a 
most interesting dining room by the class 
of U>29. Each of the senior flori.sts 
offered a table arrangement including 
centerpiece, corsages, and l)outoimiers in 
competition. Winners in this Class A 
were Olive Allen, first ; Martin (".. Fonseca, 
second; and Dennis M. Crowley, third. 
The members of the class offered as a 
joint piece of floral art, a large massed 
board centerpiece of white and old gold 
crysanthemums for a buffet table. An- 
other feature of the show was a contest 
in guessing the number of petals on a 
certain large, white chrysanthemum on 
display. There were titJO petals on the 
flower and Mr. Stout won the contest 
by a guess of (]5(i. 



Photographic Display 

Of Scenes From Nature 



Many IMiototiraphs by Prof. Frank .\. 

Waufth. Exhibit for the Benefit 

of the Outinii Club 



Ellis Leads Tufts To 32-6 

Victory Over Rival Agates 



RUSSIAN SITUATION 
DISCUSSED BY SPEAKER 



.\n imposing list of speakers appears in 

the Sunday Chapel schedule for this year. 

TIf last open date was filled this week so 

tluit the complete schedule of speakers is 

announced herewith for the first time. 

Nov. 25. 1928, Rev. K. C. MacArthur. 
Town and Country Secretary of the 
Massachusetts Federation of Churches. 

t>ec. 9, Dr. H. Adye Prichard, St. Mark's 
Rectory. Mount Kisco, N. Y. 

IM. H,, Dr. Robert E. Speer, Moderator 
of the Presbyterian Church in the 
V. S. A. 

Jan. (;, 1929. Bishop Thomas F. Da vies, 
Episcopal Church, Springfield, Mass. 

J "t 1.1, Profes.sor H. M. J. Klein, Frank- 
lin and Marshall College. 

Jan. 20, Dr. Nehemiah Boynton, Newton 
Center, Mass. 

Jan. 27, Rev. John Alison, First Presby- 
terian Church, Holyoke, Mass. 

^>b. 3, President Donald J. Cowling, 
Cirleton College, Northfieltl, Minn. 

^<'' 10. President J. tldgar Park, 
\\heaton College. 

^•t| 17, Rev. J. Burford Parry, Hope 
( (jngregational Church Springfield, 
Mass. 

Feb 24, J. Paul Williams, Interchurch 
St<rttary, .MAC. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



Whatever a persons tastes, likes or (lis 
likes may be there is sure to l)e something 
to interest or afford enjoyment in the 
collection of photographs now on displ.iy 
in the Memorial Building. This collect ion, 
taken from the collections of amateur and 
profession.d photographers in town con- 
tains pictures of unusual merit as well as 
of unusual interest because of the large 
number of more or less familiar scenes in 
the display. 

There are photogra|)hs taken by Pro- 
fessor Waugh, Professor Davis, Mr. 
Kinsman and many other f.nniliar people. 
The purpose of the display which, inci- 
dentally is very well fulfille<l, is to stimu- 
late interest in the Outing Club and to 
stimulate interest in the out-of-<loors. No 
one can give even a small amount of 
attention to the exhibit in the Memorial 
Building without being filled with a 
sense of wonder at the beauties of nature. 

Without exception the photographs 
show great skill in the art of photography 
and there is not a jiicture in the exhibition 
which is not a work of art. 

UNIQUE POULTRY 
CONFERENCE HELD 



lam 



OLTSTANDING PERFORMANCE 
OF THE PAST WEEK 



' '> the committees in charge of the 
^'f'rticultural Show is given the un- 
S't'fited praise and gratitude of every- 
'"it who viewed the remarkable ex- 
^''t'its which were the results of their 
f^'Jiisrientious work. Nothing quite so 
^h' rough has ever been presented in 
*hfc history of such undertakings on 
^ ' M.^.C. campus. 



Prof. Allenson of (k>lunribia Univ. 

Speaks in Assembly on 

"Behind the Face of Bolshevism" 

"Behind the Face of Bolshevism" was 
the title of the talk presented last Thurs- 
day in assembly by Professor Allenson, of 
the faculty of Columbia University, who 
has just returned from a six month's tour 
of Russia. Many new aspects of the 
Russian situation were presented and the 
results, both good and bad, of the great 
revolution outlined and discussed. 

Mr. Allenson introduced his subject to I 
the audience by describing the reasons 
for liie 'oeginning of the sfxial revolution. 
He stated that Russia has always had 
rlifficulty in understanding the Western 
mind because of its situation facing both 
east and west. There is no national flag, 
no national oath of allegiance to the 
country. Patriotism at present is non- 
existant, although the emotion of Prole- 
tariotism binds them together. This 
emotion is a class pride, a real idealism. 
Thus their regime has become a religion 
and as .such has its martyrs. Mr. Allen- 
son mentioned in this connection John 
l-ee, a Harvard graduate, who has done 
remarkable work in Russia. 

In summing up the general results of 
this new movement the speaker gave 
three points which to him appear as out- 
standingly valuable, and at the same 
(Continued on Page 4) 



RED CROSS DRIVE 

A nation-wide campaign is in i>rogress 
at the present time for the support of 
the Red Cross. .Starting .\(»v. 19, the 
campaign runs until Thursday, .Nov. 2.{, 
reaching everybody who feels that he 
can supjwrt it. At this college, the effect 
is felt as well, and everybody should 
contribute, so that the indicator of 
progress, found at North College, will 
rise rapidly. 

Contributions can be given to any of 
the following: 

( harles E. Walkdon 
Charles S. Cleaves 
< arl A. Bergan 
Eric Singleton 

John R. Tank 

(harles W. Barr 

Frank M. Bi.'<hop 



Over a Hundred Attend Poultry 

Breeder's Conference, Planned and 

Conceived by Pn>fessor C>raham 

Creating a new and outstanding phase 
in poultry breeding, a conference of men 
interested in this work has just been 
held at M.A.C. this last week-end. Pro- 
fessor John C. (Jraham, of the M.A.C. 
Poultry Husbandry Department, was the 
originator of the idea, having in mind the 
Poultry Judging S<-htM)l at Cornell Univ. 
He pui this idea into effect, and united 
the poultrymen of all New England and 
New ^■ork. .-Mjout 120 responded, and 
the leaders expect to see many more next 
year. 

This school, called the Poultry Bree<ler's 
Conference, is the first of its kind, nothing 
like it ever before having been attempted. 
Its |)urpose is as a training school fcjr 
poultrymen, where they can get training 
in the application of genetic laws to 
poultry breeding. The plan of the school 
not only includes the study of fancy egg 
production, but of standard production, 
idfH). This is a distinctive feature of the 
(Continued on Page 4) 



''PEPPT' MASS MEETING 
HELD FOR TUFTS' GAME 

Best Mass Meeting in Recent Years 
Held Around Fire in Rifle-Pit 

Having <b.scovered that mass meetings 
of the student body, at h-ast thos«' held 
thus far this year have fallen rather fl.tt, 
the group of North College students 
calling themselves the "Kongo Bo.ird of 
Health" de< i(le<| to run one themselves 
according to their own ideas, and last 
Thursday's g.ithering w.is the result. 
Those who participated are lou<I in thiir 
acclaim that it was one of the most 
successful meetings to be held within 
recent years, at least as far as generating 
school spirit is concerned. 

.A parade of the students led by the 
College band was the first event of the 
performance. The line of march was 
from the y.T.V. fraternity house via the 
Experiment stations, Coe.ssmann I.abora 
lory, and North College to the rifle pit 
near the Drill Hall, where the main 
events were londucted. .Several dozen 
kerosi-ne torches tarrietl «m poles fur 
nishe<l illumination for the crowd en 
route. By the light of these three wagons 
were seen, on two of wliidi were seated 
the football team, while on the other was 
mounte<j the wooden liorsi- of the .Vlilit.iry 
Department, ridden by a student. Eai h 
of these wagons was drawn by freshmen, 
some of whom were htxMled. 

(Continued on Pu^e i) 

M.A.C. RADIO FORUM ON 
AIR EVERY MONDAY 

Programs to be Given by Various 

Departments Over Stations 

WBZ and WBZA 



B«>th Ellis and Ellert Star with Ninety 
Yard Dashes ft>r I'ttuclidownN. Last 
Ciame f(»r Several Seniors 

I'or the seconti c«m8ecutive year M.A.C. 

w.is forced to bow to its traditional rival, 
lufts College, by the score ."{2 to (1 in a 
hard fought battle waged last .S.iturday 
.ifttrnoon at Medford. It was the last 
collegiate football g.nue for several 
Maroon .md White gridsters who have 
been outst.uiding in the "little retl 
machine" this f.ill. Among the.se men 
are Captain "l»i)b" Bowie, "Diik" 
Kelton, "diet" McKittrick, "Blondy" 
Mills, "Nick" Nitkiewicz, "Ray" Plumer, 
and "Charlie" Walkden. Other seniors 
who made their last appearance in 
M.A.C. uniforms at the game were 
"Andy" Coukos, "Don" Davis, "Ham" 
Richardson, and "Johmiy" Sullivan. Eight 
regulars played their last game for the 
Jumbos against M.A.C. Included in this 
group is Captair "Fish" lillis, who has 
been the outstanding star of the Brown 
and Blue backfield for the past two sea- 
sons. 

l-eaturing the game were two long runs 
which lollowed in (piick sue ( e».sion during 
(tkiniinued on Pufte 4) 



CAMPUS CALKNDAR 



"The web of life is a mingled yarn, gixnl and 
had together." — Shakeipeart (All's Well) 



Q. T. V. 

I'hi .Sigma lOippa 
Kajipa Sigma 
Theta Chi 
Sigma I'hi Ep-iion 
.... Lambda C hi Alpha 
. . Alpha Sigma Phi 

SUnley F. Bailey Alpha Gamma Rho 

Walter E. Southwick Kai>pa Epsilon 

Martin G. Fonseca Delta Phi Alpha 

Alice L. Johnson Abbey 

John S. Woodbury North Collese 



Wedneiiday 

S-iiior ■Hull-fest' in the Memorial Building 

at 7 p. ni. 
Inler(la:.s liaskeiball: 

S-niors vs. Sophomores 

Juniors vs. S.S.A. Seniors 
Thurnday 

Stiidf-nt Forum 

Outing Club niefting. lTi-n< h II, ill, 7 .10 p m 

French ( lub nii-i'tiiig, .Metiioria! Kiiildlng. 

K p. ni. 
Friday 

N II 111. Friilay Night Dame in tlii' Mfimirial 

Building 
Stoi kliri'JK"' fiK>tl.;ill. I'iti<li..li| IliKh. Iirr<' 
.Sunday 

!• 10 a. III. < haixl. Kiv. K. C:. Ma< Arthur. 

Town and Country Secretary of .Mass. 

Fri-deration of ( hun lies 
Monday 

Intcri lass basketU'ill: 

Juniors vs. Freshmen 

Seniors vs. S.S..\ Freshmen 
Tuesday 

7. .50 p. m. Sophomore 'Old Clothes Party." 

Memorial Biiilrling 
Wednesday 

12 in. Thanksgiving Reiess U-gins. 

Special Iniins leave lor Boston and way- 
stations. 

B. & .M.at 1 .'iO p in. 

Ci-iitml \'iTin<iiit at L! <KI p. in. 



NOTICE 

There w ill be no issue of the Colle^um 
Wedncs<lay, November 28 on account 
of the Thanksgiving recess. 



Thrtnigh the courtesy of the Uniterl 
.States De|)artment of Agritulture and 
the State Departments of New England 
co-ofK-rating, the M.A.C. Forum is being 
broadcasted on stations WBZ and WBZA. 
Broadcasts began November 19 at «».1."» 
p. m. and will carry on to .ind in< lu<ling 
June 24, 1929, every Monday evening. 
The plan is to have each s|>eaker appear 
but once. In the program, nine dates 
will be given to Home Economics projects 
and five to the Junior Extension work. 

Profes.sor W. R. Cole is in charge of 
this radio i)rograni. He is |>l.miiing to 
have each broadcast operate in dialogue 
form, with two people in front cjf the 
microphone. This is a very worthwhile 
anci attractive method of presentation 
anci is a little more difficult in preparation 
than for a single person to a|)pear. 
(t^ontlnued un Page 4) 

SL M.MARY OF FALL ATHLETICS 

Follciwing is a summary of the scores 
of varsity and freshman athletic compe- 
titions for this fall: 

Varsity Football 
Bow.loiii l.{, M..\.C, 
M.A.C. fi. Bates 
.M.A.C. 7, MicldlcburyO 
Norwich 18, .M.A.C. C, 
.MAC. 0, Worcester 
Amherst l.'{, M.AC. 
Springfield 14, M.A.C. 
Tufts ;{2, M.A.C. 
Varsity Cross (Country 
20 .Springfield 20, .MAC. -.'A, St, 
.Stephens 72 
M.A.C. 27, Amherst 52, 

Worcester WZ 
Wesleyan 20, M.A.C. .'iO 
M.A.C. 2o, Boston Univ. .M 
Freshman Football 
Sept. 28 S. Deerfield 0, Freshman 
Oct. T) Freshmen l.'{, Northampton 7 
12 Freshmen 0, (irceii field 
20 Adams 0, Freshmen 
27 .New Hampton School 12, 

Freshmen 
.'H Freshmen 7, Deerfield Acad. 
Seconds 
Nov. 7 Freshmen 0, Sfjphomores 

Freshman Cross Country 
Nov. l.'j Amherst freshmen 25, M.A.C. 
freshmen .'17. 



Se()t. 


29 


Oct. 







1.5 




20 


Nov. 






10 




17 



( let . 



N 



27 

2 
10 



CROSS COUNIRY 

Coach Derby's M.iroon and White 
harriers placed ninth among eleven cross 
ccnintry teams from New England col- 
leges and universities entered in the 
liitertc.llegi.ite liekl last Monday after- 
ntxjii .It Boston. At the time the paper 
went to piess the complete tietails of the 
meet were iicjt available. However, it 
was known that the Massiuhu.settsruiiners 
scored 21.') points. Snell was the first 
M.A.C. man to finish. He plac ed thirtieth, 
followed by Captain Bergan, thirty-fifth; 
F. T. White, fortieth; Mc (juckian, fifty- 
(ir.st;ancl Car|K-ater fifty-ninth. 

Basketball Next 
On Sport(8) List 

Varsity Practice Underway. Inter- 
class Series Starts Toniftht 

With the- 1928 fcKitball season ended 
regular prac lice fc»r the- varsity and fresh- 
man basketball candidates began last 
Monday afternoon in the Drill Hall. 
Practice will be held daily from now on 
with the frosh candidates using the flrxjr 
during the afterncMiti while the varsity 
will probably hold practic e every evening 

Inlerclass basket b.ill will begin Nov. 
21 with eight teams <-iitercc| in the league. 
Following is the complete schedule for 
the intcTC'lass games: 
Wednesday, Nov. 21 

.Seniors vs. Sjphomores 

Juniors vs. Stoc kbridge Se-niors 
.Monclay, .Nov. 20 

Juniors vs. Freshmen 

Se-mdrs vs. Stoc kbridge Freshmen 
Wednesday, .Nov. 28 

Freshmen vs. Slot kbridge Freshmen 

Sophomores vs. Stoc kbritlgc- Seniors 
Monclay, Dec-. ."{ 

Seniors vs. Stoc kbridge .Seniors 

Sophomores vs. Stockbridge F'reshmen 
Weclnesday, Dec-, .'j 

Seniors vs. Freshmen 

Juniors vs. .Stockbridge Freshmen 
.Monday, Dec. 10 

Ireshmen vs. Stockbridge Seniors 

Juniors vs. Sophomores 
Wednesday, De-c. 12 

Seniors vs. Juniors 

.S>[)homores vs. Freshmen 
Friday, Dec. 14 

Stoc kbrielge .Seniors vs. Stoc kbridge 
Ireshmen 



( 



OPPONENT'S SCORES 

Williams 40, Amherst l.'i 
Middlfhury 0, Vermont (', 
Lowell Textile 14, W.J'.I. 
Springfield 12, Providence 6 
Norwtih 12, B. U. 12 
Wesleyan 12, Hmvdoin 7 



.\i3dvs oaDiw irn:i 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 21, 1928 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newsiwper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural iCoUcge. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 



Shbplbv Clbavm '29 
Edward H.Nichols '20 



Editor-in-Cliiff 
ManuKinK Ivlitor 



DEI'AKTMICNT EUITOKS 
Editorial Shui.ky Ci-EAves "29 

Feature MAKGAKhi 1'. Donovan ".V) 

Alumni & Short Courses Sallv E. Ukaulev '^1 
Athletic 1-EWis M 1-vnus "liO 

Frank T Douglass '31 
Campus John B. Howard Jh. "SO 

Cecil II. Waulkigh 30 

KlAL S. I'OIIKK Jk. "il 



BUSINESS DKl'ARTMENT 

Fbcdrrick D. Thaveb. Jr. 'ZW Husiness Manager 
• • " " " Advertising Manauer 

Lawrence A. Carrhth '28 ( irculatioii Manager 
WiNTiiRoF ('•. Smith '30 

John R. Tank '30 
Robert G. Goodnow, '31 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Sinnie 
copies 10 cinfs. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber 
will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 



Entered at second-class mattrr at the Amlierst 
Poit Oflice. Accciitcd tor mailing at sjwcial rate 
of postage provided for in section IKKJ, Act of Oc- 
tober, 1917. authorized August 20, 1918. 



DO UNTO OTHERS . . . 

It is our pleasure, «)r displeasure, to 
treat innumerable applications of thought 
lessness which are exhibited by the stu- 
dents on this campus, both those of the 
College itself and those of the Stockbridge 
School since all students use buildings 
interchangeably. This time the thought- 
lessness has been shown through the act 
of petty thieving, and is the only blemish 
on the slate of the Pomology Show which 
was so successful last week. 

This stealing consisted of the mal- 
appropriation of the contents of two 
boxes of apples which had been specifically 
marked with hands off signs and which 
were sitting in close pr<iximity with other 
boxes of apples which contained good 
fruit, but were were not packed carefully. 
These boxes were not the property of the 
Department, and the theft was made 
against individuals. 

Students wlu) wilfully disregard signs 
that are appealing to their sense- of honor 
and respect for »)ther people's property 
are not any a<idition to a worth wiiiie 
student body. If the students had 
appro[)riated the contents of s<ime other 
box, the case would have been different, 
for there was no card in the other con- 
tainers. As it was, individually wrapped 
fruit which was labeled as valuable 
property to be untouclud w.ts t.iken 
which puts an entirely dilferent laate on 
the situation. 

We do not want our readers to think 
that we are getting all excited over a 
small matter. Rather we are leading up 
to the connection this happening has with 
other conditions on campus. It is merely 
another link in the chain of disgustingly 
small thievery which goes on in the 
locker rooms, lab lockers, places where 
students leave books such as the "hash 
house", coat r<x)ms, etc. There is a rotten 
spirit behind all these shady activities 
which we luust en«leavor to stamp out. 
It is, of course, a matter for every in- 
dividual, and the easiest solution is to 
make the tjolden Rule a standard for 
behavior. If one sees an individual who 
lacks the will power to keep faith with 
this standard, he must try to handle the 
slacker's part as well as his own. 

Let's work together and see if we can't 
stantp out the tendency toward klepto- 
maniacism which is so prevalent in every 
group such as ours. 



the rule of Mussolini. The streets in 
Naples were <!ean, the |)orter service 
was unusual and law and order prevailed. 
Kveryone was hospitable and kin<l, al- 
int)st to the jioint where it became em- 
barrassing. Whatever may be s»id of 
Mussolini, his direction of the affairs of 
Italy has cleared up everything that was 
obnoxious. .Sanitary conditions have 
greatly improved in the last five years, 
and a very great change has been wrought 
ill the attitude of the people." 

After visiting several towns including 
Sorento and Amalfi, Dr. 'iage returned 
to Naples where he sijent considerable 
time visiting the University of Naples. 
Here, as at other universities, he paid 
particular attention t«) the scientific de- 
partments. He siiid that although they 
tlu not begin to have the equii^ment that 
the American universities have to work 
with, that their iiutliods of presentation 
are excellent and that the relationships 
between the professors and students are 
ideal. 

At (ienoa. Dr. Gage found a flourishing 
city which he described as being "active 
commercially, scientifically, and educa- 
tionally." During his stay at Genoa he 
visited Campo Santo which is one of the 
largest national cemeteries and there siiw 
the graves of the American soldiers who 
die<l in the W'ar. He said, "I can only 
s;iy that the graves of the American 
soldiers were beautifully taken care of 
and that the crosses, which incidentally 
are all marble with letters of quartz, are 
most impressive." 

One of the last places which Dr. tiage 
visited in Italy was the Italian Riviera 
and particularly Alassio, a bathing center 
nearby. Here he was surprised to find 
very few English speaking people al- 
though Alassio is one of the finest bathing 
centers in Italy. He said that everything 
was very gay and that the fine type of 
Italian people, both i)hysically and cul- 
turally, was very noticeable. 

In conclusion Dr. Gage once more 
touched on the improvements in Italy 
under Mussolini. He spoke of the ex- 
cellent train service and, he said, "Italy 
has in some respects become more like 
our efficient America and has thereby 
lost a little bit of its oUl charm. ! lowever, 
there is no doubt but what it is much 
easier and pleasant for the traveler. " 




Campus Debrb 



STOCKBRIDGE 



INDEX PICTURES 

Follcjwing is the sihedule for group 
pictures to be taken this coming Sunday 
at Kinsman's Studio. Please be at the 
studio at the specified time. It saves in- 
(onveiiience for vcui and all members of 
your group. Proofs of individuals in the 
junior class must be- returned to the 
pliotograplu-r before the end ol the week 
in order that the cuts may be made as 
soon as |MJSsible. He prompt ami co- 
operate. 

The schedide for Sunday's pictures: 
10.1.-) y. I'. V. 
l(l.;{.-) Sigma Phi Kpsilon 
11. (M) Lambda (hi .Mpha 
1 !.;>(• .\lpha(iamma Rho 
IJ.IKI Delta Phi Alpha 
12.20 Debating Team 

Women's Student Council 

Girls' (;iee Clid) 

(.iris' .Athletic Association 

V.W.C.A. 

.Academic Activities Hoard 



1.4.'> 
2.(K) 
2.1.-) 

2.;«> 

:{.(M) 



" FACVLTYLOGS " 



Of the many members of our fatuity 
who traveled abroad last summer, un- 
tloubtedly the most experienced visitor to 
European shores was Dr. George L. 
Gage who made his tenth trip across the 
water. In the following article, written 
from an interview by one of the CollfRiun 
board. Dr. (iage tells s<jme of his im- 
pressions of Italy w hich was one of several 
coinitrn> vi-itcd by him this summer. 

"On .iniMiin ,it Naples I was immedi- 
ately iiiipi(>Mtii by the almost unbeliev- 
able fact that there were no beggars in 
evidence on the streets, a thing which 
can not really he appreciated unless one 
had seen Naples in the days when beggars 
were so numerous. .As a matter of fact 
Italy has been cleared of beggars under 



VEGETABLE (LARDENING SHOW 

There were several features about the 
show put on by the \'egetable Gardening 
department which deserve niore mention 
than space permits. In one corner of the 
rcMnii was a miniature reproduction of the 
Market (iardeii Field Station and its 
surroundings. It was a marvellous piece 
of work. In another corner of the room 
was a very interi-sting roadside display 
stand which exhibited canned vegetables 
as well as fresh one. Hemlock boughs 
were used to advantage in making an 
especially g«K)d background for this stand. 
On the main sidewall was a large map of 
the I'nited .States standing over a table 
which contained vegetables from centers 
of f)roduction outside of Massiichusetts. 
Ribbons leading from the vegetables 
served to locate the produition (enters 
on the maj). .Another feature of the show- 
was a bean guessing contest. This con- 
sisted of a jar full of various sized beans 
whi(li olfert'd (|ii;te ,i conumdrum as to 
its exact numerical number. It contained 
4374 beans and Mrs. P. Ilargraves of 
Easthami)toM won .i pair of silk stockings 
by making the ne.irest estimate vvhii h 
was 4;{72. 

Arnold M. Da\ i^ was chairman of the 
(ommiltee in charge and did a vast 
amount of work in perfecting the modern- 
istic decorations. 



Prexy Says 

I like to read a good detective story, to 
see if I can outguess the author as to how- 
it's going to turn out. 

— CD 

Interculletiiate 
Lessons in love-making are urged by 
Professcjr Heath of Cambridge University. 

Why? CD 

College women are becoming smaller 
and college men larger, according to the 
survey made by the department of physi- 
cal education at the University of Cali- 
fornia. 

More "shorts" and "longs" of it. 

CD 

There are thirteen dormitory teams 
and seven fraternity elevens entered in 
the f(K)tball league at North Carolina. 
Athletic, eh what? 

CD 

New York University's star halfback, 

Ken Strong, is the highest eastern college 

individual scorer. Langmaid of Williams 

holils second, while Al .Marsters was third. 

(We thrjught you might be interested.) 

CD 

Eleven o'clcK-k classes are most popular 
at Harvard, while eight o'clocks hardly 
exist at all. 

Evidence of what Somnus can do. 

CD 

Joe Found That 
Fannie Frosh never knew what college 
bred was until she came to Amherst, and 
now she's dis;i|)i)ointed because she siiys 
that it's only a four year loaf made from 
daddy's dough. 

CD 

/t — 

What would our game of football be 
without airtight balls? 

— Lit si 

The campus could easily be likened to 
a desert island last Saturday morning 
after ten bells. 

Rousing 

.At last , our handsome athletes are 
(diiK- into their own. These big, strong, 
he men, who worked for the glory of their 
.Alma Mater, have a new future opened 
to them by none other than Earl Carroll 
of bath tub fame. Mr. Carroll is about 
to (jpen a new show, a sort of glorification 
of the American .Athlete, and he has his 
agents out in search of talent. 

— Cheer 

Who said .Aggie wasn't 1(K);J last 
Saturday? .At the end of the first quarter, 
we had to buy TIFTS tickets to S IAN D 
on the .AGGIK side! 

Far 
Who was under the Jumbo covering? 
They, he, it, or whichever it was, had 
quite a biting time. 

An 

Speaking of the H.AND at Tufts, 
well, what about it? 

Ever 

Now that the election is over, and the 
games will bother us no more, — let 
college begin! 

Professors really aren't people, for you 
can f(K)l some of the people all of the time 
and all of the people some of the time. 
Kxperience is a siid teacher. 

Fightinf, 

Couldn't \m\ murder the guy who will 
not say "al)out," but always says 'anent"? 

Team 

In closing the football season, let me 
warn my readers against trying an end 
run on the fourth down in spite of the 
fact that you haven't a nick in your glass 

eye. Riih 

After having written a lot of drivel and 
a lot of what the Dahtmouth students 
call "Stuff and Nonsense," we shall call 
it a column. 

Rah 

Cela suffit. 



CLASS ELECTIONS 

S.S.A. class of 1<»29 have elected the 
following officers: .Allen M. Helden, Jr., 
president; Elbridge F. Helden, vice- 
president; Elliott P. Joslin, Jr., Treasurer; 
Clara L. Dillaway, secretary. 

Temporary officers have been elected 
by the class of 1930, as follows: Lester 
T. Morrill, chairman; Eliner .M. Crockett, 
vice-chairman; .Agnes K. Tanim, secre- 
tary; Richard M. Kinsman, treasurer. 

TWO VICTORIES 

Stockbridge football teams won two 
vict(jries last Friday afternoon on .Alumni 
Field, the regulars beating -South Deer- 
field High \'.\ to 0, and the second team 
trouncing Hennington High .'Jo to (i. In 
the first game, the second string backs 
ran wild through Hennington 's lighter 
line to score five touchdowns. Hill and 
Parks scored twice apiece on a succession 
of off-tackle plays. Although fumbles 
prevented the score from being larger, 
Stockbridge regulars were at all times 
superior to South Deerfield in the main 
game, as is shown by the fact that the 
home team was not once forced to kick 
throughout the game. Hill and Curran 
scored on line plunges and (ireene and 
Oksanen also played well for Stockbridge. 

The summary: 



.Stockbritlile 

Clu-ni-y, li- 
Cri-i-ne. Dibhli-, It 
Brown, Ik 
Skovron. Smith, c 
Sylvia, Mann, rg 
Oksiincn, rt 



South Deerfleld 

re, Mi-tlcv 

ft, Cafly 

rg. Otto 

c. Wolfram 

Ig, Bardwell, Canning 

It, Nietkoski 



Dibble, Durkin. re Ic, McDermott, Van t'eter^ilgc 
Hall, (|b (lb. S. Klinker 

Hill. Ihb rhb. Pielock 

iiakkim-n. Hirst, rhb 

llib. Wojtklicwicz, Gass. McDcrniott 
Curran. (ireeiu-, fb fb. P. klinkcr 

Touchdowns: Curran, Hill. Point after touch- 
down: Brown. Referee: Briggs. I'mpire: Siil- 
man. Linesman: Pollard. Time: l(l-ininule 
Huarlers. 



COMMUNICATION 



KEENE NORMAL DEFEATED 

Keene Normal .School fell victim to 
Coach "Red" Hall's Stockbridge football 
team Saturday afternoon, Nov. '.i, at 
Keene, N. IL, by the score of 13 to 2. 
In the first period, Curran scored through 
the opposing line after an offensive drive 
of forty yards by the visitors. Hill 
intc-rcepted a forw.ird pass in the last 
(piarter and ran eighty yards for a touch- 
down. Keene Normal scored a safety in 
the same period when a jjunt was fumbled 
and recovered behind the Stockbridge 
goal line. 



PITTSFIELD BEATEN, 13—6 

Hy scoring two touihdowns early in the 
game, the -Stockbridge eleven defeated 
Pittsfield l.'J to (■) last Saturday afternoon 
on .Alumni I-'ield In the first few minutes 
of play, by five plunges. Hall crashed from 
his own 4()-yard line to the op|)osing goal 
line and .scored a touchdown. The ball 
continued to be in Pittsfield territory, 
and at the end of the period. Curt in 
kicked to Hirst. Hall ran back to the 
20-yard line, and broke through for a 
touchdown on the first play of the secon<l 
quarter. Hrown added the extra point 
and made the score 1.'} to 0. Pittsfield 
scored in the second i>eriod when Sanger 
blocked a punt on the Stockbridge 2r)-yard 
line and Kelly picked up the ball and ran 
for a touchdown. 



The Collegian accepts no re^ponjibility for oiun- 
ion* voiced in "The Forum." It aims to serve uj 
a means of giving expression to student opinion, 
and will print any views expressed rationally un \ 
sanely, unless the edit<.)rs feel that tliey are ju^ti- 
tieil in suppressing them because of unfair s„-r. 
simal attack. Communications must be Umited to 
iM) woids. 

To the Editor of the Collegian: 

Thfc girls' food strike has come and 
gone, leaving n(Jt even a faint a vers 
faint echo. The cause, however has re- 
mained. The fact is, a Springfield reporti t 
notwithstanding, that the food isdefinitt ly 
unsatisfactory; and the disaffection is not 
caused by a few chronic grumblers. .\|| 
attempts to right matters have been un- 
availing; it remains, therefore, to try 
the outcome of bringing the food situation 
into the very center of the public foriim 
to s(-c if publicity cannot etfect a desirable 
change. The facts are these: many of the 
students have been ill with stomach dis- 
orders traceable to the food. Stale fcxjcl 
such as would never be tolerated in any 
one-arm lunch room is a ccjnmionplace 
thing on our tables. 

In view of the fact that we have su( h 
a wonderfully modern and sanitary 
kitchen, it is a wonder no, it is one of 
the seven wonders of the world that 
such a vast quantity of entomological 
life manages to make our food its last 
resting place (not to speak of its last will 
and testament). Raisins with wings, 
carroway seeds with legs, — these are only 
two of the many curious fossil formations 
encountered in our bread. 

Often, lest we tire of seeing the same 
kind of bugs day in and day out, the 
(ommissary department seems to have 
gone to no little trouble and expense to 
[)rocure new and strange specimens for 
(jur edification. We are duly appreciative. 
I wish here and now, to thank the un- 
known Samaritans in behalf of those of us 
who have experienced the benefits (if 
their philanthropy. The department has 
done nobly — nobly! Witness the dis- 
covery by one of our members (whose 
name, for politic reasons, I shall nut 
mention) of a perfect specimen of "dis- 
gustosaurus" which has been believed 
to be extinct for thousitnds of years. One 
begins to wonder at times, — is this 
Draper Hall or F'ernald? 

Sometimes the meat is good, but then 
there remains the other ninety per cent 
of the time. .Surely there is s<mie other 
way to go about advertising Kelly- 
Springfield tires or O'Sullivan's heels. 

Seriously speaking, the situation is 
well-nigh insufferable. We do not expeit 
as good f(K>d as we received at home, but 
tlu-re are limits to what even an under- 
graduate's cast-iron constitution can en- 
dure. Patrick Henry said, "(Jive me 
liberty or give me death!" My reiiuest 
is much more modest, "(iive me veal 
that tastes a little less like a ruliber 
b(x»t!" 

•32 



FRATERNITY BANQUETS 

Kohjny Klub members, friends, and 
initiates gathered at Draper Hall, .Satur- 
day evening. Nov. .'{, for their Initiation 
Hanquet. .After an elaborate menu, a 
program of speeches was carried out with 
much enjov nient for all participating. 



Alphi Fau Gamma fraternity held its 
tenth annual Initiation Hanquet at the 
Lord Jeffery Inn on Wednesday evening, 
Nov. 7. .After a most delicious baiupiet. 
Herman Hoyt rose to the occasion of 
toast master and requested several 
sjMdhes. .Memliership certificates and 
pins were awarded at this time. 



NOTICE 

Meeting of all members of editorial 
board of llt.'U) Index at Memorial 
Huilding Thursday afternoon at b p.m. 
This is a very important meeting and 
all members must be present. 



CLUB PLEDGES 

October, I028 
KOLONY KLLB 



To the Flditor of the Colleniati: 
"While the cock, with lively din, 

Scatters the rear of darkness thin," eti . 

Hilton apparently enjoyed the crowin^ 
of a rooster early in the morning, but we 
find no suggestion that he considered it 
as a harmonious accompaniment to ,i 
college chapel sermon. .Neither do 1 find 
any allusion to such a possibility else- 
where. 

.Apparently we originated this peculiar 
effect which was such an audible part of 
last Sunday's chapel program. It was a 
very novel effect. Nevertheless, I suggest 
that a repetition of it be reserved until 
we have a preacher who selects his text 
from Matthew, 26: 34. 

•At the close of chapel a cursory investi- 
gation of the cause of the disturbance 
was made. From the result of it. ' 
should assume that it will be no very 
difficult feat to prevent a repetition ot 
such a disturbance. Apparently the s;inie 
ventilator opens into both the .Auditorium 
and the rcKJin immediately below the 
stage in which the galinaceous flock « " 
confined. If one of these ventilators 
could be closed, the sound would he 
snulfled sufficiently. 

E. S. Henderson 



Class of '29 

Joseph R. Crissman 
Charles \V. Fletcher 
(ieorgc \V. McCarthy 
Cri-orge I. Stearns 
Thointon Stevens 
John J. Sullivan 
Milton F. Warren 
A. Howard W'helan 
Harry D. Uui. k 



Class ot '.{0 

Willard \V. Avery 
Richmond C. Barr 
Albert H. Baumnier 
( li.iilc- V. He. ker 
Sintxjrn ,\. ( .ililwell 
Alfred S. ( r.im 
Harold Durkin 
John Field 
(iardner L. Frf)st 



(Continued on Page 3) 



To the Editor of the Collegian: 

Since some students are strenuous!) 
opposed to an unjustifiable use of Massa- 
chusetts' banners, it is fitting that this 
matter be brought before the student 
body for proper consideration. T.."^ 
who were observant during this p^" 
week-end could not avoid noticing the 
display of M.A.C. banners on auto- 
mobiles between Amherst and Boston- 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Wherever well-dressed men gather, 
you see 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WKIXNKSDAY, NOVKMHI R 21. 1928 




CLUB pled(;es 

(Continued from Pafte I) 



BOLLES SHOE STORE 






il 



Vpjpp^ o I 72 sheets of Fine Writing Paper 
^ — with 50 Envelopes to match for 

A J. HASTINGS 



69. 



"™^oV;:k"- AMHERST. MASS. 



Stephen P. C.retii 
IlerlH-it F. Haley 
Riiliard C. Hall 
Charles \V. Harris 
Myron (.". Hartford 
Winston ll,irtley 
I liailes I-'. Il»hiu,in 
Fredi'tii k F. .lolinson 
Kii li.iid M Kinsman 
■\iiliiev (' Kd'isilimar 
•Ul.in W. 1 viin 
HiiKh U M.i.(;ihlion 
KolKit J. M.mn 

A. T. <;. Cl.l'B 



Willl.uii F Me-irr 
Uiiter T. Morrill 
Dana l^lrks 
Arthur \. I'helon 
Clyde II. Putn.im 
Allred J. Shals 
S-ih W Sw.iin 
Ki, luid H Tracy 
Doutilas C. Wdson 
Henry A. /imrneiiii.in 
Kichaid H. t .isw.ll 
Kiiliaid P. ( li.i.lwi, k 



BLACK'S SINGLE VOLUME LIBRARY 

MAUPASSANT BALZAC 

Complete Short Stoies Complete Novelettes 

$2.98 each 



JAMES A. LOWELL 



BOOKSELLER 



CIUNS of 'ft 

Meriitt 1, .\seltine 
Willi.ini F. Hrown 
Paul I., Fianklin 
Joseph F. Sylvi.i 
U)uis H. \'an Norman 
Kenneth H. Wliit.- 
James t». V.irk 

CiuNs of '.to 
I'liillp <■ .\llililsiill 
Floyil r. H.innolt 
William ( . Bower 
l-.UKene S. HriKikiniss 
Nirnuel C. Chapin 
Joseph II. ("oyle 



Ivhiier M. I roikeit 
Cloyes T. (ileasiiii 
Joseph L. (itiduli 
ArvoO. ll.tkkinen 
Judson W ll.isiinKs 
Kdwin W Hill 
Willi.im li. |l<Hiues 
Kiili.iid (;. U'wis 
Arne \'. I.iukas 
.Ml.m S. MiC.ialh 
Arne K. (>kas4iiien 
Allrt-rt F. Pi|ier 
llansC. Slephansi'n. Ji 
William W. Tail 
W.ilter J While 



COMMUNICATION 
(Continued from Pafte 2) 

Aid result the fact that there is a Massa- 
rhusi-tts was impressed upon the public. 
.Naturally any public observer, who was 
not familiar with M.A.C, might have 
judged in each case that the (xcupants of 
each automobile were students at this 
College. 

Perhaps students who are not enrolled 
at M.A.C. are justified in displaying 
maroon and white banners from their 
(ullegiate vehicles. Perhaps, they think 
th,it they are advertising the College. 
Milt, would you consider going to a 
I'rinceton-Vale football game dis|)laying 
a tiger banner? Vou might cheer htr 
l'rin((ton, but would you, who are not 
enrolled at that New Jersey university, 
believe that you were justified in waving 
.i Nassau pennant? In other words, 
\u)ul(l you try to be .something that you 
were not? 

It M-ems to me that if there were a 
il(niand for Stockbridge banners, ])«n- 
mnts, and sti(kers, this pr(jl)lem might 
lie solved. Why advertise another insti- 
tution when you believe that your s( liool 
- tlie best? Surely an institution that 
I :- changed its name so recently need^. 
ail the publicity that it can obtain. 
llierefore, why not consider your own 
use and not that of a college that (an 
it re[iresented on all occasions by men 



Christmas Cards 

I Seals, Tags and 

luiclosiirc Cards 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 

THE 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Offers Expert Hair Cutting 
Service for Men and Women. 

••OP" DUWELL, Prop. MEMORIAL BUILDING 

College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATII 
Reg. Pharm. 

AMHERST. . . MASS. 



who are students of that particular 
(ollege? M.'K.C. students would not go 
to .Stockbridge athletic events, displaying 
a Stockbridge banner. Why? Not be- 
cause there are no banners available but 
because Massachusetts students believe 
in loyalty to one college. 

I might like to be a Princeton man; 
but since I am not, I am trying to luake 
the fad known to everyone with whom 
I have contact that my college is a g(KKi 
one. If I lived in Rome, without a doubt 
I would do as the Romans do. Collon 
once said, "Imitation brings the sincercht 
flattery." It is true! Therefore, why do 
not the Stockbridge students use ap()ro- 
I>riate banners to advertise their own 
school and leave the M.A.C. men to 
disi)lay their manwu and white l)anners 
when and where they please? 

L. M. L. 

"PEPPY" MASSMEETINC; 
(Continued from Pufte I) 

The gathering assembled around a large 
blazing fire in the center of iIm- pit. Merc 
there were a .sc-ries of sin-edu-s by mem 
bers of the team and (()a(hing staff, as 
well as several |>o|)ul.ir ( <im|>us ( hara( ters. 
Cheers and wmgs by tin- group also 
helped to enlived the proceedings. The 
meeting was adjourned with the singing 
of the .\lma .Mater and a long cheer for 
the team. 



ASK FOR I 

" Munsingwear" 

RAYON and SILK 

Bloomers -Step-ins -Vests 

Slips - Bandeau - Pajamas 

Night Robes 

SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

G. Edward Fisher ■ 



TYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Remint^ton, Royal 
and Corona Sales and Service 

Kacllo Fquirment Ceneral Repair .Shop 

H. E. DAVID 
35 Pleasant St., jutl below P.O. Amherst 



CO-ED NOTES 

Co-ei! basketball tourn.iment is over 
and again the class of ',{1 claims the 
championship. It was a ch)se match for 
the final g.ime played last Monday after- 
noon between the juniors and .sophomores. 
I'ntil the end of the third quarter the 
two teams gained almost basket for 
basket. The final scores resulted L'.'l to 1 1 . 
Starting last Wednesday afteriUHm at 
Drill Hall the contest attracted a large 
attendance and enthusiasm from the 
co-eds which lasted with increasing force 
until the final game Monday. 

Order of games was as follows: 
\\ednes<lay — 
Juniors (Captain Gertrude Maylott 
';<()) vs. Freshmen (Captain Thelnia 
Dickinson '.'12). Juniors won. 
-Stockbrdige (Ca|)tain Agnes Tamni "AO) 
vs. .Siphomores (Captain Kiizabeth 
Marry "Al). .Sophomores won. 
Thursday 
Juniors vs. Stockbridge. Juniors high 

scorers. 
Seniors (Captain Katherine M( Kay) 
vs. Sophomores. Sophomores won. 
.M(jnday 

Championship game lietwe( ii juniors 
and .sophomores. So|)homores final 
\ ictors. 

NOTED MEN AT CHAPEL 

(Continued from Page I) 
March .'{, Trim ipal .Allred K. Stearns, 

Phillips .Academy, Andover, Mass. 
Mardi 10, President Paul I). M(KMly, 

.Middlebury College. 
.March 17. Dean Sli.iiler Mathews, The 

Divinity School of the I'niversity of 

Chicago. 
April 7, Prtjfessor Henry H. Tweedy, 

Divinity School of Vale University. 
.April U, Professor Hugh Hla( k, I'niou 

I lieoloi;i(','d S<-minar\'. 



Who Does Your Laundry? 



Our new scini-rinish process appeals 
to those students who desire iiuality 
service at a reasonaMe cost. 



THE AMHERST LAUNDRY CO., Inc. 



'Dick" Adams '29 M.A.C. Agent 



TcL 720 



Why Not Have The Rest? 

It doesn't cost any more here. As an example we 
would like to show you our hand tailored suits and 
overcoats of the highest grade of imported and do- 
mestic woolens ^^ ^^(j ^^ ^^^f^ 

II you crave a fur coat we have a corking good huy 
in a hlack dogskin ^^ ^^^ff 

R M, THOMPSON & SON 

CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN FOR NEARLY FIFTY YEARS 



S Town Hall Theatre ' 



B 



Malini'Ch .«:<Mt i.venlniis (>:4.S and H;.<ll 



J 



Amherst Shoe Repair Co. 

Master Shoe RebuHders 
^EXT TO BOLLES SHOE STORE 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Oculiala' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable makes 

.% PLEASANT STREET, (up one flifthtj 



Best in Drug Store Service 
Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co. 



THURS. and FRIDAY, NOV. 22 and 23 

"4 SHIP COMES IN'' 

Sh, //.;.(/ nrr hti hiDiil and ■.hi ilrvnlr.lly ami 
'.hr smilf'l uhin duly lallnl her hoy in Ihr 
4iil(,rs. hul ulirn hrr huhnnil Ihnut^h tnnmfnl, 
mils iiinviilffi III mur^lrr . \hi- A fmlh \liir\- 
Rl IMii.rii SI ftll.DKKnrr. I.niisi. 
HHI.'^'-I.K ,1)1.1 Kniu.m I.DI st>\ 
NKVVS A\l> <:OMKI)V 

SAT., NOV. 24 DOUBLE FEATURE 

"ROAD HOUSE'' 

l.hiSI-.l. I'.AHKVSUiKI.. MAKIA A/.liA 
'.Sfiiin'v lirriUrsI hrnutyt iiml Hurmi tiurkr 
A iliinriK fxpiisf iif Ihr Itilfiill^ anil snnrr: srl 
liir Ihr (iiiirnluriiu\ frri nf miHirrn youlh in 
Ihr riiiiil housn Ihrnughtiul Ihr munlry lixlny 
\f(i\ I V /f.l.VKS tn 

''FLYING LUCK" 

llr liHik U'.ijitti, in llyinn Imm it mrrr^pnn- 
lirnrr \i hrxil iintt ihr phinr Mimi-.m Ihr 
SpiTil if I'lum (iHlrr A ■.:rriil liiii.h-nriirr 

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 28 

''A Blonde For A Night" 

MAKV I'HIMiSI . I htiiy l:\KMs 

'iH.l IIAKHIS<).\ loKI) 

Lufirn Littlrhrlii prrfrrml btnndrs ami lit 

'•lifr wa^ a hrunrttr, mi to Imp him inln n 

tlirliilinn, \he ilimnnl it hlnndr aij; - thrnt 

FABLES SPf)RTLIf;HT f:f)MI-,l>Y 



FRUIT SHOW 
(Continued from Pafte I) 

r)oughnuts, U for 10 
Sweet Cider .00 

Total 10 

In th(- stud(-nt competition exhibits the 
results were: 

CLASS A 
5 Commercial Varieties of .Apples 
1st, loving cup, Clifton K. Johnson '12'.» 
lind, "Ess«-ntials of Pomology," John A. 

Andrew '.(() 
■'{rd,;j-year subscription to American Fruit 
Grower, R. S. Tarr '2M 

CI^ASS B 

Single Plate l-.xhibils 
blue ribbon, I-;. Ilob.ut, S.S.A. 'L'K 
. red ribI)on, K. Call '.'JO 
. white ribbon, P. K(-lley, S.S.A. '2'.» 
(LASS C 
Hu.shel Box Kxhibit 
silver loving < iip, ('. U. , Johnwm ''2*) 
and J. A. .Andrew '.{0 
(I. ASS D 
Pear Class 
bell, C. k. Johnson "li'.i 
, fountain pen, C. K. Johnson ''2\\ 
pass to lown I hill Theatre and a 
pair of golf Iiom-, J. .A. Andrew '.JO 
;iiult> ( (imp( lition: 

CLASS A 
5 Conmieri iai V.irieties 
Prof. Si-ars, Inving t\n> 



1st 

lind 

.Ird 



1st 



1st. 
2nd 
.{rd. 



I 



1st. 




ANNOUNCEMENT 

Now situated at 15 1-2 Pleasant St. 
EXCELLENT SHOE REPAIRERS 

V. r; RON DON I CO, Prop. 



L 



WINTER SHOES 
Overshoes and Stock- 
ings to help you to 
study well and 
play well. 

Thomas S. Childs 

INCORFORATEU 

275 High St., Holyoke, Mass. 



2nfL Mr. Roberts, pruning t^iw 
■Ird. Mr. Tren( h, necktie 
CLA.SS U 
.Single Pl.ite 
1st, Dr. Shaw, blue ribbon 
Und. Vxi,{. Drain, retl ribbon 
.'Ird, Dr. .Shaw, white ribbon 
.Apple pie competition: 
CO-KD 
1st, Miss.S.irgeiit 'UO. pair (»f silk sto( kinK» 
-'nd. .Miss .Siv«-rt 'L".l, pass to Amherst 
The.itre 

FACULTY 
1st. Mrs. Dr.iin. blue riblxm 
lind, Mrs. Van M< t.-r, rc-d ribbon 
•Ird. Mrs. Roberts, while ribbon 

Judging: Team prize, silver loving cup, 
St o( kill id^e 

ST(H KMKIIXiE 
IM, Massiodiio, blue ribbon 
-lid, Siniih, red tibboii 
•Ird. Ilerm.in, white riblMin 

si-:nioi<s 

1st. p. H. St.-eie. bine ribbon 
l-'nd, J. i:. Itond. red ribUm 
•ird, R. S. Tarr, while ribbon 

Riilh Stone '.M) was recently awardetl 
ihe ti-rm sdiolarship given by Dell.i Phi 
'.amiiia for alt.iiinn^ (he nii.iiest im- 
|>rovemeiit in scholarship during the 
spring term. 

Miss .M.irioii L. Tiic kei entc rtamccl the 
lloiiie Ivonoiniis girls last Sunday evening 

.11 iiei .ip.irlm(in on .Nuiiiti^j Aviinie. 



t 



M H E R ST 

THEATER 1 



Wednesday, .\«»v. 21 

|5 KfllH VAUOfVlUE AGS S 

111 i''l. I> \ \ I I. IS Ml 

"TAKE ME HOME" 

Inll.MJll. liiK I'., be h.iiiK 1-. i„ |>,.,||,. 

plus Ciiiiieilv. 

< M<lOO\ I'.AIJII, M WS 



I iiursday Hi I- riday. N.,v. 22 .uu\ 2.\ 

\\ illl.l Ml li|\ |)I1M lit s 

"THE AIR CIRCUS" 

|Ullli Sue ( .ir.,1, D.iM.I kojluis, I.OUIM- 

Dr.sser and Arthur Lake. 
\ol a w.ir |)ir|iire but a (.RI.AT 
i'K HKI.. (;,.t off III, ..arlh! II. le 
|<on).s 111. ,Mk ( |R( IS 

li Rl I.I, ( OMI l)\ .\I.US 



AMHERST FRUIT STORE 

WHERF AGGIF MKN MKKT 

WHFN DOWN TOWN 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGARS 



.Saturday, Nov. 24 

KM II.AKI) |,|.\ Ki III I I I, IK ,„ 

MORAN OF THE MARINES 

l..i\. .iii'Miin .111(1 .iiliKii .ill iIh vK.,y 
through. .Se Ruth l-.lder of .All.mii. 
(lying fame viai in the skies. 

2RL»:i.(()MI DY PA Tin-; NKWS 



Monday & Tuesday, Nov. 2b & 27 
1)1.1 OR IS 1)1. I |< I (» „, 

"REVENGE" 

Drama that will sen. I ijii b!,«i.| i.i.ing 

ihroUKh voiir veins. .S c it . Tliriiliiig 

2 RLKI. ( 'i.MLDY NIWS 

LILAC TIME" IS COMINO 



A carton of 60 "A" Mackintosh apples makes an ideal present. We pack and ship them 
I'or you at prices consistent with the market. New College Store, "M" Building 



M. A. 



THR MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WKDNKSPAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1928 



DINNER JACKETS THAT ARE BEAUTIFUL, SMART AND CORRECT , , k ., . p 

Our Dinner Jackets offer four things in particular. They are new in style; smart in appearance- comfortable '^^^^^^^^^'^^^^ 

WE ALSO CARRY A FULL LINE OF TUXEDOS FOR RENT 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



POULTRY CONFKRENCK 

((:<inllnut.-d from I'utte I) 

project, as tlicsc two groups <jf hriciltrs 
have in\<r lutn hrou^lit t<>K«tli<r in a 
Biniilar iiianmr l)i fort-. 

Outstamliriij anions the spc-akers and 
dcnioiisliatois (111 tlic program were: 
Dr. M. A. Jull, stiiior i)oiiltryman of the 
IJ.S.D.A.; Dr. 11. II. I'IoukIi, professor of 
biology at Amherst Collene; Dr. H. D. 
Coodale, ^;enetieist, formerly of tlie 
poultry breedinn section of the Kxperi- 
nient Station here; and Trof. James \'.. 
Rice, professtjr of pmdtry luishandry at 
Cornell University. These men lecture<l 
on genetics and its importance. There 
were also some of the best fancy and 
standard hrieders of the state present, 
who gave demonstrations of methods of 
lireedioK and exhibited l)ree<ling records. 
The conference was divide<l this year 
into two main sections; first, the teach- 
ing of the fundamentals of jjenetics; and 
s»'cond, the discussion hy ljree<lers, stat- 
ing how they mated their birds and the 
important points in the successes they 
have obtained. This second part was 
particularly interesting, as they demon- 
strated liow they made their matings and 
the mechanics of petligree breeding. 

One «»f the high points of the conference 
was the proof of the applicafiility of the 
genetic analysis of the five production 
characters found by the Kxperiment 
Station in the shape of matings which are 
to he made this coming spring. The work 
of this conference is to hring the poultry- 
man to realize now that the science of 
genetics has accomplished outstan«ling 
results, not only in the Kxperiment 
Station, but also for private breeders. 
Men have been breeding animals in a 
blind way, not knowing the way in which 
the laws work, but the science of genetics 
has finally been successfully applied to 
poultry breeding. 



education in general .'ind to science in 
particular. In fa«t, science has become 
so important to the Russian mind that 
over the Itntel of the Moscow (lovern- 
ment ikiilding there are printed the 
words "Science henceforth shall be a 
tort h in the hands of the working people." 
In the third place Mr. Allenson men- 
tione<l the ever increasing cultural auton- 
omy. In place of the Russian language 
which was the only one taught there are 
now fiirty languages recognized. Of these 
twenty-five are to be changed over to the 
Latin alphabet. 

On the other hand there are three 
harmful results «)f this regime as Mr. 
Allenson sees the conditions at present. 
The first of these is the fact that there 
exists a most painful sense of isolation, 
possibly due to the high tariff, and to 
censorship. As a result there has arisen 
a sense of contempt for the rest of the 
world. The second point is that a uni- 
versal militarism prevails which is but 
conscription in an aggravated degree. 
This feeling is so strong that little children 
are participating in gas mask making 
contests. The Russians fear attack at 
all times, but are exercising a remarkable 
restraint. 

The final detriment mentioned was the 
fact that there is an unusual absence of 
individualism. The same ideas prevail 
everywhere and each person accepts 
them as final. There is no individual 
thought or action. 



RUSSIAN SITUATION 
(ContinuiMl from Pafte 1) 

time three points on the other side of the 
ledger. The first point mentioned was 
the fact that an extraordinary revolution 
in industry has taken i>lace. Authority 
now is centralized and credit is socialized. 
The only banks existant are government 
banks, and all e«onomy is subordinated 
to the idea of ecjuality. In this way 
there is no exploitation of individuals 
such as prevails under other systems. 

The second point brought up is the 
increasing desire for education. Mr. 
AllenstMi stated that he had never seen 
any in other ,ounlr\ Miih a devotion to 



TUFTS GAME 

Continued on Pafte i) 

the opening minutes of play. The first 
was a ninety-five yard run to a touchdown 
by "Freddie" Kllert, the minutive star 
halfback for the McGeoch aggregation. 
Following this score by Kllert the versa- 
tile Kllis of Tufts ran ninety yards to tie 
the count. 

"Cy" Kimball, a promising Aggie 
sophomore, played well on both the 
defense and the offense. He proved to be 
a consistent ground gainer and an nn- 
portant clog in the secondary defense. 
"Chet" McKittrick, who has played well 
all season, was another strong defensive 
man in the valley warriors' backfield. In 
the line "Ray" Mann,at center and "Tim" 
Minkstein, at tackle, were the outstand- 
ing players. 

For the victors Kllis was. without doubt, 
the most spectacular player on the field. 
Mis ability to run. kick, and pass, made 
him the main threat of the Tufts eleven. 
He scored two touchdowns and made 
:-icveral long gains. In the line Urehant. 



DRY CLEANING 



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Luckas, and Austin played a very good | 
game. 

Tufts kicked off to Kllert of M.A.C., 
who ran the ball back twenty yards to his 
own thirty yard mark. Here two line 
bucks netted no gain so Howie punted. 
After carrying the ball to the Agates' 
forty yard line the Medford team was 
held for downs. An exchange of punts 
followed with Tufts finally receiving on 
its own thirty yard line and marching 
down the field to the visitors' five yard 
mark. Here Hingston fumbled for the 
home team, and Kllert picked upjthe ball 
to run ninety-five yards for a touchdown. 
The kick for the extra point was blocked. 
On the next kickoff Kllis received for 
Tufts and ran ninety yards to tie the 
score. 

From this time on the hopes of a 
M.A.C. victory faded quickly. The 
Tufts aggregation proved its superiority 
by scoring twice in the second quarter 
and once in each of the last two periods. 
The strong defensive work of the Jumbos' 
line stopped the Aggie backs from pene- 
trating into the Tufts territory. Only 
once in the beginning of the second half 
did the M.A.C. team show any real power. 
At that time Kimball and Kllert pushed 
their way through the opponents' line for 
two consecutive first downs on the Tufts 
thirty-five yard line, where the home 
team's defense strengthened. Bowie at- 
tempted to punt but the ball went off 
side at the forty yard marker. With 
Kllis carrying the ball most of the dis- 
tance the Sampson team advanced to 
the M.A.C. twenty yard line where the 
visiting club held for downs. 

Coach Sampson of Tufts will lose by 
graduation the regular backfield that 
played last Saturday. This will leave a 
big vacancy to be filled because these 
men have been important clogs in the 
backfield combinations for the past two 
seasons which have been so successful. 
M.A.C.'s regular lineup will remain 
intact with a few exceptions. With the 
available material on this year's ineligible 
and freshman elevens the outUxik for a 
Utli9 season is, indeed, promising. 
The lineup last Saturday: 
TuflH Ma»8. Ailitiea 

(iiKlfrey, Mc Rae. le re, Cox 

Luikas. Storey. Morse, It ft. Mills, True 

Raihdorf. GallaKher. Biller. Ig rK, Mannuson 

Breliaiit. Wilkinson. I'almcr. c c. Mann 

KtiKKerio, Karklin, Giblion, ril 

Ig, Kelton, Sullivan 
Ciirit. Littleton, ft It. Minkstein 

Austin. Mills. C hane. re le. Bowie 

Kllis, Muskuwitz, Ilollaml. (ih 

nil. Micks. Plummer 
.\lil,iani. Inualls. ihb rlib. Kimh-ill 

l'!ii!l!i)s. IreUind. rhb Ihb. Ellert 

lliuKston. Haber, fb fb. McKittrick 

Siore: Tufts .T2, MAC. 6. Touchdowns: 
Kllis J. HinRston. Phillips. Hab«T. Ellert. Points 
.ifter touchdowns: Luckas "J. Referee: A. \V. 
Innalls. Itnpire: 11 R. Bankart. Linesman; 
J. B. Pendleton. Field judge: O. L. T.iwer. Time: 
four l.Vniinute periods. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

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AMHERST, MASS. 



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and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



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I 



THIS MCNTH 

It's about overcoats... if you haven't 
heard about Brae-fleece . . . don't lose 
another minute... come at once... the 
greatest little overcoat you ever saw 



CARL H. BOLTER 

INC. 
EXETER AMHERST HYANNIS 



(Continued from Page 1) 

The program follows: 

Nov. 19 t'lub Work 

26 Sloraue 

Dec. 3 Home Kconomics 

10 Forestry 
17 Poultry 

2 » ( lub Work 

.M (lub Work 

Jan. " founty .Xgent Work 

H Home Economics 

21 Animal Husbandry 
2H Kruit CrowinR 

Feb. 4 Field Crops 

11 Home Kconomics 
IS Farm Management 
2.") Club Work 

Mar. 4 Poultry 

11 Horticulture 

\H Market Gardening 

25 Home Kconomics 

Apr. 1 Dairying 

8 Home Economics 

\r> Club Work 

22 Field Crops 

29 Flower Growing 

May 6 Pre>ident Thatcher 

13 Home Economics 

'JO Home Economics 

27 Home F-conomics 

June 3 Home Economics 

10 Market Gardening 

17 Horticulture 

24 F'ruit Growing 



LANDSCAPE PLANTING 

NURSERY STOCK 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter H. Harrison, Prop. 



SING LEE HAND UAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

REPAIRIM; AM) All. KINUS OF 
WASIIIMi IK)NE AT RKASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy CJuaranteeil 

NEXT TO THE TOWN MM I 



Mens Sheepskin Slippers 
At Low Prices 

Shoe Repairing Department 

JOHN KOTOS SHOE STORE 



9 



I The College Candy Kitchen e 




B 
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9 

8 
9 
I 

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I 

I 

I 

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The most up-to-date place in 
New England. We are employ- 
ing a hotel chef, expert candy 
and ice cream maker, also expert 
baker. We use onlv the verv best 
in preparing our foods and drinks. 



gi|g iBa0aarI?«ggttB fflnlUgtatt 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1928 



Number 9 



SEVERAL QUESTIONS 
DISCUSSED IN FORUM 

\uted to Have a Change in Sunday 
Library Hours 



I'resident William B. Robinson '29 ol 
Adilphia opened the first student forum 
of the year in Assembly, November 22d 
by presenting a brief history of the 
society and something of its aims and 
IHirposes. He then introduced Dennis 
.\I. Crowley '29 president of the Honor 
Council, who s|K)ke as a representative 
of this organization. He stated that 
since the last open forum there have 
been no cases brought before the council 
but that suggestions had been made with 
a view of extending the scope of the 
organization. The first of these had to «lo 
with library borrowing without per- 
mission, or as Crowley put it "mis- 
appropriation." The suggestion was to 
have the lionor Council take over such 
cases. The second suggestion was to 
have the Honor Council connected with 
the employment situation in this College 
so that applications for student labor 
IKJsitions would be filled out more fairly. 
The student body, however, felt that 
these were outside the range of the Honor 
Council and voted against them both. 

The next speaker was John K. Kay '29 
as a representative of the Senate, who 
brought up the age-old question "Should 
co-eds vote for Senate members?" The 
result of a sentiment vote on this subject 
was strongly in the negative. 

Shepley Cleaves '29 brought up the 
question of whether or not M.A.C. should 
have a mascot. The sentiment vote on 
tins was yes, and a committee is to be 
chosen by the Collegian stuff Ui inquire 
into the matter and to choose a mascot 
to be presented to the student body at 
the next forum. 

The last s|K»aker was Clifton K. John- 
Mjn '29 who introduced the subject of 
changing the library hours on Sundays. 
After some diu-ustiion it was voted to 
keep the library open from Sunday after- 
noon at one o'clock until Sunday night 
at ten o'clock, instead of in the morning 
as has heretofore been the case. 



Dr. Tehyi Hsieh Will 
Again Speak In Assembly 

Popular Chinese Lecturer Had In- 
teresting Message Last Year 



Building Fund 

Still Growing 

Alumni Classes Compete in Physical 
Kducation Building Drive 

The class of 1HS8 leads all others in 
IKTcintage of members contributing to 
the Physical Education Building Fund 
with a rank of HtK. 192X is sc-cond with 
<i"), and IHKi is third with »».{';. Following 
is the record of the classes from 191 H to 
1928. Other classes will be rejiorted in 
subsequent issues. 

('a« PrrcfHi 

H»1H ;{7 

191!» 2H 

1!«(» 30 

H»21 .•{? 

"•-'^ 2-, 

li*-.^:* 22 

l'*^» 27 

i«:i"> :»i 

1926 :u 

li»27 44 

iy2.s ... f^, 

(Continued on Pafte 3) 



Once more M.A.C. faculty and stu- 
dents will have an op|)ortunity of hearing 
and seeing that most |>opular and in- 
structive Chinese lecturer. Dr. Tehyi 
Hsieh, who will be the speaker at to- 
morrow's assembly. Dr. Hsieh, it will be 
remembered, sjxjke in Bowker Audi- 
torium last fall, and made a most pro- 
found impression on those who heard 
him at that time. 

China reborn, and its manifold prob- 
lems, are the subjects that the speaker 
will endeavor to present to his listeners. 
China's rebirth, her awakening after 
centuries of sleep, her conquest of her- 
self after years of internal confusion, her 
emancipation of women and children, her 
thirst for knowledge and her hunger for 
agreeable relationships with other great 
powers of the world these are but phases 
of the great subject which this eminent 
Chinese statesman is concerned. 

Dr. Hsieh paints a very graphic picture 
of the past history of China, torn as it 
was by conflict and strife. Then he holds 
up beside this ugly side of the picture a 
clean sheet, as it were, with but a few 
marks of pros[jerity on it, which repre- 
sents the new China, starting on an era 
of development and accomplishment. 
And when he has finished there is im- 
pressed on everyone's mind a picture, 
alive and glowing with radiance, of the 
Chinese republic that is to be. 



FRUIT JUDGERS FIRST 
AT NEWJIAMPSHIRE 

Judgers Leave for Pennsylvania 'to- 
morrow to C^ompete with Teams 
from Pennsylvania, West Virginia, 
New Jersey and Ohio State Colleges 



EXPERIMENT STATION 
LOSES RALPH REDMAN 



Assistant Director of Station 
Since 191M 



FLORICULTURE CLUB 

_ ' 'n Thursday evening, December 0. at 

■ " I>. m., Mr. Herman Warcndorf will 

^t-'.ik and demonstrate at French Hall. 

•'^li". Warendorf, one of New \'ork's fore- 

nif'^t florists, will give his own interjire- 

tation of floral art. The ability of our 

guest was emply shown last >ear, when 

fit iiave one of the most brilliant demon- 

''t rations ever seen here, of the art of 

fl'Tal arrangement. There will un- 

fl"iil)tedly be a large attendance, as last 

' -r Mr. Warendorf spdkf to a capacity 

! F<efreshments will be .served, and 

' Mtcrcsted are invitffl to attend. 



Ralph W. Redman, assistant director 
of the Kxtension .Service of the Massii 
chusetts Agricultural College, left this 
(Mjsition on November .{(I to become 
sjiecial agent for the Connecticut (.eneral 
Life Insurance Co. for .Amherst and 
Northampton. His family will continue 
to li\c in Amherst. 

.Mr. Redman came to the College in 
I9I.S as As.sistant Director of the Flxten- 
sion Service under Professor W. D. Hurd, 
who organized this sc-rvice in Massju hu- 
setts. His work has been largely in the 
field of administration dealing with 
finances, siilesnianship, advertising and 
office management. He was acting 
director for one year following the resig- 
nation of Director Hurd. He was s<le( ferl 
in 192r) by President Butterfield, in re- 
s(Kjnse to a re()uest from Simmons Col 
lege, to give a course in Rural So< iology 
in the School for Sfjcial Work of that in- 
stitution. The course proved sf) success- 
ful that he repeated it in 1927 and 192H. 
(Continued on PaUe4) 



At a fruit judging contest, held at the 
I'niversity of New Hampshire, the Mass. 
Aggie fruit judging team took first place 
in a competition with teams from three 
other institutions. t)ut of a possible score 
of 21(K) |)oints, the M.A.C. team made 
1991; Connecticut Aggie was second with 
1954 points; a score of W.il placed the 
University of Maine third; and the 
University of New Hampshire was fourth 
with a total of IKSti points. 

(Continued on Puge 4) 

Varied Costumes 
At Unique Party 

Sophomore "Old Clothes Party" An 
Unusually Successful Affair 

A most successful "Old Clothes Party" 
was given by the class of I9.'{1 last Tues- 
day evening in the Memorial Building. 
The idea of wearing old clothes was 
suggested as a happy medium between 
just a dance and a costume party. The 
resulting outfits were decidedly interest- 
ing, and in some cases rather startling, 
as the wearers had spared no effort to 
apjK-ar in dilapidated dress. 

Chocolate bars were given as the first 
prizes. They were awarded to Charles 
W. .Manty "M, who ap|>eared as the 
'N'agabond Butler"; an<i to Pauline A. 
Spiewak '.{1, dressed as the "Little (iirl 
in the Big Overalls." A special prize, 
offered for uniqueness in costume, was 
offered to Charles H. Cook '.«), a "Mas 
< uline Co ed." 

The proceeds from this entertainment 
will be turned over to the Building Fund 
by J. Joseph \\'.»i»ils, the ch,tirn.aii of lli<- 
conmiittee, whose thought and work were 
largely res|K)nsible for the unusual success 
oi the d.ince. 



Twenty-Seven Varsity 
Letters To Be Awarded 

Twenty-one Football Letters and Sin 
Crttsst:ountry Letters tt» be(;ivenOut 



International Club To 
Hear Prof. Manthey-Zorn 

Professor Zorn of Amherst College to 

Speak on Union of Cermany 

with Austria 



INDKX PICTURKS 

This coming Sunday there will In- 
several grouj) pi( tures taken at Kinsman's 
studio for the 19.{() Index. It should be 
noticed that the .Men's (ilee Club and the 
(lice Club Orchestra will be combined in 
one pictures. If there are any other 
arrangenients or changes in the schedule- 
desired please notify Kenneth HiiJit at 
the Kappa Sigma House-. Following is 
the schedule for pictures on Sunday, 
December 9: 

lO.lo .Men's (.lee Club and (^lee (lub 

Orchestra combined 
10.40 Collegian 
11.00 Index Board 
11.20 MarcMm Key 
11.40 Roister Doisters 



.•\t a meeting of the Joint Coiinnittee 
on Intercollegiate Athletics held shortly 
before the Thanksgiving recess the varsity 
fiH)tball "M" was voted to twenty-one 
members of the Maroon and White fcM)t 
ball team. .Six members of tin- \arsity 
cross country tc-ani will receive letters. 
Krik A. Johnson of Springfield was 
appointed assistant manager of football 
for the next seas<jn. 

The members of the senior class who 
will receive football letters are: Captain 
Robert I.. Bowie of Milton, Andrew 
Coukcjs of Lynn, Richard C. Kelton of 
Hubbardston, Kenneth F. McKittrick of 
Boston, Taylor M. Mills of Bc.ston, 
Boleslaw Nilkiewicz of llolyoke, P. 
Raymond Plumer of Adams, Kvan C. 
Richardson of Millis, John A. Sullivan 
of Medford, Charles K. Walkden of 
Swansea, and Manager Harold S. Adams 
of Wbitinsville. A "aMa" was voted to 
Donald A. Davis of Bedford. 

Juniors who will receive letters are: 
Floyd I-;. Brackley of Strong, Maine, 
Adelbert C. Cox of Framingham. Ired 
C. Fllert of llolyoke, Lucius A. Howard 
of Ridgewood, N. J., Herman R. .Magrui 
son of Manchester, Raymond S. .Mann of 
Daltcjn, and Henry II. True of Haverhill. 

Sophomore football lettermen are: 
Murray B. Hicks of North Adams, Philip 
W. Kimball of Northborciugh, and Thomas 
K. Minkstein of West field. 

Crosscountry insignia men are: seniors, 
Captain Carl A. Bergan of Nejrthampton, 
llolton S. Pease- of ll.impch-n. and kol.erl 
S. .Snell of .S)uthbri(lge; juniors, Ric b.ird 
A. Hernan of (nlbertville and Frank T. 
White- of llolbrook; and sophomore, 
John W. Mct.uckian of koslindale. 



NOTED IMPERSONATOR 
AT SOCIAL UNION 

Cornelia Otis Skinner t<» App<>ar 

Friday Kveninft in Bowker 

Auditorium 



RAY S. MANN TO LEAD 
1929 FOOTBALL ELEVEN 

Outlook for l«»2«» Season l.oeiks 
UnuKuully Promising 

Last week at a meeting of .i|| the 
varsity football lettermen, R.ivniond S. 
Mann '.iO of D.ilion, M.iss , was elected 
football captain for the 1929 season. For 
the last two years "R.iy" h.is been the 
regular varsity center, .ind his strong 
defensive weirk throughout the |>ast 
se-ason li.is made- him a valuable man in 
the .M.iroon aiid White forward line. 
Besides starring on the gridiron, "Ray" 
was a guard on the basket b.ill team last 
winter, and this season he is a very 
promising eandidate for a |Hmition on the 
cniinfet. During his freshman year Mann 
playe-d in three major s|K)rts, fcM)tball, 
basketball, and ImsiImII. While at 
Dalton High he [wrtic ipale-d in both 
footb.ill and baskc-tball. However, his 
real ability as a IcNUb.iU pl.iyer revealed 
Itself in the Amherst game two years ago. 
Since that time he has been a star line- 
man and is c e-rtain to be a capable leader 
for the 1929 football team. 

Although the team will lose eleven out 
e»f twenty one men reeeiving letters this 
year in fcMUball, the outlook for next 
season is very bright The- ten remaining 
lettermen toge-lher with the promising 
material in the ineligible and Ireshman 
teams forms probably the best outlook 
that this Colle-ge has had in fcKitball for 
the past three- years. As deinonstrated 
by this seaseMi M.A.C.'s comeback in 
athletics se-eins to be- on the- iip-gr.ide. 

Of course-, tlie-re will be se-veral vac^in- 
cies to be filleel on next year's team, and 
((^ntinuvd on Puge 4) 

Harriers Elect 

New Captain 

Frank T. White of lledhntok Has Had 
Oediluble Record as a IrackiUHn 



I 



PRIDE OF WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS 



tia»ti 



'»' TSTANDLNG PERFORMANCE 
OF THE WEEK 



' 'u- sophomore "Old Clothes Party" 

"IS held Tuesday. November 

"Dtributed nearly fifty dollars to 

I'hysjral Kdiuation Building Fund. 



Prof. Otto Manthey-Zorn has been 
secured as the speaker for the ofH-ning 
meeting of the International Relations 
Club which will be held in the .Memorial 
Building, Thursday evening. Prof. 
Manthey-Zorn is a member of the faculty 
of Amherst College and has recently re- 
turned from a six months stay in .Austria 
where he has followed the activities of 
the Socialists there with careful observa 
tion to discover what actually constitute 
the motive forces of that country which 
secured its inde[K'ndence as a result cjf 
the World War. 

I'or the to|)ic- of the c'\ening's discussicjn 
the subject of the union of 'iermany and 
.Austria which has recently been effected 
has been chosen. No one in the Coriru-cti- 
cut \'alley is more f)ualified to [)resc'nt 
this subject than Prof. .M.uitln\ Zorn. for 
his information has been gained at first 
hand. Becrause of this, a very interesting 
and educational meeting is promiscij to 
inaugurate the International Relations 
("lub as an undergraduate arti\ity. 



CAMPUS CALKNDAK 

"Tomrirrrru' is a snlire on tiniay 
And shim-i ih weakness." 

Dr. Viiitng UHil .Wu»"j RelapW) 



Wednefiday 

7 'H) p. m. '"K. f)." mr-c-tinK in Mr-mfirial 
HiiilrlinK. S|x-;iki-r. I'aul .XIk'T, Kranklin 
County (hit) AK'-nt. 
7.1.") p. m. Intorclass l>askct>>all : 

Srniors vs. Freshmen 

Jiiniori vs. S.S..\. Krr>hnien 
Thursd-<iy 

.'.l.'i p. m. A'-iciTiWy. S|i<>akr'r, IJr. T>liyi 

Hiirh. Boston. 
O.i.") p. m, Inli-rnalional Rilation- ( liilj 

meetinK in .Memorial Htiil'liiiK. 
7.'K) p. m. Frtnc h Club nwctinu. 
T.'iO p. m. Klorii iilluri- nii-i-tiuK in Kn-m li 

Hall. SiK-akfT. Mr ll<rinan Warenilort. 

New York. 
7 :',0 p. 111. OulinK Club meptinK in Sociiil 

I'nion Kdoiii 
Friday | 

7<i'i p. Ill .S<>( ial t'nion. Corm-lia Olis 

Skuiiii r ( harac-ter Skctrhi-s. 
Iiitrri lass baskt'tball: 

Frr-<bnirn v- S S .\ Fri'shm<'n 
l''riiit JiiflKiii, ' ■ ;■ I'.nn Stat'-. 

.Saturday 

10()0a III lir I' lasH baakpthall: 

Sopliomom v-. S.S .\ '^•■■' - 
12..'{(lp. m. Jtikf to .\I- i . II. .11, 

til'' V.A>1 K.\i« iiiii< lit '-;. i',..ii 
Sunday 

!».(»(» a. m. ClLiiH-l. SiKak'T. Dr. II. .X'ly 

Hrichard. St. Mark s Ki-ciory, Mount 

Kisfo. \. v. 



Not m.iriy times since- its inauguration 
III 1914 has Bowker Auditorium hael t he- 
honor of numbering among its visitors so 
distinguished a person as Corne-lia Otis 
Skinner, daughter cjf Olis .Skinne-r, who 
comes to ns this Iriday evening through 
the .Sejc ial l.nion of .M.A.C Miss Skinm-r 
is a character artist of reeogni/ed ability 
and rare |M-rse»nality. .She has che)s«-ii 
s<-ven <»f her character sketc lies fiom her 
extensive re-pertoire to pre-st-rit at this 
time. 

.Miss Skinner is widely known for her 

charming |)e-rsonality and entertaining 

ability, which have come to her thrcjugh 

two unusually fortim;ite circumstances. 

(C«>niinued on Pafte A) 



Numeral Awards Made For 
Fall Interclass Sports 

Thirty Sets of Numerals CIven for 
Participation in Interclass 
Ointests 

Numerals have been awarde-d to the 
following men for this fall's athletic 
activities: 

Freshman football: Howard .A. Chc-ne-y, 
Ozro Fish, John J. Fole-y, ClilTord R. 
Foskett, \inrent .N. (.agliarducc i, William 
(". l-ibbey, Douglas Roach, Kdwin H. 
Thomas, Frederic J. Welch, J. Louis 
Wilson, William F. Batstone, manager. 

Fre-shman cross country: He-rbert L. 
Forest, Henry Halzubir, John D. Hitch- 
cock, Kenneth K. Hodge, Donahl .M. 
.Mason. 

Interclass track nieef: Walter (,. 
Hunter aii'l Dan.i O. Webber oi the class 
of 1929; Nelson V. Bartsch, Rial S 
Potter, and Hardy I.. Wahlgre-n of I9.'{|; 
and Henry D. Davis, Warrfii Fal.yan. 
Old Kobert A. Wilson of 19.'{2. 

.Members of the wituiin;.^ sophcjmore- 
tt.itn in the six man r()|)e- pull: John 
Burnham, Richard W. Fv.itis. ( irl .A 
Holm, Marc .N. King, Rol,. m ( K'.,-,ii. 
.Old \A\\ ill T. White-. , 



As the result of the- election held last 
week. I- rank \ . White- '.{O of HolbrcMik, 
.Mass., will c.iptain the Bay St.ite- h.irriers 
through their cross country seasem next 
fall, riiroiighoiit the- past season "Wliitey" 
has pl.ice-d e eiusisleiilly in ,||| ( |„. ||„^.t^ 
in which he- p.irtic ipate-el. During his 
fresh m.in year be- w.is a me-niber of | he- 
frosli cross eetunlry team Ih.it chlt-ate-cl 

the- Amherst fresi -n. In the- spring he 

r.in on the- freslimaii Irac k team and won 
his niime-r.ds. His |ie-rformaiie e-s in the 
mile and SKO were very prcjinising. Ilow- 
eve-r, during his soplioiiie»re year he was 
foree-el lo elisi arel athletics, but this fall 
he returned lo make a very ere-dii.d)le 
showing as a "hill and daler." His work 
has been pr.iis«-worthy throughout the 
st-a.s<m, and he oroniise-s to be- a likable 
It-ader and a strong clejg in the ."Vl.A.C. 
team next year. 

BASKKTBALL NOTES 

B.iskc lli.ill pr.ieliee- for the- members of 
the varsity .sepjael is being held daily at 
the- Drill Hall. Thus far the practice 
sessions have Ix-en elevoted to funda- 
mental eirill anel serinmiage-s. .Asa whole, 
the e andidates are very promising, and it 
is probable that M.A.C. will be- re-pre- 
se-nted this se-ason by a strong c|iiiiitet in 
spite- of the clifhc iilt sc he-«lule- wliic h has 
l»een arrangeel. Among the- nie-n who are 
doing very we-ll in practice- ,irc- Captain 
Kllert, ( oukos, Ke-llcy, Weber, Burbank, 
Helherington, .Mann, Pae ks;irian, Stan- 
swieski, and Hi< ks. 

Fre-shman practice is held thre-e after- 
ncKHis a we-ek with approximately twenty 
men re-|K)rting for e-ac h session. Lmphasis 
is being plac e-d u|miii fundamental drill, 
ancj not muc h opfiort unity has been given 
Coach "Larry" Briggs to size up his 
material. Hc>we-ver, clnring the- next few 
weeks the c anclidatc-s will be given more 
strenuous drill in pre|)aration lor their 
first gaitiewith .Arms .A' .ideniy on j.iii II. 



FOOIBALL NOTICE 

I here will be ,i meeting of all canefi- 
dates for the 1929 varsity fcKitball 
team at the- S)e ial l.nion RiHjm, 
fhiirsday, Dec. 0. immediately after 

A - < niliK . 



I 



nil: MASSACIIUSKTTS COLU:c;iAN\ \\l DM-SDAY, DFCF.MRI R 5, 1928 



Tin: MASSACIIl SI/ITS ( OLMXHAN. WKDNr.SDAY, DI.CI.MHKK 5, 1'>2S 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official new^rwi'*' "f t''^" Massiuhusetl;^ 
Agricultural '.CulUre. I'uhlishcd tvtry 
Wediu'bday by the btudcntft. 



BOARD or KDITOKS 



CLVB NEWS 



EMEri.FY ( I.KA\KS "M 

EdwabdH.Niciiui.s '20 



I'.ditiji in( hid 
Man;iKi>iK l-'litot 



UKrAKTMKNT EDITORS 
Editorial Siikii-EY Ci.kaves 'ao 

Featur<r MAkt.AKKf 1'. Donovan "<(» 

Aluniiii & Short Courses .SAi.r.Y li. Ukaulev *ai 
Athletic l.KWis M l.YNi>s •:!() 

Fkank T Dort.LAss "11 
Campus J"'"' ^*- HowakhJr. '30 

( KtiL 11. Wadlkk.h '30 

KlAL S. I'OllKKjH. '31 



BUSINESS DKl'AKTMKNT 

rBBDCRICK D. Thaybb. Jr. "Ztt Business MiimiRfT 
• • •• " " AdveilisInK MaiiMKcr 

LAWHkKtK A. Cabbi'TH '29 ( iiculiitioi. ManuKPr 
WlNTIIKOI' O. Smum '30 

John R. Tank "30 

ROBEKT G. GotlDNOW, '31 



Subscriptions S2.00 per yiar. Sinj;l<- 
copits 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to iHE Massachusetts Collegian. 

In (ase of change of address, subscriber 
will please notify the business mananer 
as soon as fxissible. 



Entcreil as second-class matter at the Aiiilu-rst 
Post tMlice. A< (i-ptcil for mailinK at signal rate 
of postaKc provided for in section 1 103. Act of Oc- 
tobi-r. UU7, authorizi'd August 20. 191H. 



CIIAPKI. BITS 

The attendance at the Sunday Cha|)fl 



siTvicfs which have been held the p.isl 
few Sundays is a novel si^ht to anyone 
acciistonietl to seeing the scattered few 
that have in former years been regular 
attendants at these services. It is not 
only the freshman class that has con- 
tributed to this sudden increase, but also 
the three older classes. The quality of 
the speakers secured so far has certainly 
been up to a very hi^h standard, and 
there can be no doubt that those who 
brinj; us a Sunday messiiye feel more like 
putting; real efTort into their talks when 
they are facing an auilience of three or 
four hundred rather than a widely dis- 
tribute<l \irtmp of a hundred or less. 

Sunilay Chapel seems, from casual 
observation, to have lost the atntosphere 
of disrenartl which has been so evident in 
recent years anions the students who 
rese ted c«»nipulsion when it interfered 
with sleep. The chaiine that has come 
about so suddenly is one to welcome, for 
it very often happens that the finest talks 
of the coll»Kc year are n'ven at Simd.iy 
services. These Chapels are conducted 
for the undernr.iduates' benefit and de- 
serve the interest which has been siiown 
them so far this I all. Let's hope that 
this interest will be maintained, for the 
series of Sim<l.iy meetings has its sutcess 
dependent on the co-operation <>f the 
student botly, even at the exiHiise of 
ct)ni()uls<)rv attendance. 



oi ii\(; ci.i u Nori s 

.\t a meetinK of the OutiiiK Club held 
IhnrMlay e\tiiiiiK, Nov. L'2d, Mr. Basil 
\\iH)(l delivered an illustrated let ture on 
Mount Katahdin. This mountain, one of 
the highest in New Kngland, is in the 
heart of the Maine woods, in the norlii 
central part of the stale, and is very 
diliicult to reach, as Mr. Wood (lis 
((jvered on his trip there last sumnur. 

Settlements in that region are very 
remote, and wild ^unw is abundant. The 
top of the mountain is so wind-swept that 
nothing more than grass can grow there. 
The view is sujjerb, and includes some 2(K) 
lakes. Mr. Wood showed many view of 
Mt. Katahdin and its vicinity, and gave 
a very interesting and amusing account 
of the trip, int hiding the hazartlous ascent 
along the Knife-edge. 

Sunday, Nov. 25, twenty-one students 
joined in a steak dinner at the Outing 
Club cabin. The novelty of the party 
was further enhancetl by the sudilen, 
vigfirous snow storm that came up that 
afternoon. 

The next meeting of the Club is to- 
morrow night, Thursday. Dec. (5, at 7.;J0 
p. m., in the Sot iai I'nion Room. .At this 
meeting the arm badge of the organization 
will be given to all members jiresent. 

This S.itiirday the windosvs will be put 
in at the cabin, and a stove will be in- 
stalled. There will also be an overnight 
hike hehl there, Siiturday and Sunday. 
All wishing to go will take the 12. ."5(1 bus 
at the ExiH-rinient Station on Siiturday, 
and bring their own food and blankets. 








STOCKBRWGE 



J,nt' 



.s 

,l:» 



COMMUNICATIONS 



FRENCH CXUB 

Again, on Thursday, Nov. 22, the 
French Club conducted a meeting which 
was attended by a large gathering of 
students interested in French. The 
meeting was opened by a short talk by 
President John R. tiuenard 'HI, who 
encouraged the students to profit by the 
opportunity thus presented to s|)eak 
French. The rest of the meeting was 
given over to playing F'rench games. 
Light refreshments and snn)kes were 
passed during the evening. 

Next Thursday night will see the Club 
convene at the same place at 7 o'clock. 
.\ good program is in order and members 
are urgetl to attenti. 



Campus Debris 

IntercoUejilate 

At Northwestern I'niversity a botani- 
cal field trip was recently made by air- 
pl.me, when three professors and three 
students used a plane to study and phottj- 
graph plant communities from the air. 

- CI) 

In oriler to aiil in "rooting," men and 
women may be separated at ftxjtball 
games at the University of Colorado. 
What's the reason for all this? 

-CD — 
Alfretl N'oyes, poet laureate of Flngland 
will speak at the L^niversity of Indiana in 
January. 

Just one of the notables. 

CD 

Much excitement found place at 
Antioch when the girls' new dormitories 
burned down in the middle of the night. 
Think of the excitenuiit just one of 
our old buildings could bring by going up 
in flames! 

CD 

At Syracuse one of the leading pro- 
fessors considers it as bad to cram as to 
cheat in an exam. 

Now crammers,— aren't you 'shamed? 

CD 

Joe Found That 
F"annie Frosh can't see how this school 
can use trick plays if it boasts of being on 
the honor system. 

Have you had your hike today? 

— CD 

At the last Open Forum, behold! — 
There came the Bride, Romona. Though 
she belonged to somebody else, — and all 
the rest. 

CD 

If the library hours are kept to meet 
the sentiment vote, then such courses can 
be exteiuled for another day. 
CD 



UEERFIELD SUPREME 

IN CLOSING CANH: 

Deerfield Academy's strong ftjotball 
eleven defeated the Stockbridge team lA 
to () on Friday, November 2;} at Deer- 
field, in the final game of tht. seastjn for 
both clubs. The winners' scores were the 
results of long i)asses, while Cheney re- 
covered a fumble and made a touchdown 
for Stot kbridge. 

In the second |)eri(jd a pass from 
Powers to Markoskie gave Deerfield a 
touchdown. Cheney recovered the ball 
and scored when Mearn fumbled behind 
the goal line in the third peritjd. A 
stubborn gtwl line defense twice stopped 
Deerfield in the last period, and Brown 
kicked out <jf danger. Near the end of 
the i)eri()d, Sniead snared a pass and 
gave Deerfield their second touchdown. 
I learn, Markoskie, and Smead featured 
for the home team, and Cheney, Curran 
and Hill starred for Stockbridge. 
The summary: 

UtwrHeia Stockbrldiie 

Edwards, Taylor. Lisle, Ic re. Dibble 

Murphy, It rt. Oksanen 

Hodtie, I'ellon. li{ fK. Sylvia, Mann 

Ray, c c, Skovron, Smith 

Ri( hardson, S. Johnson, Bennett, rs Ir. Brown 

Wheeler, rt It. Curran 



le, Cheney. Durkin 

(|b. Hall 

rhb. Ilakkinen, Hirst 



Markoskie, re 
Shechan. I'owers, qb 
I'owers. lx>nK. Ihb 
Sniead, A. Johnson, rhb 

Ihl). Hirst, Greene, HeywiKxl 
Hearn, fb f>'. Hill 

Touchdowns; Markoskie, Cheney, Sniead. 
I'oint after touchdown: Markoskie. Referee: 
Reuan. I'mpire: Shea. Linesman: Whalen. 
Time: 12-niinute period*. 



FAIRLY SUCCESSFUL 

SEASON COMPLETED 



It is always easier to criticize Chaiiel 
services than it is to s;iy a good word lor 
them. A short time ago we mentionetl a 
few conilitions which needed to be 
remedied, and now there are others. One 
of the hrst is the time worn plea to usi- 
half an oiint e more of strength when 
placing the hymnals back in their con- 
tainers. The noise interrupts the serviie 
anti indicates carelessness, thoughtless- 
ness, laziness, and any number of other 
unilesirable .ibstrat t ions. 



On some Thursday afterntMuis a 
stranger visiting Bowker Autlitorium 
would be dehnitely remintled of a Chinese 
school where e\eryone studies and talks 
aloud. No proverbial sewing circle could 
e\er be half as disiigieeable in their dis- 
cussions as is the buzz and hum of voices 
that has a weekly habit t)f disregarding 
the platform ami causes the laculty 
member who is introducing the speaker 
to stand heliilessly before the audience 
until a series of chiklish "shhhhhh's" give 
the leader a chance to speak, llu im- 
pression that results from this can never 
be complimentary to a college under- 
graduate body. It is up to each of us to 
see to it that any visiting sfxakcr does 
not go away with the idea in the back of 
his mind that we are a crowd t)f children 
without an hi,i oi spontaneous resinit . 

ALUMNI NOTES 

'2S "Al.t " ,\l>i,ili.nii-(m and "Ai" I. a 
Vr\M- li,iN< joined the -,il«^ lone of t he 
Howkd- t Ileum ,il Co. ot .\.^.(■., iiniler 
t he siipei \ iMon ol M.iuiiir J. < lou,i;li 'l.>. 
"Alie^" tc'iiliax i~criili,il I'tnn^yK.inia 
and \ iiKiii't. ''^lnii' "Ai" is going strong 
in \\<-nin .M,i--.u liiiMtts and nortli- 
e.i^tirn .New ^ulk. 



BASKETBALL COACHES TO .MEET 

On I )e( . 1.") at 7. ol) ill the evening, there 
will be held in the Drill Hall a meeting of 
.ill the w lioListic anil collegiate coaches of 
western .Massiichusetts. lor several years 
it has been felt that the basketball 
co.iches in the Connecticut X'alley should 
get together at such a meeting to discuss 
the iiroblems confrtmted in that sjKjrt. 
This \e.ir invitatitms ha\e been sent out 
by Harold M. (ioie. the M.A.C. basket- 
ball coach, to all the coaches in western 
Massiichusetts asking them to attend this 
get-together. 

IVom the coaches' standpoint this meet- 
ing shouhl aid the educational values of 
b.isketball and the technical development 
t)f the sport. There will be .several short 
talks by leaders of the game, which should 
be very much worthwhile. The standing 
of the sport in the middle west and its 
tievelopment in western Massachusetts 
will be discussetl. The policy of the rules 
tommittee together with plans for a 
tiefinite publicity campaign antI sugges- 
tions for solving the coaches' problems 
will be heard. This meeting is merely 
an informal get-together, and it is antici- 
pated that it will be a success. At least, 
it is a step toward higher standards of 
basketball ami the {Kissibility of the 
formation of a Coaches' Club for western 
Massachusetts. 



INTERCLASS BASKEIBALL 

Interdass basketball is now under way, 
anil to tiate, eight games have been 
()layed with the following results: 
No\ . -1 Sophomores 2',t, Seniors .') 

Juniors 2S, S.S.A. Seniors 25 
2() S.S..\. F'rosh 17, .Seniors 4 
Juniors 17, F'rosh O 
Dec. ;{ .Sophs 17, S.S.A. Frosh 11 

S.S..\. Seniors IS, .Seniors 10 
The standing of the league follows: 

Juniors 

So|iliiimor(s 
S.S.A. Seniors 
.S,S..\. I resliiiun 
Freshmen 
Seniors 

The leadin,; -i > 'ni ~ ol 
.Minkstein ';il. Is |(iiiilN, I'liului ^.^. A. 
'L".', is joints .mil raks.iri.in 'oU, 14 points. 



ir. 


L. 


I'.C. 


2 





1 (MK) 


') 





1 (KK) 


1 


1 


.")(K) 


1 


1 


"MMt 





1 


(KK) 


( 1 


;; 


l)(»(l 


1 liic 1. ,1 


<oc .\re 



Just a bit more hooey. 

CD 

So winter has cub. Now comes the 
time for Aggie's ctninskins to apjiear. 
CD 
Boost the Outing Club. 

CD — 

riie faculty and only the faculty 
were privileged to make the annual sur- 
vey of what is behimi the closed iltxirs at 
the effeminate building at the north end 
of the campus. 

—CD- 
Wanted: Anyone with a bright idea 
which imludes how to keep the doors at 
the Dining Hall closed so that the patrons 
will not have to suffer tiraughts in additit)n 
to other things. 

CD 

Join the Outing Club. See Nature. 

CD 

Who is the beautiful-intelligent-charni- 
ing co-ed who will grace the Index as the 
Campus Queen? We have the inside dope 
that Prutlence and F"annie Frosh received 
honorable mention. Wait for the Index! 

CD 

To think of all the money some dads 
put into their sons' education and all they 
get in return is a halfback, — or sometimes, 
just a cpiarterback. 

CD 

What a life, — full of fast ones like that. 

CD- - 

Just a little guessing game. \Vho are 
these? 

1. ".\t the end of the last hour we were 
discussing " 

2. "Well, now, then— are there any 
questions, class?" 

',i. "Take paper." 
is horrible.) 

— CD 

This is merely the completion of another 
advertisement. 

CD 

Cela suffit. 



Although losing the first three games, 
the Stockbridge football team has com- 
pleted a fairly successful season, winning 
three of the games on the schedule and 
scoring 57 iioints to their opponents' .'>{ 
for the seven games. The summary 

follows: 

NewhuryiKjrt Hi|{h 6. Stockbridue 
Vermont .-Uadeniy li'. Stiw kbriiiKe 6 
Ilolyoke HiKh 7, StockbriilKC 6 
Stwkhridue i:j, Keeiie Normal 2 
Stoikhriilne i:5. I'itt-tield lliilh ti 
StockbridKC 1:5. South l>-enield 
Deerfield Academy 13. Stot kbridse 
Sixteen |ilayers and the manager have 
been awarded letters for playing this fall. 
The names are as follows: Captain Brown, 
Ashworth, Chace, Cheney. Curran, Dibble 
Durkin, Graf, (ireene, Ilakkinen, ll.tll. 
Hill, Hirst, Oksanen, Skovron, and Mana- 
ger Parkinson. 



tkl. 13 
L'O 
20 

Nov. 3 
10 
10 
23 



EDWIN HILL ELECTED 

1929 FOOIBALL CAPTAIN 

Kdwin Hill of (iardner has been elected 
captain for next year. He has starred in 



the backfield for this year's club with his 
ball-tarrying, forwartl passing, and de- 
fensive work. Other lettermen left for 
next year's team are Curran, Durkin. 
Ilakkinen, Hirst, and Oks;inen. With 
these men as a nucleus, and with this 
year's substitutes, Ileywood. Mann, Parks 
Sawyer, and Smith, and the material in 
next fall's freshman class, a winning 
combination should be built up by Coach 
■Red" Ball for H»2U. A tentative sched- 
ule has been arranged for next year, with 
the season opening against Palmer High 
at Palmer on October 12. (iames are 
expected with Holyoke High, Keene 
Normal, and \'ermont Academy, while 
Pittsfield High, South Deerfield High, 
and Deei field Academy will be the last 
three contests. 



The (.olleni.in .iciupt-. no resjionsibility lor opin- 
ion* voiced in "The Koruin." It aims to serve a 
;i nie;ins of uivlnn expression to student opinion, 
and will i)rint any views expressed rationally an ! 
sanely, unless the editors feel that they are justi- 
fied in suppressing them because of unfair fKir- 
sonal attack. Communications must be limited to 
oOU words. 

To the F'ditor of the Collegian: 
Dear Sir: 

It has been brought to the attention of 
the writer (forcibly, in several instances , 
that certain professors on this campus 
have in some manner become obsessed 
w ith the idea that the thoroughness of an 
examination is in ilirect proportion to its 
length. As a result of this misconception 
examinations in certain subjects have 
been of longer and longer duration a.-* 
these courses proceeded Indeed, and I 
am not mentioning this with any idea of 
humor in it, there have occurred cases 
when the time of finishing could have 
properly been dated one day later thiiii 
that of the start. An example of this 
totjk place just the other day in a cer- 
tain science with an examination which 
lasted from two o'clock until far, far 
into the night. 

It is a matter of common occurremt- 
for those professors 'and thank (iod they 
are few and far between; to announce an 
examination for one (jr two hours, and 
for the students to find themselves at 
the end of that time with but one or 
two of the questions answered. In such 
a situation it is rare for the first student 
to finish, or give up in despair, before 
the elapse of five or six hours, and stagger 
from the room. One can easily imagine 
the complimentary thoughts concerning 
the whole situation which run through 
one's mind at such a time. 

Final examinations are scheduled by 
the Dean's Ofhce for two hours and 
should be so arranged. Is there existant 
at M..\.C. a state of war or rebellion 
between the part of the faculty in question 
and the Dean's Office that the former 
should instigate an opposition to the 
latter's ruling? Or is the situation due 
rather to a misconception on the part of 
the jirofessors. I sincerely hope it is the 
latter case. 

.■\s to a solution of the problem I would 
ap|>eal in the first place to the sense ot 
fair play of those professtjrs who fall 
untler this catagory. Let them think 
over the condition for a moment and try 
to realize the justice of this ajiix-al. .\ 
little thought shouhl bring home the fart 
that they are doing neither themselves 
nor their stuilents justice. 

As a second remedy, in case a sense of 
fair play fails to relieve conditions, I 
would suggest that students be alllowed 
to leave after the apjjointed time regard- 
hss of the amount tliey have accom- 
plished, and that the professor endeavor 
to mark on what he sincerely consider* 
to be a fail and Mtuart average of th.it 
accomplished by the class as a whole. 

As a final point I wish to remind these- 
professors that just as surely as they, the 
professors, form their opinions of the 
students, the latter are forming their 
opinions of their teachers. 

"The ntjble army of martyrs."— Com- 
mon Prayer. 

By one of them. 



STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL 

ALUMNI BANQUET 



(What happens next 



NOTICE 

Student Sunilay night supper at Grace 
Church Parish House on Deceinber it at 
ti p. nt. will be followed by an adtlrcss by 
Dr. II. .^dyc Prichard, Mount Kisco, 
N. \. All M.-A.C. students are cordially 
iiuited. 



The annual banquet and meeting of 
the Stockbridge Alumni Association was 
held Saturday evening after the Tufts 
game at the Hotel Bellevue in Boston. 
The meeting was sponsored by the Boston 
chapter of the alumni association and all 
arrangements made by their committee 
who should be complimented for their 
fine work. 

Over UK) members were present, not a 
few of these were girls, and many of the 
men brought their wives. A fine menu 
was served which was made more enjoy- 
able by the efforts of three lady musicians 
who played throughout the meal. 

After the dinner the group gathered 
round and listened to some very interest- 
ing and helpful talks. Mr. Lawrence 
l.ongley, President of the Alumni .Associ- 
CContinued on Pafte 4) 



To the Editor of the Collegian: 

Dear Sir: 

May I ask for space in your Forum 
deiKirtment to answer a letter in the 
Nov. 21st issue signed L.M.L. 

It seems to me that the writer of this 
letter is displaying a very narrow minded, 
jealous and petty attitutie toward the 
two-year students. These men are carry- 
ing on their work in the same buildinijs. 
on the same campus and in many cases 
under the same professors as are the four- 
year men. They are, in every sense, as 
far as the public is concerned students 
of M.A.C. If some of them go out and 
become millionaires, M.A.C. will be very 
glad to receive their contributions toward 
further up-building of the College. 1 hty 
are intensely loyal to the College, more 
so than one would expect from the treat- 
ment that they receive while there. 1 '"^^ 
analogies drawn from Yale, Princeton, 
etc., are silly. Yale has the ShefticM 
Scientific School and these men are prouu 
to call themselves Yale men and ^al« 
men are proud to acknowledge them as 
fellow students. Other very similar 
situations could be cited. 

The quicker the four-year student at 
M.A.C. overcomes his superior attit'.''^ 
and observes a proper respect and fei 
ship toward the two-year man the bcltff 
(Continued on Pag* 3) 



Wherever well-dressed men gather, 

you see 

BOSTONIANS 



BOLLES SHOE STORE 



Special 72 sheets of Fine Writing Paper ^Q 
J^ — With 30 Envelopes to match for _ 



A. I. HASTINGS 



NEWSDEALER and 
STA'noNKR 



AMHERST. MASS. 



CHRISTMAS 



PERSONAL CHRISTMAS CARDS 

Samples now ready. 
Your name printed from type or from your own plate. 

M.A.C. SEAL CHRISTMAS CARDS 



JAMES A. LOWELL 



BOOKSELLER 



lU II DING FUND STILL CROWING 
(Continued from Pafte I) 

I ( iimmittees in all alumni clas.ses are 
(ailing upon their mates for one hundred 

Ijnr cent contributions in order that this 
project may be presented to outsiders 
with the backing of universiil aUnnni 

Uiipport. The point which is being 

liniiihasiEed is that everyone should give 

Something. The amount of contribution 
is less important for it is confidently 

|tiii|K(l that philanthropic fwrsons not 
oiiinected with the college can be per- 
Mi.ided to give substantial aid when it 
(111 be shown to them how worthy is this 

Iprnject and how- seriously needed. Sup- 
jK.rt liy a large proportion of the alumni 

lis the most tangible proof of such worth 

land need. 

The contributions to date follow: 
r.'lcrKraduate Classes 

l< .i's Amount V.C. 

'.-> $t(iB6. «;j 

'ill 112:i. S7 

• 1 HUH. .VI 

20. 1 



I iiini (including class of '2S) 
■■■ klitiduc School: Alumni and 

' lidiruraduates . . . . 

. ulty 

'■!,.t- 

I'r.ndTntal . 



»:i24.1. 

l^.VJ.V) 
29.')7H.f(6 

102(1 5<l 
. 22-lfi 
.•>,s:52 4(1 

»41.<I2(> .">« 



<>:( 



^^tiji^if-'- ^^,■ •■-<«te&-'' 



LEATHER ^ 

Hd.xes, Change Purses, ^ 
Manicures, Key Cases, 
N\riting Cases, etc. make | 
Useful and Beautiful 
Christmas Gifts.. I 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



THE 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Offers Expert Hair Cutting 
Service for Men and Women. 

POP- DUWELL, Prop. MEMORIAL BUILDING 



IMPKRSONATOR .\T SOCIAL UNION 
(Cunllnued frum I'afte I) 

The first of these is that she is tin- 
daughter of Otis Skinner and thus has 
for a heritage the genius of that beloved 
.\merican actor. In the second place she 
has had opportunity for a very extensive 
training in France and in this country- 
In France, she studied under several dis- 
tinguished actors of the Comedie Fran- 
(.aise, and in .\merica she has had four 
years' experience in New \ork and on 
the road, apfwaring in several successful 
|)lays. 

Still another point in .Miss Skinner's 
favor is the fact that every line of her 
sketches is her own. Every situation, 
every plot, and every character is original, 
and they run the whole ganmt of human 
feeling from pathos to mirth. Hut her 
writings have gone even further than the 
stage, for articles by her have apjHared 
in several leading American magazines. 
Her father also produced and apjH'ared in 
one of her full length plays, "Captain 
Fury." 

The AVic York Graphic has said of her: 
"Not merely an impersonator, but an 

actress of rare ability as well." And the 
.Vcic York /'.roiitia Worlil has said (jf her 

entertainment that it "is well worth 

while to those who are weary of the 

blatant and obxious." 



COMMCNICAIION.S 
Cuntlnuod from I'aiii- |i 

it will he for himsi-lf and .ill concerned 
.\s I Iia\e obscrxtil befnre, when ill these 
men. four ye. ir and others iinliKU'.l, go 
out to ill) their work in the world, no 
()iie will ask how many ytars they sjunt 
ill college. .\ person will say, "Mere is .i 
i-iicc of work, can you do it i*" and w lut her 
the iii.m lias a <legree or iu>t will not enter 
into the (piestion. If he does the job he 
will receive the credit and this will go 
b.u k to his ctillege. If he falls down on 
the job the fact that he has three degrees 
will not hel|) him one particle. 

1 have cotne uixm the two-year stu 
dents many times in their \.uioiis .utivi 
ties outside, I have even eniplo\ed some 
of them, and I laii assure you that every- 
one is a credit to the college .iiid is doing 
his work suoissfully. 1 am proud to 
.!( knowledge them as fellow alumni of my 
K'lhge. If I were a .student .it M..\ C. 
I should be prouil to associate with them 
.IS fellow students. I woidd assure L.M.I.. 
lli.it he will h.ive to associ.ite in business 
or ])rofessional life with many men who 
m.iy be his inferiors in ailvani.ige .iiul 
1 1. lining and that it would be well for 
iiiiii to learn during his college years how 
to do this thing gracefully .md how to 
deter to ability no matter what degree 
or title it may hold. 

U. I. Mayo, Jr. 17 



ASK FOR I 

"Munsingwear" 

RAYON and SILK 

Bloomers - Step- 1 ns - Yes ts 

Slips - Bandeau - Pajamas 

Night Robes 



SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

■ G. Edward Fisher 



'ollege Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH 
Reg. Pharm. 

^MnER.ST, - - MASS. 



Amherst Shoe Repair Co. 

Master Shoe Rebuilders 
ht.XT TO BOLLES SHOE STORE 



TYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Remington, Royal 
and Corona Sales and Service 

Radio F.qulrment General Repair Shop 

H. E. DAVID 
35 Pleasant St., jutl below P.O. Amherst 

S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Ocullata* Prescrtptions Filled. Brolcen lense* 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable malces 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one aiftht) 



To the Fditor of the Ccllr^inn: 

Irom time to time you open your 
(olunms to older members of the C«)llege; 
m.iy I ask for this privilege? 

.\ communiiation in last week's (e/- 
li-KKiii, signe<l L.M.I.., seems to call for 
reply, and since those who were attacked 
in it cannot well reply, it seems fair that 
a frienti of both parties should do s«j. 

That conununication is part of a sort 
of talk that has been floating around the 
lampus for some time, and is like the 
ridicule of agriculture that some stud«-nts 
indulge ill .i ridicule th.it no thoughtful 
nor intelligent man would pour on .my 
honest occupation. 

As a matter of information it is well for 
the writer of that communication to know 
th.it it is [H-rfectly permissible to carry 
.ind wave banners of any college th.it one 
likes and wishes to enciiurage, ami men 
who feel real loyalty to their coihge 
gr.itefully welcome such encouragement, 
just as they seek and wehonie contribu- 
tions of money to support athletics or 
build new buildings. 

.\s to this (ampaign of ridicuh', two 
(piotations come to mind aptl\. "No one 
but a gentleman tan insult me, and no 
gentleman will," is one, and the otiur is, 
"Some men look down on those whom 
they consider beneath themselves. I 
look «Iowii on tlujM- who consider them 
seUes above me." 

Manly silenj e under ridicule alw.iys 
excites .idmiration, and those who stieer 
may well remember that mud slin^'ing 
.ilways muddies the slinger. Hut 1 don't 
believe the spirit of fair |)lay is tiead; 
hence this cominnnir.ition. 

\'ours f<jr frientlly co-o|X'ration at 
M..A.C. 

n. 15. w. 



Who Does Your Laundry? 



S Town Hall Theatre g 

Q MalineeN .<:00 KvenlnilN 6:4.^ and N:.«l Q 



< Diiys Chililri'ii i.S» .\iliilis S0< 

Wed., Thurs., FrI.. Dec. i>-6-7 
Mat. .t.tMl Kveninil One Show al 7.00 

llirtv poi^nuMlly, /i«;t- lirrply I'nlur llu,'.ii 
ilrdTis upon Ihf uells iit lilr in hi\ \liirv 

THE MAN WHO LAUGHS 

J hi- romiimr oj tin ,l.i\,)i -hn t^iin. Iirmith 
II ml iif tfiirs and Ihf heiiulifut umrnnn Urn 
and the did^ dei rerd. Ihnunh thry should »;(> 
Ihriiunh life lonethrr, \he shiiuld nnrr Ifik 
upon the ftt(f iif the man she lined. 
Heller than "The Itiim hlnu k uf Sulre f)iimi" 
'■r " I'he I'hiitilnm '•' Ihf Opfrn . 



Best in Drug Store Service 
Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co. 



Sat., Dec. 8 



A Double Bill 



The mufh talked almul pt/lurr 

DIAMOND HANDCUFFS 

nuh I.IJ..\ NOA- JViA{<l).\IA.\ 

l-'rom Afriian Dtamund .l/inri U> .Snriety's 

upper crust and undrrwirld. 1 his film blaze-. 

a trail nf unfutnetahle drama. 

nndl.l-.n \t.4l.n\r.V in 

THE DEVIL'S TWIN 

A siriry af a happy-ii<>-tuiky, itinerant hone 
trader -uhn inients a I'iin brulher In 'tear 

him .!'■.( ^, fr.iwrl l-nr.e V/.ll's 

Wednesday, Decern Ikt 12 

U WASHINGTON SQUARE 

.1 my\lery r<,mrdy ■•itlh Aliie Jnyie and Jean 
Ilersholt. taking a part similar to the one he 

h'i'l tn ",^h<r the Deanm" 



Our new scini-tiiiish proccs.s appeals 
to tho.se stiuients who ilesire ipialitv 
service at a rea.soiuiMe cost. 



THE AMHERST LAUNDRY CO., Inc. 

'Dick" Adams '29 M.A.C. Agent Td. 720 



Don't he satisfied with just a Sweater 
Buy an Oakes Bros, and have the BEST 

Priced at ^H.^o and :?io in Hhuk, Navy Hlue, Ma- 
roon anti White. Other good sweaters tVoin $:; up. 

Plenty ot* Ski coats at $i).SO. 

F. M. THOMPSON B SON 

CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN FOR NEARLY FIFTY YEARS 



ALUMNI NEWS 



''J't ( leorgi- L. Chun h ( oiii|>leteil his 
re«piirenients b)r the I'll. I), degree at 
Harvard last June, and is teaching 
botany at Brown Univ. this f,ill. 

'2'i ( iordon II. Ward has received a 
promotion to the head of the division ot 
information of the I'.icific Egg Producers 
Co., 17H Duane St., N.Y.C., and is the 
author of several recent articles on 
marketing. He is working also for his 
I'h.l). in "aggie ec" with the I'niv. of 
Minnesota. 

'2<> After receiving the M.S. degree 
from IVnn. Slate List June, William K. 
budge accepted a position with a 
large ice cream manufacturing concern 
at Worcester, Mass. 

'iiti "Jack" Lambert, wlm was married 
to Miss Margaret A. Ilartwell, a niece 
of Dr. Hurt L. Hartwell 'K'.) last June, is 
now teaching at (ireensboro, V't. 

"27 Earl F. Williams has left his work 
in Cleveland to become assistant super- 
inteniU'iit of (.reenwood Cemetery in 
Chieiino. 

'2H Wellington W. Kenne«ly has ac- 
<epte<| a position .is iiistniitor in l.md- 
scape gardening and tloric nil lire at 
.Mississippi State College, Columbus, 
•Miss. 



'l-'.S ".\1" C. C<H>k t<M)k special work 
at ll.irvard this jjast summer .md diietted 
pl.iyground .utivities in Uilinont, Mas.s. 
lie is now physical director at Wilbraham 
.Academy, Wilbraham, Mass. 

(i Herbert W. ^'ounl, as,siHtant re- 
search professor of agricultural economicH 
.It .M.,'\.C. has also bct-n appointed 
assitant professor of st.itistics and fore- 
casting at Northeastern University, 
Springfield, .M.iss. 

2H Sam !• . Hrewster is now ixteiision 
specialist in landscape gardening .it 
Al.ibama Polytechnic Institute. This is 
the s.inie institution where Johnny Hyde 
'2(\, is teaching landscape. 



Kingsbury Box Sc 
Printing Co. 

Joh Printers 

Phone 354 or 33^ 
NorthamptcMi, Mass. 



t 




Winter Footwear 

for all occasions 
Thomas S. Childs 

INCORPORATED 

275 High St., Holyoke, Mass. 



A 



MH ERS 

THEATER 




Wediiesday, Dec. .S 

5 KEITH VAUDmilE ACTS & 

JA( (jLKI.I.Nh: L()(,A.\ in 

NOTHING TO WEAR 

( \K l(»(»\ I'.M III. M US 



ti 



ff 



I hursday & Friday, Dec. 6 and 7 

DI-.I.OK l-.s JH.l. |< I () i„ 

'T//£ RED DANCE'' 

with ( ll.\kl.|.s I AKKI-.I.I. 

Color A. lion Kom.incc 

2 Kill. ( OMI.DN M.WS 



Saturday, Dec. H 

AiH'i I'll .\ii;.\[or in 

''HIS PRIVATE LIFE" 

;is only Mcnjou can r|r> it. 
2 Kl.l.l. COMEDY PA Till. M.WS 
Monday & Tuesday, Dec. 10 & II 

I he tircatest an'l M«»st S|mc tac iil.ir of 

All S.,1 Di.iiii.iv 

''SUBMARINE" 

|A( K IIOI.T.V DOKOI IIS l<|.\ II.K 
2 Kl.l I (OMI |)\ M.WS 



AMHERST FRUIT STORE 

WHERE AGGIE MEN MEFT 

WHI-N DOWN TOWN 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGARS 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Now situated at 1.^ 1-2 Pleasant St. 
EXCEI.I.ENT SHOE KEPAIKEK.S 
V. (.KO.NUO.MCO. Prop. 



carton of 60 **A'' Mackintosh apples makes an ideal present. We pack and ship them 
fo^^ you at prices consistent with the market. New College Store, *'M" Building 



VI 



A* C Li^rciry, 



! 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 5, 1928 



EARLY GIFT SUGGESTIONS 
We have just imported some handsome Leathers from London; included in colors are Slippers, Collar Bags, Lighters and Pouches. 
Dressing Gowns in English Flannel - Pajamas and Big Wooly Slippers or an imported Tie for *'Dad" from the 

"HOUSE OF WALSH" 
KNOX HATS HICKEY-FREEMAN BURBERRY 




•Of) Norman 13. Innliam, former AgKie 
athlete, now Kfi^ri*' manager of the 
«>,(KK)a(re Hin James Kaiuh, San Joaquin 
Calif., eame east this summer, visiting 
relatives in Massachusetts. 

'(Ml Kdwin 11. Seott was t^'ven the 
honorary ile^ree of «l(Ktor of stience by 
the Univ. of C.eorKia last June. Dr. 
.Seott in everyday life is dean and registrar 
of the (ieorgia State College for Women 
at Millcdgeville, (ia. 

•(K) Luther Ci. Willis was elected 
chairman of the North Carolina section 
of the Amer. Chem. Soc. at its spring 
meeting. Mr. Willis is soil chemist at 
N. C. State College, Raleigh, N. C. 

'()<» Samuel S. Crossman, who en- 
gineered the very successful 19()9 class 
reunion last June, when over fifty percent 
of the class membership was present, 
writes that '09 is already planning for 
its 2r)th reunion in l\)'M. 

'10 S;imuel W. Mendum was a mem- 
ber of the statistical committee which 
prepared the very useful economic ad- 
dendum to the li»27 Yearbotik of the 
IJ.S.IJ.A. which has recently been dis- 
tributed. 

'14&'24 Alfred L. Tower recently 
resigned his jHjsition as principal of the 
high 8ch(X)l at Stafford Springs. Conn., 
to enter the insurance field. His place 
is being taken by Earl V. Witt '24. 

'U\ Justin S. Ilemenway spent the 
summer on the campus working for his 
master's degree, lie is a teacher of 
science at the Allen Military Schwil, 
Bryan, Texas. 

•l«» lli-nry J. Burt, research specialist 
in rural sociology for the University of 
Missouri, reports that he has been en- 
gaged in making studies of the rural 
communities of Missouri. 

•20 Charles F. Doucette tells us that 
he put nmre than 20.(M)() miles behind 
him last year when he visited Kurope 
with the American Legion and traveled 
the Pacific Highway twice. He is now 
located at the state experiment station 
at I'uyalhip, Wash., as assistant ento- 
mologist with the I'.S.U.A. 

'21 "l)i(k" Mellen, boy scout execu- 
tive at Arlington, has two enthusiastic 
scoutmasters working with him in John 
Crosby '2') and Sherman 1 lardy w'2.{. 

'22 llervey F. Law. along with his 
lan(ls<ape architecture, golf course con- 
struction and sinnlar lines of work has 
been engaged in building and s«-lling 
summer cottages in Maine this past 
season . 

'22 Miss 11. Margaret IVrry is now 
located at the Colorado Agric. College, 
Fort Collins, Colo., where she is teaching 
bacteriology. She writes that the country 
is gorgeous, but "it seems a long way 
from Massachusetts!" 

'2;J C.ustaf K. l.indskog received his 
M.D. from Harvard Mediial .SduMjl last 
June and began his surgical intern- 
ship at Lakeside Hospital, Cleveland, 
Ohio, October 1. He had the distinction 
of being elected to Al|)ha Omega Alpha 
the honorary medical fraternity. 

"24 Victor 11. Cahalane following his 
work in landstajH- architecture here and 
in forestry at Yale has now become 
instructor in forest zoology in the .Sch«)ol 
of Forestry anil Conservation at the 
University of Michigan. 



MANN TO LEAD 1929 KLEVEN 
(Continued from Paftc 1) 

the number of promising ( andidates 
leave these positions open to much com- 
petition. Next fall the coach will be 
(onfronted with the problem of finding a 
fullback that will be a dangerous threat 
to the opposing line. Then, the loss of 
Bowie leaves a vacancy at end, which 
must be considered. Roach and L. Wilson 
of the freshman team looked very goo<l 
this year and may develop into reliable 
varsity ends. Burbank and Phinney of 
the ineligibles will be competitors also for 
wing iMJsitions. Both of these men have 
had ex|K'rience and will be strong aspirants 
for positions on the 1929 team. Kimball, 
who starred this year as a halfback, may 
be called upon to do the passing and 
kicking for the Bay Staters next fall. 
His ability to run, pass, and kick will add 
much strength to the backfield. A. Brown 
and Holmberg of the ineligibles showed 
up very well this year as punters. They 
may prove very valuable in filling in any 
position in the backfield. 

As a whole the backfield pros|)ects 
l(M)k very promising. FLllert, llowarti. 
Hicks, and Kimball, all lettermen, to- 
gether with Brown, Costanzo, Costello, 
and Rcxjney of the ineligibles, form a 
wealth of good material for backfield 
I)ositions. In the line D. Cox, who has 
|)laye<l all season at end, may be shifte<l 
to (juarterback where he played two 
years ago. 

E. Cox, the heavy center of the in- 
eligibles, and Mc Bride at tackle are 
pronusing possibilities. Besides, there 
are several heavy linesmen from the 
freshman team, who may develop into 
valuable men in the varsity's forward 
line. Among the lettermen in the line 
are Brackley. Magnuson, Mann, Mink- 
stein, and True. They have all had at 
least one year on the varsity s<juad and 
are strong defensive players. With this 
outlook it is hoped that the comeback 
which started so successfully this year 
will continue through next season with a 
strong team representing the College on 
the football field in 1929. 



CO-ED NOTES 



Over seventy-five members of the 
faculty availed themselves of the oppor- 
tunity of becoming acquainted with the 
co-eds and their dormitory by visiting 
"the Abbey at Home" sjwnsored by the 
Y.W.C.'X. on Sunday afternoon, Nov. 20. 
Excepting for a bit of "slicking up" the 
Abbey was in its natural state, even the 
"yuiet" signs were no exaggeration of the 
usual ambitiousness. Refreshments were 
served and getting better acquainted with 
the faculty proved most delightful. 

Y.W.C.A. held its Initiation Banquet 
at Draper Hall on Thursday evening, 
Nov. 2'3. Miss Margaret Hamlin and 
Miss Helen Knowlton were guests of the 
occasion. Following a real "banquety" 
menu served by Mrs. Hathaway's direct- 
ions, the girls adjourned to the Memorial 
Building. Here the beautiful candlelight 
service so typical of Y.W.C.A. was led 
by Carmeta Sargent '29, president, and 
(lertrudc Davis '."JO, vice-president. Each 
of the eight new members present lighted 
a candle signifying their desire to carry 
on the ideals of this world wide move- 
ment and all present pledged themselves 
anew to Y.W.'s standards. 



ALUMNI NEWS 



FRUIT JUDGERS ARE FIRST 

(Continued from i'ufte 1) 

In regard to individuals, PieriM)nt of 
Conn. Aggie made the highest score which 
was «>7() out of a [wssible 7(H) [joints. 
Colby of Maine was second with a total 
of (,C..s. P. B. Steere '29 and R. S. Tarr 
'29, both of M.A.C., tied for third by 
aggregating t)(>7 |K)ints. M. F. Trevett 
'29 ama.ssed t'),')7 counters which placed 
him fifth. The contest included 15 
varieties which were distributed among 
14 classes, five plates to a class. 

The team leaves for I*enn. State to- 
inorrnw, where it will enter a contest 
with re(>resentatives of the state institu- 
tions of Pennsylvania, West X'irginia, 
New Jersev, and Ohio. In this contest, 
2."> varieties will be placed against 20 
(lasses, with three plates to a class. 

Profes.sor Brooks D. Drain is coaching 
the team and its recent success |)ro\es 
that it has been under excellent super- 
vision. 



stockbrid(;e 

(Continued from P»A* i) 

ation was toastmaster and intro<luced the 
following speakers: Miss Margaret Ham- 
lin who chose for her subject "Taking the 
Measure of One's Job." Director Roland 
H. Verbeck who spoke on "Character 
and Credit." Emory E. (irayson followed 
and the theme of his subject was "( Gradu- 
ate Placement Service." Prof. C. S. 
Hicks was next introduced by Mr. 
Longley. Prof. Hicks gave a very fine 
presentation of the whole history and 
progress of the Physical Education 
Building Campaign. The last speaker of 
the evening was President Roscoe W. 
Thatcher. He spoke on "The Purjxjses 
and Outlook for the Stockbridge School 
of Agriculture." The President stated 
that he felt the Stockbridge School of 
.Agriculture filled a very definite need in 
our educational system, and that the 
graduates and undergraduates should 
take pri<le in their sc1uk)1 as it was the 
leader of its kind in the United States, 
and he felt would set the example which 
others would follow in the future. 

A business meeting followed at which 
time it was voted to change the name of 
Two-^'ear Alunmi Ass<xiation to the 
St(Hkbri(lge S<.-h(K)l Alunmi Asstn-iation. 
.At that time it was also brought out that 
a drive should be made for more members 
in the Association. 



'10 Louis Brandt, retiring mayor of 
Fulford City, Florida, was paid a fine 
tribute in the Bulletin for his services as 
an active member for the original in- 
corfjoration of the commonwealth and as 
a member of the first city council in 
Fulford. 

"Mayor Brandt has been one of the 
most active pro|>onents of progress. He 
fought for electricity throughout the 
city and for street lights on main high- 
ways. He favored fire and police protec- 
tion and has consistently favored any 
progressive measure if economic condi- 
tions would permit." 

"As a member of the city planning 
commission, Mr. Brandt's knowledge of 
city planning has been invaluable in 
establishing a policy of protection and 
preservation of the rights of citizens to 
the proper and adequate access to the 
ocean, now and in the future." 

This is the opinion of the people who 
have learned to respect and value his 
services. They also add: "The results of 
his work will long outlive him."^ — this 
landscape architect of the class of 1910! 
'10 Henry T. Cowles was honored 
with a repetition of Phi Kappa Phi 
honors at the University of Florida 
chapter upon the occasion of his receipt 
of the M.S. A. <legree from that institu- 
tion last June. 

'2;{ Conra<I L. Wirth has been ap- 
pointed landsca|)e architect with the 
National Capitol Park and Planning 
Commission, and is located at lfi21 Navy 
Bldg., Washington, D. C. He was 
formerly engaged in landsca|)e work 
with Harold J. Neale '09 at New Orleans, 
La. 

'24 After completing a tour of duty 
at Fort Riley, Kansas, E. A. "Sug" Kane 
became an instructor at the C.M.T.C. 
at Fort Ethan Allen, \'t., with the grade 
of 1st Lieut., U. S. Cavalry Reserves. He 
is nf)w eni|)loyed as an assistant chemist 
with the Bureau of Dairying, U.S.D.A., 
at Beltsville, Md. 

"24 & '25 "Bob" Woodworth '24, Will 
.\. W hitney '24 and (ieorge L. Church '2.t 
were recently elected members of the 
Botanical Society of America. 

'25 John W. Hyde, who has been an 
instructor in landscape gardening at 
Michigan State College the past two 
years is now an assistant professor of that 
subject at the Alabama Polytechnical 
Inst., Auburn, Ala. 



M.A.C. Men 

are always wel- 
come to visit us 
in our new store. 

Whether it is to 
smoke and chat 
or to buy a com- 
plete new outfit, 
we will always 
try to give you 
the very best of 
our service. 



^ 



Carl H. Bolter, 

Incorporated 

Exeter Amherst 

Hyantus 



LANDSCAPE PLANTING 

NURSERY STOCK 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter H. Harrison, Prop. 



DRY CLEANING 



PRESSING 



'25 Adrian D. Barnes tells us that 
two Aggie alumni besides himself, Myron 
G. Murray '22 and James H. Gadsby '24 
are still going strong with the Division of 
Parks, Miami. Fla., of which J. tk-rry 
Curtis w'07 is superintendent. 



SING LEE HAND I.AUNPRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

RI^:P.\IRIN(i AND AIX KINDS OF 
WASHING IX)NE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Pulicy (.uurantet^d 

NKXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



Winter's Around The Corner 

WOII) THE Rl Sll. Come in and get 
\oiir < Hcrshoes for this Winter. 

Shoe Repairing Department 
JOHN FOTOS SHOE STORE 



What vou can get tor Pastry made l)y us every day: 

Cakes, Cup Cakes, ICclairs, C ream Putt's, Pies, Ne- 
apolitans, jam 'I'urnovers, Jelly Rolls with Mocha, 
Fig Bar Cookies, .Macaroons, Jelly Doughnuts, 
Raised Doughnuts, Crullers, C\)tt"ee Rolls and Patty 
Shells. i-et us make your Hirthday Cake. 

Do NOT f()R(".i:t s^^l).\^ xk.ht .sri>i>KR.s 

THE COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 



.\DDRE.SS BY DIRECTOR VERBECK 

Director R. II. N'erbeck, upon s[)ecial 
recjuest, recently addressed the M.A.C. 
Club of Washington, D. C, with an 
explanation of the Stt)ckbriilge Schoijl of 
.Agriculture and other short courses 
offered at M.A.C. Cireat interest has 
been shown by the alumni of M.A.C. in 
the enterpris«?s of the Stockbridge School 
of .Agriculture and it is interesting to 
note that although this school grants no 
college degrees to its gratluates it is today 
turning out the largest number of young 
men from M.A.C. to be the farmers of 
the state. 

STATION LOSES RALPH REDMAN 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

Before coming to .M.A.C. Mr. Red- 
man had a wide exjjerience in the field of 
agricultural education. As special agent 
for the United States Department of 
.Agriculture he visited li'-i states of the 
Union in connection with the Extension 
S<rvice program of the Department. 

He is a graduate of the University of 
Maine and has pursued graduate studies 
at Columbia University, University of 
Maine and Mas.-vichusetts .Agricultural 
College. Ill- is a member of Flpsilon 
Sigma Phi, honorarx Extension Service 
fniternity; I'hi Kappa I'lii and Alpha 
Zeta, honorary sc'holastic and professional 
fraternities; and is a Fellow in the 
-Aiiu'rican .Assoi i.ition for the Aih.incc- 
ment of Sii'iici'. 

l-"or ten xc.irs he h.is been mtv .iiti\t' 
in the promotion of agricultural enter- 
prises in Mass.ichust-tts and li.is m.ulc a 



For Prompt Service Phone 828 

••LET DAVE no IT" 

AMHERST CLEANERS & DYERS 

1 1 MAIN STREET NEXT TO TOWN HALL 

One Day Service on Dry CleaninU Work Called for and Delivered Dally 

REPAIRING LAUNDRY DYEING 



JACKSON & 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST, MASS. 



CUTLER 

READY TO WEAR 



consider. iMc i (iiilrii>iit ion to tin 
peril y nt .lui u ulture in this st.ite. 



pros 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER-KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



iSl?^ iMagaarliugrllB (UnlUgtatt 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., VVEDNKSDAV, DIXIKMBKR 12, I<)2S 



ALUMNI APPOINTED TO 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

I nderick I), (^rifiti^i '1^^ '^"d IMiilip I'. 
Whitmore '15 Chosen by (iov. Fuller 

lour nt'vs apix>intments to the Hoard 
of Trustees were rerently announced hy 
(.osernor Fuller. Of these, two are for 
ri'.ippointinents and two are new appoint - 
iiients. Both of the new trustees, Fred- 
irii k n. ^'TiKKs "f Springfield and Philip 
F. Wliitniore of Sunderlaiul, are alumni 
of M..\.C., the former of the class of 191.> 
and the latter of IJUr). 

.\lr. VV'hitmorc, whose ap|xjintn)eiit is 
to 19:J4, replaces Arthur C. Follard of 
Lowell, whose term expired in llt27. Mr. 
('■rings replaces Atherton Clark of New- 
ton, who recently resigned. His term 
goes to 19.S5. 

in addition to these, (ieorge II. KIlis 
of West Newton has been reapi)ointed 
to 19.J4. His term expired in U>27. John 
Chandler of Sterling Junction was also 
reai)pointed to \U,ir), his term expiring in 
I'JL'H. 

.Since his graduation in H>1."), Mr. Wliit- 
niore has been a farnur and luml>er 
dealer, making his home at Sunderland. 
He has been active in alunmi afl.iirs and 
is I'resident of the Assotiate .\luinni. He 
has also been active in the State Cranne 
and other organizations. Mr. C.riggs 
was .Assistant Secretary of the iia!np<len 
County Improvement League, Manager 
ot the Midfllesex County Bureau of .\gri 
I lilt lire and Home Kconomits. He is a 
S|>riiigfield business man of widely known 
M.mding. At present he is I'resident and 
denera! Manager of the .Approved Way- 
si<le Stations Incorporated. He was a 
meniber of the Massjichusetts Legislature 
from H»21 to 1".I'_*H, where b«- beranu- a 
prominent lawmaker and rendered much 
valuable siTvice to this College. Me 
sought the Kei)ublican nomination for 
Congress during the past elections, litit 
was unsuccessful. 

MOVIES FOR ASSE.MBLY 

l)ei)arture has been made from the 
usual run of Assembly exercises for the 
la^t one of the year. In other words, a 
s«t of three ino\ing picture films will be 
sliottn. These films depict the life an«l 
habits of two of the most s<'rious forest 
[H'sts, the (iy|)sy moth and the browii- 
tail moth. The films are borrowed from 
the Inited States Department of .Agri- 
culture, and their purpose and (ontent 
will be explained in a short intro(liict<jry 
talk by Mr. Kenneth Salman of the 
Kntoniology Department. As two of the 
Worst pests economically in the country, 
it is interesting to note that they are 
i'liinigrants, ha\ing been brought in from 
a foreign country. The pictures will show 
examples of the work of the moths and 
methods of fighting them. 

Judders Fourth 
at Pennsylvania 




I'iiS FOOIBAI.L IF.X.M 



Stiff Opposition Outclasses Potnolo|;ty 
Judfijng Team in Pennsylvania Meet 



When the Pomology judging team 
entered into the Pennsylvania im-et, they 
'.iiiii- ujKjn much stifTer competition than 
they found at New Hanii)shire. In spite 
"f the fact that Pennsylvani.i grown fruit, 
'" !iiany cases, l<x>ked altogether different 
f^'ui that produced in New Kngland, the 
ni'inbers of the M.A.C. judging team 
f'i''d up a very creditable score. The 
i s<ores were as follows: Ohio State, 
'l-*)2; Rutgers, 11,4^1(1; Cniv. of West 
^Tvinia, 11.472; M.A.C, 11,244; and 
I'«niKy!vania -State, l<).:{(;t;. A store of 
A as jjossible. 

(Continued on Paftc .<) 



BI.A<:K, li.lnv CoiK'h (iWS. 'Tralnvr KRKV 
M((;K<><:||, illeuJ KUItl CtMih' St I.I.IVAN. I 
t;(>KK Head <:oath IKI K. IM.I MKK. 

KI.I.KRr. .VIINKSTKIN. RKACKI.K 

Aggie Review Postponed 

Until Next Term 

Annual Show VN ill Feature I'lay by 
Arnold W. Dyer '29 

Instiad of presenting tin- Aggie ki\ ue 
near the end of the I, ill term .is is the 
usual custom, the .Scjcial Inion has post- 
(Miiied this feature until sometime dining 
the winter term. This yt.ir, there will be 
no freshman pl.i\. Imi in its pl.it c. will 
be dram.itit t (impo>iti<>n entitled, "I he 
S(|iiiie." written liy Arnulil W . Dyt r 'J'.t. 
.Also, those in charge are tt. ntempl.it iiig 
shiiwiii^; the movie tiealiiig with Aggie 
life, which was filmeil .i few \fars ago. 
The authtjrities fell that ttto' mut h in 
foriiKitioii lonteriiing it slH>ultl mil In- 
ilistlosetl until its presenl.it ion wis 
tlefinitely deculeii uiion. 

.Another fe.it ure of the program will be 
intliviilual sluilent acts. inUrs|Hrsetl witli 
music i)f various sources, l-.v eryone ha\ ing 
confitlonce in their .iliilit> as an actor or 
entertainer shoultl see Letinard W Morri 
son '2'.l in onler to secure ,in opport unit \' 
to display their art. .\ll fri-sbmtn who 
ilisire to partake in llie Ke\ iie .ire inviteil 
to a meeting of the Koister |)t)istersto be 
helil Tliur.sday evening. 

.AltliDiigli the plans for this e\(nt arc 
t)nly in embryo, it is undoubteilly icrtain 
that an evening's entertainment will be 
presented whit h will vie with, if not sur 
p.iss, the majtirity of facetious iK-rform 
antes that have taken form in Howker 
.Auditt>riiim. 

MILITARY BALL ON 
SOCIAL CALENDAR AGAIN 

Formal .AfTair to be Held in Drill Hall 
February 8th 



. Hour. IM KI>V. ADAMS. Mttr MVKICK. C:AI.I . TOMKIIIKDK. JOHNSON 
nil K. KICIIAKDSON. SIM KK. I)AN<;H Ml. VKR. |||\Ks. SAI KM! S. <:Ol KOS 
Mills. M.KIIIKICK. liU:KS. M I KIIWIC/.. kIMIIAII. MA<;M.SO\ 
V. MANN.«;a|)t.-fleel) IIOWIK. (Capi.) CtlX, KKI.'I'ON, WALkllKN, IIOWAKI) 



SCHKDl IK DRAWN IP 

FOR l«>i«> SEASON 



1 'repar.it ions anil plans are already 
under w.iy for the foolb.ill si-ason whit h 
looms up lor the fall of HIJ<.( even before 
the memories of this year's eleven li.ivf 
laihil. Man.iger Karl M. roinfuhrile '.{It 
ol We>t Soiiicrville h.is .ilre.idy .mnount til 
the s< betlule which iiinsists of eight 
g.imes, the M.iroon .ind White griilsters 
meeting the s.iiiie o|)piiiients they f.u id 
this p.ist f.ill. Captain eU-ct U.iymonil 
S, M.inn ';i()ol D.ilton will h.ive.i strong 
;;i<iup of pl.iyers tti le.id when the tf.iiii 
is lormeil next year with .i good siippiv 
of letter men on li.inil. 

The scheilule bir next year is .is billows: 
2S Hall's at Lfwisliiii, .M.ilm 
.'. Howil.iin ai .Miiiiini titlil 

Mi<l<ll<t.iiry at MuMlclMiry. Vl. 
Norwirh al .Miiniiil I'irlil 
Won fstff Tctli al Won rsier 
2 .\iiilii-rst at I'ratl Kiilil 
i» SiirJiicliclcl al ^ihIiikIii'I'I 
L'.'t Tufts at .Miiiiiiii III 111 

To til- together the two seasons this 
s( hedule is being published in t Diijiint t ion 
with the printing of the pittureof the 
stpiail wbiih uniler Capl.iin "Bob" Bowie 
'L".» h.is t.irried the College t (dors on the 
gridiron this f.ill. 

Valley Coaches To Hold 
Meeting In Drill Hall 

Many Ct.aches to .Avail Ihemselves 

of Opptirtunity to Discuss 

Mutual Problems 



S-|il . 



\nv. 



Id 

2o 



'»' ISTANDINC; PERFORMANCE 
OF THE PAST WEEK 



'e honor of f)eing the first student 
'" 'reak the ice on the College fxind 
'' • u inter goes to Albert I'. Zuger '.'iO, 
^^iio fell unexpectedly into five feet of 
niiiddy water last Saturday afternwm 
ttli<n he was over anxious to test the 
^'" ngth of the thin ice. 



Because of the overwhelming success 
of the Militarv B.ill which was given last 
winter the cadets of the College have 
I)lannefl to give another Ball this year 
and the date which has been ilet ide-ti 
u|K)n is Fritlay. Fefiruary Sth. This tlate 
is the day before the annual fraternity 
banquets and it is hopeil that a large 
number of alumni will be presi'nf to 
enjoy the occasion. 

.Again the Drill Hall has been securetl 
for the fiance anil plans are underway 
for a flecoration scheme whit h will [irove 
to be just as novel ami striking .is tin- 
one which was followtd at thi' Hall last 
year. 

The Hall will be helil primarily for the 
members of the K.O.T.C. I'nit ,ind their 
guests, anil stuilenis who are not mem- 
bers fjf the I'nit will he aHmilteii oidy 
through invitation fjy the r.ulits, Senif>rs 
and juniors in the Militarv department 
may invite two couples apiece while 
sophomore- iinl In-limri will be limited 
to one couple e.n h. Ilie li.ill will In- 
formal in natun -,11 unK uniturms ami 
tuxedos will he .illoued. 

Committees have been selected and 
consist of the ff>llowing cadet officers: 
(Continued on Paft* 3) 



Plans for the valley basketball 1 o.n Ins' 
get-together to be heltl at the Drill ll.ill, 
Dec. 17, are well untler way. Favorable 
responses have been reteived from ap- 
proximately twenty coaches of colleges, 
(Continued on Pafte .i) 



CAMPLS CAI.KNDAK 



To ii>l<l rrfined Kold, U> paint the Uly, 
To Ihriru- a prrfume on Ihf niAet 
/s u<t\lrfut iin^l riili, uliiu^ rxress." 

Shakfipfiirr 

Wednesday 

Inlin lass liaskt-tli.tll: 
Soplioriiorr- V- Krcsliiiipn 
.Sinior - \ 
Thursday 

.X-i-w'tnldy. t Diitiol ni I'oii 1 I'. • M,, 
l'i< tiifi's 
Friday 

ItUc f 1.1 'is l):i-k<nt).il!: 

S S .\. S'liiiirs Vl. s ^ \ I J, I -, . ,, 

M't 1' III. '■ ■ • '.n\l .S!ll.,k. I. \I.M1..M. 

Hllll'llIIL.' 

Sunday 

!».Hi .1 Tu. ( !.,>.• ■ 1)1 !■ ! 

.\|i><I"T;iI"I I i 

the t S .\ 
■}.:{() p. Ml. \ U . .\i; 
Monday 
Final- Ixiiin 

sIKI [, •:. I - . - , ,,, ,|,,. [,, 

II.. I! 
.Saturday. IK'cenilxr 11 

l-all UTiii iii'l 
ednesda>, Januury 1 

Ws.Oii ,1. iij. ^\iiitrt t<iru 1m i;iii , 



Basketeers Practicing Hard 
For Heavy Schedule 

Season Opens Early in January. 

Sironti Opposition Anticipated 

This ^■^•ar 

Pr.ntice g.imes with te.ims from Hop 
kins .Ai.idemv, Siutli Detrlitltl High, .md 
Siillitlil Sihool ihuiiig the p.ist week, 
helped Coat h "Kid" ( iore to whip into 
sh.ipe the v.irsily basket b.ill i.intlitl.iti-s. 
During iIum- thills, mut h triiiiinn in 
olteiisive .itid defensive play w.is g.iined 
In these sessions, the first te.iiii w.is 
tiimpoMil of lietheriiigtoii and Kelly, 
lorwards; Slani.siewski, center; .md lillert 
and M.inri, gu.inls; while Kiiib.nik, 
Coiikos. Micks. P.iksarian. .ind Webber 
made U|i the setDiid eliib. Allii this 
week, prictitf will be resumed on I )et 
2(1, .ind three sessions .i rl.iy will be held 
until clasM-s sl.irl on January 2. 

With llarvanl ami Dartmouth on tin 
St hedule, the .Mass.ii hiiset ts te.iin have ,i 
h.inl program of fourteen games this 
winter. The season ojieiis with Fitch 
burg Normal at the Drill Hall on januarv 
'.♦. lughl home games are on the st bed 
ule. whit h ini bides lontests with D.irl 
mouth, l.ouell iextile. M.I.T., .Slevtns 
Tech, and Wesleyan, who will be met 
ig.iiii after an absente of .i few ve,irs 
from the program. The si hedule: 

.1.111 ■' i'lti lllilllK Notllial. Ili'le 

M UVileyail, liili- 

III Oarlniiiuth. al ll.iiinv. I \ II 

.'2 Willlani!!, here 

'I \Vorif:(tlT I'tllyll'ih. lii'ir 

'Ii .N'orthcastiTii Iniv.. at itosdin 

I ' •' '~ Sli-vi-ns Ti-i Ii.. hiTir 

<i Ixwi'll Ti-xliU-. here 

'■> I l.itk t iiiv,. al VVorii'stiT 

I.'t ll.iivaril •){ <'aiiil>rtilKr 

Hi Si .Mil hai-ls, tun- 

T^ .VIM., at < aiiil,riilKi. 

2.J .New llam|.shir<-, at Uurliaiii. .\ II. 

Manli 2 TiitH. lunv 

(Continued on Pafte \} 



Number 10 

SOCIAL UNION PROGRAM 
PARTICULARLY NOTABLE 

Series of Character Sketches Sbowod 

Remarkable Observation anil 

Interpretation 

I'efore .1 l.irge hut r.ither listless 
■ lutliente Cornelia Otis Skinner List 
I I 111. IV night presented .1 se-ries of i h.uac- 
lii sketches in .1 .Sh iai I'nion piogram 
whith will remain a |)leaK.int memory in 
the nmiils of the auilience for some tune. 
by the sh-er b»rce of her iMTsoii.ility 
she brought the wt>rltl .it l.irge into 
Howker .\iiditoiiiini, presenting .111 in- 
sight into the depths of .1 v.iriety of 
th.ir.it lers by her inimit.ibU- im|M-rsona- 
lions of them. 

•Miss Skinner's high intelligent e. keen 
sense ol humor, .iiitl uniisu.il ii.ituralness 
en.dded her to .idd to her sketches a 
backgioimtl t)f culture .ml ex|M-rience 
silt h .IS is given to few entertainers to 
P08S4-SS. And what .1 variety of little 

dr.im.is she presenleil! At one n lent 

the .luilienif was laughing at the hapless 
actors snowbound in the railroad st.ition, 
the next it w.is holiliiig its breath while 
.1 mother inquired t,iutiously over the 
telephone the .iiiswer to a ni.it hem.itics 
problem of her ten year-old son. At one 
lime the entertainer pl.ived up to one 
moot!, at another to just the opposite 

III I. 

(continued on Puite .t) 

VARSIIV IIOCKEV .SCilEDCI.E 

riiis winter Co,it h "keil" P. ill's v.irsily 
hotkey ic.im will fan- nine dilbrent 
op|*oneiits. Candidates bn the v.irsily 
.md freshin.m le.uns will not be calle 
until .liter v.ic.ition. rheie will be two 
games played with Amherst ami one with 
Willi. mis sometime during the season, 
but the ix.ut d.iles h.ive not been detiti- 
iltly .mnouiued. I he scheilule which 
h.is bien .irr.inged is ,is follows: 

I'lM 12 ll,llilll|i>ll. ||||.||. 

Ill Wi-»i I'liiiii. thi-ti. 

17 St. Sli'|ilii.|i<^, ihrrc 

Ti Hiir., I,,.,,- 

2."> Hatfs, itien- 

2»i < ulhy. ihire 

- .New llaiii|islil|i', hrrr 

!t • "lliy. Int.- 

Excellent Talk 

In Assembly 

Dr. Tebyi llsieh CAws Clear Con- 
ception of Needs of Nev* China 

"Ohl China h.is gone! N,-w China h.is 
come!" This is the essence of the mes- 



lil 



JUNIORS AHEAD IN INTER- 
CLASS BASKETBALL 

Fletcher and Paksarian High .Scorers 

Six interclass basketball games were 

pl.iyed last week, some of which were 

very interesting contests 1 he most im- 

! .itant game was between the juniors 

nil the sopiiomores Last Monday night. 

which the juniors won !."> to \.i in an 

overtime |)eriod. I he game was t lov 

thriinylioiii. ,ini| was tiei iile»l by Suher's 

I'll li'Mii till tenter of the fliMjr. Suher 

Mil tin i)oinfs b)r the juniors, while 

■ -L 111 Kimb.ili and .Miiikstein stood 

I lie sophrtinrtres. 

I ii- otiii I ..inii- of the evening resulted 
" a J J In I'.i VII tory for the .V1..A.C. 
! • -hmen omi tin- S.S..A. seniors. Samo 
• ki siored ten points lor the uiiiiMi-,, 
111 I'.i Men did the same for the 

111 Wednesil.iv night, f he SI I 11 

,1 1 iii-,1 ill 1;.;. ,11 !,•. i| the freshmen li'v the 
store III \2 to 11. I'aksari.in sioriil six- 
teen points lor the juniors m their wm 
((Continued on Page .<j 



s:ige brought by the vivacious and [Hjpu- 
lar DiHtor Teliyi Hsieh to fhi students 
.irid their friends .it Assembly la.sf Thurs- 
day afternoon, lie (xiinteil out that 
( liina's most pressing need was to borrow 
three inspirations from the United States, 
namely; co-oper.ition with Americi, emu- 
l.ition of America's organizjition, and 
emulation of its efTicient y. 

Co-o|wration of the whole of China 
with America and co-o|>eration of each of 
the several parts with one another is a 
prime necessity in this old, young tountry. 
A scientific aid to cooperation with 
America will be the proiKised funnel 
between Al.isk.i and .Siberia. Among 
Ihemselves, the country is divided up 
into s«-veral small groups, ,ind, until now, 
these h.ive not re.ili/.td the necessity .md 
advantage of working together 

'I'o aid the spirit of organization as 
much as jios.sible, a new n.itional flag 
of China has been adopted. It is red, 
white ,ini| bill! I 111 red repres«<nting the 
blood of t he |»ople, 1 he w hite symbolizing 
the light that will shine upon the China 
that is to roine, and the blue signifying 
the intelletfual aristfxraiy u|>on which 
the future government will be based. 
Mil- old fl.ig has served its fiur(K>se, it 
his united iimler one lieail the various 
IHOplis of Chin. I. I ornurly, China was 
restr.iiniil l,\ tin p. oph-s of .Mangolia, 
M.ini liiiri.i. libit .mil Turkestan, who 
would not .illow the Chinese to ricvrdop 
their own l.mil. I hey are united ;it 
iireseiit, ,irid the Chines*- are now insti- 
tuting their own met hiwls of government 
antl religion. 

.Many merchanl- ot other ronnines 
have expressed siirpn.. il,,,) tl,,. (hiiiese 
(Continued on Page \) 



t 



THE MASSACIIUSE'ITS COELKGIAN. WFDNKSDAY. DICFMRI R 12. 1928 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLKC.IAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12, l')28 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Oftitiai ntwt^paiHT of the Massachusetts 
Agiirultural C(>lUi;e. Piihlishtd tvtry 
Wednewiay by the students. 



BOAKU OF KDITORS 



Ehepi.ky Ci.kavks '29 
EdwakdH. Nichols '29 



Kiliti)r-in-( liiif 
ManiiKiiiK K<liti>r 



UKl'ARTMKNT KUITOKS 

Editorial SlIH-LEV t LEAVES |'J<,( 

Peaturf MAK(,Akti I'. IJonuvan '.'i*! 

Alumni & Short (.nurses Sai.i.v K. Hkadi.ky "M 
Athletic Lewis M I-ynus ':il) 

Kkank T Doi i.i-Ass '31 
Campus John ». Mowaki' Jn. '30 

C KCIL 11. \\ ADI.hlCH "M) 
klAL S. I'ollKKjR. '31 



B U SI N ESS D K I' A RT M F. N T 

rutDRKiCK U. Thayer. Jk. ■2<i Busin-is .ManaKtr 

• • •• " " A(lveitisini{ M:in:iK<.'r 

Lawkknck a. Cariii :ih '29 Circulation Manapr 

VVlNTHKol" <>■ SMIIH '30 

JdHN R. Tank '30 
Robert G. (JfxiDNow, '31 



Subscript j<jn.s $2.00 per year. Sin^-li- 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In ( ase of channe of address, subscriber 
will please notify the business manaj;er 
as soon as iK>ssible. 



Entered a» •econd-class matter at th<- Amiurst 
Post Oflite. Accepted lor mailiiiK at siiciial rate 
of postaRi- provided for in wctioii 1 103, Act of Oc- 
tf)bcr. 1917, authorized AuKust '-20. I9IH. 



NOMKNCI.ATIIRE 

We have often wondered just how that 
certain someone feels when he or she 
writes a description of a course to be 
offered on the campus, said description 
to be incUuled in the College cataloKiie 
for the illumination of the investif^atinK 
stutlent. We are reminded of a chapel 
niorninK perhaps tw«» years ago when an 
announcement was maile that the nomen- 
clature of a more or less popular course- 
was to be changetl from Rural Kngineerin^ 
to Agricultural Knuiiieerinn. The cliapel 
leader happened to Ic a member of the 
English (lei)artnient who was com|Htent 
to make an intelligent comment, perhaps 
the most pointed and effective words 
that have come from the platform in a 
long while. I lis words were, "Agricul- 
tural Knglish will be taught as usual." 

At first it seemed merely humorous, 
but as the statement continued to come 
to mind, the suggestions it brought be- 
came more and more ivident. Why all 
this stupid business of tacking the word 
"agricultural" on e\er\ thing mentioned? 
Why all the sham and lupocrisy, tiie use 
of words to mislead the catalogue reader 
but which never coiihl convince the stu- 
dent for whom the \t)lume is theoretically 
published but who gets his information 
about courses from a fraternity brother 
or a friend? 

I'erhaps we can realize wherein lies the 
difticulty when we have been inh)rine(l 
that the reason that I.TOught a favtirable 
decision from the State in regarti to pro- 
viding f<)r the teaching of a projMJsed 
Knglish conrsi- w.is that the subject was 
Chaucer, a rural poet of l-^nglaiul. I'er- 
haps the story of the introduction of 
courses in I*sycholog> imder the mask of 
Agricultural Kducation has the same sort 
of far fetched rural connection even if it 
is only in name. Evidently, the nomen- 
clature untler which we labor has at 
times been of assistance in ofitaining per- 
mission for the inauguration of new 
courses, and we should acknowledge its 
help in enhancing the currit ulum. The 
trouble is that it merely pulled the wool 
over some gullible person's head, which 
suggests a use of a nu)st niilti form of 
craftiness and under-harshness which we 
applaud because it is all for out interests. 
Why should our honorable faculty and 
administration be obliged to jeopardize 
their self-respect? 

Yes, you have guessed it. Just another 
reason for changing the name of the 
College. 



( »t course, the greatest dlllii uitV is the 
ia» k of ade<|uate eledives. This is due 
mainly to tiie fact that most of the 
courses offered are in spedali/.ed fields 
into which the student (aiinol go witiiout 
l)rere(|uisites; and when lie is allowed ad 
mission to the cours*-, he lacks a ( ertaiii 
ac(piaintaiice with the subject matter 
which inhibits him from thiiiig his best 
work. Courses such as I'^nt UO, Business 
Law, I.andstape 7"*, and some Sociology 
and .Agricultural Etiucation courses are 
good electives because they do not re- 
(piire any previous stmly in a certain 
field, but merely a mind ready for some 
new ideas which can tie together massi-s 
of memories gained from oliserxation and 
reading. The selection ol these courses 
is sometimes interfered with, however, 
because of the reputation of the professor, 
either from hearsiiy or from actual ex- 
perience on the part of the undergraduate. 
What are remedies for this tri-annual 
tearing of the hair and racking of the 
brain to i)ick out subjc-cts that hcjld no 
interest, in order to complete the neces- 
sary twenty credits or whatever the num- 
ber may be? Additions to the course of 
study in the fields of History, Political 
and Industrial Relations, both national 
and international, and similar other sub- 
jc-cts which would hcdd a broad interest 
for all would solve most of the- iiioblem. 
Courst-s under this category would round 
out the curriculum to make it much more 
evenly balanced than it is now with its 
preponderance of specialized courses. We 
know that this is a scientific college, but 
scientists tleniand and need humanistic 
courses with enough of a choice among 
them so that they, as students, may not 
be- obliged to elect to study under a 
"lirof" who instills no confidence or 
desire to work in his dasst-s. Electives 
as they are now indicated on the cards 
are not the result of a selective jirocc-ss 
as much as they are the dregs of an 
eliminative procedure which represents 
submission to the least of the evils. 

In reorganizing the curriculum last 
year the administration took a firm step 
forward in attempting to broaden the 
rc-c|uirenu-nts for a di'gri-e from the insti- 
tution, but the success of the plan will 
never be complete until there are enough 
elective courses offered from which the 
student may choose what he wishes, 
rather than take what he can get. 



K'') 







V 



,<iS!' 






campus OetMis 

Iiitercolleftiate 

The ■'college Ford" is losing its sway 
in Wesleyan circles, according to the 
(jffuial registration of automobiles now 
adorning the ca!n])us. t)nly five of the 
twenty-three actise mac hines are cif that 
species, and of the fi\c-, only one dates 



ALUMNI NEWS 



back as far as l<t2;i. 



cartoonist s 



c:ooi.id(;e economy? 

What would you have said if you were 
the worker in the Hash House who ate 
forty-four meals and worked forty-three 
and eleven-twelfths hours, and then re- 
ceived a bill from the College for *().():{? 
The Treasurer's Office has c crtainly taken 
Ik-njamin Franklin's teachings of thrift 
seriously. It goes to show that there is a 
real effic ienc\ in one department on 
campus. 



BY TIIE WAY 

The C'lillf^^iiiii Hoard extends to its 
readers best wishes ftjr a holiday re|ilete 
with the Christmas spirit and ho|)es that 
the New Year may offer brighter, happier, 
more worth while ex|)eriences than have 
been enjoyed before. 



COIT.EGIAN COMPE1ITION 

For thc»se sophomores who conscien- 
tiously desire to contribute something to 
their college- in behalf of academic activi- 
ties, the editorial board of the Collc^uni 
is opening a competition to the class of 
l>t;U at the beginning of next term. The 
competition will consist of writing up 
certain specified events in journalistic 
style. The reports handed in will be 
graded by a disinterested party. Election 
to the board will take place at the end 
of the term and members will be chosen 
on the basis of their proficiency, efficiency, 
and punctuality. 



ELECTIYES 

With the announcement of schedules 
for next term the undergraduates are 
again faced with the task of selecting a 
set of courses which will > icid the required 
amount of credits for passing nuister in 
the Dean's Office. This certainly is a 
task, nejt only for those students who are 
majoring in sciences, but also those who 
are concentrating in economics or flounder- 
ing around under the guise of education 
with a luoie or less definite goal in view. 
Terhaps the iiiadeejuacies of the curricu- 
Inni are inon c\icleiit than c\tr this year 
1)11. mx \\i h.iM now I icconie accustomed 
to the new .iiraiigenunt of the courses 
of sIikK at the iii-^titmion as etfected last 
year. 



INDEX PICTURES 

F'ollowing is the schedule for Index 
pictures to he taken this coming Sunday, 
December Iti: 

11.00 Junior from Committee, Sopho- 
more-Senior Hop CoiTimittee, 
and Informal Committee to be 
combined in one picture. 
(Tuxedos to be worn.) 
M.A.C.C.A. and Y.W.C.A 

bined 
Honor Council 
Senate 
.\deii)liia 



11.30 

12.00 
12.15 
12.30 



com- 



Now what will be the 
dream of the collegiate car? 

- Thr 
There is no comfort for the believer in 

w hite supremacy in the latest report from 
Indiana, the citadel of kianhood. Kappa 
Alpha I'si, a Negro fraternity at the 
I'niversity of Indiana, ranks highest in 
the report of fraternity and group grades 
at I lie- university. 

— Collei^idtt — 
.Man tilled with Wom.in last week 
when a team of \ermont co-eds upheld 
the success of co-education against a 
team of Dartmouth debaters. 

Smith College is adding a new course 
to their physical education department. 
Its name is Keauly Culture. Ahem! 
- Wishes 
Since fifty-four co-eds are rejMirting 
regularly for rifle practice at Coe Ccjllege, 
captains and teams will soon be chosen. 
Conifjetition, eh what? 
To— 
"Delta Sigma Tau of Norwich plans 
to become naturally affiliated. A pt-tition 
will be sponsored by Professor S. F. 
Howard of the chemistry department, 
member of the .Alpha chaiiter of Phi Sig- 
ma Kappa at .M.A.C." .Xoncith (iiitdoii. 
— Extend 
.An R.O.T.C. unit is to be established 
at Boston College. More fellow sufferers! 
—A — 
Joe Found That 
Fannie I-'rosh s.iNsthat she can't under 
stand why a perfectU upright piano like 
the Afibey piano should utter the false- 
notes that it dfx's. 

Merry — 
It is about this time that the freshmen 
think that this fraternity idea is "not so 
hot" when they are cleaning cellars or 
polishing floors. 

— Christmas — 

We are now at that stage which scien- 
tists wait for the week befcjre finals, 
which, in reality, is the Revival of Learn 
ing. 

— and — 

Have you noticed that squirrels seem 
to be increasing on the campus. It must 
be that there are more nuts on the cam- 
pus, or elst- there are more nuts on the 
campus. 

—A — 

Why criticize the opposers of co-edu- 
cation and the women-haters? Perhaps 
man>- of them intend never to get married. 
This at least is a definite step towards 
"World Peace." 

— Happy— 
The Aggie man's Christmas song: "1 

Can't Give You Anything But Love." 

— AVk' — 
One of our rising junior men contributed 

this one: "We find among our wander- 
ings a fellow who has solved a problem 
which has baffled science for the Lord 
knows how long, namely: 'Which came 
first the hen or the egg?' He says the 
egg came first because if the hen came 
first, the eggs at his boarding-house would 
be fresher. 

— Year — 

Well, skating is here. All that the pond 
needed last Saturday afternoon was 
someone to conduct relays so that everv- 
onc who wished to could use the ice at 
some time. Perhaps a traffic system 
would help to overcome the difficulties 
of congestion. 

-To-' 

Have vou written to Santa Claus? 



STOCKBRIDGE 



'IS .Arthur I,. I'tidc-rwood came as 
near the old (cillege Idun lie knew ten 
\earsago when he selected .1 nihcrst, A . //., 
as a |>lace to start a coniliination fruit and 
vegetable gardening l.iini. 



.1// 
(Juestion: How ni.my Cliapel scats 
will be vacant next term? 
(Jrcctin^s — 
Cela Suffit. 



'U2 Henry B. Emerson severed his 
connections with the .Arlington Mills. 
Lawrence, M.iss., September 1, and is 
now a consulting engineer at ;ns Brciad- 
way, Methuen, .Mass. 

•<»2 (.eorge B. Willard, who last year 
left the position of deputy treasurer and 
receiver general at the State House, 
Boston, to take a position at Greenwich, 
Conn., is now in the public utilities 
l)usinc-ss at 73 Cornhill, Boston. 

w'H7 Kcjbert L. Farnsworth, who has 
been connected with the International 
Paper Co. for many years, is a depart- 
ment superintendent for that concern at 
(.atineau, P. Q., Canada. He resides at 
5 Edgar St., Ottawa, Out. 

'HH Julian S. Eatcjn was a recent 
visitor on the campus during a motor 
trip through New England. Mr. Eaton 
is a lawyer and banker with offices in 
Miami, Florida. 

w'9y Carl C. Dickinson is a tele- 
grapher with the Southern Pacific Rail- 
way Co., at Santa Paula, Calif. 

'02 Arthur L. Dacy has joined the 
large group o\ M.A.C. men on the teach- 
ing staff at the Essex County Agricultural 
School, Hathorne, .Mass. 

'02, 'lo & '20 The choir cjf the Holy 
Trinity Church at (iit-ensboro, N. C, is 
unicjue, according to reiKirts from "did" 
Mackintosh '21. in that Frederic H. 
I'lunib '02, and the wife of < dendon R. 
Derick '20 and the wife of William H. 
Hatfield 'lo make up a part of its per- 
sonnel. 

'12 Leon E. Fagerstrom, local mana- 
ger for the American .Agricultural Chem- 
ical Co., has now established his central 
office at 12<.t Lewis St.. Buffalo, N. Y. 

'12 Charles A. Lodge, formerly county 
agricultural agent in the State of Wash- 
ington, is now an instructor of agriculture 
in the Coast Union High Schoeil, Cambria, 
Calif. 

'12 Leon Terry is in educational ser- 
vice as princiiwd of the Newark Prepara- 
tory School, Newark, N. J. 

'13 James D. French advises that he 
now resides in Newl>erry, S. C. He was 
formerly located in Ne-edham. Mass. 

'13 W. Stuart Moir has joined the 
forces of the Fairchild Aerial Surveys. 
Inc., 270 West 3.Sth St., New York City, 
as manager of the niai)ping division of 
that company. 

w'14 Frank \'. Wright, formerly civil 
engineer with the B. & A. R.R., is now 
serving in a similar capacity with the 
State of Maine Highway Commission, 
and resides at North llarpswell, Maine. 
'IC. Harold R. Kelley recently joined 
the forces of the American Cyanamid 
Co., New York City, as s;desman. 

'14 Harry Brown and Louis .A. Web- 
ster, both class of '14, were elected to ihe 
Massiichusetts Legislature at the last 
polls. Brown is of 17th district of Middle- 
sex. Webster of 7th district of Wcjrcester. 
Both are Republicans. 

'15 Merton C. Lane, one time captain 
of Aggie's crack rifle team, has moved 
from Toppenish to Walla Walls. Wash- 
ington, where he is assistant entomologist 
for the C.S.D.A. 

'17 William R. Irving is now sales 
counsellor for the Phoenix Mutual Life 
Insurance Co., Turks lk#id Building, 
Providence," R. I. Mr. and Mrs. Irving 
attendeel the World Aggie Night gather- 
ing in Providence. 

'17 Ceorge C. Everbeck writes that 
he is a siilesman with Kettell Blake & 
Read, Inc.. 387 Washington St., Boston. 

'17 Hans A. Rorstrom recently re- 
signed as teacher of agriculture and farm 
mechanics at the Smith Agricultural 
School, Northampton. Mass.. and is now 
actively engaged in farming for himself 
on the Boulder Brook Farm, Nixon Road. 
Eramingham Center, Mass. The farm 
consists of 280 acres and is owned by the 
father of William I. Mayo '17. 

w'l7 Leonard H. Nason, who has 
achieved fame as the author of many 
war stories which have appeared in The 
Saturday Evening Post, American Legion 
Monthly and other magazines, was a 
recent visitor in Massachusetts. Mr. 
Nason makes him home in Belgium and 
France. 

'18 Franklin H. Canlett. Ist Leut., 
5th Field Artillery, who is now stationed 
at Fort Bragg. N. C, after a three year 
tour of duty in Honolulu, T. IL, is 
grooming two little Canletts as future 
\LA.C. candidates. 

'IS Mrs. H. Clifton Speed, nee Eliza- 
beth .Additon, now resides at Chelmsford 
Centre. Mass. 



BASKETBALL 

Candidates for the Stockbridge basket- 
ball team were called out yesterday 
Prcjinising men from the si-nior class an 
Belden, Chace, Fleming, Fletcher, May 
and Woodger, while Bower, Frost, Morrii 
and Shates of the freshmen show possi 
bilities. The schedule has not been com- 
pleted, negotiations being under way with 
Dalton, Pittsfield, Holyoke, Smith Acad- 
emy, Smith Aggie, and Deerfield Academy 
to fill the o|)en dates. The schedule as 
far as is decided is as follows: 



Fcl. 



s 
1,-1 

22 

29 

1 

2 



ll(jpkiiis .\radeiiiv. ln-ri; 
NortfiaiiiptoH Iliuh. here 
Arms .\cadeiay, here; 
isouth Ueertield, here 
New Salem Academy, here 
("lark School, at Norlliamploii 
Xorthaiiipton C'oniiiiercial, here 



FRENCH CLUB 

Tuesday night a large group gathered 
at the Memorial Building to participate 
in a \ery successful F'rench Club meetinj;. 
The main event of the evening was an 
interesting talk on F'rance, given by 
Professor Atkinson of Amherst College, 
who was introduced by President John 
R. Ciuenard. Professor Atkinson's witty 
remarks were special treats. 

The remainder of the meeting was 
spent in partaking cjf refreshments and 
in enjoying a fine social tinie. Behire 
closing the meeting, the President an- 
ncjunced that a list of selected speakers 
was being prepared for next term. Thf 
first meeting then will be held on the 
eN'ening of the second Thursday in 
January. 



INTERCOLLECIATES 

The \'ale I niv. Aeronautical 5>ociety 
will begin a course in ground school in- 
struction in flying. The course which 
begins at once, consists of ten lectures 
and is in charge of Lieutenant Jack 
Tweed, instructor of the New Haven 
Naval Reserve. The series of lectures is 
intended to aid many of the stutlents 
interested in the fundamentals of flying. 
.At the finish of the course the instructor 
will conduct an examination similar to 
those given a regular transport pilot. ^ 
Wesleyan Argus. 



There are 30(X) entrants in a beard 
growing contest at the University of 
Illinois which is to last two weeks. Tht- 
oflicials in charge of it were offered S.'itHi 
by a prominent s;ifet\ razor nianufactiinr 
to stoj) the contest, but they are deter- 
mined to glorify the beard. 



Men students at Antioch College have 
unanimously agreed to forsake the ciga- 
rette in favor of the pijje. The move 
came as the result of reports that co-eds 
have proved too much competition. .Al- 
th.oiigh cigarette smoking has beccMiie 
effeminate, real "he-men" will be al)le to 
smoke the more manly pipe in peace. 

Two hundred fifty students from .Asia 
are registered at the University of Cah- 
fornia. I'niv. of \\ ashington Daily. 



President Cousens of Tufts Col!ti;e 
sitid recently that a four year college 
course is tcx) long for the average busim ^- 
student and recently a Technology pro 
fessor declared decisively that an en- 
gineering student should not have to 
obtain his practical knowledge at college. 
according to The Sortheastern AVvi. It 
that is the case, who is there left to go 
to college who does not fall in these 
classes? We humbly suggest ministers, 
teachers, and farmers. 



ALUMNI NEWS 
Marriages 

'12 George S. Fowler to Miss Olive 
Lucille Sleight, at New Bedford, Ma'> • 
October 3, 1928. 

'19 Dr. John Yesair to Miss Mina 
Greenbaum at Washington, D. C "''• 
15, 1928. 

'22 Philip H. Haskins to Miss Belle 
Williamson Graves at Mount Airy, N C . 
Oct. 13, 1928. 

'22 Ralph Russell to Miss Judith Find, 
at Madison. Wis., Sept. 8. 1928. 

'27 Demetrius L. Galanie to M'^' 
Bernice Pierce, at Falmouth, M^**' 
August 30, 1928. 

Births 
'23 A daughter. Marie Alicia, to M' 
and Mrs. R. D. Nieves. Sept. 10, 1928 at 
Cambridge, Mass. Mrs. Nieves ' '- 
formerly Miss Mary K. Gildemeistn. 

'23 (& '23 A daughter, Virginia M-""'^ 
to Mr. and Mrs. J. Stanley Bennett. 
August I'.t. 1928 at Wareham, Mass. 



XMAS GIFT 
SUGGESTIONS 



SOX, COLF HOSE, SHIRTS, S//K./TKRS, HEl/lS, SILK SLSPEXDEUs, Mi III I- Ks 

J\/J./.\/./S, liOXEl) STins ./.\n Cl EE EI\KS. 

SHOP E/REV IT L A N D I S YOLK COEEECE STORE 



M'CKWKAR SALK 
Begins this Week 



Wherever well-dressed men gather, 

you see 

BOSTONIANS 



BOLLES SHOE STORE 



Christmas Books For The Whole Family 



75c Novels 

Novels of Distinction, $1.00 

Star Dollar Books 

Cook Books. Etiquette Books 

Bridge and Chess Botjks 



FOR CHILDREN 

Picture Books 10. 15 and 25c 
Many Series at 35 and 50c 
Volland Color Books 
Glitter Wax for Modeling 



JAMES A. LOWELL 



BOOKSELLER 



CO-ED NOTES 



SOCIAL UNION PROCiRAM 

(Continued from i'aiie I) 

Mi>s Skinner easily handled characters 
as widely separated as a stjuthern girl, 
,111 old aristocratic lady, anel a small-town 
v.iiideville artist. Along with this versa- 
tility was her ability to create imaginary 
M'enc-s and people by the mere sound or 
inflection cjf her voice, or by little charac- 
teristic gestures of her hands or head. 
One realized her unusual power in this 
re^;arcl to a great extent in the sketch 
t-ntitled "Snowbouncl in Iowa." in which 
sill' took the part of a traveling vaude- 
ville- artist who is caught with her partner 
i.i a small town during a blizzard, and 
who is waiting for a train three hours 
overdue. Here Miss Skinner brought the 
audience through humor to pathcjs at 
will. 

The following is the program of seven 
"•kc-tches as it was given by Miss Skinner 
l.i>t Friday night. It serves to illustrate 
her versatility as no description could do. 

1. .\n American Girl on the French Tele- 

l>iic)ne. 

-' Id a (iondola 

■'J. A Southern Girl in the Sistine Chapel 

4. Snowbound in Iowa 

0. Home-work 

''. Woman's Crowning (dory 

7. .Sailing Time on the "Olympic" 



•MIMTARY BALI. I'LAN.S 

i(A>nlinue«J freini i'aiie I) 
FIxecutive— Capt. Itergan and a sergeant 
to be chost-n; Music Capt. Young and 
1st Lieut. Isham; Deccjrations .Major 
Plumer, 1st Lieut. Chadwick, 1st Lieut. 
Howe, and 2ncl Lieut. Jones; Refresh 
ments Major Nitkiewicz; Invitations 
and Receptions 1st Lieut. Woodburv 
and 1st Lieut, (iraves; Tickets — Capt. 
Richardson. 

It is of interest to note that last year 
was the first time since 1898 that a 
.Military Hall was held. In 189.') the Hall 
was begun as a venture and proved sue li 
a success that it was held annually until 
'99 when it was replaced by the Junior 
Prom, the enrollment cjf the college not 
being great enough to support two formal 
dances in the same year. 



"K.O." held its monthly "get-together" 
in Stockbridge 1 1. til last \\ cclnc-Ml,i\' niglii, 
iHc. .->. Mr. Paul Algc-r, 4 11 Clul. le-.ider 
of Franklin County. acUhessed the- ("luh 
on the ciu.ilitie-s and functions of good 
leaders. He illustrated his talk by ex 
plaining a long list of the various statistics 
and act oinplishmeiits g.itlie-recl from e-x 
tension work in I-ranklin Comity, Miss 
M.irion F'orbes, assistant state club leader, 
-pcike- to the Club on some future- po^si 
hiliticsfor "K.O." 

Club songs were sung .md a gener.il 
discussion enstit-el as refreshments were- 
se-r'.v-d. 



An .Abbey Christmas party, s|H)nsore-<l 
I'V Y.W.C.A. will be held in the- Abbe-y 
Center, Suiid.iy aftc-rnejon from .i.'.H) to 
4.;iO o'clock. .Many "Xmasy" features 
ire- being planned and ^;irls are reepieste-d 
to sign up at the .Abbe-y for this afT.iir. 
.All c-o-eds of the college are most cordi.illy 
urged to come. 



^ Charmiti^ and Smart 

i 

I Pendants, Necklaces, 
i and Bracelets 

'■ for that ^ 

i. 

>^ister or any other Woman 

' Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



THE 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Offers Expert Hair Cutting 
Service for Men and Women. 

"I^P ' DUWELL, Prop. MEMORUL BUILDING 



JUDGKRS FOURTH AT PENN. 

iC:onlinued from l'uit«* li 

In regard to the .Aggie team. Koy S. 
Tarr '29 took seventh place among the- 
fifteen individuals competing, with a 
score cif .■{81t). Phillips H. Steere '29 was 
e-ighth with .'{748 points, and .Moody F. 
Trevett '29 placed tenth w ith ;i7(Ki |x>ints. 
Kyle of Ohio State tcMik first place with a 
score of .V.MiO out of a possible 40(K). The 
competition consisted of twenty classes, 
with three jilates to a class. Twenty-five 
varieties were represented. 



KXIMIUTION OF OIL PAINTINCJS 

-At present there is .in cxtciisi\e- ex 
liiliitioii of oil p.iintings, t we-iitv -two in 
numbt-r, displayed in the Memorial 
Hiiilding. This is the annual exhibition 
given by the faculty of the Grand Ceiitr.il 
SchcK)! of Art, New York City. The pic 
tme-s are all fresh, new, and up-to-date. 
.Some of them are quite "modern" in thc- 
spc-cial sense- of that term; some- others, 
though entirely new, are strictly classical 
in their method of treatment. There are- 
jiictures, in fact, for all tastes, so th.it 
anyone who cares for paintings should 
find sonu-thing worth stucK in the- i>re-se-nl 
showing. This exhibition will re-main in 
place until December I.'"), and will be o|K-n 
during the- day time, evenings and Sun- 
da\ s. 



H^e can please any of the fellows 

tor whom you arc l>u\ inij; >^[\\s. Ami ilon't r()r<;ft 
they will appreciate it all the more it" thev know 
it is rii^ht in every way. Neckwear, (ilt.ve.s, Muff- 
lers, Shirts, Pocket Hooks, C'iu;aretre Lii^rhters, (ioll 
Sox, or any of the huiuireils i»t' tlili'erent item, 
that we can show vou. 

F. M, THOMPSON & SON 

CLOTHE.S FOR COLLEGL MLN FOR NI-AKI Y I IITY YFARS 



In the last number of Photo-l-'ra 
appears an illustrated article by Professor 
Frank A. Waugh on making photographs 
in the- rain, this being one of his fa\e>rite- 
p.ist iines. 



'19 Ldward A. White is re|>orted to 
be making a success in the real estate 
business in Pro\idence-, K.I. 

'71 ( ieorge Leonard of Springfielcl, 
.Mass., captain fjf the Aggie crew which 
won the regatta against Harvard anel 
brown at Inglesiele on the Coime-ctic ui 
River, July 21, 1871, gave an interesting 
talk at the WorM .Aggie Night me«-ting 
ill Springfielcl. 



I ASK FOR 

" Munsingwear" 

RAYON and SILK 

Bloomers -Step-ins -Vests 

Slips - Bandeau - Pajamas 

Night Robes 



College Drugstore 



W. H. McGRATH 
Re^. Pharm. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



Amherst Shoe Repair Co. 

Ma.ster Shoe Re builders 
>>EXT TO BOLLES SHOE STORE 



SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

G. Edward Fisher 
TYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Remington, Royal 
and Corona Sales and Service 

Radio Equipment General Repair Shop 

H. E. DAVID 
35 Pleasant St., juti below P.O. Amherst 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Oeuliats' Prescriptiona Filled. Broken lenae* 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable makea 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one aiftht) 



VALLEY COACHES WILL MEET 

((Auiilitui'd friiiii I'uiii- 1 1 

.icademies, and high schools in ilu- 
Coiint-e tic lit X'.ille-y. This instnt-s i 
siicct-ssful informal me-e-ting with I lie- 
hopes that a Coache-s' Club may be- i he- 
outgrowth of the "shop talk." Tlie- 
jirincip.il speakers of the- evening will be- 
A. (i. JoliiiMHi, Ldward llickox, both of 
Springfield; anel "Km" Ciraysun, well- 
known former M.,\.C. athh-te-. 

Other co.iches who have expresse-d 
their intentitms of attending are "Kd" 
Hiirke- of Smith .Acade-my, i'r.iiik lioyeh-n 
of Dc-erlield ;\cacle-my, "l-Id" Wilder of 
Williamsliingh High, "Al" Cook of 
Wilbrahain Academy, "Larry" Duify of 
.Arms .Academy, "Jiin" Ri-e-d of Hopkins 
Ac.ide-my, "Andy" Stcinhope- of M.iy 
Path Institute, Leonard Thompson of 
(iiie-i. field High, "koly" Ree-d of I-;.is| 
iiampton High, ( .e-orge- Williams of 
Amherst High, "Ron" Jack of Senith 
De-e-rfie-ld High, Waller ( lit ler of Wore e-s 
ler High -School of Cejinmeree, anel 
"Chief" Meyer of Springfic-ld High 
Sc hool of Comnjerce. 



EXCELLENT TALK IN ASSEMBLY 

(Ceinlinued from l*uili- I) 

can tarry on their wonderful system 
while the ecuintry is in the prcic ess of 
being ctrg.mized. All trade at pres4-nt is 
controlled by the Chinese Chamber of 
( ommeice. This hoard has charge of 
lumdre-ds of guilds, silk guilds, te.i guilds, 
etc., that are- tracliii^ with .ill parts of 
the world. The results show the useful- 
ness f)f effic ieiie y applied to the- e|iiesti<(ns 
c»t I his country. 

China is at i)res«-iit in the- |M-riod of 
tiansilion. The e)Id China is passing anel 
the- nt-w Chin.'i is coining in vi-ry r.ipiclly. 



It will he- ditTere-nt fnnii iIm- foi iiic i coii- 
dilioii of the- country in iIi.k ii uill be 
able to work out its «»wn dotiiiy. .Al- 
• hoiigli just in its iiif.me y the new gove-rn- 
me-iit will pre.ve-, |)r, I|si,|, |„|i,.v..s. i,, 
he- the- best one that the- country h.is 
experie-nce-d. 

JUNIORS LEAD IN I ERCl ASS R.\CE 
(CoiillnueHl (ri>ni I'lme I) 

over tiK- .S.S.A. freshmen the s.im.; 
eve-ning. IhcMigh flu- first h.ilf was slow, 
sce»ring was eoimnon in the- seeonci p.ut 
of the soplicMiiore S.S.A. senior contest, 
which w.is won by tin- foi imr 2.'"i to |.S, 
last Kricl.n night alt.-i the Soci.d riiieiii 
enlertainini-nt. l-our iiie n made most of 
the |K)ints in (his g.inie-. K.iiie- getting 
ten and D.nis nine loi the winners, .ind 
I'leming and l-U-icher eight apiece- bir I he- 
losers. S.iiurd.iv afteriKMin. llie- M.A.C. 
fre-shmen defeate-d Hn- S.S.A. freshmen 
20 to l.'i, with Wilson hading the- .,ii,,ek 
hy getting sixteen [loinls. I lie- standing 
of the teams now is: 



II 


/. 


!•( 


.jiiiiioi'i 1 
Si|ilii>iiiiiii's ;{ 


11 

1 


1 CNiel 
7. 'if I 


I'le-Hliiiu-ii ;> 

Sl-|lio|8 1 

S.S A Sfiiiiirs 1 
S.S, A I'rc'.liiiii II 1 


a 
.1 
.1 


.',00 
2.VI 


HcIcIht (S.S a. SeiiidH) 
l'iiksieri;in (Jiinuirs) 




. :i:i 

■\2 


Minksiriii ISnplKtinurt-s) 
Wilson (Kri'-.hiii<'iii 




27 

. 2it 


Hcni.ii.l (Jiiiii.,1-, 




lU 


Killll- lS<(Il|l<)IIHl|l-S> 




I'l 


Davis (Siplmiiirirt-.) 




. IV 



I 



w'H2 Dr. Henry I. ( l.nke-, lorme-rly 
of Anehiver, Mass., now resides in West 
Urewster, .Mass., where he is still active 
as ,1 physiciin ;md .ilso interests himself 
ill t.ii minv;. 



! Town Hall Theatre ! 

Malinc-cs .<:IMI Kv e-lliil;>s e.: IS ;in<l K : ^ei Oj 



Best in Drug Store Service 
Best in Druit Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co. 



Thursday-Friday, Dec. H-I4 

Her Cardboard Lover 

With Marion Dai ies the greatest 
Comedienne of I'icture History, fall 
ing in love with a man's photo -hut 
it comes to life-see what Marum does 
NEWS COMEDY 

Saturday, Dec. LS 

At liisl, Ihr •.ho-it I hititren nnd Kru'.m ups 
hiive united jirr . TDM M I X and TD.W in 

The Son of the Golden West 

'lnm'\ Jir\t piiturr under the /• /SO hiinner 

after his ureal vaudeMllr tunr. Tinnlinitlhriil 

< if the Pony lixpres', Rider- Red lUmided 

Knmanie of the l-i^hting .Sixties. 

.XEWS COMEDY 

Wednesday, Decemt>er I'* 

The Naughty Duchess 

With EYA SOUTHERN and 
H. B. WARNER 

A charming romance suggested hy 

Sir Anthony Hope's Novel "The 

Indiscretion of the Duchess" 

FABLES Sportlight COMEDY 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amherat, Mass. 

REPAIRING A.M) ALL KIND.S OK 
WASHING DONE AT REA.SONABLE 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Clas» 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

NEXT TO TIIE TOWN II A I.I. 




House Slippers 

for yourself or for 
gifts. The largest 
assortment in town 

Thomas S. Childs 

INCORPORATED 

275 High St., Holyoke, Mass. 



J 



AMH 

Jt\ THl 



E RS 

EATER 



Ti 



AMHERST FRUIT STORE 

WHLRF aggip: MF.N MF.F.T 

WHFN DOWN TOWN 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGAHS 



WeeliM-selay, I)»t. 12 

5 KFITH VAUDmilE ACTS i 

not f.i AS I .xiRj'.wKs ),. .,,,,1 

|'»in \A ICAI.SION in 

The POWER OF THE PRESS 

|-.m.ilnl l>l.iiii.i .,1 .\.AK-.,.,i„ I I ||, I,.., mil-- liiy 

Mllliitt .\lv-lciv. I'd il ( .iiniMiKii ,,|„| Jy.v,. 

-loM i.f uiih-ii.il int.-n-i ili.ii \m|i i|„,|i , ,,,, 

C.\I<H)«>.\ I'.MIII. M US 



Ihursday & Friday, Dec. l.<and 14 

\ iiuM' mse I M ri .ni\ ihin^j like- 

SHOW GIRL 

Siairing ALK I. WHITF. 

SiKiikliiii; wild iIk liiiMii I ..I ! I' \|, (vf.-- 

2 Rl.i.l.t (».\II-.|»V I'M IK. .\|,WS 






Saturday, Dec. 15 

.Milton Sills \- riielina Todd in 

THE CRASH 

SilN .>- ;, c ,,..1 It,,. ;„,, |<.,i|w.,. M,|,,|r,,„,,, 

2 KI.LI. ( '■MKI)V-.\LV\S 
Monday & i ue»day, Dec. 17 & IH 

( I.AK.A I'.OW ill KI.INOK M N'Ws 

THREE WEEK ENDS 

2 RLKL ( OMI.DV \| US 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Now situated at 1.5 1-2 Pleasant St. 
EXCELLENT SHOE REPAIRERS 
V. (,I<0.\I)().\ir(). Prop. 



A carton of 60 **A*' Mackintosh apples makes an ideal present. We pack and ship them 
for you at prices consistent with the market. New College Store, *'M" Building 



:.: R BASIL 



•V 0^ 



TIIK MASSACIIUSiyrrS C0LLE(;IAN, WKDNKSPAY, DECKMBER 12. 1928 



LIBRARY 



CUSTOMIZED BY 11 I C K E Y - F R E E M A N 

J'.// J, .INI) iriSTI.K SI ITS '111. IT IMlTIi VOIR JTTKXTIOX .IM) DKSKRI l< IT/ 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



Freshman Schedule 

Includes Nine Games 

llnskilhall CiuidUhili's l»r;ictitinji 
Kftiiihirly 

I'n'sliiiian ImskftWall candidaUs havi- 
Itccii i)ra( ticiiin siiUL- N(»v. L'O iiikUt the 
(lircdioi) of Coach "l.arry" Hrign^- •'"■•"'■ 
ti(c so far lias (oiisisti'd of fundatm-ntals, 
spec i,d (>ITiiisi\«' and (Itfeiisivi- plays, ami 
wriiiiman*'. Sixlcia miii art' now ii|)oit 
iiiK daily, and tliout^h no particularly out- 
standill^; stars liavo Iweii dis<ovfri'd, the 
following im-ii will prohahly stc- action 
this wintir: i'liilip J. Conni-U, John J. 
Koky, Clifford K. i'oskitt, Kt'nmth E. 
ModKi-, Kidiard 11. Merritt, ki<:hard 
KowUv, Mclvin II. Wanegar, and Kolnri 
A. Wilson. Many of these nun haw had 
«'xpiri(ii( (• on hinli s( luHtl and indopi iidtnt 
l»askilliall ti-anis. Otlu-r nuMnlM-rs on 
the squad ar«' ll.itis, Chapman, l-ahyan, 
N. S. Ilah-, Springer, Ti-aKiH', Th<»nipson, 
and Tikofski. l.coii.ird A. Salter is out 
foi niananiT of I In- team. A tentative 
schedule has heeii arranged, with the 
season ojwninn on January II. A v;anie 
with Northampton Hi|j;h will iM)ssil)ly he 
played l"el»rnary 2 at Northampton, 
\vhi< h will neiessitate channinn the date 
of the South Deertield iinnw. Only two 
home contests are planned. The schedule: 



.hill. 11 



Fel. 



Arms Araili-iiiy at Shflhmnc Kails 

l<» llolilni llji'h ..t M.A.C. 

2('( (lark S liiMil .11 NinUiaiiiptiiii 

Siiitli Diirliild lliKli at S. i).-<T(i<-l(l 
Tinners l.ill lliuli at Tiirm-rs K.ills 
liuslliaiHiili.ii lliijli at Kaslliaiiil>tc)ii 
Sacri'cl llrart lliuh at llolyok"- 

'Z2 « iishiiiK Ai ailoiiiy at Ashliuriili.iiii 

2!) Hopkins Ac adciiiy at M.A.f. 



1 

K 

ir. 



RALPH SIKDMAN 

nFAIXS COMMIITKK 

l.,iM week the l».»2t» Advisory .Mumiii 
IJaskelhall Coniinittte met and t'lected 
Ralph Stedman, a prominent Si)rinKfield 
liusiness man and former M..\.C. Iiasket- 
liall star of ten years ago, chairman for 
the second time. This season the "Uin 
Ten" who ((imini-e the ctinimittee are 
Allt.ii (.iisl.ilMin. t .eorne Kelso, and 
Kayniond Smiley, all of the class of I'.t'Jti. 
TluM men wer;' .dl stars of that team 
whiili won the v.illey championship for 
M.A.C. The other memhers include 
Koland Keeil, last year's cajilain who is 
now ((lachiiiK at Kasthampton llinh; 
lloran Hro« kway. manager of the '28 
team; l.dward Hike, the Westfield and 
M.A.C. star who is now coaching at 
Cushing Academy; Kmory (irayson. 
captain ot "Kid" ( lore's first basketball 
le.nn in I'.M"; I.eo DufTv, manager of 
one ot the hesl teams since the war and 
now <ti.i(h at .\rms .Academy; and 
Kd«-inl lliirke, capt.iin of the M.A.C. 
I.askelhall teams ol I'.MtK and liK«». 

w'(m; ( .illiert hay is an automotive 
RU|K'rinten<lent at ".»:{l) Commtmwealth 
Ave., Iloston. His home is at 2(M> ScIkhjI 
St., \Vatert<»wn. Mass. 



Dr. Fernald Gives Talk 
To Amherst Nature Club 

Tsilk Kntitied "Birds. Butterflies and 
Bi'es In Florida" 

Last evening in Fernald Hall there was 
given hy Dmtor Henry T. Fernald, one 
of the most interesting talks to the 
Amherst .Nature Clul) heard thus far 
this year. Dr. Fernald has spent the 
early part of the last few years, that is, 
from January until late spring, (ollect- 
ing and working in the state of Florida. 
It was on his experiences in this region 
that he based his unusual talk, entitling 
it "Birds, Butterflies and Bees in Florida." 
Dr. Fernald has, since his first intro- 
duction to Florida, been intensely inter- 
ested in t!ie flora and fauna charat:teristic 
to that part of the country. He has made 
this study both his pastime and his work. 
As a result of this instructive task, he has 
become acquainted with many intimate 
I)rol)lems relating to birds and insects, to 
which he has devoted a great deal of his 

time. 

In the discussion last evening, Dr. 
Fernald pointed out the relationships he 
hati noticed iktween insects or birds and 
their surroundings. He stated that he 
has found a direct correlation existing 
between the insects of a given region and 
the characteristics of that region. Further- 
more, he has been able to find a definite 
relationship between one Xy\>v of taun.i 
and another. All these he illustrated by 
s|K'cific examples. 

An extremely interesting part of the 
talk was that in which the speaker men- 
tioned the unusual birds or insects with 
which he has come in contact during his 
stay there. 



EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 
DEC. 17-21, 1928 



Monday, Dec. 17, 7.S0-9.SO a. m. 



AKroM 2'i 




ii:i 


l-'.lll! •).') 


hW 2.-I I 




<; Ami 


l-'Ujii '>.i 


Ak K(I .7> 




114 


Ak Knu 7.') 


An II us .'.D 




111 


Land (lanl 7.") 


( llCIII ."ll 




C, 'IH 


Pcult 7.') 




Monday, 


lO-U a. m. 


.•\Kric 1 O 


AlK 


. 2.H, 2f) 


I'oiii 77 


|'livsi( s 2.'> 




(II A 





Monday, 2-4 p. m. 

luiK 2.') (i .\iicl. 2<). 2S F.iriii .\Ii;l 7."> 
lloiiu' K« .'»() !•:» K Mori MIks 7.'> 

I'om y.i Wll H l,an.l <iar<l 7(i 

.\k K. k:{ 111 



102 
III { 
110 
Wll H 

:ji2 
Wll u 



ii:s 

11. M 
Wll 



Tuesday, Det. 18, 7.S0-9.50 a. ni. 



I;raw 2.') 1 
K. 2.-, II 
Kill 2<) I 
l-riiK h 2H 
Cii-riiian 25 

.\k ic.i r,:, 

li.iiry .jl) 
ICUK .Vi 



Wll 

(i Aiul 

KH 1) 

Ml I) 

(;2H 

12 

l-L M 

111 



.\« IC. 77 
Clit'ii 7.') 
Iviit 7<i 
Moiiic hi- 76 
Land (ianl 7H 
I'oiii HO 
\'ii 7."i 



Math 1 
Mr. lioiitflle 

(; Aud. 26 
-Mr. Moore 

MB& Ml F 
lJraw2."iIl Wll 



Tuesday, lO-li a. m. 

Mist 2H 



Hot .")H 
Kill M 
ICiit iki 
l-'orrstry o't 
l>airy 7t) 



Tuesday, 2-4 p. m. 



Zix.l 2(i 
Hot .'12 
iMit .-.2 
Moii .'K» 
\<K (iard 



KU D.St » 
(11 ii 
Kit II 
111 ( 
Ml F 



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lion Mf«s SO 
I'oiii 7.1 
I'oult 7t> 



110 

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III 
(II Ii 

KB K 
KH I) 
Ml ( 
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111 

FL .M 

Wll H 

:ii2 



Wednesday. Dee. 19, 7.50-9..S0 a. m. 



Km 21. II 

I Ionic ICc 2."i 
Sor 27 

.Ak Ki :*> 

Ak Kd .-,1 
H.I. I till 
Ff.-n. h .".<) 



VARSHY RELAY 

Cnder the guidance «)f Coach Derby 
candidates for the 1U29 varsity relay 
team are holding practice sessions daily 
at the Drill I bill. I'lms far the men have 
been drilled in preliminary wtirk to get 
them in condition for the winter meets. 
.\fter the ( hristmas recess the prospects 
will l)e given more strenuous wcnk on 
the boitrd track. Among the nun who 
have reiMirted are two lettermen from 
last ye.ir's team. Captain "Don" Davis 
'211 and "Pete" Rtjbertson '.{O. Others 
who are reporting daily are "Dick" 
Adams 'l2',t. Cordon Hunter '29, Frank 
White ';«). and "Charlie" Little ';{1. 

The schedule which h.is been recently 
announced is as follows: 

Feb. 2 B.A.A. Meet at Boston 

4 .Armory Meet at Springfield 
22 VV.I'.I. Meet at Worcester 



i;h I) 

212 

III 
ii:i 

102 
M 2.S 
Fll II 
Wedni'sdiiy, 

( ; 211. 2s 

(; And 

212 

Wll H 

II I 



( li.ni I 
( hem I 
llonif Ki 2.S 
Land <iard .~iO 
Musi. .V) 

WedneHday, 2-4 p. n» 



lli-l .Vl 
ll..rt .'.() 
.Math :*t 
I'nb Spk :a) 
.\k l''.d s.-. 
( hiin so 
M;ith 70 

10-12 a. m. 

I'hysiol ti;4 

I'oilll ■'*> 

H.ii I so 
lOnt S.". 



Fll { iv 1) 
I- II F 
MH H 

111 

:iHl 

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Ki.K : 

Mr. 



.Viwlir^ini 



Mt I'riii.r 
.Ml. Kan.l 



And, 2(1 

(i 2.S 

I I.I. II I 



I'hy.i. - .".<• 
Ak K. 71» 
An 1 1 lis "."» 
ICnt 7!t 
I'lori 7."> 



Thursday. Dec. 20. 7..SII-9..MI a. m. 



.M 2S 


;ii2 


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KH K 


I'l. H 


:i 1 c. 


Ml 


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Fll I 



I Ionic Kc I 
Mil I 
Mil J.-. 
.\k !•:« •">1 
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Pull Spk .">2 

Si Mil .">() 
.\k Kd 76 
M.ith 7.". 

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ll.ni 2.". 
c hi-in <'>1 
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Hot 7.') 



114 
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1 1(1 
1 II l> 

111 
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Thursday, 

111! 

I II F 
c ; 21 •> 
i;h li 

.{Hi 
(11 K 



Mil 7.'. 



.\Kron SI 
Ak KiiK S-7 
Fioii SCi 
llort MiKs SI 
Hon S-7 

10-12 a. m. 



.\K Opiiort S-l 
KnKS-1 
Ak Kuk S- 1 
Km S-l 
Hon S-'.» 



M H I) 

(; 2.S 

(; And 

102 

FH t 

FL M 

Fll II 



111 
Fll I) 

102 
KH K 
Fll II 



'.SC. .Although still a resident of I'ea- 
body, Mass.. Kichards B. Mackintosh 
atlvises that his home is at 1 1(» Central 
St., in that town. 

'S'.t Burt I.. Hart well, former director 
of the K. I. State .\gricultural Flxperi- 
ment Station, now resides at 2t) Rowe St., 
.Auburndale, Mass. 



Thursday, 1-3 p. m. 



Special 



A J. HASTINGS 



72 sheets of Fine Writing Paper 
with 50 Envelopes to match for 



69 



NEWSDKALER and 
.ST.\TIONER 



AMHERST. MASS. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAl.RKS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS READY TO WEAR 

AMHERST, MASS. 



l-t. n.h 1 KH K 

Fri-ni h 1 & 2."> 

ILL lit. 111. 110 
('.crinan 2 (1 .Viid. 2S 
(icrnian I ("» 26 

Friday, Dec. 21 

FnK 1 
Mr. .Anderson <". .\tul 
Mr. (kjUIIhtb 

G 26. 2H 
Mr. Patterson 102 
Mr. I'riiue 114 

Mr. Rand III. ILJ 



Remember vvc arc serving the finest 
food in our attractive shop. 

Special Siniday Night Suppers 

Just rciiuinhcr I>ctorc you go home to take a 1)().\ 
ot" chocolates. Page ^ Shaw, Cynthia Sweets or 
Lovell (5c C'ovel. 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 



Home Ec S-l 

Dairy S-l 
I'om S-.S 
WuCard S-l 

Poult S-.l 

.\K IV SO 
.\K K.I S2 
Hot .'lO, 7s 
li..v\ T'.t 
Home F. M 
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212 



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Flori S-l 
Ak EnK S-.*} 
IJairy S-2 
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Pom s:? 

7.!40-<».50 a. 

Pom S-l 
Pom S-7 
Poult S-l 
Hai t S-2 
An II us S-3 
Flori S-:t 
Hon S-4 
Pom S-4 
Poult S-7 



12 
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Fll I> 



Outing Club Members 

Get Riding Privileges 

.\rm Badges (iiven Out at Monthly 
Meeting of Outing Club 

The mcmtldy business meeting of the 
OutiuK Club, held at the Social I'nion 
Room last Thursday, was attended by 
over thirty members. The arm badjjes of 
membershij) were ^;i\en out at this time. 

Amonj; other thinj^s, it was announced 
that the Military Department had ex- 
tended ridinj; privile^'es to the Club mem- 
bers for parties up to twenty-one horses; 
and it was voted that President Walter 
K. Southwick should appoint the Winter 
Carnival Committee, before the January 
meeting;. 

Follow iuii the business meeting, i.au- 
rence A. Carrutli entertained with a few 
"tall" stories, and then .Mr. Williams led 
the group in singing, until time for the 
roasted marsh mallows. 

Next term there will be specially con- 
ducted hikes for those who wish to attain 
advanced membership. The report of the 
Committee on Rules for Advanced .Meni- 
bershii) is as follows: 
.A. The re(|uiremeiits shall be: 

1. Knowledge t)f the Mountain. 

a. Woodbury's Tr.iil. 

b. Sugar Trail. 

i . Long I'lains Trail 

d. Ca\es Trail. 

e. M.S.C.C.A. Cabin and 

Metawampe Club Cabin. 

f. Twti waterfalls and two good 

sources of drinking water. 

2. Ability to identify the principal 

landmarks seen from Mt. Toby. 
;{. .Attendance on an overnight trip to 
the Cabin, im which the candidates 
must demcmstrate their ability to 
liiiild a tire, icMik meals, and build 
sleeping (juarters. 
I. Knowledge of hrst aid. 
.">. Iwo half days spent on some con- 
structive Outing Club project. 
|{. The pri\ ileges open to achanied mem- 
bers shall be: 
1. They may wear the Outing Club pin. 
'2. They will recei\e credit in the Index 
for .ictive work in the Outing Club. 
.{. .Adv.mced members altme shall be 
eligible to represent the Club at 
lonventions. to act as guides on 
Mountain Day, and. in general, to 
assume the leadership in the Club. 
The Committee on Ceneral Policy shall 
apiMiint sue ll members as they see tit, to 
advancetl membership, who shall ser\e as 
examiners for all candid. ites on recjuire- 
ments 1, 2, .'{ and "i. Professor Curry -S. 
and Mrs. liicks shall be authorized to 
examine all candidates cm re(|uirements 
4 (First Aid). 

The Cabin is now equipj)ed with storm- 
tight windows and a cook-stove. Last 
Siiturday five men spent a cozy evening 
there, while the snow fell and froze out- 
side. 



There are 
Smiles and 
Smiles on 
Christmas 
Day. 

The forced 
smile of 
politeness- 
or the hearty 
smile of real 
pleasure 
that rewards 
the smart 
person who 
buys 
Gifts for a 

Man from a 
Mans Store. 

Carl K Bolter, 

Incorporated 

Exeter Amherst 

Hyantus 



Friday. 10-12 a. m. 

FL M Ak KnK .S-2 
Fll O Rnr Soc S-l 
Fll F 
Friday. I-.* p. m. 

1112 \i-K Card S-;< 

By .\rran)lement 

I'hys 7.") 
Poult SO 
Sex 7»). 79 
Span 7.J 

/f><)l •'>:'.. 7."> 



FH H 
FH F 

12 

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11(» 

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:{12 

102 
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FH D 



LANDSCAPE PLANTING 

NLRSERY STOCK 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter II. Harrison, Prop. 



Winter's Around The Corner 

.AVOID THE RUSH. Come in and get 
your Overshoes for this Winter. 

Sho« Repairing Department 
JOHN KOTOS SHOE STORE 



DRY CLEANING 



For Prompt Service Plione 828 



PRESSING 



'LET DAVE IK) IT" 



AMHERST CLEANERS & DYERS 



1 1 MAIN STREET 



NEXT TO TOWN HALL 



One Day Service on Dry Cleaning Wiirk Called for and Delivered Dally 

REPAIRING LAUNDRY DYEING 



VARSITY CLUB SMOKER 

On I'riday. Dec. 14, at S p. m., there 
will be held in the Memorial Biiildiiig a 
N'arsity Club Smoker tni .ill uc.ircis of 
the "M". The pm-i.c-e .it the niectiiii; 
is to get together as niaiu tmiiur or 
l»re ent M..\.C. athletes as possible to 
talk over reminiscences, policies, and 
future i)l.ins. Invitations have been sent 
out b\ CliaiUs R. MiCeoch and l'..irle 
S. Carpenter, ind it is hoiied that there 
will hi' .1 l.tiKC response among all the 
former M.iroon and White athletes, 
expecially those who are now located in 
the Connecticut X'allcy. 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



5l|g jJHBBarl^UBgttH Olnll^nttttt 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JAMARY 9, 1929 



Number 11 



FUNCTIONS OF COLLEGE OUTLINED BY 
PREXY IN DISCUSSING NAME CHANGE 



CAUTIONS SrUDENTS AGAINST 
ILL-ADVISED ACTION 

Kxpresses Sympiithy for Desire to 
Change tiie Name 

In his speech before the assembled 
^ludent body in Howker .\uditoriiim last 
Wednesday afternoon President Ko>-:coe 
\\ . Thatcher put forward this idea that 
ttie name ".Massiichusetts Agricultural 
college ' is in no way an erroneous desig- 
nation of this institution. In proof 
ttierecjf he mentioned the fact that Ci,")'^ 
(if the total activities of the college, in- 
(hiding the experiment station, exten- 
sion service, and similar divisions, is 
concerned with agricultural work. 

President Thatcher agreed that the 
question of a change in name is debatable 
froni the standpoint of teaching of 
collegiate grade as carried out at this 
institution. This question arises becaus<* 
llieie is a chance that the present name 
iiiiglit easily lead tcj an understanding 
that the majority of the teaching is 
n.irrowly professional or vocational in 
character. This is not the truth, however, 
and a complaint is justifiable on this 
basis. On the other hand, regarding the 
various other branches of the College, 
not one is hampered or hindered in any 
vsiy by the present designation of .Agri- 
(ultural Ccjilege. 

I'rcsident Thatcher drew statistics from 
lilt five divisions of the College, which 
are: (1) Resident teaching of collegiate 
Krade, (2; Resident teaching of short 
courses, (3) the experiment station, 
4 the extension service, and (.">) the 
c(;ntrol service in connection with the 
enforcement of regulatory laws concern- 
ing the sale of agricultural commodities 
The result of these figures shows that 
the work of the last four of these grcjupsi 
which makes up 58i of the activities of 
the College, is "wholly agricultural in its 
methods, pursuits, and results." This 
figure, plus that i)art of the collegiate 
(Continued on Pate 4) 

Etchings In 

Latest Display 

Excellent Kxliibition .Secured by 
Miss Margaret A. .Sullivan 



Smie of .•Xmeric.i's most distingiiishc-«| 
;irti>t«, have contributed to the collection 
"I titty American etchings which is now 
<'ii \iew in the soc iai rcjom of the Nb-mori.il 
huilding. This exhibition has been made 
lH>s.sible through the kindness of Miss 
•Margaret A. Sullivan, formerly of .-Xm- 
hir^t, now <jf the Macbeth tialleries in 
.New \ork City. 

I lie etchings arc extremely interesting 

••■ their variety of subject matter and 

treatment. There are bird studies by 

Irank \V. Hens«m, the "Portrait of an 

"I'i .Man" by Arthur \Vm. Heintzelman, 

^lii(h was the frontispiece in Harper's 

Miiiiihly for November i, some vastly 

"itriyiiing sea-s<-ai)es by Sears (i.dlagher. 

nufics in various jxises by Troy Kiimev 

'incl Warren l^avis, and dog pictures by 

•M(ir;;an Dennis. There is als<j a portrait 

"' Ihrbert Hoover by Samuel Theobald 

.'r '■!],- of Mary Baker Kddy by Krnest 

.md one of Josc-ph Conrad by 

't nitr Tittle. There are numerous other 

•ittr.irTivc pictures of all kinds to plea>e 

• i-te. Students and faculty .it 

ii.iy well count themselves fcjrtu- 

ii.i\iiig the opportunity to view 

■ k of contemporary .American 

- Ill this field. All of them are ex- 

'i.illy fine. Many students have 

"> a\ailcd themselves of the o|)])or- 

' sec and admire this v;'""''|' "' 

The exhibition is o|)en to 

ind will l)e held until J.ui. !.">. 



ILLUSTRATED LECTURE 

IN SOCIAL UNION 

Ciilbert McClurg (iives Interesting 
Lecture on the Subject. "Kly 
With .\Ie Above Pike's Peak" 

Social Union opened its entertainments 
for this term with an illustrated lecture 
by (.ilbert .McClurg, in Howker .Audi- 
torium la.st Friday evening before a com- 
paratively large audience. "Fly With 
Me .Above Pike's Peak" was the title of 
this interesting discourse, although the 
s|H'aker gave a considerable digression 
cm the history and practicability of 
aeronautics. 

•At the oi)ening of the i)rogram, Mr. J. 
Paul Williams, accompanied by Miss 
.Mildred Pierpcmt at the piano, sang 
"America the Beautiful." This hymn 
pro\ed to be very appropriate to the 
occasion. 

Mr. McClurg o|H'ned his lecture with 
a discussion of the advantages of air- 
I)lanes for travel and trans|)ortation. He 
presented many lantern slides which cer. 
tainly ga\e considerable foundation to 
his statements. He also informed the 
audience of the history of the develop- 
ment of air|)lanes from simple gliders tcj 
the |)resent giant triinotored construc- 
tions. He put forth what his conception 
cjf future tendenc-ies in aviation woulcl be- 
-Mr. .Mi-Clurg presented a "movie" of 
Pike's Peak and surrcmndings. Mcjst of 
the reel was taken from the air and gave 
'»ne a bird's-eye view of the beauty of 
the surrounding country, fdled with some 
of the most awe-inspiring wonders of 
nature. It showed |K'culiar rock forma- 
tions, winding highways over the moun- 
tains, and many other luring attractions 
which draw people from all over the world 
to that section of the country. Mr. 
.McClurg proved his keen interest in 
conquering the air and admiring the 
works of nature, and instilled in many o' 
those present the desire to do likewise. 



FOOT BALL AND CROSS 
COUNTRY'^M'' AWARDS 

Twenty-eight Receive Letters and 
(k>rtificutes 



Program Nearly Complete 
For Winter Carnival 

Student Co-operation and Snow- 
Needed to Put Day .\cross 

I he Outing Club has already dr.iwii iii> 
deliiiite plans for the Winter Carnival. 
Helore the war, an annual carnival w.is 
a campus tradition, and last ye.ir tin 
Club revived this custom with .i pro 
gram of snow and ice ic>nii>etitic)iis. 

I his year the carni\.il is to be c.uried 
out in a more extensive w.iy. The dale 
set is S.iturday, Janiiiiy l',>. If there is 
no snow then, it will be held on the first 
Saturday pos.sible theie.dter. The morn 
ing will be devotciW to snow events, in 
charge of Edward Ii. Nichols '2'.t. There 
will be ski and snowsluK' c ompetitions 
and a snowball fight all held at the ski 
slide and the field in front of it. .After 
luncheon, horses will be brought to the 
field, for the benefit of those who wish 
to try ski-joring. The skating events, in 
charge of Robley W. Nash '2\i, will t.ike 
place in the afternoMi, and will include 
comiK'titions and a hockey game. Coin- 
[K-titions for co-eds will be held, of cours«-, 
in connection with tlic-se snow and ice- 
events. There will also be a prize given 
for the cleverest snow in. m built during 
the clay. .And finally, if the snow comes 
in time, there will be a toboggan chute 
ready for use throughout the day. 

The Club would like to arrange for a 
meet, some time this season, with .i 
winter sports team from some other 
college, and the winner of the e\enls of 
the carnival will be eligible to represent 
M.A.C. in such a meet. So, while a crowd 
of spectators is desirable, it is hc)|K-d th.it 
a large number will gi\e up the side lines 
in order to join the coiniKlition. The 
c<jm|)lete program, together with ex- 
planations and announcements, will .ip 
pear in next week's Collegian. 



BASKETBALL UNDERWAY TONIGHT 

WITH FITCHBURG OPPOSING AGATES 



> i ANDI\(; PI RFORMANCi: 
OF THE WEEk 

'I rii liiu I 1j~'- i~ .iniong t hi- 

": the I'.illic .News, which 

• ■ i I ti'Tc tiirt\ million iK'()[)le. 

1 '■ --iiow 11 ,ii t lie .Xnilii r^l 

■•■!ll'jl!l . 



.As has been its custom for many years 
the- college thrcnigh its constituted .Ath- 
letic; Board has .igain passed juclgment 
uiKin the various members of the foot- 
ball squad. It selected the following as 
w-orthy to receive the coveted ".M". 

Dean Mac hnier made- the awards with 
the following commendation: "We appre- 
ci.ite deei)ly the spirit you dis[>layed both 
fhiring the j)ractice jjeriods. which are 
necessiirily more or less tedious and fre- 
<|uently discouraging ami in the sched- 
(Continued on Pajje .tj 

Maroon Key Mardi Gras 

To Be Held Soon 

(Committee Working to Run a Party 
Equal to Mardi (iras Held East Year 

.Among the interesting social events on 
the- campus in the near future is the 
Maroon Key Mardi ( iras. which is to be 
held in the Memorial Building on Satur- 
day, j.iiui ir\ 20. Costumes or formal 
(IiiiIk- .lie in ordc-r. This afT.iir will be 
till- M I iiiiil 'it its kiii'l gi\c-ii by the Maroon 
Ke\ , .iii'l the intention is to make it an 
annual event. 

Music is to be- furnishc-d i)y Irv (.uyer's 
f )ri lu'str.i. a well-knf)wn club which has 
li(( 11 -(■]{■( 1t-i| ti\ the committee. Tin^ 
committee is hea(|c(| by \\\iit()n K. 
Danglemeyer ';>1 and is < ()ni|Ki-.e<l as 
well of the following ^.eiinnnore-: II. 
Daniel Darling. Kich.ird \\ . h.ivis. 
Lawrence .\ I'l-ies. .\rnold W. OIsmmi, 
Hardy 1.. Walij^ren, 
r. 

;:' ;;i hcirm 



AGGIE REVUE HAS 

UNUSUAL PROGRAM 

.Movie of Aggie Life to be .Shown. 

Play and .Several Shorts Acts 

to be Presented 

Flveryone who .attends the Aggie Revue- 
next Friday evening is assured that they 
will witness an excee<lingly interesting 
and anmsing e-ntertainment . The pro- 
gram contains many interesting jH-r- 
formances and includes the talent of a 
large number of the "bright-lights" cif 
the campus. 

(Cunlinued on I'aite.t) 



w- 



Frederick S 
and Allen S 

Plans 1(11 • '..I fill . 

drawn ii;i i _ aiuuit! 

.iiuuniiK I'l more ' ;:!!> ne\i 

hoWCN I : it 

111* . T I ' • .. ' 



- ,:■ i mil be 
^' ... 1 , kets. 
|i!i; 111 \ 'il t In- 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

" //(-// ;s paved with f^ood intentions." 
Ho swell (Johnson) 

Wednesday 

.'{.Ii;') p. m. .Assembly: i<e-\ . .\1. J. 
.Ahern, S. J. Weston ("olli-ge-, "Is 
Science- a Cooel Will .'\nd)assad(>r 
for Ke-gliion." 
7 p. m. \arsit\ B.iskctball: 
Fitc hbing at -M.-A.C. 
i'hursday 

lilt erfr.it emit > Basketball: 
.S..{() p. m. i„iiiibda Chi Alpha vs. 

Thet.i Chi 
!).;{() p. 111. Alpha Sigma Phi \s. 
A. T. (.. 
7.<KI p. m. French Club .Meeting in 

.Memorial Building 
7.1.') |). III. Index Meeting in .Me-iii 

orial Building 
<■>..''.() p. m. liiterii;itie)nal Relation-. 
Club Meeting in (jrae:e Church 
Parish 
Interclass Hockey: 

Sophomores vs. Stockbridge 
Freshmen vs. Juniors 
Friday 

.Aggie Re vue 
Freshman B.isketball: 

.Arms .Ac adeiiiy at Shelburne lalls 
.Saturday 

\arsitv Basketball: 

Wes'leyaii it M.A.C. 
\ .irsit\- 1 1()( k(-> : 

llaiuilt'iii ,it (Hilton, .N. V. 
.Sunday 

'.I.IK) ,1. in. Sunday Chaixi: I'rnt 
H. .\l. J. Klein. Ir.inklin .md \I.ii 
shall College. L.tiu ,i-ter. I',i. 
Tuesday 

lilt erf raternity Basket b.il): 

S.liO |). 111. Sigm.i Pill Fpsildii \ •,. 

I a< ulty 
'.I .;n |i. m. Kapjia .Signi.i \ - 
Kappa l.psiloii 
Sim kbridgc I5,i-ketl)all: 



OPTIMISTIC OUTLOOK 

FOR HOCKEY TEAM 

Hamilton Will Probably Cross Sticks 
With Maroon and White Saturday 

.Ml hough only two letter men .iie- 
.iv.iil.ibU- for the lit2',t v.irsil\- Ikk ke> 
team, the l.irge- immbi-r of cmdid.iiis on 
the sipiad niakc-s the- outlook lor the 
se.isoii ai)|M',ir very promising. .Approxi 
m.iteU twe-nly-four e-.indid.ites .ire .it 
tending daily practice sessions under tlie- 
directiou of Coach "Red" Ball, and the 
c-oiiipt-iitioii for rc-gular be-rths on the 
sextet is unusually kee-n this si-ason. TTu- 
first g.ime of the winter will probably be 
I)l.iyi-el with Connc-( til III .Aggie- .il Slorrs, 
^ c)iin., Thinsd.iy provided th.it wc-,itlie-r 
conditions are favorable. This is .i iii-w- 
coiii(-r on the M.iriMm .md White- si hediile 
siiiic the- sport has re-cently been intro- 
duced at Storis. On January 11! the team 
wdl jounu-y t„ Clinton, N. V., to play 
• he strong JIaniilton College club. The 
probable line-up for the Bay Staters will 
consi.st of Frost '.H and Manty '.U at 
Ihe wings. D.ivis '.'{l at center, C.ipt.iin 
•N.ish 'L'c.» .md Bond '.{(» on the chtense, 
and .Myrick '.'U, go.d te-iide-r. A se-cond 
foru.ird line- ni.iy be- used consisting of 
'^iiger, W.ie-e liter, .md Pillsbiiry, .ill of the 
junior c l.iss. Patch '2\) a letter man, has 
been .disenl from pr.ictie:e for a fe-w days 
because- of illness, but it is possible tli.it 
he will see action in the- forward line 
during the first game. Other c .iiidid.ites 
who are out for the te-am are- Kiimc-y 
•md kllchpiisi of the e l.iss of 'li'.t; B.ibsoil, 
Hall, Hayes, .Swift, and Warren, of ';{(); 
•md B.irlse h, Cox, Him-s, Frase-r, Kooney, 
•md .S.il,iriius of the .sophomore class. 
Among these men are several very gcMKl 
i)rospe-e ts; thus, the first team is supplied 
with some encouraging material which 
maybe use-el to alternate- with the- re-gulars. 
Pr.ictice is being held daily and ganu-s 
are played eve-ry ehiy if the- concliiion of 
Ihe rink or jHiiid pe-rmits. With a little 
mr)re practice the team will lie ready for 
the- hard sc he-diih- which il confronts. 
However, the outlook seems bright and 
a successful hcKki-y season is aniii ipale-d. 



SE.\.SO\ I.DOkS FANORAHI.E 

i-ine-up in Opening (;ame Si ill 
.Soniewlial DoubltuI 

Allhough till,-,- iii„t string li.iskclb.dl 
pliiyeis have be-en out with sickness or 
'"juries diiiiiin the past week, il is ex- 
P<'t'-d lh.it thc-y will be ready to start 
'" the- opcnin^,' g.imc- of the- sc-.ison to- 
"i«ht with Fitchbmg Norm.d Sliool. 
'he prob.il)!,. sl.irliii^i lim-np will h.ivi- 
llelhi-nii^jton at left forward, Kelley, 
"ght forw.ird, Stanisiewski, center, Capt. 
l-llert, h-fi iiii.ird, and M.imi, right gii.ird. 
With but om- letlermau, l-Tlerl, on the 
tcanj. Coach "Kid" (iore and .Assistant 
^ "'ich "I. .my" Briggs have built up this 
strong te.nii, which should win a l.irge 
pe-reent.,^,. of its games this winler. 

I hose- who h.ive not be-e-n .ible to play 
'or .11 Ic.ist OIK- ,|av during; the- ji.ist we-ek 
•"e Hetlieiiii^;(,,n. Kelley, .md Stamsiew- 
^k'- "roinniy" lletherington has been 
'*"ck with grippe ,i( the- Infirm.uy. Ilow- 
••^••r, it is hoped that he- will be well 
«'><>ugh to play tonight. "Link" Kelley 
pulle-d .1 tendon in his feM)t during prac- 
I'ce- .md vvas imt in uniform for .several 
days. He- lesiiiiu-d pr.iclici- .S.iturd.iy 
"ighl, .md will de)ubtless start against 
litchbuiK. "-Sl.in" St.misie-wski had a 
flight lold whiih kept him out of pr.ic-- 
tice one day. 

Inliiisive- pr.icliei- w.is held ejii Friilay 
and Saturday after ' hn.ds". and also 
since the men eame b.uk on Dee ember .11. 
'■rom one to three workouts have bei-n 
held ilaily, and h.ivi- consistc-d ni.iinly of 
olbnsive- .mil defensive pl.iys, with some 
attenijon on shooting and drill on funda- 
menl.ijs. Se-ve-r.d serimm.igi-s li.ive- been 
held, iiic liidiii^' ^..iiiM.s with the- Ireshmen 
and with Amherst High StheKil. A few 
alumni, who were hiMip stars at M.A.C. in 
past seasons have been back to watch 
the team practice. "Roly" Reed, captain 
and forward, and "Blondy" Thomas, 
leiiler, both of last ye.ii "s eliib, "Herb" 
(CJonllnued im I'uite 4) 



t 



FRAT HOOPSTERS OPEN 
SEASON THURSDAY 



Distinctive Jerseys for Kach Frater- 
nity learn T bis Year 

Fraternity basketball opens on I hurs 
day night. J.iniiary 10, with l..iiiibd.i (hi 
.Ali)h.i playing Theta Chi, and .Alj.h.i 
Sigma Phi meeting A.T.ti. As in former 
years, the- tournament will be rlivide-d 
into two It-agues, with the champions of 
e-ac h league me<-ting in the fin.ils on 
.March .'). (iames this ye.ir will not be- 
split up by h.ilf eif ihe second game- biing 
pl.iyed belwi-en the halves of the- first 
(Cftntlnued on Piifte .<) 



Relay Team Has 
Several Contests 

.Season's Outhmk Not Too Promising 



Norl haiiiiiT'ii 



M \( 



Freshman Basketeers 

Play First Game Soon 

.Arms Academy .Scheduled to Kub 
With Frosb Friday Night 

Co.u h "l.arry" Briggs' freshman basket- 
ball team, which meets its first opi)oiient 
in .Arms Academy at Shelburne- l.ills 
next Friday night, has, during the pre- 
se.isoii practice, been sh.ipiiig up f.nrly 
well from the- a\ailable initerial. The- 
te.iiii whidi will piob.ibly sl.irt in this 
game- cciHsists of Wilson and Tikofski, 
forwards, l-f)skeft, eente-r, and Foley and 
Connell, ^uard-. John J. loley has been 
(-Ice ted ea()tain of the (|uiiitet. This 
.Amherst player has gaine-d experie-iid- 
|)laying with the St. Bridgit's tt-am. 

I'r.etiie before (.'hristm;!. .nel n. . 

tin licsiinning of the secoii'l l.ini ii.i-. 

UK liKJed shooting (»r,icti(e ,ind dnll mi 

tiind.im! iitals. .\ l.iir olfeii^e li.i^ li<>ii 

' .' d and niiK h time has been -|« iit 



'lefeir.e, with f:i\'or.i! 



Under the guielanec ot t o.k h Derby 
intense- practice- for the v.irsily relay 
e.indid.ites is being held daily on the 
bo.ird tr.K k. The lack of veterans makes 
the- season's outlook not loo promising. 
However, there are ap|)roxiiiialely ten 
men re|)orting each d.iy. .Among these 
men arc- Captain "Don" Davis '2U and 
"Pete" K«)berlson '-'{O, who have- tie-e-n 
doing very good work. 

On J.muary 2ii the le.iiii will compete 
in the William C. Proiit .Memorial dames 
at the Boston darelen. The .MarexJii and 
While- (jppone-nl has ne)t been named, but 
in |);ist years the Boston University relay 
team has always c <)iii|H-ted .igainst the 
valley club. On lebriiary 2 the- B..A..A. 
.Mee-t will be- he-hl in Boston with Coach 
Derb\ 's team running against .Amherst 
aii'l < <)lb>- in ,1 triangular r.ice-. The team 
will rim .igainst the .Springfield College 
f|u.irtei .It the .Armory .Meet to be held 
lebriiary '.K 

As in ])nst years there- will be an oj)iK)r. 
timily for men to i ompele in events other 
111. Ill the ril.iy at Iwo of the- meets. .At 
the .Armory .Meet se\<r.il e\e-tils will be 
open to p.irticipant s linni this College, 
ancl on Febrii.iry 2J the- .mmiai indeKir 
meet with W.P.I, will be- held at Worcester. 
Training for all canelidat«;s who wish to 
f.ike part in these- meets is now being held 
'iaily in the Drill Hall. It furnishes a 
u.'xkI opportunity for the spring track 
< .indi(|at«-s to get |irelimin.iry |)rae"tie:c as 
u<il .1- v.ilii.ible ex|M.-rieiii <-. 

I or til' l.isf tttfi ve.ii^ tin- Woii' 



I.. ! 
I'.,r 

t IIIK 

Te. I 



1 1 1 . 1 1 1 . 1 ., I i\ 

'i\\ |)>jint- 

w It hoiit 

.d.tc 



tu beat 

IlLir-kjill 

doubt, 



-,1(1 
t he- 
ll h 
the 



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thi.-^ will 


. : 


111- 


i-, 


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Tlionipx 


111 


iie 


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iwlev 



to furnish imich 

III lie- W I' I.- 



.\|. 



' lool 
I lilin. 



Till MASSACIIUSK'ITS ClOLLlXilAN. WEDNKSDAY, JANUARY 0, 192<» 



THE MASSACmiSE'lTS COLl.K(;iAN, WIDNESDAY, JAM ARY '». I«I2<> 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN I we want, ami it mi.ains K. »,\viiin tlx'si 

111 (oiitrril ol our COlU-^ji- iiitu liiu-. 



Oftitial ntws|«|)cr of tlu- Ma^sat liUhetts. 
AKii< iiituial C(;ll<^:v'. I'uljli>h.d ivciy 
WidiiiMlay by Ihi- htiidnits, 

HOAKl) OF LDITOHS 



Smkpi-hy Clbaves "29 
EdwahdH Nichols "29 



l',<lili)riii( liief 
Managini; Ivlitur 



UII'AKTMKNT EUnt)RS 
Editorial SHhii.KVli.KAVKs;'J9 

Feature MAK<iAKin 1'. IKinovan .to 

Aliitm.i& Short Courses Sai lv K liKAm.fcV _.il 

'^*" l-NANICT DoK.I.ASS'lil 

Pamnua John H. H<iWAkl> JK "10 

KlAI. S. I'm IKK jK '•'•• 
( )M AK MaK'.'II IN "■>- 



Bt'SINKSS OKI'AKTMKNT 

rasnillilcK I>. TllAYEk. Jk. 'Hi* lUisin -iS Manarr 

• • " '• " AdvcrtisinK Manauei 

Lawren'CE a. rAtmiiTH "29 ( in-iilaiion ManaK'-r 

WiNlMKiii' «;. Smiim '30 

JciHN R. Tank '30 

RoliKKI C, CnnDNOW. '31 

IJAMl' M. Nas'IN •11 

I'Ai I. A. SMI rii "M 
F. KiNsi.Y Wiuin M "U 



&• 



Subsciii)tinns f2.00 per year. Sinn c 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, subscriber 
will please notify the bubincss mananer 
as soon as possible^ 

Ent<*ren a» necond-clauM mntttr at the Ainherst 
Po«t Office. Accepted for ninilinK at special rate 
of postage provided for in section 1 10.<. Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917, authorized AuRUst 20. 191K. 



WHERE DO WE STAND? 

Knowinj; that these words will not be 
read until after what promises to be an 
all important meeting of the board of 
trustees of the institution, we are, never- 
theless, Koinn to venture a few general 
comments on the situation of the cani- 
paJKii for rhan«inK the name of the 
(■oiiem-. KeKardless of the action of the 
trustees in the matter, we slioulil all ha\e 
a rather definite ide.i of every aspect of 
the situation. In the little space allowed 
us here, we shall endeavor to discuss the 
affair in a logical way. 

ill the first place, those numbers of the 
student bo<ly who sinned the petition 
which was circulated attached their 
names to a statement which any number 
of youiin alumni, and we may reasonably 
expect many tif the older alumni, would 
have sit;ned. It was a statement that 
had no explanation as to its tlestination 
included with it, liut merely indicated the 
positive stand that a vast majority of 
the four-year students take on the 
(juestion. The si^ninn of the petition as 
t was worded did not necessiirily commit 
the advocates of the movement for 
channinn the name of the College to any 
causi- other than that stated in writing. 

Of course, a petititm is no ^ood unk-s^ 
it has a destin.ition whiih will insure it a 
fair hearing. To whom tlid the petition 
we signed j^o? It is on this jniint tli.it s<> 
m.iny discninim ies in reasoiiiiiu .ip- 
pearetl. but it has tiii.ilU settled down t«j 
that fact th.il the board of trustees have 
bv now formally received the petition. 
Their disposition of it is nalur.illy un- 
known, but in the event of their possible 
favorable action on the paper, we still 
ha\e to combat the unfavorable publicity 
that tloodetl the newspapers during 
vacation time with what prove now to be 
misconstrued facts, colored by reporter^ 
and editorial writers. To the greater mass 
of people, these articles will not carry 
much weight, but to those who have an 
interest in the College and understand 
how it is constituted, the facts as tlies 
read them will be im|)ortant. We can 
at least be suie that e\er\ tiling h.is 
settled into a rej'ular t liamiel now that 
the trustees' nieetiiiK is over, but in the 
event of their acceptance of the petition, 
there must be a clearinn up of the facts 
which have been so muddled b\ the 
newspaiiers. 

In spile of all th.il li.i> hci ii s.iid on the 
subjtct, we lia\e still to decide win I her 
we cm Mii'iiort both the president of the 
College and the four stiidints who 
assumed the responsibilit\ of jiiesentiii^ 
the sij^natures to a responsible jHrson. or 
whitlnr we must jump fnnii the feme 
onto one side or the othir. If in no other 
w.i\. a student bod\ is moralU' bound to 
stand beliiiifl it- ri-coRnizeil administra- 
tive leader, but in our presmt -itu.itioii 
we face a dilVii iilt tpiistion tdi him Icidrr 
has iioi (oiiiniiui-d liini'-dl to ii- nn \\iv 
subject. Slr.ii(llt> iuii;lll |(ili(iv\ Miildiv , 



Whether or imt we < in do that remains 
to be seen, and although there are some 
• isixits of the situation that call for local 
« riticism, the cause is too ^reat to foster 
lietty tlifferences. Co-o|)eratioii is the 
only thinn that will ever put the project 
a( ross, and we must all be ready to push 
forward at the ri^ht time. The outcome 
will be in«lirate<l ^<)nlewllat by tlu' action 
of the trustees, and we must leave our 
subject here until their decision is avail- 
able. 

WHY I AM A Lllil KAI " 

Those of us who knew and remember 
the ('olU^;e's former president, lulward 
.M. Lewis, will never forget his pleas for 
tfilerance that were made so often and so 
forcefully to the student body when 
assembled for < liapel or assembly. We 
were always made to realize that toler- 
ance is a trait which invariably needs 
cultivation, and which has an un- 
tpiestionable value. 

This is esiHcially true in a college stu- 
dent body where jietty dilTerences are 
over-rated and misunderstandinKS are 
easily created. Friction of this kind 
ennenders a lack of co-operation toward 
« ommon ends and tends to inhibit what 
niinht well be worthwhile friendships. 
Kather than assume the responsibilities 
of preaihin>4 ourselves we have called on 
HrowninK for the first New Year's sermon 
which has tolerance for its subject. I'.acli 
one of us can profitably incorporate in 
his attitude toward his associates the 
poet's philosophy which prompted him 
to answer the nuestion, "Why am I a 
liberal?" thus: 

" Why?' lie-cause all I haply can and do. 
All that I am now, all 1 hope to be, 
W heiicf comes it save from fortune settini.; 

free 
Hodv and soul the puriwise to pursue, 
( .od'tiac eel for both? If fetters not a few, 
Of prejudice, convention, fall from me, 
Thcsc' shall I bid mc-n each in his decree 
Also Cod- Kuidecl bear and ^ayly too? 



0? 





STOCKBRIDGE 



Hut little do or can the best of us: 
That little is achieved throuuh Liberty. 
Whc , then, d.ires hold, emancipated thus 
His fellow shall continue bound? Not I, 
Who live, love-, labor freely, nor eliscuss 
.•\ brother's ri^ht to freechim. 'I hat is 
Why'." 

sopnoMoiu: competition 

.Members of the class of \Wi\ will have 
their last chance to eibtain a iMisition on 
the editorial board of the CollrsiKi", this 
term. I'articulars concerning the com- 
petition have been pul>lisheel in a recent 
issue and anyone interestetl in partaking 
should st-e Shepley ("leaves as schiii as 
possible, or report at the Collrfiiun otiice 
immedi.itely after assc-mbly next Wed- 
nesday. 

SONG LEADER 

Three candid.ites have reported for the 
c.ill lor SOUK leader. 1 hey are Robert 
(',. (".iKxInow ';;t>, Henry W. Jensen ':;(», 
and Don t". Tilfany "M. These men will 
eomiK-te at the basketball names durini; 
I his term and will \x elected at the end 
of the term. Anyone- else who is inter- 
esteel in this competition should confer 
with Shepley fleaves as stKin as possible. 

Inspiring Sermon Given 
By Rev. Arthur Kinsolving 

Life and Work »)f Alexander Barttn 
Euhigi/ed 



but til. 'I '- 

tin-, w 

!■" '' ■ ' ' 

e III ii I ' ' 

wli.it t; 
actuallv (i - 
minor re a-' 

We IHI'J 



"il'iiii the case-, 
not suffsestiii 



In •;,i\ ini; 

th.it I lie 

' !ir lour >eit - 

li.ixe our 

': 'dTere-nces in 

ml ui.il liu\ 

Will ,1- I iL hei 



.\ very imiiressive sermon was delivered 
Sunday by the Keveiend Arthur Lee 
Kinsolving, pastor of (.race Church. 
.\niherst. Me spoke of the life and work 
of .\le.\ander Barton, one time Rhodes 
scholar at Oxford and an inspiring leader 
of Christianity. 15arton feiunde-d missions 
in the slums of London and relieved in 
v.irious ways the- misery he found existing 
the-re. lie w,i- .i tliorough sportsman, a 
good athlete-, and a true christian in 
every sense of the word, spending Ins lite- 
in aiding others, and clyin;..; .it la^t, while 
still young, from blood jioiscmiiig. 

Reverend Kinsolving was. himself, a 
Rhode-s sehol.ir. and knew Bartcm inti- 
in,ihi> ..t I Moid. Ik; has been active in 
ciuntli woik in .XmhcT-t for five years 
lie is interested \ ei \ nnic h in voiing 
lieople, and is now in c ii.nne of reli;4ioiis 
,irf.iir> .it -Anil I I -t folic-i;e. 



I I,' 



with tin- (11m iission. Imt u (loi> not sc cm 
worth while. We vliiilcnls know wh.it 



Campus OeDrls 

Prexy Says 

"If your nose is close 

To the grindstcjiie rough 
And you hold it down 

'Ihere long enough 
In time yeju'll say 

There's no such thing 
As brooks that babble 
.'\nd birds that sing. 
These- three will all 

Your world compose 
Just you, the stone, and 
Your darned old nose!" 

^ Con mil Life 

CI) 

Intercollegiate 

Co-eds at Minnesota s|)end more than 

*.")()0 weekly on chewing gum. according 

to campus store keeiH-rs. They state 

that over 1(».(KX) packages are sold every 

week of which half have the flavor of 

pe]i|)erniint. 

The Wrigley family works overtime in 

this case. 

CD 

Lawrence House, the newly built 
Y.M.C.A. recreational center of New York 
University, was form.illy opened Oct. l.'L 
CI) 

Twenty-three states are represt-nted in 

the freshman class of .\ntiocli College. 
CI) 
Dartmouth lost to the Vermont co-ed 
debaters on the success of co-education. 
The decision was unanimous. 

Interesting! 

CD 

Joe Found That 

Fannie Krosh says: "From my first 
term in college. I know that every pro- 
noun should be preet-ded by forty light 
years with a catalytic agent followed by 
the s<iuare of the first plus the sub- 
junctive and the niemsoon winds." 

CD 

Fannie also adds that you should not 
worry if your graeles aren't so gcHMJ this 
term because everything is marked down 
after Christmas. 

CD 

The New Year slid in, eh what? 

CD 
An Aggie man's description of his first 
walk up the hill to classes after the holi- 
davs: 

"I slide. I slip. 1 f.ill - 
Kerplunk, that's all!" 
iThe s;ime jK-rformance can be re- 
peated anv number of times, i 
-CD- 
Well, well, well,— the rush is cii ag.iin! 

CD 

If the S.P.C.A. were present last week. 
wh.it coulil they have done for poor 
"I'al" in his frozt-n st.ite? 
C\) 
Speaking of horses, some dignified senior 
has just come through with the fact that 
he comes from a uni<iue town. Etymol- 
ogy involved: 

I. "I'nus" means "one." 
'2. "I-lepius' means "horse." 
;{. Therefore "unique" means "one- 
horse." 

- CD 

Where are the snows of "year Ijefore 
yesteryear?" 

CD 

The library seems to have gained th.it 
much-talkeel-of "'overnight i)o|)ularity.' 
I'pon investigation we found that the 
sophomore class was the chief cause. 
(1) 
Have- voii a little cold in your licid? 

CD 
Forw.ird with the .inmi.il iii.iiiifestation 
of -Xggie's talent heretofore hidden until 
Friday night! Are we really going to see 
the "Movie?" 

Ccl.i SiilVit 



Stockbridge Haskeiball Schedule 

Jan. H Hopkins .Academy, here 

I.") .Ncjrthaiuptoii High, here 

'22 Arms .\iadeiiiy. here- 

2'.t South Deerheld High, here 

Feb. 1 New Salem .Ac.idemy, here 

Ii C lark School, there 

') Northampton Coium.. here 

7 Sacred Heart, here 

21 Turners I'alls High, here 

2i> Smith .Aggie, here 



COMMUNICATIONS 



Probable Lineup for Hopkins (iame 

Stoekbridge st.irts its season by play- 
ing Hoiikins Academy in the Drill Hall 
on Jan. S. The- prosincts of the game are 
cpiite fair in the opinion ot Coach Hall. 
Although the boys have only been work- 
ing together for a little over a week, 
they show good spirit and increasing 
betterment in form and should hold their 
own against Hopkins. Tuesday night. 

The probable lineui) will be: Fletcher, 
If; Bower, rf; Frost, c, Morrill, rg; Chace 
or Shats, Ig. Other men, working hard 
cjn the sepiad, are: Coyle, lleywcKid, Hill, 
Mayo, Oksiinen, Parkensaii, Sarris, Stone, 
and Swain. Hulbert is manager of the 
team this year, while Taft is a canelidate 
for the position of assistant manager. 

There is a possibility of games with 
Holyoke and Pittsfield away from home, 
which will complete e|uite an extensive 
Schedule for the Stoekbridge basketeers. 

Hockey 

With IH Stoekbridge Schexjl htxkey 
candidates rejMirting daily to Coach 
"Chick" McC.eoch the prospects for a 
successful season appear exceedingly 
bright this winter. The sthedule has 
not yet been completed so the team has 
been holding regular practice sessions 
with the Varsity s<piad. Anwng the men 
reiKirting are six veterans who had ex- 
perience em last year's team. These men 
include Captain C.raf, Hoyt, Winthrop, 
Brown, Kyberse, (iillis, and Stevens. 
Last season C.raf and Hoyt worked in 
combination at wing and center respec- 
tively. They have had a year's exi)erience 
together and have shown some good work 
this seasem. The cither candidates for the 
team arc Wing. Baumer, William Brown, 
Cahlwell, Durkin, Filbrick, Hall, Hastings, 
Lewis, and I'.irks. 



Ralph !•:. Stone. Jr.. Stcnk 
bridge '2\K clie-d at the Beverly 
Hospital, Beverly. Mass., on 
December 20, 192S, fohowing a 
long illness. 



CLASS MKIi INC; 

The ' ' ■-- "t '.n lieM .1 -li..it nm lin^ 
.ttiei \ I,;-l W I ' .\i' -'\a\ II 1 ill I ult 

ii|)uM llii "I llie nonini.il in;.; 

I oiinnit t< e. 111! -nul.iix > report w,l^ 
re.id .mil the nitinhci'- ol the coininittee 
weir (!,.'-< 11 li\ the i hi-.'-. llio-<' .ip 

pointed wen: LdiiuiiHi L. I lo-t. Noiiium 
Mvrick, and J.mie s J . Woods. 



notic:k 

Tr\oijt> lor the junior I'lom Show 
.It M' Hiori.il Building at 7.:;i' o'rioek 
on Wednesd.iv . J.iiui.irv It',. I r, -iiiuc'ii 
,irc- eligible ,mcl are- iirgi il to Ik prex iit. 
.\n\one who i-~ interested in tiirtliir iii- 
lornialion should see Riissil W. 
W bitten 'l'M. 



OITINC; Cl.tB notks 

The next meeting of tlu- Club will be 
Thursday evening at 7.;5I). in the Soci.il 
I'nion Room. North College. The (irin- 
cipal business will be concerning the 
cemiing Winter Carnival. Examination 
cards will also be- given out at this time 
to all wishing to attain advanc-eel mem- 
bership eluring this college year. 

1 he- Club is now listed as a member of 
the .New F.ngland Trails Conlereiue. an 
organization working for the common 
interests and welfare of Outing and 
Mountain Clubs throughout New Flnglancl 
Tlu- hike last Saturday proved quite 
an exhilarating affair, since progress on 
the icv trails consisted of slipping and 
sliding rather than walking. The hot 
cocoa and marshmallows at the cabin 
were ver\ welcome-. 

The schedule for the rest of the term 
is as follows: 

Jan. \2 Long Plains Trail to M..A.C. 
Outing Club Cabin, returning 
by Woodbury's Trail. 
P.t \\ inter Carnival. 
21) Mt. Tobv Falls and the Sugar 
Trail. 
Feb. :> Steak Roast .it M..\C'. Out in;.; 
Club Cabin, returning by Melt.i- 
wampee Cabin .iiid Bridle I'atli. 
If) Open date. 
L'J ■_':; Overnight Xr\\> to Mount 
Monadnoc k. 
M.u . 'J Mt. Toby Cavc-s. 
Ill Open eiate. 

INROLLMtNT HCI RES 

In the 1U2!» Ceillege Cat.ilogue vvhiih 
is to ni.iki its .ijipc.irnnic in a few ela\s 
the loiiowing fiKiires wiil ,ipi>ear regardim; 
the eiuoUment ol st talents ,it the end ot 
tlic til 'I term: 



Tlie ( ii:it-,ii.in .nxciit^ no ie-i>oii^il)iUty for oi)iii 
ioiii voiced in 'Tlu- For.jiii." It aim< to serve .. 
a Mieins ol liivinK exi)re-i ion to stiKleiit oi)iiiio:i, 
anil will t)rint any views expres'^'J rationally ai: 
■sanely. iinU-ss tlie c-ililors fi-el that tliey aie jii>' 
lii.il in suppressinK ilicin because of unfair pi- . 
wmal attack. Coniinunii.uti(>ns must bi- limile'l ■ j 
jUO words. 

A NAMELESS COLLEGE 

To the Editor of the Collegian: 

.\eeorcliiig to the President's speech on 
January 2, there are five department- 
making up the Massachusetts Agricultui. 
College. If the President is correct, tl. 
n.ime .Massachusetts .Agricultural Colle^;( 
doe-s not ajiply to a collegi.ite college d 
any sort. The state collegiate college in 
the town of Amherst, then, all must 
agree, is a part of the Massachusetts 
.Agricultural College. 

Carrying this reasoning a little farther, 
we must say that the four-year course at 
M..\.C. has no real name at all except 
[Kjssibly a primitive one — the four-year 
or collegiate course at M.-A.C. The ex- 
tension department has the name Massa 
chusetts Extensicm Service; the exjH-ri- 
nient station has the name Massachusetts 
FLxperiment Station; the two-year course, 
a jiart of the short course division, h.is 
the name Stoekbridge Schex)l of Agricul- 
ture. However, the four-year course has 
no such name! 

What should we four-year students 
want? If the graduates of the Stcjek- 
bridge SchcMil <jf .Agriculture are also 
gr.iduatesol M..\.C. as much as the b)ur- 
year graduates, the four-year students 
.md graduate-s should in some way be 
dilierentiated from the two-year or any 
short-course students or graduates apart 
from their certificates of graduation. By 
such differentiation there is no reason fciJ 
considering collegiate students in any 
way superior tt) short-course students. 
There should be just the correct differen- 
tiation in name! 

What name should we want? If tlic 
wliole institution cannot be called the- 
.Massiichust-lts State College and if the 
four-year graduates cannot call them- 
sc-lves the only graduates of Massiichu- 
st-tts State College or even of Mass.ic hii- 
st-tts Agricultural College, then certainly 
there should be an appropriate name for 
the four-year course Massiichusetts 
State College or some other suitable 
name. If we five hundred students liave 
not the right to that representative name 
then the twei hundreel or more two-year 
students, enrolled in a part of the short 
course, have not the right to the name- 
Stoekbridge School of .Agriculture. Also, 
the- M.iss.ie luisetts llxteiision Service and 
the Massjichust-tts ExjK-riment Station 
should lose their names and beioim' 
simply the extension service and tin- 
experiment station at M..A.C. If tlu^ 
names remain, erne more must be addeil 
the Massachusetts State College or sonit- 
thing as appropriate, representing the 
four-year collegiate course as it re.illy 
exists today. The student body of tlu- 
lour-year course at M..A.C. should hf 
come the student body of Massiuhusetts 
State College or ejf a place eif some >iii li 
appropriate name, whether that name It- 
applied to the whe>le institution or to tlu' 
cejllegiate course- alone. 

Roger S. Tourte-lloi '-"' 



C7</.^.^■ 


.1.', n 


11 


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7, ■;,;.' 


l'.t2^t 


Si! 




_•' 


KC, 


I '.>:;(! 


mo 




» 1 


vi: 


l'.":;i 


lit 




:'4 


\\s 


VXVl 


170 




-IS 


z\s 


Sptei.ils 


1 




O 


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I'O 




i:;4 


cm 


< .1, III, Lite -r'liool 


lO 




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,S(I 


Stoekbridge 


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Ten-week school 








.._ 



To the Ivditor of the Collegian: 

The Western Massachusetts Basket- 
ball Coaches Club wishes to thank the 
basketball team of tlu- Stockbrukr 
School for its interest and co-oiH-raticin 
displayed at the Club's first smoker an J 
get-together held December 17 in tlu' 

Drill Hall. 

I.awrc-nce l-L. Firiggs. 



C:OLLEC;iAN ELECTIONS 

The editorial staff of the ti/zVi;/ 
chosen two lu w freshmen memlje 
the result of its competition held 
term, lluse selections are made on 
basis of \Mirk < i>mi>lete-d by the frc -i 
.As .1 result ol till- - !i-i lion, t ".n 
neopiiytes have been elected t" 
l'.o.ird. These are Oscar Margo 
Newtoiuilk- and Fr.ink I.. Sprin.. 
.Ailin^'.on. They took uj) their diit 
the -latt at the beginning f)f this 1 
The lni~incss dcpartiiK nr Ii;i> .li-' 
-,iM( ;.Mi 1 i',:' to their luimlier. 1 
men iicni tiie .-ophomore c-l;iss '■ ■- • ■ 
elected to ti.c dc-partment. I' 
N.ison. ot Me.lford; Paul A. >" 
Maiden; ami I. Kinsley Whitn. 
Springtie!d have- been taken on : 
busine ss ^t.ill . 



i.i-t 



■/7//.V //KI-.K O.W.r I.IM-ilS Oil EKS CtjKDi Rn) TKOt SI-:/<^, liKEECII l:S o K.\li;KI:US l\ sl\ Mil lOl.ORS 

PRICES Till. S.Vri'RD.W NIGHT ONLY: S6.00 CORDUROYS, NOW $-,M: S.S.OO CORDt KOVS. NOW S4..S0 

yniR I'.iiK IS RE.iDY i-vR Yoc. LANDIS—QPEN EVENINGS m v xmi nn s.n a i/o.x/.r. 



BASS MOCCASINS 

Men and Women Hand Sewed Waterproof 

The very best for Winter Sport wear 

$4 to $i6 pair 

according to style 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 

SOLE DISTRIBUTORS FOR AMHERST 



ARTIST MATERIALS 

PAINTS WATER COLOR BLOCKS 

PASTELS CHARCOAL PAPER 

DRAWING PENCILS FIXITIF 

ALL KINDS OF MEMO PADS FOR THE NEW YEAR 



JAMES A. LOWELL 



BOOKSELLER 



"IVl" AWARDS 
(Continued from I'aftc 1) 

iiled contests when \ou were willing to 
j;i\e every ounce for the honor and f.iir 
n.iine of the College. \'ou aecpiitted 
vourselves creditably and we were as 
|iriiiicl of you in defeat as in \ictory. As 
President of the Athletic Moard I am 
.ititliorized to award you this certificate 
which enrolls your name anions that 
honored K^oup of NLA.C. varsit>' men 
.ind entitles you to all the rights and 
|iii\ iU-KCS which belong to the wearers of 

tiir"M". 

FootbaU. C'apt. Robert L. IJowie '29. 
.M.maKcr Harold S. .Adams '29, Adclbert 
<iix ';i(). Lucius .A. Howard ','{(). Herman 
k. \Linnuson "M). Henry 11. True ';itl. 
.Murray B. Hicks '.tl. Philip W. Kimball 
Ml, Thomas E. Minkstein '.{1. Donald 
\. Davis '29. Seniors: Andrew Coukos, 
( .trleton C. Richardson, John A. Sulli- 
\ 111 Previous rewards have been made 
tu: I loyd K. Hra.kle-y '20. Robert (". 
Keltcn '29. Kenneth V. McKittrick '29, 
T.iylor M. Mills '29, liolesiaw Nitkiewiez 
:".". Paul K. Plumer '29. Charles L. 
Ualkden '29, Fred C. Kllert ':{(). and 
K .\ S. Mann '.{(1. 

(Iross (Country, ('apt. Carl A. Herman 
'■I'.K llolton S. Pease- '29. Robert S. Snell 
."'. 1 rank T. White ao. and John W . 
Mi'iiickian '.'SI. .A certificate was Ki\cii 
to Richard .A. Hernan 'MO. 



Smart Stationery ' 

in Note or Letter Size to 
help you acknowledge : 
thcjse Christmas (iifts. 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 

THE 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Offers Expert Hair Cutting 
Service for Men and Women. 

"POP- DUWELL, Prop. MEMORIAL BUILDING 

College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH 
Keg. Fharm. 

AMllLRST, - - MAS.S. 



FR.AIERMTY BASKETBALL 

(Continued from I'afte I) 

Kame. but two nanie-s will be- played each 
iiinht, one at S.;{() .uid the other at 9.;«»- 
A new team in competition this year wil 
represent the faculty. A feature this 
year will be special jerseys for eat li 
fraternity in the fraternity colors. I'n- 
less "Larry" Mrijjus or "Kay" Smith is 
notified at least one day in ailvanee-, .i 
team f.iilin^; to reiMirt at the- time- sc he-cl- 
uUcI will birfeit the name. 

The schedule which has been arranged 
by Kaymond F. Smith, tournament 
manager, is as follows: 

Jan. 1(1 H.:i() L.C.A. vs. T.C. 
9..i(l A.S.P. vs. A.T.t;. 
b") H.:{(( S.P.I-:, vs. Faculty 

9.:i0 K.S. vs. k.f:. 

If. K.:{<» T.C". vs. g.T.V. 

9.:{(> A.(;.K. vs. I). PA. 

IS K.:{() A.T.t.. vs. P.S.K. 

9.:i() k.f:. vs. K.K. 

2:5 X:M) L.C.A. vs. Non-frat. 

9.:4() A.S.P. vs. Faculty 

29 K.:{(l S.P.F:. vs. A.t.K. 

9..«l K.K. vs. (J.T.\ . 

:j(t H.:{(t K.K. vs. Nem-frat. 

9.:i() A.T.C. vs. D.I'.A. 

:u s.:{(i A.S.P. vs. S.I'.K. 

9.:i() T.C. vs. K.S. 

Feb. .■) H.:>() L.f.A. vs. K.f:. 

9.;{0 A.t.k. vs. Faculty 

('. S.:{(» P.S.K. vs. I). P. A. 

9.:i<> K.S. vs. n.T.\ . 

S K.:;(t K.K. vs. Nem-lrat. 

9.:{(l A.T.Ci. vs. S.P.K. 

12 x.:i(t D.P.A. vs. Faculty 

9.:{() T.C. vs. K.K. 



ASK FOR 

" Munsingwear" 

RAYON and SILK 

Bloomers - Step-ins - Vests 

Slips - Bandeau - Pajamas 

Night Robes 



SOLD ONLY AI TIUS STORE 

G. Edward Fisher 



Amherst Shoe Repair Co. 

Master Shoe Rehuifders 
"^fXl TO BOLLLSSHOE STORL 



TYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Remington, Royal 

and Corona Sales and Service 

Radio Kqulrnient CA-ni-rul Ki-pair Shop 

II. E. DAVID 

35 Pleasant .St . ju»i below PC. Amherst 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

Oculictts' Prestriptlons Filleel. liroken lennes 
urcurati-ly repturt-d 

BUi DE.N AI.AR.M CLOCKS and othrr 
re-hat>le makes 

3 PLEASANT .STRKET. fup one flifthf) 



Best in Drug Store .Service 
Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co. 



Ml SICAL CLIBS NOTICL 

1 he .Miisic.d Club manane-me-nl .in 
nounces the lollowiiiK sehe-diile. It is 
imdcrslood that members of the- club will 
be a\ail.ible lor .ill of tlusc- d.ites e-xc epi 
as spe-ei.d arraii^cmeiils .ire- m.idc- in 
advaiue with the co.uh. It is linilur 
understood tli.it the- m.m.inenienl will 
confine- itself to the- cl.ites indic-.ili-d 
except as the clubs m.iy .i^re-e- to spe-eilic- 
bcMikiiiKS outside-. 
Jan. U lluKoke 
IS ll.idlev 
24 Ashlield 
2f. 

•'{•• I- lorcnce- 
Fe-b. C. 
•S 
12 

l."> C.impus 
19 
2(t 
27 
M.ir. 9 

Personnel .Men Visit Campus 

Mr. \crnoii \\ . (looch. spt-cial repre 
sent.it ive- of the I'nitcd Fruit Comp.iny 
visited ilii- Colle-ne- Monday .iiicl Tuesday. 
Dec-. 17 and IS for the piir|His(- of inte-r- 
\iewinn se-niors, both four-year and 
StiH-kbridnc School, who mi^ht be- in 
lere-ste-d in becoming .ilhli.ited with his 
coni()any. .Appointments were made 
tlirouv;h Mr. (irayson. l-rom time- to 
time- re-preseiitati\es ol other eomp.inies. 
such as the Anier. Tel. & Tel., Standard 
Oil Comp.my, W. T. Craiit cS: Company, 
will visit the Colle-ne- for the- s.ime jiurpose-. 
St-niors intere-sled in se-curiiiK interviews 
with these men should enroll with Mi 
Crayson at the Placement Oftiee-. 

INTERN.VnONAL RELATIONS 

The- International Kelatioiis Club h.is 
chosen the ( irace Church Parish Mouse- 
as the place for ihi-ir ne-xt mi-etinn, 
lominn Thursday e-veiiinn, at (i.:!(l, J.iii. 
Id. This is to be- a sen i.d ^;.il he-rinn, with 
a dinne-r and a social pro^r.im in pros|H-e t 
for those- who .iitencl. ;\stlie- pronr.im for 
the evening is in the hands of Const.mline 
Continued on Pa|te4) 



I.5 


.s.;!0 


L.C.A. vs. K.S. 




9.;;(i 


A.(..K. vs. P.S.K. 


14 


H.;{(t 


A. 1.(1. vs. l-'aculty 




9..{(l 


T.C. vs. Non-frat. 


IM 


.s.:{(( 


K.S. vs. K.K. 




9.;{(i 


S.P.K. vs. P.S.K. 


2<l 


.s.;{(» 


A.S.P. vs. A.<..K. 




9..S0 


L.C.A. vs. O.T.V. 


21 


K.;«i 


O.T.\ . vs. K.K. 




9.:i(i 


P.S.K. vs F.I. nil V 


2b 


K.;;(» 


A.S.P. vs. D.P.A. 




9..!(» 


K.S. vs. Non-frat. 


27 


K.:i9 


L.( A. vs. K.K. 




9.;i(» 


A.T.(.. vs. A.t.K. 


2.S 


K.;!() 


A.S.P vs. P.S.K. 




9.:!() 


(J.T.\ . vs. .Non lr.it. 


.Mar. 1 


.s.;i(( 


T.C. vs. k.i:. 




9.:j(» 


S.P.K. vs. D.P.A. 


.1 


K.:{() 


Finals 



Town Hall Theater S 

y M;ilin<-«-s S-.m I.M'nines i,AS :intl K:tll Q 



I luirsday-i ridas . .Ian. 10-11 

THE PERFECT CRIME 

II ///; Olivf Hrook i> Irrne Ktch 
Crrepirr lluni "Jhe Hut", SptHikirr 
than "I'hr Coritln" , more 7 hrtllini^ 

Ilia n" J lie i'ltl and Canary". 

I hi iiiilliin'linK m\ Irr; dnimn nl Ihi \nir 

M:\VS C(>.\f/J>y 

.Saturday, Jan. 12 

Double Feature Rei^ular Prices 

THE DANGER RIDER 

II lieii Jiiiiit (iilnoii mid lii.\ :',U wild 
nditiv, nnclioys aren't fhillhif^ you 
',i.itli llirilli llicy arc steumtnn you uf) 
'i.ttli fun. AND Junior Ctn'hhni m 

MARKED MONEY 

A romance (if Love — Money- Hrnvi 

.\fin — ('ro'i.-'- and a filnriotts In'lil 

Wednesday, January 16 

Raxiiiiitid Smarro Ki-nrr Adonr lu 

FORBIDDEN HOIRS 

A romanUi itiui ■•■tirnni^ tiih o\ tiif 
tragedy thai stalks in the shadmv of 

the tliK'iHr. " Mrii Hvr's" si ir ai'ain. 



SING LEE HAND I.AUNPRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

kri'.\IKIN<. AM) Ml. KIND.S OK 

wasiiim; imi.sk .\t rka.sonahi.k 

PRICt.S. 
f)ur Laundry First c;l;iss 

Our PolU-y r;uarante.fd 
.\tXT TO Till. Tf)W.\ HAII. 



STARTING THE NEW YEAR RIGHT! 

20 Discount on Suits and Overcoats 

N "IIP (li.iiue- |(» |»uy .1 ;.;i)()(l M|i| e »i (O.il ,i( .i |(,\\ piiic . 

Light corduroy trousers, now $4.00 

$1.50 neckwear, now $1.15 

$1.00 neckwear, now 79c 

R M. rilOMPSON & SON 

CLOTHES FOR COLLEGK MKN FOR NKARI Y I ll-TY YEARS 



AC:c;iE REVIEW PROr.RAM 

(ConUnufd fruni I'aUe I) 

.\nion^ these e\e-iits. the- principal one 
will III- the movie. ".'\v;nie Men .Xie- 
(■athere-d," which, as the upiM-re lassnie-n 
will rt-call, was filmed on this campus 
three- ye-.irs at,'o. The stars who feature 
in this picture are Neil C. Uobinson '2S. 
Robert L. Fox '2S, and Miriam 11. Muss 
"29. 

This movie is merely a depiction of life 
on tlu- .Annie- campus and oiinlit to be- 
e-spec i.dly interesting from tli.it point of 
\ ie-w. The agricultural side of it is l)\ no 
means l.ic Linn, f'lr, in one- sce-m-. Uobinson 
is seen tenderly e.ire-ssinn .1 bull. This 
nolc-cl .Annie actor shows his usual ex 
cpiisite .ibilily in dram.itic pre-sc-nt.ilion. 
lox .ilso clis|)l.iys his tale-nt in this pro 
dm lion and aiiyom- who can recall his 
ac tinn ill stane pc-rform.inc es will be- onh 
IcKi ple-ase-d to aniin witness his ability. 
.Miss lliiss' Ice hiiicpie-. tcMi, is up to its 
usual «-xe«-llency and as one of Annie's 
fore-most actresse-s of rece-iit years she- 
will ill IK) sin.ill iiie-,isiire- .iclcl intere-st to 
I he pic t lire-. 

Professor Frank P. R.ind anel Neil C. 
Robinson have the honor of be-iiin,the 
sccii.irio write-rs of this movie-, it w.is 
ilireeted by Profe-ssor Rand, and photo 
nraplied by Rone-r S. Chamberlain '27 
and U illiani I. < •oodwiii. 

"The .S<juire." a one act play, from t he- 
story by F-lsie Sinnmaster, dramati/.ed by 
Arnolcl W. I )yi-r '29, will also be- .in im 
portant fe-ature- in the pronram. Tlie- 
.iiithor wrote this play as a part of 
Professor Pattersein's e-oursi- durinn sum- 
mer SI li(M)l last year, and it was so popii 
l.ir then that it w.is di-cidi-d to n<^e the 
whole student body .111 op|M>rtunity to 
wilni--^ this n-,ill\ notiuoi t li\ di.iin.itii 



Winter FoDtwear 

for all occasions 

DRESS 

CAMPUS 

SPORTWEAR 

at Special Prices 

this month 

Thomas S. Childs 

INCOKPOKATKO 

275 High St., Holyoke, Mass. 



production. |)\e-r t.ike-s .1 le.iilinn part 
and llioiciiinhly exhibits his rem.irk.ible 
se-iise- of dram.itic silualions. The- play 
is eo.ic he-d by Prole-ssor P.itlerson. 

The e-.ist of ch.ir.ii te-rs will be- .is 
follows: 

Sepiire, a eouiitrv l.iwve-r 

Mr. Il.iiold VV Sm.irt 
I'.lder < lit/, e-xpl.iiiis the- lommnnits 

Mr ( ii-orni- I- . Pusln-e 

• iret.i, .1 hired n''l 

Pauline- .A. Spie-w.ik "M 
Siila Myers, a yoiiiin bride- 
Luc \ .A. ( ■rimw.ilt '.'{O 
Adam .Mye-rs. her liiisb.ind 

Arnold VV. Dver '2<.> 
Sallv Hull. Siil.i's mother 

lailh I'ack.ird •2«.» 
Mari.i .Myers, .Adam's mot her 

Ikiii- ll.irtlitt "29 
1st Wom.iii ( .iMiiit.i K. Sarne-nl '29 

Aiiionn other events which will be- pu- 
se-nled will be- .1 liil.irioiis perform.ince by 
.Myriek's Melodious .Minslri-ls who will 
h.irnioiii/e- their h.irmonic.is fi»r the- e-difi- 
c.ltion of the- public . Also. Miss Mildre-d 
Iwiss '."{2 will ente-rl.iin tlu- .ludieme- 
Ihroiinh her ri-ailinn ability. 

Faiiorv D. Mmni-ss "29 h.is romi<h'<l up 
nine- ol t he- loieiiiost music ni.iki-rs on tlie- 

• ampiis to constitute- "The Anniv.ilors." 
I lii-si- peppy music i. Ills will put on wmie 

re.tl sn.ipp\ milndie s under the- coiidui tioii 
of Osi.ir F. liiirbank '.{II. whose rliylh 
metie iiiti-i pret.it ion of "j.i//" is superb. 
Kussi-ll R. Whitteii is .sl.ine- m.in.inir 
of this alT.iir and li.is eonside-r.ible- re- 
spoiisibilitv . The- arr.inn«nie-iit of 1 he- 
pionram is under the- immi-ili.iti- su|>«-r- 
\isioii of Leon.trd VV. Morrison 'Jil, Miss 
Jane- P.itters.)n '2\\. .in.l Russell R. 
Whit ten 'I".!. 

'IX Miss Marnaret K. Illni.in is ciii- 
Iiloved .IS .1 see ii-t.iry at VValerlord, N.Y. 



{ 



A 



MH ER S 

theater 



T 



Wednesday, Jan. '» 

5 KEiiti mmm acis & 

ON 11 IK SCRKKN 

.M.irc cliiii D.i\ iV \c, 1 111,111 Ticv.ii ill 

RESTLESS YOUTH 

( \l< IMON I'AI III \l US 



Ihurs. & Fri., Jan. Ill and II 

kl< 11 \kl) l!.\l< Nil I All SS IM 

SCARLET SEAS 

with 15c It y ( ompson. For sl.irk dram.i ; 
loi liti. ill the r.iw ; for he man love ami 

.idveiitiiri-, nolhinn lil<c it has 
ever bi(.u ^cre.'nc d. 

2 Kei I ( (iiiii d\ l'..i.iiin)unl .\i w^ 

Saturday, January 12 

|.i' k I I'lll ill /.111. ( ,ii.\ ' \i,\( I 

THE AVALANCHE 

Willi I'.ii l.inov.i. ,A hair tn.'ner dr.im.i 
■ .I I lie Koi ki( - with ,111 -III 1' li inn < lim i\ 
2 Kl.l I ( ().\||.|)\- I'M III-. \IA\S 

|MondayA( ruesday,Jan. H-LS 

\l M i Will I I, Mi 

NAUGHTY BABY 

2 kill < . ^\ll,l»^ \i ws 



.4i>lHERST FRirr STORE 

VVm.KI- AGGiL MFN Ml IT 

Win N IX)W.\ TOWN 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGARS 



a\\oun(:i:mi:m 

.Now situated at LS 1-2 Pleasant St. 
EXCKLLENl SHOE REPAIRERS 

V. (.ia>.\lK)M( (), I ',,,[,. 



A carton of 60 **A" Mackintosh apples makes an ideal present. We pack and ship them 
for you at prices consistent with the market. New College Store, **M" Building 



> 1 33VS oaD A 






c. Li:. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1929 



w-e-l-c-o-m-p: b-a-c-k 

YOU II ILL FIMD // FILL LL\K Of SP./LDL\C, EQUIPMENT .IT THE ''HOUSE OF IVALSir 
BI UK STREAK SKATES SHIN GUARDS TOM HOWARD STICKS GLOVES OFFICIAL BASKETBALLS 



CO-KDS (;iVK FIRSr CONCIKI 

KnttrtainiiiK anuiiKl Iwo Imiidnd iiuiii 
hiTs of tlic I'.xtcnsioii Sir vice of Massii- 
( luisiiis oil Wrdiicsday fvi-nin;;, Di-r. !<<, 
at Memorial lUiildiiiK. was tlio initial 
foat of till- (.ills (.Ui- Clul) tliis st-asoii. 
Till- |)rov;raiii prcstiitcd was as follows: 
"WluM 'Iwili^ilil Sli.itluw> l)i(|)<n" 
"I l,o\r Voii Truly" 
"Cai liiiro and !■ imiiiiiunali" 
\\\ till- ('horns 
V't-ra Wriulit "•'>'-, pianist 
Sil.dion from ()i«ia "Sampson and 
Dililali" and "l.a Iraviata" 

l.lfanor Caldwtll 'li'.t with dann.-t 
Ruth Srotl ':n at the piano 
Ri-adinji: "Katrina's Visit to Now York" 
by Mildrt'd Twiss ':{2 

'"I'hc Swan" 

"Karl llaldon's Daughter" 

luitiri- Chorus 

"SoiiKS My Motlur lauKht Me" 

"Caruiina" . . , 

l'.v the Douhle Trio consistmK ol 

(.uila llawlev -".», Alice Joluison 2M, 

I..m Cordon ';U , Kathleen Km^■ .51. 

Kuth S«ott ';51. \era \Vri^;ht ':i2, 

rianist, Anna Parsons "Xl 

'1 he Dame "Cavotte" 

by lldith iiertensliaw 'JO 

and Alice Chapin 'J'.t 
Vera VNri^ht ':VJ, pianist 
"Do. in Ye Cry Ma Honey" 
"Alma Mater" 

Hy the Chorus 

iJy the exeelleiit leadership of < >uila 
llawley "L^'J and with Mary Kane "29 as 
niananer. the rlub put forth a fine show- 
ing. A letter of appreciation and eon- 
gratiilation to the (.iris Clee Club m 
monnition of this |)erforniance has been 
received from Mr. Willard Munson, 
iJireclor of Kxtension Work in Mass;i- 
eliuselts. 

INTKRCl.ASS BASKETBALL 

Final standing of the teams: 

C,.rs.- »»<"' ^'^' 

Seniors ^ 

Juniors '^ ., 

Soi)homores ' ' ij o 

l-reslimen ' ' ' ' "i "\ 

Sfiiior S.S.A. • • • • , 4 

Frc-slimen S.S.A. ...» 
Iliuli seorers: 

Juniors 

Paksiirian -i'^ ^"•it"«' }-* 

Bernard I'J Stevenson !•> 

.S'«/)/i(>wi(>rc.v 

Minkstein :«> Kimball 2\ 

Kane Ul Davis 1< 

.V..S..1 . Seniors 

Fleming -i'y l^olden '2<» 

Fletcher M 

IW conipletins a most successful season 
of an undefeated team, the juniors cap- 
tured the class championship, which was 
held .lurin|4 the p.ist two weeks. Kach 
te.im played five Kanies; one with each 
of the- aspiring" Ic-ams. 

Fleming of S.S.A. was the individual 
hij-h scorer, netting :>.") |K)ints for tin- 
senior team of that school. 

INTERNATIONAI. RELATIONS 

(ConlinuiHi from Piiftp .«) 
1'. 1 adas, everyone is assured ol .i k<mi(1 

time. 

The followinv; week a meetinu will be 
held at which the speaker will be Dr. 
C.ec;rKe K. ( .ane. lie will speak on his 
obsiTvations of the conditions in Furope. 
especially Itah. with interesting dis- 
cu^•■!llns cm Mussolini. 



BASKEI BALL STARTS TONKiHT 

iCoiiiliiuvtJ from I'^iii! I) 

C.raysoii 'liti, and Farl Weilierwax '2-1, 
who came <»iit from Ohio, were- four of 
the members of a team which one day 
j^crimmaKed with the varsity. "Hank" 
(.owdy '22, captain of the '2l-'22 team, 
.ilso was around .md R-i^x- some helpful 
sunnc-stions. 

With all of thc> first team in the name, 
a fast and smcwnhly playing; tiuintel will 
be I 111 tlK•(^<>orllll1i^>llt Captain "I'rc'ddie" 
IJlert, allhounh but a junior, is an ex- 
perienced and clever player. He formerly 
played with the .Mohawks of Holyoke, 
and was the cjiily letterman wh<J did not 
j^raduate last June. A forward last year, 
he has been shifted to running guard for 
this winter. "Link" Kelley, a senior, is 
starting his first year in varsity conqK'- 
tition. This former Dalton HiKl> ^lUi'^cl 
is playing forward this year. Fairing up 
with Kelley in the forward court will l>e 
•'Tommy" Hetherington. As former cap- 
tain of Adams High's quintet and as a 
substitute forward last year, he has de- 
\eloped an accurate eye which will help 
the team considerably this winter. At 
center, Leon Stanisiewski ':{() is also 
starting his first year of varsity play. 
This local player has had some experience 
in outside basketball, and combines his 
height with a gcxjd eye, especially under 
the basket. "Kay" Mann, another 
D.ilton player, will be in the back court 
with i:ilert. He was a substitute guard 
last year and is cajUain of next fall s 
football eleven. Kllert, Hetherington, 
and Maun were members of the undefeated 
freshman basketball team of the class of 

For the seccjnd combiiiaticm, Hurbank 
and Webber are forwards. C oukos, 
center, and Hernard, Davis, and I licks 
are the guard possibilities. Coukos and 
VNebber are si-niors, starting their third 
>ear on the varsity squad. Coukos can 
play either at center or forward, and 
Webber either at forward or guard, 
iiurbank was a member of the IWO fresh- 
man team, and was a reserve forward last 
>ear. Davis, center on last year's fresh- 
man team, may be utilized at forward, 
center, or guard, while Bernard ';}(), and 
Hicks ':ii, are on the varsity squad for 
the first time. 

This squad of hoopsters has been prac- 
ticing since before Thanksgiving, and has 
develoi>ed into an outfit with great 
IKjssibilities. Coach "Kid" Core hoiH-s 
to approach the records of the 1921, '22. 
•2."), and '20 teams. In the past four 
seasons, Massiichusetts teams have won 
.W games out of .")5 starts, and it is ex- 
pected that this year's team will at least 
uphold this record and probably be above 
the average Massachusetts team. Chances 
to see how the team lcK)ks in action will 
be .dYorded tonight against Fitchburg. 
and SaUird.u night ag.iinsl Wesleyan. 




K. R. Ravmoth '04. lives at <>.'!2.'j 
Kenwood Ave.. Chicago. 111., and teaches 
hortic ulture in the Chicago high sc1uk)Is. 



$6.00 DRAWING SET $4.00 

Drawing Boards. T Squares. Triangles. Pencils and Erasers 

A J. HASTINGS "''''^^Z:-' AMHERST, MASS. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Dl.M.KRS IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



READY TO WEAR 



AMHERST, NL\SS. 



When down Town visit our 
Store for Lunch, Dinner or 
Refreshments. 

Spiciul Siifiddy Nig/it Suppers 

Sams Restaurant or College Candy Kitchen 






L 



I'atlie .News recently had a represeiila- 
live on campus to photograph the co-ed 
riding class. This picture appears this 
evening at the Amherst Theatre. It is 
said (hat over one third cjf the total 
population of this country will view this 
pic ture. 

both the Varsity and K.O.T.C. rifle 
teams are rapidly coming into shape for 
the matches to be fired this term. The 
veterans of last year's varsity team are: 
Chesley L. black '2'.>, Kenneth F. Mc- 
Kittrick '2t», last year's captain, Taylor 
M. .Mills •2<», John B. Zielinski '2«l, 
Robert L. .\rmstrong ';J(). Herbert A. 
(ioodell "M, Hermon U. (ioodell ':«), 
John b. Howard '.!(), and Laurence W. 
Spooner '.'50. 

The co-ed rifle team also has some 
matches this term. There are eight on 
schedule now and there are hopes of more 
to follow. 

The complete schedule of all teams to 
date follows: 

Varsity Schedule 
Week ending January !'.»: 

I'niversity of North Dakota 

C.ettysburg College 

Fiiiversity of .Maine 

Ohio State Univer.sity 

Louisiana State I'niversity 

Week ending January 2ti: 

Kemper Military .\cade.iiy 

I'niversity of Wyoming 

Kansiis State Agric. College 

Worcester Polytechnic; Institute 

Louisiana State Cniversity 

I'niversity of I'orto Kico 
Week ending February 2: 

.Michigan State College 

Oregon State College 

Mississippi .'\. & M. College 

I'niversity of Dayton 

Virginia .\. & M. College 

Week ending February 0: 

Culver Military Academy 

.•\mherst College 

Cniversity of Delaware 

Rhode Island State College 

Texas Military Institute 

Dei'auw I'niversity 

.•Mien Military Academy 

\irginia Military .Academy 
Week ending February 1(1: 

Cniversity of Illinois 

Wentworth Military Academy 

( ".eorgetow n Cniversity 

Washington University 

boston I'niversity 
Week ending February 2.L 

.\. & M. College of Texas 

I'niversity of Pittsburg 

Week endiiivAIarch 2: 
Williams Vollege 
.Agric. College of Ctah 

Week ending March !»: 

New ^■ork Military .Academy 
Davidson College 
Cornell I'niversity 
University of X'ermont 
Connecticut .\gric. College 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
Howard Cniversity 
Johns Hopkins Cniversity 
West Virginia Cniversity 
Okl.ihom.i .\. & M. College 
Knox College 

R.O.T.C:. Schedule 

Week ending January 2ti: 

I'niversity of Washington 
Week ending February 2: 

Rutgers Cniversity 

University of Tennessee 
We-ek emliiig February Ui: 

University of .Alabama 

University of Cincinnati 

Week ending February 2;>: 

University of Nevada 
Week encling March 2: 

Universitv of Tennessee 

S)iith D.i'kot.i State College 
Week ending Marc ;h '.»: 

Indiitna University 

I lemson .Agric. College 

Western Maryland College 

Also: 

First Corps .\re>a Intercollegiate match 
Wiiliam R.mdolph He.irst m.itch 
We men's Schedule 

Wei k ending January 2(5: 

IViinsylvania State College 

K.m>as St.ite .Ai;ric. College 

Northwestern University 

Michigan Si.ite College 
Week ending February lt'>: 

Cornell University 

Oklahoma A. & M. College 

UniverMiv of Californi.i 
Week ending M.in h 2: 

Universitv "I \\tiiiont 
Otli.r ii.iK iu ■- jjcnding. 

'IStV '21 ri.ivel M. CilTord. tor sev- 
eral vears principal of Smith .Ac.idemy. 
H.itfielcl. .Mass.. is now located at M.iy 
u.ird High School in the same capacity. 
• Don" I eiit '21 is also at Mavnard High 
ascoac-h .mil i,ni;lt> m.m.e^er (it .itlilct ii -^ 



. 



PREXV DLSCCSSES NA.ME CHANCE 

(Continued (rum I'ujit; I; 

work c»f the institution concerneil with 
the teaching of agricultural practices, is 
increased to 7.')'^. F-'rom this point of 
\iew it is obvious that there is no mis- 
nomer. These figures are based on the 
ijistribution of e-xpenditure and of faculty 
to each of the five fields. By far the 
largest group was that of the resident 
teaching of collegiate grade, which used 
12'i' of the total funds available, and 4:{'i 
of the total jirofessional workers. 

As to the names adopted by the vari- 
ous state institutions he stated that in 
4."{ states the land-grant institutions are 
called state universities; there are five 
state colleges, nine state agricultural 
colleges, and three state polytechnic 
institutes. Thus it may be seen that 
there is a tendency for institutions bear- 
ing the word ".Agricultural" in their 
name-s to be in a decided mincjrity. 

"Is there now a need for a change in 
the name of this College?" was the next 
question asked. From the viewpoint of 
the present-day function, taking into 
consideration the experiment station and 
allied divisions, there is no need. From 
any other viewjKjint the <iuestion was 
left unanswered by the speaker. 

The President stressed the jH»int that 
the present name is the original name 
and that everybody going here is entitled 
to use that name. .Also everybody going 
here is a member of the institution. The 
member ejf one branch of the College 
represents only his branch. Thus a mem- 
ber of the .Sttxkbridge sihool cannot 
play on any four-year team. Therefore 
if a s|)ecial name were to be applied the 
two-year students could not legally use 
this name. 

A further point brought out was the 
fact that the committee of four students 
who presented the petition to the Ciover- 
iior did so without authority . This might 
easily cause dithculties to arise, said 
President Thatcher. .As a result of this 
meeting the alumni have asked two 
questions. The first of these is, "D<x;s 
the student boely supitort the president 
or is it opjxiscd to him?" The second is, 
"Are the students embarked on a cam- 
paign which will tend to jeopardize the 
new building fund?" President Thatcher 
stated that he had assured the alumni of 
his complete belief that the student body 
would show common sense in all their 
undertakings. 

The President mentioned the fact that 
there is at present being carried out a 
nation-wide survey of all land-grant in- 
stituticjns, to be completed in liKJO. This 
survey, he s;ud, will try to eleterininc the 
future policies for these institutions, anei 
thus it is best to wait until the comple- 
tion of this work before going on with 
this movement. 



The Fame of 
the Name 
Guarantees 
Satisfaction. 

Judging clothes 
before you buy them 
is like judging a 
check before you 
cash it. You must 
be guided largely by 
the reputation 
behind it. 

All the more reason 
for choosing your 
clothes and 
furnishings from 
among our large 
and varied stock, 

Carl H. Bolter, 

Intorporatid 

Exeter Amherst 

Hyantus 



LANDSCAPE PLANTING 

NURSERY STOCK 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter H. Harrison, Prop. 
Winter's Around The Corner 

.AVOID THE RUSH. Come in and got 
your Overshoes for this Winter. 

Shoe Repairing Department 
JOHN FOTOS SHOE STORE 



DRY CLEANING 



PRESSLNG 



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Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1929 



Number 12 



Movie And Play Feature In 

Successful Aggie Revue 



ANNU.AL C.AM PUS SHOW PROVIDES 

INTERE.STING PROGRAM 

TO MANY STUDENTS 



i'riniary among the sorial attractions 
(it tin- last week was the A^jgie l<i\ ue, 
prrsenteci in Howker .Auditorium last 
Kriil.iy e\eninK. This Kevue. untler the 
iiiiiitit>n of the Roister Doisters, ^i\t's 
tli,,>f in the student body who ha\f 
III. lit the chance of usin^; it. Leonard 
\\ . Morrison 'liU, president of the Roister 
poisters, was master of ceremonies and 
his witty intrcxiuctions and snappy com- 
iiKiits upon the pres^-ntations ^am- a 
liiinicrous side to the program. 

Norman Myrick "M, and his band of 
li.iriiionica artists, under the name of 
il.ippy Day llarmoni/ers," gave several 
elections comptjsed of cleverly picked 
liiniliar tunes. They took instances of 
prominent days and played tunt-s repre- 
-«-nting periods during the day. 

A reading by Mildreil Twiss ".i'2 fol- 
lovM'd. "The Suffragette's Speech," a 
' ttrrible" tirade against men, was lur 
ofitring. Donning the typical dress, 
manners and speech of the woman sutlra- 
^ettc, she appeared before the audience 
anil delivered a dununciation of the 
npp()>ite sex, stating that the women 
-hoiild not let the men dominate them, 
liut that they should dominate the men. 
Ttii> reading was spirited and cleverly 

ilollf. 

llif .\ggievators," an orchestra under 
tilt directifm of Kmory D. lUirgess ''2\) 
<.i\e a collection of ])ieccs interspersed 
rtith specialty numbers. \"era Wright ".)2 
-iMk Smny Hoy" and Lmory D. lUirgess 
.Kill Birger J. I<uth)ui.st 'Jl> ga\e a dra 
iii.iii/.ition of the s;ime piece, with Rud- 
i|iii-t in the interesting role of "Sonny." 
kuiiquist made a lajiful as "Sjnny," to 



the least and he was a source 
Continued on l'aiie4> 



ol 



IKATLRMIY PLLIK;I:S 

lli<)>o pledging fraternities this term 

iv .IS follows: 

'.'. /. V. ClitTord R. loskett ■;;J. 

I'ht Si^ma Kappa Harmon O. .Nelson. 
Ir. ■.•;!. 

K'^ppii Sigma- John J. I(ilcy "•'<-. Robt. 
C. * lunness '^iJ. 

>iiiiiia J'lii Epsilon James L. hell '.(2, 
Kinneth K. llo<lge ':\2, Walter S. Utley 
■''1. I lans L. \ an Leer ".V2. 

Alpha .SigwKJ J'hi Richard A. Eldridge 
• iv 

Mpha Gamma /</«> Nathan S. Hale 
•i-'. Curtis (i. Keyes '.Vl, Nusret ( >. 
Maniuqui "^'2. 

Kappa t.pstlon Jerom J. (iarvey ".V2> 
Thomas P. O'Connor ';J2, Richard A. 
Rowley '32. 



Students Appear 
Before Trustees 

H\i Representatives Present Under- 
jiraduate Viewpoints On (Question 
of Changing the Name 

•^s one further step in the develop- 
n.tnts concerning a change of name of 
'(lis College, five students from the four- 
Mar student body were present at a 
meeting of the Trustees of the College 
ficl'l last Wednesday morning in Boston. 
" this time they presented a series of 
•Tguments in favor of such a change as 
"♦■tn from the students' view|X)int. Those 
^ho appeared at this meeting were 
i^'iinis .M. Crowley '29. John W. Devine 
-' \Mliiam B. Robertson '2*>. Henry 
^'* It risen '.H), and Lauri S. Ronka 'M. 
■•' result of this meeting, as is tohl 
■'■■ u;.. It her article in this issue, was that 
[ 'ill' niatter is deferred until the comple- 
'•'^n in 19;{U of the National Survey of 
'-''ncl '.rant Colleges. 



OL I STANDING PERFORMANCE 
OF THE WEEK 



li' this form we send our "card" to 
i'^-'' i'atterson •2«» for her unselfish 
^''fK in attaining such excellent re- 
"^ults in the production of ".^ggie Men 
"• ' -athered." 



MILITARY MAJORS WORK 
TO MAKE BALL SUCCESS 

Program Includes .Several Attractive 
Features. Large Croud Anticipated 

I'lans for the Annual Military Hall 
which is to be held on Friday night. 
Iebruar\ H, are fast materializing. Over 
light y couples have already signed for 
the unique affair and it is hoped that the 
number may reach l.'MI before the night 
of the dance. 

Tickets fur the B.dl .ire being h.indlnl 
l)\ Cadet Capt. Kvan C. Ridi.irdsoii I'it 
and are now on h.ind. They may In- 
obtained from the following meinbtrs of 
the Ball Committee: Boleslaw .Nitkiewic/ 
'-'!♦, Paul R. IMumer '29. Evan C. Richard- 
son '29, John S. W.MMJbury '2\K Prescott 
D. ^oung "ix.t, Carl .\. Bergan '.•{(), and 
Charles B. Cox '.{(». The price of the 
li<kets is $2.(K) per couple. Freshmen 
and so|)hoinores in the Military Depart- 
ment may purchase two tickets apiece 
while juniors and .si'ni<»rs are allowed 
three each. 

Chaperons for the girls from Smith .md 
HoKoke have been chosen and are as 
follows: from Smith, Mrs. M.iry 1'. 
Ingle of the Washburn House; from Mt. 
HoKoke, .Miss S.ira M. Stinclifjeld of 
1 Brigham Lane. ( iirls should be notiticd 
t<i get in touch with these cluiperons as 
sotjn as |>ossible. 

(Continued on PuUe.t) 

REV. M, J, AHERN 

SPEAKS IN ASSEMBLY 

.\ssembly Speaker .Mtempts to 
Reconcile .Science and Religion 

"l^ Science a (ifKid Will .Xmbassador 
to Religion-'" was the subject which 
R. V M J Ah.rn. S J. of West.m College 
chose to s|)eak n|)on last Weihu-sday in 
Bowker .Auditorium. Father .Miern took 
the affirmative side of the (piestion and 
presented a number of able an<l \.ili(l 
.irguments to pro\e his i)oiiit. 

.\s one of the outstanding pr«M»fs of 
recent years the speaker made the statc- 
mt lit that, were not science a dood Will 
.Ambassador to Religion, his institution, 
Weston College, could not exist. The 
reason for this is that this is an institu- 
tion in which up-to-date stieme. both 
theoretical and practical, is being taught 
along with theology, a thing which a few 
years back wttuld have been c<nisidered 
im|>ossible. Here the teachers are all 
members of the Ortler of Jesus, more 
commonly known as the Jesuits. Reverend 
.\hern is himself professor of c hemistry 
and geologN at Weston College. 

.Another point brought up was tin' fact 
that at least ninety ])ercent of the world's 
greatest scientists have at one time or 
another expressed absfjiute belief in an 
omnipotent Being. In this connection 
Reverend Ahern quoted several scientists 
from the time of .Aristotle, down to the 
present living masters of the different 
sciences. 

(Continued on Pufte Ji 

Maroon Key Anxious For 
Successful Mardi Gras 



Tickets Now On Sale for (iala .Affair 

Plans have l>een completed for the 
Marrwn Key Marrii C.ras, the second 
time that this scxial event has hcvn helfl 
here. The dance is to .start at 7 o'chxk 
and will last until 11. Formal df^s or 
costumes will be worn. 

Irv (iu\er's Orchestra has been secured 
to furnish the music, a club that is well 
knf)wn hx'ally. The committee in charge 
of the affair is headed by Wyntr)n K. 
Danglemeyer ''31. Tickets may he ob- 
tained from an\' of tin- loiiowinj^ mem- 
bers: Wynton R. Danglcnieyer. H. 
Daniel Darling. Richard W. I>a\is, 
1 .lurciK <■ A. Jnnc-, .Arnold W. < 'l-^on 
Frederick S. Troy. H.inh I.. \\ .ilili^n n, 
anil -Allen S. West. Jr. I he price is 
>^ _'■'>! I p<T couple. 



Robert Havvley Describes 
Trustees' Attitute 

irusteeti' Consideration of Name 
Change Reported 

The editor has asked me to describe 
the .iititude of the Trustees regarding the 
propos.ll to change the name of the 
<.ollege anti while this is not an easy 
thing to do I'll gladly try. It will be 
understood, of course, that m\ im- 
pressions have been gained only from 
• liscussions of the matter which have 
taken jilace at regular meetings of the 
Boanl. 

I think I m.iy first congratulate the 
studnit body upon the splendid appear 
aiice which their committee of five stu- 
dents made before the Board of Trustees 
at tliiir .innu.il meeting cm January 9 
and u|ion the impressive and digniftid 
w.iy in wbiih these students presented 
their proposid and .inswered the questions 
whii h were asked. Their statements to- 
gether with the |)etition containing 4.>'{ 
names and the 14 telegrams from student 
organizations on the cam|)iis mad*- .i \ery 
impressive presentation of the iiuiiter. 
(Continued on I'uite .<) 

WINTER CARNIVAL 
PLANS COMPLETE 

Excellent Program Drawn Up. Outing 
Club Anxious t«» .Make Day a Success 

.At Cli.ipil, Friday morning, it will be 
announced whether or not the Winter 
C.irniv.il will be held this S.iturd.iy. It 
<lepends entirely upon the snow. .All 
other arrangements are complete. In 
order that everyone may join in the fun, 
the Dean will ex< use the .disemes from 
Saturday classes of all students who 
enter any of the competitions listed below . 
.\ list of all those who |i,i\e competed 
will be snbniittefl to the Dean's office on 
-Monday. In order I h.il there m.iy be no 
<lel.iy in starting the events, it is re- 
• pusted ih.il the students read the pr*)- 
Kr.im listed below (.irelulh, and then be 
on h.ind ,it t he |)rop«i time. 

I C Continued on PuHe 4) 



Agates Drop Fast Game To 
Wesleyan By Single Point 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

" lliiniilily is a virtue all preach, none 
prailiii'. itnd yet everyhody is muteiit In 
hear. I he master thinks it ^oiid dinlrine 
tor his servant, the laity for the elerny. 
and the elerny for the laity." 

Selden (Table talk) 

Wednesday 

;i.;i.") !>. in. .AssembK : Dr. Ra|iliael 
/on. Director, Lake Stales Forest 
Experiment Station. 
7.(K) |). in. .Agronomy Club .Meeting. 
John B. .Abbott, lecture and slides 
on "Pasture Inijirovement. " 
l<cH)ni 114. Stockbricjge. 
S.id p. in. Varsity Basketball: 

Dartmouth at Hanover. 
I ntcrfr.it emit v Basketball: 
Thet.i Chi vs. (J. T.V . 
.Al()ha Ciamma Rho \s. Delt.i I'hi 
Alpha 
I'onltrv Judging Team in New Vdrk 

(ity. 
\ arsitv Hex key: 

UVst Point at West Point. 
Thursday 

Narnity ILnkey: 

St. StephiMis at .Annandale. 
*i.4.j p. m. International Relations 
Chib meeting in the .Memorial 
building. 
F'riday 

Men's .Musical Club Concert in 

lladley. 
tiirls' (.lee Club Concert in Leeds. 
I nterfraternity Basketball : 
X.JOp. m. A.T.ti. vs. P.S.K. 
'.i.iO p. m. KB. vs. K.K. 
.Saturday 
W inter C.irnival. 
!■ acuity Dance. 
;j.'M( p. in. \ .irsity Hoc key: 

('onnecticut .Aggies at M.A.C. 
H.0() p. m. \arsity Basketball: 
Connecticut at .M..A.C. 
.Sunday 

'.t.iKla. m. Sunday Chajx-I, Dr. 
-Neheniiali Mc>ynton, Newton 
(enter, -Mass. 
."j.tH) p. m. (iirls' (dee Club Concert 
ill joiio Library. 
Tuesday 

• ).4."> p. m. .Meeting of Language and 
Literature- Dc'p.irtment in .St.M k- 
bridge Hall. 
s.fM) p. m. \arsil> Baskctl/.ill: 

Williams at .M.A.C. 
Stockbridge Basketball: 
.Anns .Atadenn at .M..A.(;. 



FITCHBURG LOSES IN 
OPENING CONTEST 22-13 

Team Shows Pr«>niise in First Kxhi- 
bition on Drill Hall Kl«»or 

Last Thursd.iv evemiin ( o.u h "Kid" 
(.ore's varsity b.isketb.ill icMin opened its 
season by overcoming Fitchburg Norm.il 
-1.' to i;{ ill a rather slow hut interesting 
game. ,A large crowtl of students, facullv . 
and visitors, gathered in the Drill Hall to 
witness with interest t he deveh)pineiit ol 
the I'.tJ'.t team led by Captain "Freddie" 
l-llert, a junior wlui is one of the most 
colorful players s»-en on the home lloor 
for sever.il ye.irs. In .i l.n^;,. pen ion of 
the game the .MaitK.ii and While were on 
the offensive with i;ileii h-.iding tin- 
attack. 

During the lir^t \^,,^, minntes ol pla> 
mitlur te.im w.is .ible to score until 
(l^ontlnued on Putfe.t) 

THRILLING ICE BATTLE 
DROPPED TO HAMILTON 

Lvenly Matched Teams in Nip and 
Tuck Struggle 

Ihe llamillon College hockev le.im 
nosed out the pow.rful .\lass;ichnsetts 
.se.xtel by a score of .; to L' .It I'tic.i, N.N., 
l.isl S.iturc|.iy night in .1 n.niie lli.it w.is 
witnessed bv Willi.iiii 1. Tild,-,, o| (..nni^ 
f.inie. 

A b.ittle ol ecpial Ic.Kc^ 1 li.iiacterixed 
the first period. Ingalls of Itic.i led the 
Hamillcni scpi.id in a bisl .ittack but w.is 
effectively slopped bv the .Ag.ile goilic-. 
Mvrick. In a tense nioiiient of pl.iying. 
Stevens, Buff and |{hle sub center. 
slipped I he- rubber pin k across the bj.tc k 
hue after a pass from Chase- in sirinmiagc- 

.A second thrill c.inu- .;() seccnids Liter, 
when Front, a .Ma:;s;»chu-Jttts forvv..rd, 
nl.iliated for the luisterners. Ilainillon 
secured 1 h,- |,-.,,| j„ (|„. si-cond period, 
when Hiker shot the puc k inloih,- .M.A.C. 
<.iKc. However, Davis, Marcnjii and U hili- 
(eiin-r. immedialely caged a L'O-yard shot 
to even the score. Baker of H.imilion 
then, a fe-vv moments later, slipped in the- 
ccmc hiding point. l)es|K-rate attempts to 
balance the accoiml siipplie-d continuous 
interest until the- iin.tl bell. 

The summary: 

^'•'^•'' Hamilton 

l)avis, Wai-chter, c <-. Ingalls, Stevens 

Irosl. M.mty. Iw Iw, Smith, Chas«- 

.M.iiitv. Pile h, Waeehter, rw 
,, , , rw. brown. Baker 

Bond, rd rd. S< hncid.r, Moiil^;omery 

O,'"^'.'- ,'•' Id, Nibhcilh, Harman 

•^'V^KK- K g. Cutti-r. Redmond 

Frosb Win Close Game 

From Arms Academy 

Tikofski Loops Winning Shot in Last 
.Minutes of Play 

The- freshman basketball le-.im de 
feate-d the- Arms .Ac .ide-niy five, last 
Friday night at Slnlburne Falls by a 
score of 19 to \H. The Aggie frosh were 
in the leacl at the half with an II to (> 
score, but lost the lead towards the- enel 
of the game, only to have Tikofski, 
freshman back, drop one through t he- 
basket with only a minute to i>lay. .Arms 
then threatened by trying a shot with 
only .1 f«-w seconds to play but missed 
and time out was talleel. .After play 
was resumed, the ball liaci only lime- to 
be tossed up when the game ende-d with 
a final s<ore of I!> to IH. 

The .Arms seconds defe-ale-d the frosh 
seconds by a score of 17 to 14. 

The summary: 



KLLERI LK.ADS NLAROON AND 

Will IE IN DESPKR.VIK 

LA.Sr-PKRIOD RALLY 

Waging an uphill battle throughoul the 
lenilesl, the Maroon .iiid While- te-.im |,,st 
.1 h.ird bdighl g.iiiu- let the strong Wes- 
h v.iii c|(iiiitet last S.iturday night at the 
Dull 11. ill bv Ihe close seore of l.'i to 14. 
With bill i-it-ht minutes to play and trail- 
ing 1.". to 10, the learn started a desperate 
alle-mpi to win. with the- result that Capt. 
"Iri-ddit" l-;ihrt i.iged two M-nsiition.d 
floor shots. The lime was loo short, how- 
ever, and Wesle\.iii wem by the margin 
e>f cMie point. The whole team, and es- 
pecially Kllerl. de.s«-rve e n-clil for such a 
b.illli- against their more ex|H'rienced 
opponents. 

Wc-sle-v.in scored first .md held the- U-.id 
Ihroiighoiii the- g.ime. In the first ft-w 
inmule-s, Nyi-.ind \an Coli e.i, j, drojiped 
.1 loul to start the scoring. Neither team 
could score again until about nine mimites 

"f ""• «• ■ li-xl g<'«ii pl.ived, wh.-n Owen 

scored .1 lloor shot. Nye made the count 

•' to by Lipping the ball in under the 

(Continued on Piiite 4) 

FRESHMAN MOCKKV 

I lie- lollowing fri-shme-n re-|Mirtec| last 
week bir |)ositieiiisoii tin- fn-sliiii,»n hew key 
sejii.id: A. I-;. Brown of Wayland, W. K. 
(I. irk of l)e<-rfielel, II. L. l-oresi of Arling- 
ton, J. J. (i.irviy of Holyoke. I-!. C. Howe 
of .\oibilk. R. C. (Minne-ss of .Amhe-rst. 
J. I-: I. epic- ot Dure he-sle-r, R. C. Roffcy 
ot Rockporl. N. II. Sm.irl of W.illham, 
and (,. S. Sylvesle-i ol ( .h-iin Rcm k. N. J. 
Cli.ipm.iii .Hid Stu.irl .ire c .indid.iie-s b.r 
till- pioilion ol m.in.iger. 

I here- is let be- no outside stheelnU-, the 
Ic-.im onlv pl.i>iiiK the- other c l.iss sextets, 
SiiM kbiiik-e- Ic-.mi^, or Ihe- junior v.irsily. 

Conn. Aggies 
Beaten In Hockey 

Neighheiring ".Nggits" Ha,||y Beaten 

In First Athletic Contest with 

M.A.C. in Three ^ ears 



I 



Freshmen 

B.I I'. 

Connc-ll.lf (I (I 

Rowle-y.lf :{ ;', 

Wilson. R.,rf 1 (I L' 

Foskitt.c ;; ;i 

Icley.lb 2 •do 

labyan.lb O 

I iko^kirl) O I I 



I'lir'gton.rb 

Rc-<-d,lb 

I'lokin.i.i 

I )ubij(|U(-.rf 

I'ark.r.ll 

Kiiisiii.iM.lt 



Arms 

B.F.P. 

4 X 


2 2 1; 


(I 11 1) 

_' O J 



R.t<ii<- 

pel io'i-. 



I.; i'.» 

iei^Dll. 



•|..I,,1, 
1 line: 



.S 1 



H21H 
iiiiiute 



.Alter a l.ipe-se- ol two ve.irs, .ithletic 
rekitioiis between ( onne-clieiil Aggie .inci 
.M.A.C. were resumed List week when 
Cc,ac h "Reel" B.dl's varsity Iicm key team 
o|H-ne-cl its HV2U seas<in by troune iiig the 
Connecticut pucksters b to in a fast 
g.une played al Sforrs, Conn., on Jan. 7. 
"IvJ" Frtjst, the sophomore star who 
plays left wing, led the .Maroon .md 
While attac k by caging the pu«k tlirei? 
times. In spite of the jKKir concliiion of 
the ice and the fai I thai this is Coiiiie-e:ti- 
cut Aggies' first attempt to intrcKfuce 
hcK key as a varsity .sport, I he g.iiiie was 
not so one-sicled as the- More indicates. 
The passing game- of the- B.iy Staters 
was superior and tliiir spe-e-c| on the 
olle iisivc- W.IS a big f.ie lor in their victcjry. 
Ill I he- first period the .M.A.C. team 
scored thre-e- times. During the s«-cond 
|H.-riod Irost caged a long shot, .md in Ihe 
third Davis and Wae< hte-r scorecl on re- 
bounds. For the .Massiic :hus«-tts club 
Frost, Davis and Captain .Nash were the 
outstancling players while B.ium.in, .Mur- 
phy, and Christen did S(»ine good work 
for the op|>osing .Aggies. 

In general, the outcome of the game 
was very en<ouraging to .M.A.C. followers. 
Of the men who panic ipate-d in the game 
for the .Massiic husc-tts le.im Captain 
.Nash, and Kinney are s<-ni<jrs; Boncl, 
Patch, Waee liter, and /uger are juiiirjrs; 
anci D.ivis, Frost, .M.mty, anc| .Mvrie k 
comprise- th<- s<»|»honic>re members. Willi 
these men, iiic ludiiig a majority of juniors 
and sophomores, (c>ntinuing to play the 
type of hmkey they exhibited in the first 
game- the si-ason's outl(K>k appears m r\ 
bright. 

The line-u|): 

.Massachusetts (ainnecticut 

.M.iiitv, I'.itc li, Wai-chler. rw 

Iw, ( hrisle-n. Rjiiirl.s 
I ),i\ \~. \\ .let litc-r, c- 

c, .Mullane, Passelinski 
I- r'l I . /u^i I , Kinne-y, Iw 

rw, B.iuman, .Mur|)hy 

hi, B.ibel, Kn.iut 

rd, Kn.iiit, Wilcox 

g, Sass<j, .\lcK>re 

> iiimute |K'rio<|, ( .oals: 

-', W.ie.ln.'i, RltiMT; 



Bond, r 
Nash. 1. 
.Myrick 
'I imi 
Front .; 
-Maber^; 



1 IlIci- 



y**** 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1929 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN I'ut the time to have decided that is 

past , and there are no regrets nor ai)oloy;ies 



Oflicial newspajK'r of the Massarhusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

Smbplby CtBAVBS '29 Kililor-in-Chiet 

■DW4BIJ H.Nichols '29 ManagiiiK Kdiior 



DEl'ARTMENT EUITOKS 

Editorial Shkplev C i kaves •20 

Feature Makgakei 1'. Ui/Nuvan '.iO 

Alumni & Short Course^ Sali-V K. Bkaulev "31 

Athletic l.twis M l.YNDs :iO 

Fkank T Udiclass '31 

Campus John H. Howaku Jk. '3(t 

Cecil 11. WAOi.KiiiH "M) 

Rial S. I'diiekJk ''il 

(JscAK Mai«.()I.in ■•'«- 



BLSINESS UKPAUTMF.NTW 

VBBnBKicB D. Thavek. Jk. "M Hiislin-ss ManaKfr 

" •' '• *• AijvertlMiiiti ManaKei 

Lawrencb A. Cabbuth '29 ( iiculiition ManiiK"r 

WiNTHBDP G. Smith '30 

John It. Tank '30 

KollKKT <;. (;<Hil)N<)W, '31 

l>AVin .\l. Nason '31 

I'AII. A. Smiih '31 

F. KiNM V Wnmi'M '31 

Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Sinnlc 
copies 10 cents. Make ail orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In < ase of change of address, subscriber 
will please notify the business manager 
as soon as possible. 

Entered ns gerond-clas* matter at the Amherst 
Pout Oftice. Arippted for niailinK at special late 
of postaRp provided for in section 1 103, Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917, authorized AuKUSl 20. I'.IIH. 



RK'IAI.IATION 

A well tlioii^lit out (luestionnaire ap 
pears in tlie (oniiiuiniiation (olinnii this 
week, and it (an best be answered by 
taking each (|iury in onler. At the out- 
set, l(t it be understood that the editor 
of the Collvginu is responsible alone for 
the editorial (ohinuis of the Ci>llii;iini 
and that an\ tiling .ii)pearinK unsigned 
has been \uitltn by him. Since this is 
the case, the answers will be written in 
the first person. 

1. To the best of nty kimwIedKe all 
the nienibers of the Ci'llci^mu staff are 
whole hearledly in favor of i lianuinK the 
luinie of the College. 

L'. The movement to change the name 
of the College resulted frtmi a publication 
which appeared on tampus last term. 
devoid of courtesy and antagonistic on 
its initial appearance. Skepticism con- 
cerning this nio\ement and a lai k of 
confidence in the methoti of its inception 
were only logital on the part of one who 
exj)ects his ideas to be available to over 
\:M) subs»ribers. As the movement un- 
fol«le«l and the publication became iiion- 
logical, the method of procedure whidi 
was being announced for the petition's 
presentation struck me as being entirely 
wrong. Tli.it is why in the face of stu- 
tleiit -emiiiuiit only one attemi)t Ii.is 
been made to »x press student opinion in 
these iohimns. I felt justified in main- 
taining a minimum tlis( ussion. and now. 
since the argunients which I presented 
to one of the four students who went to 
Mr. I'uUer have been justified, I feel that 
the Collegian or its editor has no apology 
to make. 

:\. These next two questions I shall 
answer as one. The four stuilents did 
declare their al)solute loyalty to President 
Thatcher, but I <|uestion it. It is for the 
best interests of the project's future that 
there be absolute loyalty, but that does 
not mean that there is. My proof for the 
logicality of this tjuestioning is t(K> per- 
sonal to admit of publication if it is not 
necessary, but I shall be willing: to 
demonstrate to anyone whose connection 
with the project will be benefited by it. 
4. To the next two questions I shall 
gi\e the answer \es,- but I have a 
counter tpiestion. M whose retpiest was 
the bill withhehl from the Clerk of the 
Cieneral Court? 

.'i. The meeting of the Trustees was 
over when the Colle^niu carr\ing the 
controversial editorial was offered for 
distribution. The meeting turned out 
us tlie editorial anticipated. Call it bad 
taste if \ou will, but at least one of the 
four stu<Unts knew exactly wli.it might 
appear in these columns, and I was fair 
enough to restrain it until it coulil do no 
harm. 

f). Witii tluiiikr. to K.iiit lor ilic de- 
scription of the editorial, I shall say \es 
to this (|Ue>tioii. 

7. The Lt-'UcjiHin m.iintains a coni- 
nuinication colunui which is open to 
e\tT> student wlio wishes to ((.nnilniK 
any ideas on .my subject, so Inn.; i-, tin 
letters are reason.iliie in len^lii ,itiil trci- 
from too person. i! .itt,iik>. ll llir editor 
of tin ( ~ ..|.| <>-( ll to .1 |>rocedure 

which Ik iiiUAi- will licit, It a principle 
for wliidi lie >l,iiiil--, luil whici) procedure 
is SUppoitcil li\ iiM-^ .I'lmn not the 
name "! .t piililir,;iiim , In- iiiii-i ili!\ 

those \\\i'< llli-t hull or lc.l\c the i ,i>c In 
till' ( I 'iMiiuiiu ,it ion ((liiiiiin. 1 (li(>~c the 
latter, liirntlsii niii;lit li,i\i incn wir-i-r, 



which will be of value in the future. 

\<>ur editor and all sjine people con- 
nected with the institution realize the 
\alue and need for an appr<jpriate name 
lor this CoUege. The change must be 
effected only when the arguments are 
wholly in favor. As yet, we have merely 
the student arguments which are far 
minute in comparison with financial 
(ontiiigencies and curricular difficulties 
that will arise with the change of name. 
That is why 1 have faith in the present 
survey being conducted by the Federal 
(Government, for there is bound t«) be 
show 11 conditions that now exist not only 
here, but all over the United .States. 
N(xt week I'resident Thatt her will tell 
our readers the puri)oses and policies of 
this survey. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION BUILDING 
CAMPAIGN 

Thirty-three per cent of the graduates 
of the College have given their U)yal 
support by a pledge or contribution 
lowartl the new Physical Kducation 
building acciiiding to the returns avail- 
able iij) to January 14. Pride in bringing 
about a respectable showing for their 
various classes has brought many new 
contributions during the past month 
boosting the total amount of the fund by 
nearly $1000. 

Class agents are actively engaged in 
setiiring contributions from those mem- 
bers of the (lass who for some reason 
have delayed in forwarding their endorse- 
ment toward this worthy project. 

The class of l.SXK which set the pace 
for all alumni classes last June still main- 
t;iins the lead over all other classes by a 
wide margin with a rank of SO per cent. 
The class of I'.tJ.S stands second with tWl 
per cent of its members contributing, and 
1SS;{ is third with iV.i per cent. .All per- 
(cntage figures are based on the number 
of actual graduates in each class who 
have sent in a pledge or contribution. 

The following is a summary to date for 

the ten leading classes giving the number 

of living graduates in each class, and the 

miniber and per cent of those contributing. 

Xo.iiriids \(iAiriids I'vricul 





Class 


in iliiss 


Cotilr g 


(. utilr j; 


ISSN 


15 


12 


SO 


IML'S 


112 


74 


(>*i 


l.s.s;; 


17 


9 


o:{ 


l.s'.tT 


12 


7 


5S 


1SS2 


17 


9 


.'.2 


is7:i 


4 


2 


.'Kl 


INT.". 


8 


4 


.")() 


is<ti» 


18 


9 


.")0 


liC'T 


81 


:{9 


4S 


ISitS 


9 


4 


44 



The following is a general summary „f 
contributions to the Building Fund up to 
January 14: 

a roup A mount 

M.A.C. Ahimni $;{(),(t21 10 

I ndergraduates ;>24.'J (H) 

S.S..A. .Mumni and Undcrgrads KCiO ."iO 
Faculty SAM) AH) 

tlthers nKilAO 

Total »4o,372.0t; 



CLASS MEETINGS 



Junior Class 

On Wednesday, Jan. 0, the junior class 
met to arrange for nomination of officers. 
The meeting was called to order by 
I'resident Raymond S. Mann. The 
minutes were read and accepted. Miss 
Rachel At wood of the \9'M) Index Hoard 
reported that dues for the Iiidix pictures 
were rather slow in coming in. A com- 
mittee to nominate class officers was 
chosen consisting of the following: Miss 
Hvelyn C. Sandstrom, John R. Tank, 
Harold J. White, and Davis H. Elliot. 
The committee will report its decision at 
the next meeting. 

Sophomore Class 

.At its second meeting this term, the 
sophomore class held its election of 
officers. A nominating conunittee chosi^n 
by the class, and consisting of Norman 
Myri(k, J. Joseph Woods, and Fdmund 
I.. Frost, nominated two candidates for 
t.uli oIVk c. Later nominations wire 
,i( I cpteii inmi the lloor. A vole was taken 
and the following were elected: \\\nton 
l\. I )angleniayer, president; Zoe F,. 
lliikiuy, vice-president; I'aul ,A. Smith, 
tri'.ir>urer; Norman Myrick, class cap- 
t.iiii; .111(1 John Sandow, sergeant. it- 
.iriiis. I'dr class secretary, the vote was 
tied between Miss riielma Iriedrick and 
.Miss Pauline Fredtiirk. Tiiis will be 
\oti'(! ii|i(in .It till' iitxl uicctini,;. 
Freshman Class 
1 he --111';!!! inrrliilv; (d llic liolini.in 
t !.i>s lor ihi- iirm was helil l.i^i Wcdnes- 
il.i\ . .\ iioinin.iting coinnintcf. cUcted at 
tlif previous meeting, riiliiii;it( d its 
choice ol iioiiiiiRo lor i l.ix nlluir-, A 

b.lllot W.IS t.lklll. jdllll I. I()ll\ w.is 



Campus Debris 

Prexy Says 

The ability to keep the door of one's 
mind dosed against undesirable or de- 
I)ressing thoughts is a priceless |)Ossession, 
which should be guarded at all costs and 
can be increased by exercise. 

- CD 

Intercollegiate 

Freshman (o-eds at .Mc(iill University 
are forted to carry whisks with which 
to sweep fallen leaves from the paths of 
their upperclassmen. 

CD 

.An uiirooted tree on the Ohio College 
campus disclosed the ancient college well, 
which was in use over a century ago. 

- II) 
The Vnhersity Hatchet of George Wash- 
ington University says: "We hear that 
profs .spend the holidays reading papers, 
attending conventions, and seeing shows. 
We hear that they enjoyed one third of 

their holidays." 

- CD 

Joe Found That 

Fannie Frosh comments: "Well, well, 
well,— the movie was staged with appro- 
priate organic accompaniment. 

.And this is an .Agricultural College! In 
the movie: 

1. "In April." 

2. (Next scene) "Picking the a})|)les." 
Wasn't Ira's song a help? 
Sonny Hoy's daddy should have been 

more (arefid of that skin that had al- 
ready been toiK hed 'upL " 

- - CD 

Who said Aggie hasn't one shouting 

""big-league" play? 

- ' tl) 

It looks as though for years to come, 

our sheepskins will still be signed from 

the pen,- and, after all,- what's in a 

n.ime, though there's quite a field for one 

here. 

CD 

Is there anvthing from =alt water to 

gasoline that hasn't tou( hed the throats 

of those '"I think I'm getting it?" 

- CD 

The height of bliss was reached last 

week when one of our most jiopular 

seniors sent a blank letter to the mails. 

"On its way, but no jdace to go." 

CD 

We can now present the eighth wonder 

of the universe, nanielv,- the -Scotchman 

who advertised a free lecture and gave it! 

-CD 

What's wrong with Pathe News,- 

letting only 40,(KH),(KX) see the big riding 

show? Why not let the other W)<MK),000 

laugh? 

Playlet called "The Proposal" 

Scene .Abbey Center. 

Time Nine o'clcKk at night. 

Characters — lO;? co-eds and one innocent 

freshman. 

ACT I 

Freshman {enleritiji icithoiil jti/oct/wg i : 
Is Miss .M here? 

Miss M : Here I am, why? 

F'rosh: Well, woidd \(»u please sit down 
for a minute, 'ciiz I'd like to propose to 
you. 

Miss M - : Oh girls,- the chance of 
a life-time! 

l-"rosh ion bended knee, and very de- 
voutly): 1 love you, w ill you marry me? 

Miss M (r<>_v/yi: Do you mean it? 

I'rosh: lle\, let me hxjse, this is all I 
have to do. Thank the lord, this is the 
end of m\' inili.ition! 

lie il.ishes (iut to the wails ol "llcre I 

.Am I'ldken-hearted." 
CD 

If \(>u ,in- good at guessinj;, try this 

trio: 

1. "Fella, fell.i." 

2. "Fcologi( .il!y speaking." 

'■>. ""If \oii ii.ivcii't ,uot the authority, 

it's worth .I'lM'liilt K notiiiii.;." 
C\) 
('.1,1 Siifht. 

elected proiili lit , \ 1 1,1 \\'iii;lit w i^tlrricil 
\ ice-presidriit , M.ivbelle .XiKitixui wis 
elected secretarv . (iittord 11. luwlc \\,i> 
elected treasurer. ( ieorge I.. Kwi^ n- 

i t-i\ fii tile rl,i-- cipt.iinsliip. .ind I h .u.ird 
F. Ciiencv i- -n -raiU-.U-ariiis. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 16. 1029 



COMMUNICATIONS 



BASKETBALL 

Coach "Red" Hall's Stockbridge basket- 
ball team started the season well by 
trouncing Hopkins Academy 23 to 8 on 
Tuesday evening, January 8, at the Drill 
Hall. The game was rather slow at Jirst 
but in the second half .Stockbridge tallied 
fifteen jjoints. Frost and Fletcher played 
well for the home team, the f(jrmer scoring 
ten points and the latter five. The team 
showed promise by winning the first 
game, and may, with a little more prac- 
ti(e t(jgether, develop into a sm(K)thly- 
working club. Hill, a guard, who has 
been out with vaccination, has recently 
joined the squad. 

In the preliminary game, the .Stock- 
bridge Seconds smothered the Hopkins 
Seconds 2;{ to 2. Oksiinen scored eight 
points and Parkinson six for the winners, 
while Tenanes shot two fouls for the 
visitors' only scores. Swain and Sarris 
also i)laye(l good ball for Stockbridge. 

Registration for the 1929 winter session 
numbers ;i2 students for the full ten-week 
j)eriod. 

C.reens' keeping course was filled early 
in the fall since it is limited to fifteen 
ajiplicants. It now includes students 
from Kentuckv, Iniliaiia, and Ohio in 
addition to several well known -Massa- 
chusetts golf professionals. 

Oswell Fish of Waltham, C. Carlton 
1 vons of Piitnev, and X'ictor Salo of 
Millbury, all former members of the 
class of "32 have transferred to the class 
of '."iO Stockbridge. 

Miss Cornelius Smith of Winchester 
has registered for the course in poultry, 
St(M kbridge ';{(). 

Helen (iottfried of Stockbridge "M\ 
spent the Christnias holidavs at her home 
in Try on. North Carolina. 

Klliot P. Jocelvn, Jr., S.S.A. '29 of 
Oxford and his father. Dr. F:iliot P. 
Jocelyn were the guests of Leonard Tufts, 
manager at the Pinehiirst, in North 
Carolina, during the holidays and re- 
turned nmch enthused over the fine 
.■\\rshire herij which has been built up 
in connection with the I'inehurst hotels. 

Albert Piper, S.S.A. ".H), of Holden 
won first, third, and fifth in the Rhode 
Island Red class of 4-H clubs .it the 
recent Hoston Poultry Show. 

Ira Wild, S.S.A. '27. recently sent a 
letter to Professor Hanta describing con- 
ditions around Petaloma, California, 
where he is working on a poultrv' plant. 

Louis I.eoncini. S.S..\. '20, announces 
his new address as Siin Anselmo, Calif. 

William Hower, S.S..A. "M, is a gradu- 
ate of the Clark Sch(K)l for the Deaf in 
Northampton. It is interesting to note 
that despite his total lack of hearing he 
is holding down the fxisition of right 
forward on the Stockbridge \arsity 
basketball team. 

Peter Scoveran, S.S..A., has withdrawn 
from school to take up a position at 
Brewster, N. V. 



The Collegian accepts no responsibility for o;ni. 
ioni voiced in "The Forum." It aims to servi- as 
a means of giving expression to student oijiniyn 
and will print any views expressed rationally anj 
sanely, unless the editors feel that they are justi- 
fied in suppressing them because of unfair [«r- 
sonal attack. Communications must be limitefl to 
.loo words. 

To the F^ditor of the Collegian: 

The unsigned editorial appearing in tl^. 
columns of your January (Jth issue i,.,, 
made it necessiiry that we who an 
anxious to have the name oi .M..A,C 
changed ask a few questions, 

-Are all the members of the edii.,n,ii 
board of the Collegian whole-heartedK m 
favor of changing the name? Why timi. 
while the entire student body has l„.i.„ 
showing great interest in this progressive 
step has there been but one attempt tu 
exi)ress student opinion on this matter in 
your colunms? 

Is it necessary, in view of the fact that 
President Thatcher declared the tour 
students who visited Alvan T. Fuller 
innocent of insubordination, for the stu- 
dents of .M,A,C. to line up on one suk- 
of the fence or the other? Did not these 
four students declare in public through 
their spokesman their absolute loyaltv t„ 
President Thatcher? Is it not possible 
for students who sc-ek to have the truth 
shown to the people of this State to ii„ 
so and at the same time maintain absolute 
loyalty to the officials of the College? 
Have not the four students demonstrated 
their lovaltv to the Colk-gc offiri.,K 1,\ 
having a prepared bill withheld from the 
Clerk of the Cieneral Court? 

Was it not exceeilingly bad taste lor 
the Collegtun to publish an editorial lull 
of criticism of expediency at a time winn 
the persons attacked, accompanied l>\ a 
.Senate representative and backed b\ 
their fellows, were carrying the cax- oi 
the students to the Board of Trustees, 
whose President they had previouslv 
approached? 

In reference to the appeal for o.. 
operation made by the author ol the 
editorial, was not the canting critique 
of pure reason in itself a very good ar^ii- 
ment for the need of more co-oper.itive 
action? 

In closing, is it the [Mtlicy of 
mend)er of the editorial dep. 
the Collegian to perch atoj) 
when a question of vital imp 
the students arises, regardless 



anv 



opinion.' 



Dennis .M. Cro\vle\ 



Sidney Smith, .S.S..A. '21 of Worcester 
announces his engagement to Miss Doris 
.\1. l-ivermore. Smith is a former presi- 
dent of the Stockbridge -Alumni Associa- 
tion. 

INDEX COMPETITION 

ComiHtition has st.irted for the \\Y.\\ 
Index Hoard with eleven sophomores re- 
jiorling for trial for the various places 
on that publication. -Assignments will be 
given out at the next meeting of the 
comjK-titors, held after -Assembly, Wed- 
nesday afternoon. Those sophonmres 
w ishing to try out for the bo.ird .ind who 
have not already done so should see 
Lewis M. I.vnds ';?() and get the first 
assignment and give him their names. 
Those who are trying out at present are: 
Literary Department Sally E. Bradley, 
H. Daniel Darling, John R. (iuenard. 
ZcH> Fl. Ilickney, Frieda H. Norell, Rial 
S. Potter, Jr.. l.rapold 11. T.ikahashi, 
and Hardv L. Wahlgreii; .Art Depart- 
ment Catherine -A. Hiirnham and Cier- 
trude L. LeClair; Statistics Departmt^nt 
~ Marion L. Roper. 

.MENORAII .SOCIETY 

riie Jewish students of M..A.C. have 
forn.til ,1 -Menorah Society for the dis- 
i u->,(iii ol current problems of Jewish 
life. Mr. J. P. Williams i> hoiior.iry 
president with Maxwell II. (ioldberg as 
l.icultv advisor, and .Martin Fonseca .is 
leader. The meetings are to be held bi- 
weekly, the next meeting being January 
22 at 7 (), m. in the Memori.il Building. 
.Ml iiuir(sl( d .ire cordially inviterl to 
attend. 



To the FIditor of the Collegian: 

-As students we have an almost liiiiitioj 
capacity to tolerate unfair treatment. 
F(jrtun;itelv , there is a limit lieyond which 
we can not be forced without objection. 
Furthermore, if all ixditical means Uil. 
this objection may take the form ot 
making a UmA out of ;iny professor, which 
can easilv' be done by an> class on campus 
The professors and instructors on caiiipu- 
should take these facts into consideration 
in selecting courses and condiMtini: 
classes. 

In s|K'aking to other sophomore-. 1 
have found that there is a w idespre.td 
feeling of resentment at the fact that a 
hitherto elective course, -Agricultural 
Kconomics 2». has been made compulsory 
What, I often wonder, underlies 4uih a 
degenerate change in the College curricu- 
lum? Surely those on the curriculum 
committee must be playing a little game 
among themselves. "If I give you this, 
you give me that," must be their prin- 
ciple of arbitration. Of course, I maybe 
wrong; but, from the external apiie.!''- 
ance of the present curriculum, in which 
almost every department has a chance to 
pour its wisdom onto the student>. 1 !«'' 
that I have not C(mie very l.i: 
guessing correctly. This nuich is cc.tj:n: 
someone has been thinking more ' ^■ 
own particular department ti 
welfare of the students. 

If one considers a collecti<jn o: 
tical facts, and the putting of '■ ' 
states according to the amoun' 
or corn that grows there, of hig; 
tional value, one could not take 
loiirsr. 1 nriunately, most of us 
higher conception of education th.H: :-'• 
In my opinion, anything to be ■ • 
cational value should inspire the 
and give him a better under-t,. 
this gri.it dr.ima of life and tin 
plays in it. Without inspiration 
will .imouiil to no more than a do ■ 'i^''"^' 
(|Uickl\ forgotten conglomeration oS !."'" 
Thougli a wealth of economical (Jct- " 
may give one .u- increased understanding 
(Cuntinued on Page 4) 



(;OLF AND HALF HOSE REDUCED J"" JHIS WEEK SNAPPY CO.l.EtiE P.VITKRN.S. GOOD STANDARD MAKES. 

\OULL FIND THE KIND YOU WANT AND GET QIALITY AT A RE\E SA\TN(; 

GLAD TO SHOW THEM K) YOU. 

LANDIS 



BASS MOCCASINS 

Men and Women Hand Sewed— Waterproof 

The very best for Winter Sport wear 

$4 to $i6 pair 

according to style 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 

SOLE DISTRIBUTORS FOR AMHBRST 



ARTIST MATERIALS 

PAINTS WATER COLOR BLOCKS 

PASTELS CHARCOAL PAPER 

DRAWING PENCILS FIXITIF 

ALL KINDS OF MEMO PADS FOR THE NEW YEAR 



JAMES A. LOWELL 



BOOKSELLER 



.MILITARY BAl.I, PLANS 
(Ckintinued fruni Page 1) 

R(garding music for the Mall, several 
uicliistras are under consideraticjii. 
.\niong those being considered are "The 
holiemians" from Worcester, "I>i(k" 
.NiwKHub's from .Northampton, " 1 he 
.\iiilierst Serenaders," and several others 
wliiih have made splendid rej)utations 
t(ir themselves on campus in past >i'ars. 
The hnal decision will be announcetl in 
ncM week's Collegian. 

K'efreshments will be si-rved during the 
iiinrmission at the Hall and are under 
the supervision of Cadet Major Holeslaw 
Nitkiewicz, who says that the old siiv ing. 
"There's a surprise in every package" h.is 
nothing on what he'll put out during 
iiiteriiiissi(jn. 

busses will leave the Drill Hall im- 
niediately after the Ball to take the 
,;ir!s back to Srjuth llailley and North- 
ai'i[»ton. .Since girls from Smith and Mt. 
lliilvoke will not be able to come over in 
large enough groups it will not be jM>ssible 
to furnish bus transi^rtation from South 
ll.iilicv or Northampton to .\mherst. 
lliey will, however, be taken back. 

("adit Major Paul R. Plumer, who is 
111 cli.irge of decorations, promises an 
ttfcct in bunting, banners, streamers and 
ornaments of a martial nature such as 
».iherj, rifles, machine guns, etc., which 
will eclipse even the brilliant decorations 
of List year. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

r!'. J"hn F. Lambert, who is now 
teaching and coaching basketball in the 
•'riinsboro, Vt., High School, has re- 
'<ntly been elected president of the 
Urmont State Board of Approved 



Greeting Cards and 
Suitable Little Gifts 
for your Sick Friends 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 

THE 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Offers Expert Hair Cutting 
Service for Men and Women. 

"POP" DUWELL, Prop. MEMORIAL BUILDING 

College Drug Store 

W. H. McGRATII 
Reg. Pharm. 

AMIILRST. - . MAS.S. 



REV. .\l. .1. AIILRN SPEAKS 
((k>nilnu»l from Puftc I) 

As a further |)roof of his contention 
the speaker stressed the idea th.it it is 
only the scientists and theologians who 
have disigreed throughout the ages; the 
facts of both branches of learning have 
not and can not clash. In other words, 
it is only what some scientist helieves 
that is at odds with religion, and religious 
doctrines. .\iid the same is true of the 
opposite. Fact cannot disiigree with fact, 
stated Father .Miern. It is only wh.it 
man tonsiders to bf the fa( ts of the case- 
that cause the trouble. .And this has been 
at the bottom of nearly all the arguments 
and (initlirts held thus far. 

Reverend Ahern pleaded for bro.idir 
niindi-dness. He held that when the time 
comes in which man will be big enough to 
see the futility of these petty s<piabbl»s 
and turns his energy toward the better- 
ment of himself and his fellow nun, that 
at this time s( ience and religion will go 
forward hand in hand, as they are des- 
tined to do. 

The sjKMker (oncluded with the fad 
that he also held that evolution, that 
siibjii I whith one instinctively conneits 
with this (|uestion, is after all nothing 
but a s(ientific theory at most, and as 
su(h no really valid argument can be 
constructed either pro or (<in, using this 
subject. 



Dr. Nehemiah Boynlon To 
Give Sermon In Chapel 

Popular Newton Center Pastor Re- 
turns to Preach in Sunday Chapel 

nine more the student body is to have 
the pleasure of listening to a siMinon bv 
Ur. Nehemiah Hoyntoii of Newton Centd, 
Mass., who is the s|H'aker ne.\t Sunday 
morning. Dr. Boynton, who h.is .ippi-.iied 
here for the l.ist several ve.irs, is ,i t.imili.ir 
and vsell liked tigurc to M \ C smdints 
.Old f.iculty. 

In this brief article it is intendfd to 
merelv mention the s.ilient facts regard- 
ing this spf.iker, in order that his (oniing 
ni.iv h.ive more significain e .iiid bi- pir- 
haps of more interest. 

Dr. Boviiton holds the degree of .A.H 
trom ,\mherst College and the degree ol 
I > I ). from .\ndover Theologic.d Siiiiin.irv . 
Since HtJl he has been minister emeritus 
of the Clinton .Avenue Church in Brook 
lyn, N. V. Ik- w.is the moihi.iinr ot the 
.N.itional Council of Congregation.il 
Churches of till- Cnited Si.itis from I'tlO 
to l'.»l;:, lie is (h.iiriii.in of the World 
.Alliance for the Promotion of Inter- 
ii.it ioiial Friendship Till oiigh the Chiinluj.. 
In 1".M;! Dr. Boynton w.is the Cli.ipl.iiii 
of the i:{th Coast Defence Comii.iny of 
the .Nation.il C.uards of Ni\v ^■ork. Ib- 
is the author of a book entitled •\<,a\ 
Preaching." 



INLERNAIIONAL RKL.A I IONS 
CLCB 

Last week a viry sin ci-ssfiil soi i,d 
meeting w.is held by the Interii.itioii.il 
Relations Club at (irace Chun h Parish 
House. .An interesting program w.is pn 
sented and tlios«- who attended iiijovid 
themselves imihinsely. 

Thurstlay evening this week .i iiiicting 
is to be luld at vehii h Dr. < .eorge F. 
< ..ige is to bi- the s|Maker. He will givi- 
his impressions of (ondilions in laiiopc, 
especi.illy It.ily, with inttn st iiig side 
lights on Mussolini. 

Rl LE APPROVED B^ CO-EDS 

IO ALLOW SMOKINC; 



STARTING THE NEW YEAR RIGHT! 

20'r Discount on Suits and Overcoats 

\oiir cliaiuf lo luiy a ii(><»<l Miil or coat al a low prict-. 

Light corduroy trousers, now $4.00 

$1.50 neckwear, now $1.15 

$1.00 neckwear, now 79c 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN FOR NEARLY FIFTY YEARS 



The proposed rule thai the co-eds ol 
.M..A.C. be allowed to smoke has been 
.ipproved by a majority vote of the girls 
of the College. The hii.d dei ision .is to 
whether this rule will be .i.lopted or not 
remains with lertaiii memlurs of tin- 
faciili V . 



Basketball Officials, and is ex-officio a 
member of the .National .Advisory < )fh( ials 
Committee. 

William C. King, grad.. has o|Hned a 
flower store in connection with his land- 
scajH- gardening work at .iJti West 
Josephine St., San Antonio, Texas. 



ASK FOR 

"Munsingwear" 

RAYON and SILK 

Bloomers -Step-ins -Vests 

Slips - Bandeau - Pajamas 

Night Robes 

SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

I G. Edward Fisher 



Kingsbury Box & 
Printing Co. 

Phone 334 or 333 
Northampton, Mass. 



Aniherst Shoe Repair Co. 

Master Shoe Rebuilders 
^l X r TO BOLLES SHOE STORE 



TYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Remington, Royal 
and Corona Sales and .Service 

Radio Kquirment (it-nenil Kt-pair .Shop 

n. E. DAVID 

.^5 Pleasant .St . just below P.O. Amherst 

S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN AI,AK,M CLOCKS and other 
reliable makes 

.t ri.F.A.SANT STREET, .up oneflifthf) 

Best in Orug Store Service 
Best In Drug .Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co. 



? Town Hall Theater jj 

y .Vfalinets .<:tlO I vtniniiN h:4.S and N:.<0 Q 



Thursday-Fridav. Jan. 17-18 

''FOUR WALLS'' 

This is John Gilbert's slrony^est part 
since the "Hix Parade" as the h.a.l 
Side '^an^ster 'J. ho determines to break 
lhroux.h the Jour ualls 0/ his life of 
crime, aided b\ a vreal loie. 
M-AVS CO Ml:!)) 

.Saturday, Jan. 19 

lr,ni:i ,V I'tii hmnii Sni Ifnmilfiii in Ih- 

GRIP OF THE YUKON 

Human passions crackiin^i to the 
■ihiplash of a cruel land. 

A i> I) E I) A r I R A <; r 1 o \ 

HARRY ( .IRhV in 

''BURNING BRIDGES" 

-'/ U'etern ['inked xith thriiis. 
Wednesday, January 2i 

FREEDOM OF THE PRESS 

'.iilh I.eiiis >^tone Marceiine l)a\-It t,! 
iam R. It 'ailhall and Malcolm McGrey:or 
// thrilling and reiealin^ story of a 
ne'j.s paper's baltie ii:ith the "I'^ice Rinf 
I .IHI.hS St'ORTl.lCHT (.()MI DY 



ROBKRI ILAWI.EV'S l)E.SCKII>ilON 

((^onllnu«Hl from i'aUe I) 

I here was a very e.irnest considi-ral ion 
of the proposal bv the Uo.nd of TriisUrs 
.iiid, while then- is no ollirial returd of 
till' sentiment of individii.d members, 
llicic is, without doubt, .1 ilivided opiniim 
.IS to the need for ,1 i h.ingc of ii.inir. 

The discussion devilop«d tli.it I heir 
.ire many factors involv«-(l in the (iin 
sidrr.ilioii of the ( li.inge of the n.iine of 
the College. There is the m.itter of the 
etTect a ( hange of name might have upon 
the ollii iai relationship of the College 
with .St.iti- .Administrative Dep.irtnuiils. 
Wli.it effect upon the attitude of the 
Ugislalure might a change of name havei* 
I he Trustees rightly feel ill. it, after much 
cllort, they h.ive g.iiiied .1 very favor.ible 
status lor the College in its relationship 
I o Slate .Ailiiiini^lr.itive I )epart men Is and 
there is no doubt tli.it the College enjoys 
much gootl will in the Sl.ite Legislature. 
I he Trustees do not wish to take anv 
step whii h may jeop.irdize these rel.ilion 
ships unless the end assuredly justifies it. 
I he 'Trustees have received much con 
Hiding testimony from the alumni. .Some 
.ire opposed and some are in favor of a 
(hange of name. The ellect of legislative 
|iro(cdiire for a i li.inge of name upon |h« 
.diiniiii cimpaign for .1 I'hysit.il T.din.i- 
tioii building has to be consideretl. There 
was also stated the opinion th.it ( (insider 
.ition of a (hange of ii.inie necess;irily 
involves the consideration of a change in 
the scope of the College. 

It is evident, I think, from the abo\c 
thai this problem cannot be solved im 
meili.ilely. I beliive there is no doubt in 
the minds of the Trustees that the si 11 
dent body desires that the name be 
(hanged and I believe that they will not 
leave the consideration of the problem 
until they laii decide, with c(Mihden(c 
'!>at they are right, as to what is the be.st 
solution. 

The reiord of their action at the meet- 
ing on January 9 kf as follows: 

\(>'TKI): To re(eive the petition of 
the students for earnest consideration 
and with appreciation of their interest in 



IITCIIBCRi; LOSES TO A(.(;iE 

(Conlliiiied from I'aitr li 

"Kav" M.iiin sunk .1 slmi jioiii ne.n (ho 
middle of the (Iimm. lillb.i.k, the lilch- 
bmg left forward, scored .1 b.iskel, ,iiid 
"Sl.in" .Sl.inisiewski billowed by .iddinf; 
two points to ni.ike the s.i.ie 4 lo 1 ill 
l.ivoi ol Ihr home (e.iiii .is (he «|ii,iiler 
ended. Al the t ii.l ..I the li.ill I he v.illey 
b.iskeleers were still le.idillg It lo J. 

I'itchburg came bai k strong in the 
s(((Uid h.ilf Id m.ike four poiiUs on 
b.iskels by lillb.iik .ind S.iiiter while 
Stanisiewski t(».ssed a double dei kei tioin 
the side. The home team then began .111 
oheiisive .ilLuk which resulted in ICIIert 
sinking .1 long sliol .iiid •Tom" Ibiher- 
iiiglon, who subslituted lor I r.ink Uur- 
b.lllk, putting the M.iy Si. He (pjinlel ill 
the lorctidiil .ig,iiii by sroriiig iwo points 
on a "cut." The perioil then ended with 
the ^Llroon .iml W'liile in the le.id !.'» lo M. 

In the t.ist (pi.iiler Sl.inisiewski .mil 
Tillb.uk, the Normal S« Ihm)1 star, collecletl 
lw(i b.iskils apiece. M.iriii tossed ,1 foul, 
and .IS the g,ime . iideil Itiiib.ink • iil l<» 
gel ,1 b.iskel, m.ikiiig I he score 'I'l lo |."{ 
in l.ivor of I he v.illey (piinlel. 

Tor I he home leaiii T.llerl .mil Sim 
sieswski were I he si irs of ihc g.mie. The 
oillsl. Hiding; Till hbiirg pl.ivcrs were C.ipt 
lillb.n k .iiiil Saulir. 

I he simim.ii V : 

Mass. .\ggies 

|{ I .IV 
bmb.mk.ll I (I J Hi.oihv.ib 
Coilkos.lf (I n U ( I'I.e.iiv.tl, 
llcth'Kloii.ll 1 U li Sulliv.iijb 
Kelley.rl 1 (I 1 S.iuller,( 

Webber, rf (I I) VVard.( 
■Sl.in'wski.c 4 S Cav.m'gh.rf 
M ann.lb I 2 I AnderMin rf 

D.ivis.lb O (( (( Tillb.i.k.li 

l-lleil.rb 1 (( -1 



I 



Filchhurg 

H T.I' 
(I 
I) 1 1 
1 1 
12 4 
(» 
I 1 
II 

;; 6 



lol.ils 



;n.{ 



HI 'l-ll Tot.ds 
S<(.re al h.ilf lime: .\Liss. Aggies «», 
Titihbmg Normal \. Keferee: Shea. 
lime: hmr 10 niinule periods. 

the welfare of the College; that any 
ad ion relative to (hanging the name (jf 
the College await further study by the 
Hoiird (oncerning the |Missible compli- 
(.11 ions which m.iy be involved. 

I< I). Il.iwhv 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 



No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

RII'AIRINf, AMI M.I. KINIJS Ol 

wasiii.m; uo.ne at reasonable 

PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy fiuaranteed 

.NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



Winter Footwear 

for all occasions 

DRESS 

CAMPUS 

SPORTWEAR 

at Special Prices 

this month 

Thomas S. Childs 

INCOkFORATtO 

275 High St., Holyoke, Mass. 



AMH 

\t\ THl 



ERS 

EATER 



T 



.4MHERST FRUIT STORE 

WIIKKF AGGIE MEN MEET 

WHIN DOWN TDWN 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGAHS 



VVe<liiesday, Jim. 16 

5 KfJIH VAUOmilE ACTS 

AM> O.S HIE SCKKE.N 

l»<ii) Alv;ir:i'|i. Hii.l \Liri,Mr" LiviiiK'tiiii 'ti 

"IHE APACHE'' 

\ < M<l<)<i\ I'Allll \i \\S 

Thurs. & Fri.. Jan. 17 and IH 

T; .Mil. I I-. \ \ I \(. S in 

"SINS OF THE FATHER" 

whU kiilh ( halterton liarry .Norton 

'J Kl-ll. < OMIDV \i:us 
{Saturday, Jar.iiar>' l'> 

Audrey In [aim s .Miiri.i 
kobi 1 1 I dioM ' .' Ml ;" ( ., ui i| I in I 

"LITTLE WILDCAT" ' 

2 Ul.\ \.( <)MI.|>\ I'Mlll M,\'v 

I .Monday & Tuesday, Jan. 21-22 
llclle beiinett — Victor M< Las.d<n 

\i ii 11 iiiiiliMii Tf d \I( N.mi.n.i in 

"MOTHER MACREE" 

1' K'l.l I ( 'All |)\ \| \\s 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

.Now situated at 15 1-2 Pleasant St. 
KXCEIf.EN I SHOE REPAIRERS 

V. (.KO.MJOMCO. I'rop. 



U. A. C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16. 1929 



\Vc cannot let this season pass without thanhinfi you /or your loyalty and co-operation during the months that have passed. You have made this a very 
^ood year for us, in spite of our fire, and ice appreciate it sincerely. And yet it is not as our customers that we think of you— it's as our friend. 
for somehoiv our business fades into nolhinfiness, and our membership in the firm of ''Mankind, Inc.'' seems the thing that is above all worthwhile'. 
And so ive send the a^e-old but never improved ^reetiuo A HAPPY, HAPPY .\PW YEAR. THOMAS F. WALSH 



WIM KR CARNIVAL FI.ANS 

(Continued from Pade 1) 

'i'lic |>r<»ni.iiii li.is l)rfii airaiiKf'l w'lli 

the piiiposf of iiK lixliiiK suiiU'thiiiK tor 

fveryoiii'. Iliirr are daslics and distaiuf 

events in all depart nu-nts, an<l laces for 

men and for women. Tfiere is a snow-ltail 

fight, open t(» all. A prize will In- given 

for the cleverest snow man ma<le rlnrinn 

the day. 1 lies*- works of art must lie all 

made in the field west of Wilder Mall, 

Itetween that and I'leasiinl St., and must 

In- ra( inn the ro.id. They will l>e jud^;ed 

at 4..'J() (). m. Ki^ht after hiruh horses 

will he hrouuht to the field|iiilfront of 

the ski slide for the lienelil of those who 

would like to try ski-joring. At the 

condusioii of the skating events, there 

will he a f)urles(jue hiMkey game, with 

l)roomsti<ks and a teiniis ball, whidi 

should prove very entertaining. Finally 

the varsity game, M.A.C. vs. C.A.C"., 

will take place at .{ p. m. In the evening, 

M.A.C. meets C.A.C. in l)asketl)all. 

Following this game, there will lie a 

jovial gathering round the fire at the 

Social Union r<K)m, North College, to 

which everyone is invited. .An informal. 



A(;c;iE RKVIJK 

(CJunlinuvd from I'aftv 1) 
inhnite troulile to his fond parent in the 
person of lunory D. hurgess. A (juartet 
was next <im the prcigrai.;, and .ifter that 
the orchestra played one or two nuniliers. 
Oscar !•". IJurliank, Jr. performed cpiite 
well as leader of the orchestra, giving a 
g<Kjd show ing as a specialty dancer. 

As a feature for the evening, those 
presi'nt were shown a movie on the life 
of the Ag^ie camjiiis. This film has been 
three years in the making, and in it are 
shown many familiar faces and institu- 
tions of tlie (ampus. Jane Patterson '2'.», 
made the presentation of this film ]Missil>le 
by weeks of labor in editing and perfecting 
the film which w.is nearly abandoned as 
being impossible of getting into shape. 
The picture of President Thatclier, which 



Learn The Piano 

In Ten Lessons 



friendly gathering of this type is'a fitting I the cajitain of the football team and t< 



climax to a <iay of competition. Professor 
(irose will entertain with stories of "I'aul 
Hunyan," and Mr. VVillianis with some 
songs. Further arrangements are to be 
made. 

Kobley Nash '20, in charge of 'skating 
events, has been on the watch*for <xhi- 
bition skaters, and wishes to hear from 
an\one he m.iN have o\erl<ioked. 

As was sl.itcd last week, the winners 
of the competitions will be eligible to 
reiireseiit the College in winter spurts, if 
a mict c.in Ik- arrang»-d with s<ime out- 
side tc.ini. 

'I he progr.im follows: 

1. ,S.4."i-l l.b'i. Snow events, in charge of 
I.dward H. Nichols '2H. At ski slide in 
frcint of the .\bliey. 

(ai K.4r». Cross-countr\ race (Competi- 
tors may us*- either skis or snowshoesi. 
(bi it.;!ll Ski nmninu iCompetition for 
form in ski ing <lown liiU . 
(C) in.l.'i Ski anil snow ?<hoe raies. 

1(M» yd. d.eh on skiis for men. 
:*) vd. d.i-^li on skiis for women. 

100 y<b dasli nn shuwshoes lor min. 
,")() yd. dash on snowsluies f<ir women 

( )bsta« le rat es. 

2. I l.lo-l 1.4."i Snowball fight, in < harge 
of Sen.ite. .\t the field between the ski 
slide .ind the .\blit \ 

3. 12.;itt-l.;!0 Ski joring. in I h.irg«of Koy 
Tarr "l-M. .\t the held between the ski 
slitle and the .\bbe\ . 

4. l.:>o;i.lM) be events, in «harge ot 
Roblcy \\ . N.ish 'li'.i and T.iylor M. Mills 
'l".t. At the pond. 

(a) I.;MI FLxhiliiti<in skating. 

Norman Mvrick "-W. < .ustave S. 

IMoUKpiist 'JO. Robert K. l.abarge. 
(bi 1.4.") Ka(es for nun. 

100, I'l-'O, 440. .S.SO \.ird>. 
(C! 'lA'i K.i'.es for wmen 

IIM), 440 yards. 
(di -.;iO Obst.icle races. 
(ei Huiles«)ue luH-kc-y g.nne. 

5. ;!.(K) p. n». VarsityTUK-key game 
M.A.C. vs. ( A.C. 

6. 4.:U» p. m. Ju<lging of snow men com- 
petition. 

7. .S.(K) p. m. \arsitv basketball. 
M.A.C. vs. ( .A.( . 

S.OO p. m. Shial Hour, Social I nion 
Ko4tm. North College. 



TtNOR-BANJO OR MADOIJN 
IN FIVE LESSONS 

Without nerve-racking, heart-breaking 
siales and exercises. Vou are taught to 
pla\ by note in regular professional chord 
style, in your very first lesson you will 
be able to play a popular number by note. 

Send for it on approval 

The "Hallmark Self-Instructor," is the 
title of this method. Flight years were 
reciuired to perfect this great work. '1 he 
entire course with the necessary examina- 
tion sheets, is bound in one volume. '1 he 
first lesson is unsealed which the student 
may examine and be his own "JIjU<«F- 
and JIKV." The later part of the "Hall- 
mark Self-Instructor," is sealed. 

Ijion the student returning any copy 
comes at the end, was only taken three [of the "Hallmark Self-Instructor" with 

the seal un-broken, we will refund in full 
all money paid. 

This amazing Self- Instructor will be 
sent an> where. \\m do not need to send 
any money. When you receive this new 
method of teaching music, deposit with 
the postman the sum of ten dollars. If 
you are not entirely satisfied, the money 
jiaid will be returned in full, upon written 
re<|uest. The imblishers are anxious to 
place this "Self- Instructor" in the hands 
of music lovers all over the country, and 
is in a position to make an attractive 
projiosition to agents. Send for your copy 
to(la\. Address the "Hallmark Stlf- 
Instruitor", Station (i, Post Ofiice liox 
111. New York, N. V. — Adirrttsemen} 



weeks ago. 

The name of the film is ".Aggie Men 
Are C.athered," and the story is of the 
fortunes of a freshman from the time he 
leaves home until the height of his success 
on the campus. It shows how he fights 
the battle between the desire to shield 



live up to the rules of the Ibmor Council. 
Me has seen the captain using notes 
during an exam, and finds himsi-lf facmg 
the predicament as to whether he will 
fell or not. He has decided to leave 
(dllege rather than face the thing any 
longer, when he is overtaken by his 
friend, "Halis," who explains that she 
h.is explained everything to the captain 
and that he has confessed to the Dean. 
This puts a different light on the ni.itter 
and he g.ies back and attends the game 
with Andurst to si-e the captain make the 
winning touchdown. As a sign of the 
\ictorv, the students sing a new song, 
the one that be himself ha<l comtM)sed 
and that he had called "\ictory. March 

On!" 

Throuvihont the film there are scen<s 
around the campus, showing the buildings, 
the classrtHjms, the liichers and the 
>tudents. Kven so humble a thing as the 
exit from Assendily is plioloKraphed. 
Miss Patterson desi-rves great credit tor 
lur part in the creation of this iiicture. 

The last feature w.is a pl.i\ taken from 
the story "The Sijuire," by Flsie Sing- 
master. This was dramatized by .\rnohl 
W. Dyer '-IW and was pla>eil by nuiubers 
of the Roister Doisters under the direction 
of Prof. Charles H. Patterson. This is 
the story of a young couple in a small 
town in the mountains who are both tiK) 
much dominated by their respective 
rel.itives. They come beftire the judge 
who unites theni again and makes them 
liappy by giving them money that he 
has saveil for years for his own vacation 
with which they are able to go otY to- 
i;.t!ur. The acting in this short play 
w.i> uimsuallv excellent and finished. 



Tlulnui Dickinson '.'?•_' has been elected 
b\ tlie membirs of the W.S.C.A. to 
represent the i lass of '">'J on the \V.S.(i..A. 
Council. 



$6.00 DRAWING SET $4.00 

Drawing Boards. T Squares. Triangles, Pencils and Erasers 

A J. HASTINGS "^^l^^^r AMHERST. MASS. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS I.N 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS READY TO WEAR 

AMHERST, MASS. 



When down Town visit our 
Store for Lunch, Dinner or 
Refreshments. 

Special Sunday Night Suppers 

Sams Restaurant or College Candy Kitchen 



COMMUNICATIONS 

(Continued from I'uite 2) 
of moilern life, is it not obtained .it a 
greater loss? Is it not the substituting 
of transient for eternal values? Possibis 
not, but it seems so to me! 

To ((intinue the argument on a prac- 
tical basis, what eartliK good will such a 
c<iurse be to the scholar or scientist other 
th.in the scientist i-ngagetl in agricultural 
pursuit? Indeed, it may do him no harm, 
but are there no course-s on campus fr<nn 
which the same student coulil derive far 
more practical good? Furthermore, a 
great man\ students from this institution 
.ire going to enter non-agricultural gradu- 
att- schools, in which these agricultural 
subji-cts will be politely dis<ardeti. 

lin.illy. this course is so conductt-d 
that one must do a prodigious amount of 
dry, <letestable work in order to e\en pass 
it. This means that the majority of 
students will neglect, if possible, and dis- 
like the subjett. I'nder these ctinditions, 
wh.it giKxl is the course doing either the 
student or the professor? Then, the 
course takes such a great amount of time 
that the ordin.iry student cannot possibU 
do the work without neglecting other 
conrM'-; ( )ii fliis .(ccoiint the profrssors 
themseKes should not tolerate such in- 
direct unfair treatment. 

What can be ilone to change the situa 
tion? Partial immediate relief could be 
brought about through the professor's 
being reasonable; but one can not \\o\)v 
lor this. I will [iropose a plan which. I 
believe, will bring about a iK-rmanent 
change for the better if it becomes 
ettt'Ctive. Since the students must eventu- 
ally take the courses, they should have 
soii'e siiy in the courses to be gixen, and 
e^liecially tliose to be re()uired. To this 
efiect. I proiH)se that the students elect 
a council simil.ir to the Honor Council 
which will meet with the f.tculty curricu- 
lum committee. NaturalU, this group 
will only play a minor role, but it will be 
able to hel]) the faculty committee, avoid 
stufihng any more sour lemons down the 
students' throats. It would also benefit 
the faculty, for they could then determine 
the students' opinion of a i)roposed 
change before it was put into effect. 

If this plan is further extemled. as I 
hope it will be. how will the faculty 
recei\c it? Will the> accept it and show 
that they have the interest of the stu- 
dents at heart, or will they oppose it and 
contim:;' in their narrow, selfish, (xiiitical 
paths? Time will tell I 



AGAIES LO.SE K) WE.SI.EYAN 

(Continued from Hafte I) 

basket. Kelley then put M.-A.C. in the 

scoring colunm b\' sinking a long floor 
shcjt. .Xfter Owen had scored again, 
"Ireddie" Kllert made a sensational 
dribble down the fhxjr to t.illy two ixjints. 
"Hur" Hurbank h(M>i)ed the ball f(jr 
Mas.s;ichusetts before the half closed, 
leaving \V'esle>an ahead 8 to (5. 

.'\t the beginning of the second half, 
Wesleyan increased their lead to five 
points with a floor shot by Millspaugh 
and a free throw by ( )wen. Kelley dropped 
another long shot, but \an Cott soon 
sc<jre(l to keep Wesleyan well in the lead. 
The (ount was made l.'i to 10 when Kllert 
and Ward scored baskets for their re- 
s|)ective teams. 

After Massachusetts had called time 
out, the game, hard-played before, de- 
veloped into a battle for the ball. Capt. 
Kllert refjeated his ix-rformance of earlier 
in the game by running through the 
Wesleyan defense alone and scoring. With 
about a minute to play, Kllert scored his 
fourth basket <in a long shfit. Two or 
three more tries failed, and the game 
ended as Stanisiew ski made a last attempt 
to overcome Wcsleyan's one-|K>int lead. 
The shot failed, and Wesleyan won l."i 
to 14. 

Captain "FrecUIie" Kllert stands out in 
a review of the game, with his defensive 
work, his clever passing, his two runs 
down the fltjor, and his four baskets for 
eight iKiints. However, the rest of the 
team, liurbank, Kelley, .Stanisiew ski. and 
Mann, all deserve credit. The former 
two appe.ir in the scoring column with a 
total of si.\ points. .All played a full, 
hard g.ime both offensively and de- 
fi-nsi\el\ . 

Wesles.m. pl.iying four lettermen in the 
game, had an ex|K-rienced team. This 
st'.isoii the\ h.id already beaten Clark 
and Host on I'liiversity and had been 
turned back by Springfield before meet- 
ing .M..\.C. The scoring in the game 
S.itur<lay night was divided between 
Owen. \'.in Cott. Ward. Nve. and .Mills- 
paugh. while Captain .Sinders also plaved 
a good game. The summar\-: 




Weslevan 


.Massachusetts 


IM "P. 




H.F.P. 


Owiii.lt 2 1 .") 


Mann.rg 


(1 


\aii Cott.rf 1 1 :; 


Kllert. lu 


4 (t .S 


W.ird.rf 1 (1 2 


Stani'ski.c 


II ll II 


Nve.c 1 1 :; 


Kellev.rf 


•J 4 


Sanders.lg »l (1 tt 


lUirbank.lf 


I 2 


.Miilsp'gh.rg 1 (t •_' 






Totals f. ;{!.') 


Totals 


7 014 


Score at half time: 


Weslev.in .S, 


Massa- 


chusetts »i. Keferei 


•: Farrell. I 


mpire: 


Johnson. Time: 20- 


minute hal\e> 





Laid Up Cars 

$2.00 Per Month Until April 1st 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter H. Harrison, Prop. 



IT'S THE 



There once was a 
fraternity custom 
...the first man up 
was the man best 
dressed. 

We put an end to 
that 

Now f*•^^»^rn^ltY 
men sl«'ep pea/^" 
fully through eight 
o'elocks knowing 
there are plenty 
of Br-iehuroc* to 



6^ 



ro 



uud. 



Carl H. Bolte 

Incorporated 

Exeter Amher. 

Hyannis 



Winter's Around The Corner 

.WOIU TllK RUSH. Come in an<l ^tt 
your Overshoes for this Winter. 

Shoe Repairinii Department 
JOHN FOTOS SHOE STORE 



DRY CLEAiMNG 



PRESSING 



For Prompt Service Phone 828 

"LET DAVE DO IT" 

AMHERST CLEANERS & DYERS 

1 1 MAIN STREET NEXT TO TOWN HALL 

One Day Service on Dry Cleaning Work Called for and Delivered Dally 

REPAIRING LAUNDRY DYEING 





NOTICE 






Durinjj the 


winter term 


the 


srhedule 


Inr the suppl 


v r(K)m hours. 


at 


the Drill 


Hall is as follows: 








Mcrtiini> 




Aflcnioou 


Mon<la\ 


10-11 






TuesdaN 


11 12 




12 


We<lnes<la\ 


U U 




:i-:i 4.-. 


ThursiLn 


ll-l'J 




1 '_' 


Kriila\ 


lt-l(l 






Satunl.n 


S 10 






1 iiesila\. \\e( 


liu~(la\ . and ' 


riiursdav 


noons 12 


10 1 






Frill. i\ niKiii 


r_' ll! :;o 







Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



Sl|^ iMag0arl^«Hdtg OInlUgtatt 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2.A, 192*> 



Number \^ 



Dr. Raphael Zon Sketches 
Present Age 0{ Wood 

Interesting Talk in Assembly 

Tiiat we are now in what might l>e 
termed the "Timher Age" was the ilaim 
,,i |)r. Raphael Zon who spoke in Assem- 
lilv last WednesdaN afternoon. Dr. Zon, 
vvho is Director of the Lake Stales Kx- 
|)tri""^nt Station, was the exohan>{e 
Icdurer of the Division of Horticulture 
diirini} the past week. As prt)of of his 
st.iunient, Dr. Zon <ju«Jted a few figures 
which indicated the trend toward greater 
use of w(xjd in the world. 

The soil, saitl the speaker, is in the 
final analysis the only real producer of 
iinihing. We go to the soil for nearly 
.ill (lur raw materials although their con- 
litiiins may be greatly mo<litied before 
tlie\' reach the final c<jnsumer. 

In connection with the grcjwing use of 
wood in the making of paper the s|X'aker 
stated that in the U. S. six million c<irds 
are cut j)er day, and that is an average 
use of lliO pounds per capita each year, 
.IS against 90 pouniis in England during 
the same jwriod. 

Ill (losing. Dr. Zon emphasized strongly 
ilie need for a proper understanding of 
tiie ( unditionsas they are present through- 
mit the world. He stated that through 
projier consideration these dangerous con- 
ilitions couhi be securely remeilied. and 
lliat the sooner this was realized the 
Letter for the people of the world. 

POPULAR BAND SECURED 
FOR MILITARY BALL 

Invitatictns Sent to Prominent 
Officers in First (lorps .\rea 

< »niy sixteen days now remain before 
the evening of the Militar\ Hall which 
will be Friday, February .s. The dance 
uill take |>lace at the Drill il.ill between 
ihc hours of 7.;J0 and ll.;{0. .All those 
iinong the student bo<ly who are eligible 
In purchase tickets fur the liall are re- 
i|ue:-ted to ili> so right away so that the 
lonunittee in charge ma\ m.ike its final 
irr.uiijements on refreshments. 

Tiie Bohemians frmn Worcester h.i\e 
1 (< II ( hosen to favor the cadets and their 
IriciuU with tnusic for the e\ening. These 
niuMcians tiot oidy rank among the fijre- 
most orchestras in New Kngland but are 
\try well known «)n campus, for the\- 
I)la\ed here last \ear at both Junior 
I'roni and Soph-Senior Hop. 

Aiii«»ng the chajK-rons at the Hail will 
III Major an<I Mrs. N. Hutler Hristoe. 
Mjjur and Mrs. Kustis I.. Hubbard. 
<^-H4^»aH«l Mrs. luiwiii M. .Sumner ami 
I'n -ident .ind Mrs. KosdK- W. Thatcher. 
'^I'l' 111 guest in\itations ha\e been sent 
■\\i- following: Major-tieneral an<I 
^ir-. I'reston lirown, c'onnnander of 
I r-t Corps Area. Colonel W . H. burtt 
I liMihpiarters, First Corps Area, 
'jlonei and Mrs. J. H. K. Davis of 
H.irilord, an<I Colonel and Mr>. Clieiicx 
"t tlie;jnuh Cavalry, IIartfor<l. 

It is requested that all the men plaiming 
'" in\ite guests from Smith or .Mount 
'l'Jl>'ike to the Ball get in touch with 
Continued on Page 4) 



STUDENTS ATTAIN HIGH Cast Chosen To Play 
AVERAGES FOR TERMl In Annual Prom SI 



low 



Honor <;roup .\iinoutu-ement Shows 
Satisfactory Kepresenlalion 

.A ver\ substantial increase in the num- 
ber of names appearing on the dean's 
honor list is to be noted in the list re- 
cently finished, for the fall term of the 
pies»iit college year. The results of this 
iheckup show that there are 112 names 
on the present list, an increase of thirty 
over the list of 1027, and of twenty over 
last \ ear's list. Nine names appear in 
the group for those attaining averages 
of o\ er OOfi, 2G in the second honors gr«jup 
with averages between .S") and iH);;, and 
7'.t in the third honors group w ilh averages 
between SO and 85",. 

The c()mi)lete list follows: 

(iruup 1. Over 90;^ 

Class 1020 Harry K. C opson of Fast- 
hampton, Ruth H. Parrish of ( Ireat 
Harrington, Walter K. Southwick of 
Clinton, and Klizabefh A. .Steinbugler of 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Class HKIO Winthrop A. Ames of 
Falmouth, lre<l W. Jon<s of (His, an<I 
Alice (.. Stiles of We^t field. 

Class VJtU Flarle I.. Morawski of 
Attleboro, and Marion I. Roper of West 
minster. 

C;rou|> 2. H.S-90:. 

Class 1929 Chesley I.. Black, Laurence 
.\. Carruth, William ( i. Kdson, Mildred 
I ontaine. .Alfred < .. Ililbert, Ta\lor .M. 
•Mills. Fldwar.l II. Niihols, Bolesl.iw 
.\itkiewicz, Faith E. Packard, William B. 
Robertson. Phillips B. Steere, Di< kran 
X.irtanian and .\le.\amler C. Winton. 

Class 19.'{0 RaNuiond C. .\Men. Harold 
\. Campbell, Addis.m S. Hall, John B. 
Howard, Theodore .Marcus. Beryl I\ 
Morse, Wilfred ( i. Purdy, Raphael 
Saraceni, and .\ibert P. Zuger. 

Class VS.',l S.dly I.. BiMdh-N, Rich.ini 
W. i)a\is. (.ertrude i.. I.eCl.iir, and 
Benjamin Wilbur. 

(Continued on Paite ij 



Jane Patterson New Head 
Of Roister Doisters 

Dramatic Sm-iety to Hold .\nnual 
Banquet at Lord Jeff Inn Toniiiht 



FACULTY NOTE 

' :r members of the M..\.C. bnulty 

'^"1 >peak at the ninth annual meeting 

"' the .Mass;ichusetts Agricultural Fairs 

^>-<i' uition at Worcester on Jan. 22. Mr. 

''"'-■ 1.. Farley will give a conmiittee 

'l"''t on the Boy's and dirl's FIxhibits; 

*"■ I'.arle S. Cariwnter will give sjjecial 

■J"' information and a rep<jrt of the 

•ininiittee on judging; Major N. Butler 

I'rxi,,.- will talk on the subjett "Morse 

- It Fall Fairs, and The Place of 

tntl.i^hi Weight Horse in New Flngland;" 

^"'1 l'rofess<jr C. J. Fawcett will conduct 

' 'ii>' ussion of the dvnamometer. 



"I' Ol TS TANDING EVENT OF 
THE PAST WEEK 



Red" Ball's hockev se.xtet 
"light fame upon itself b\ 
three s<alps to its victory belt 
• ii^t week. 



r<' 



I 



The Roister Doisters will hohl .i 
ban(|uet tonight at the Ford Jetf Inn 
The chief guest of the evening will be 
Windsor P. Daggett of New ^ ork. Mr. 
Daggett is a well-known teacher and 
coach of dramatics. He will address the 
Roister Doisters on the subjeit, "The 
Speech of the .\ctor." illustrating his 
talk by using talking-machine rec(jrds 
made by prominent c<mtem|Mjrary actors. 
Jane Pattersf)n will be iit the head 
table as |)resident of the organization 
sinic. f(j|lowing the resignation of l.eon.ird 
W. Morrison, she has su(cee«led to th( 
presidency of the Roister Doisters. 
Taylor M. Mills has been eleded vice- 
president in her plate, and Wilfred <>. 
Punly has been ele( ted assistant manager. 
It is with regret that the s<j(iety has 
accepted .Mr. Morrison's resignatitm from 
the presidency, as he has been very 
acti\e in dram.itics in the past. 

INTKRFRATERNn V CONFERENCE 
MEETIN(; 

Two important c|uestioiis wt-re dis< ussed 
in the Interfraternit\ Conterence meeting 
held last Thursday. The first was on de- 
ferred rushing and the other w.is on the 
lnterfraternit\ Siny. 

It was det ided Id have the delegates to 
the Conference re[)ort to their various 
fraternities and obtain the sentiment in 
regard to tie question o( deferretl rushing. 
They were to find out whether the fra- 
ternities were in favor of holding the 
rushing season the first week of the set find 
term or at some other tletemil t inie. '1 he 
plan of rushing. howe\er. would remain 
practically the same as it is at present. 

There is to be no Interfraternity Sing 
thi- viar. The sentiment of ttic Iri- 
ternities was obtainetl and it w.i'- to the 
efle't that there shoultl be no .Sin,;. 



Roister Doisters To Present "CraijJ's 

Wife" by (ieorfte kelley 

for Sprinji Slum 

Tryouts ftir the Junior Pitnii pLiN . 
"Craig's Wife," were heltl Wetlnesday 
evening, January Iti, in the Memori.il 
Building. .A large number of caiuliil.ites 
was ()resent, ami from this group. Prtif. 
I'rank Prentice Rand, faculty manager of 
the knister Doisters, who is in charge of 
the protluction, selectetl thirteen to take 
l)art in the play. Jane Patterson is cast 
as Mrs. Craig; Carmeta S.irgent as Miss 
.\ustin, Craig's aunt; I,uc\ ( .runwahlt as 
Kthel l.andreth, a niece of .Mrs. Craig; 
Iris Del'alct) as Mrs. I'razier, a neiglibt)r; 
Ruth SiDtt as .Mrs. Ilarohl, the hou.se- 
kee|HT; anti Faith Packanl, as Ma/ie, 
the maiil Irene Bartlett will umlerslutly 
the female parts. The male roles will be 
taken as follows: Craig by Tayh)r M. 
Mills; Fugene Fredericks, Kthel's fiance, 
by Carl A. Bergan; Birkmyer, a frienti of 
Craig's, by Davis H. Flliot; Catelle, .i 
tietective, by Oscar Margt)lin; and Harry, 
a Si'ctiml tietective, by John W. Schoon- 
maker. 

(Continued on I'ufte .t) 

FIRST LARGE SOCIAL 

AFFAIR SATURDAY 

Futuristic Desij^ns to be Keynote of 
Mardi (iras 

Plans for the Maroon Key Marili (Iras, 
lielil Jamiary 20. are progressing with 
lapitlity ami success. The dei t)ratit)ns 
lia\e been cUt itietl uimn; the\ are to be 
futuristic, with baltM>ns as well. 

.Many tickets have been solil at present 
ami timse wht) have ntJt purchasetl theirs 
should see one of thosi' s<'lling titkets 
stMMi, as there is every imlitatitm th.it 
this alTair will b«' a sut i essful one ami 
titkets will be scartf. Those selling 
titkets are as ftjilows: W\nton R. 
Danglemeyer, II. Daniel Darling, Richartl 
W. Davis, Paul R. I- it/gerahl, l.awreiitc 
.A. Jtines, .\rnt)ld W. (Hsson, Ireileritk .S. 
rrt)y, Hartly L. Walilgren ami Allen .S. 
West, Jr. The irrite ft)r the titkets is 
.f2..")0 |>er cou|)le. 

It is intentleil to make this one of the 
mt)st successful sticial functions of its 
kinti e\er heltl, antI to make the custtmi 
a permanent one on this campus. This 
tiance is to be formal; that is, ct>stuines 
or ft»rmal attire is to be wtjrn. 



Army, St. Stephens and Bates 
Bow To Varsity at Hockey 



CA.VIHt .S C;.\I.KM>AK 

I hill hr^l piirlion ui n grmj mnn' ■ Hi 
III', lilllf. namrU^-.. unrememl'' , 
kiihliif, and < if litre," 

II VWitforrt ( I'mlii » 



C.A.C. Rallies In Second 
Half To Beat Agates 

Mar«M>n and Wbite Kasketeers Play 
(itM>d (Jame Ajtainsl Stiff ()pp<»sili«>n 

Pl.uing without the services of Capt. 
Fllert ami .St.misiewski, the Mass.it hn 
M'tts basketball team heltl Ctinnecticiit's 
strt)ng club to a tt> <t tie in the first h.ilf 
t)f the game List Satuitlay night .it the 
Drill Hall, but was t>utplayetl in the 
sectnul h.iif, the final sct>re being 21 tt) 
i;j in favt)r t)f the visitors. Captain Ry.in 
of the visitors letl the att.uk with four 
baskets, while I.amtmreux antI Chubbui k 
sct)red six ptiints each. 

In the first half there w.is gtwKl tle- 
fensive play by l)oth teams. Ryan startetl 
the scoring by c;iging a fltitir shot, whit h 
was followetl by I.amt>ureux' h)ul. D.ivi> 
tallietl with a foul shot for M.A.C., but 
Ctmnettiiiit matle the sctire to 1 with .i 
llotH anil .1 ftnil sht)t. Coukt)s then s.ink 
a pretty htM)k shot from the foul line ami 
sot)ii ailiieil twt» mtire pt)ints by c;iging 
a pair of free throws. Ryan tht)ppeil 
mother b.isket, but Mann put Mass.i- 
t huselts into a 9 to .S le;itl with Iwi) long 
shots. The game then tightenetl up bir 
the remaining few minutes of the h.ilf, 
the only stt)re being Chubbiick's foul to 
tie the ct>unt. 

Coimetticut startetl strong in t he 
seconil h.ilf with b.iskels by Ry.iii, 
Chiibbuck. ,md I imomeux ami a gift 
toss by the hitter belolf the M..\.C. te.im 
ctniltl score. Kelley 's loiil bit)ke the spell, 
but Clitibbiit k ftillt)wi'i| with ,i doiibli 
tiet ker lor the \isitors. Thne poini-, 
were atjileil to the home team's tot.il 
when Coukos tht)pped .i fiiiil ,\\i,\ D.i\i> 
a IliMii shot, but C..\.C. stDretl three more 
points to in.ike the sct»re 21 li> j.'! beb»re 
the game emleil. 

-•\s i"i the D.irtmtnitli gime, ( .iptnn 
Fllert was miss«t|, but "Ray" .Mann 
shtniltlereil well the responsibility i>f 
at ting c;i|)t.iin. The wt)rk of Davis, 
starting his lir^t v.irsit> gime, w.is idui- 
mentlable. 

The summary: 

Ciiniift lU'UI .MaNHaehuitellN 

H I- V H. !•. I' 



In a 1, 1^1 n.inie, the .M.iss.i( husetts 
hotkev te.im e.i.silv tleb-.ited West I'tiint 
by the St lire of ;; to 1 |.,s| Wetlnestl.iy 
.ifterniM.n on the Siii.iit Rink, West 
I'omt "Retl" B.ill's tliib was not loiitti 
• o pl.iv .IS h.iiil .IS .It Hamilton, but the 
whtile te.im woiked well olleiisiv elv .mil 
ilebnsivelv. Davis, Patch, ami Frost e.ich 
stiireil one gi>al for the visiti>rs. Captain 
Ct>^tell(., the West Point go.llie, w.is the 
m.iinst.iv ol the losers' ilefense. ami lind- 
tpiist was the ollensive st.ir, st tiring the 
t>nlv goal for the home team. 

Ne.ir the emi of the first peritxi, D.ivis 
sttnetl U» M./\.C. on a pass lioin P.itt h. 
i:.irly in the next staii/a, Patth pusheil 
the putk past Costello .ifter rettiving it 
Irom N.ish. Later in this perititl, I.intl- 
ipiist sttiietl West Point's only goal. 
Frost itintiibiileil his sh.ire of the vittorv 
by stt.Miig un.issistetl early in the List 
periotl. 

I he siimmarv : 
MaHHachUNcllh 
l'.ii< ti, r\v 



D.ivi 

l'li>-l. \w 
HulKl. Kl 

.Nash. 1,1 
Mvnik. K 

S|Mi<--. M.i^s.i. Ihm-h^ 
M.inlv. West I'DJiK I .III,., 



>\fNi riiiiit 

IW. t ll.llIlT 

< , l.iiiili|uis( 

iw, T.i|i|>ii»i 

l<l. litiL 

ill. S. Ikkii 

t:. I iislrllo 

/llWI. \V.l<-> llti'l. 

l'lrH:>|l-y, llllKlin. 



I.iiiioiiri'iix.lf 

l.li llll'ih.ll 
K:..in.it 
ll.iri'iu .It 
t liiililiiii k,< 
M.it/kiii.i 
lJuti,.lK 
I IstnliiiK.H! 
I);ill,t« 



M.llltl.lK 
K.ll.v.li; 
l>.>vi^.• 
< iiiiko-..!!' 

W.I.JHl.ll 

llnJH-ti iiin.li 
ISiiiluiik.il 



1 '-'., 



Wfdni-sday 

^;'.'i]. Ill .\sx-nit)ly: Mi-is Lilian I. I'; I.' m 

luiiiiL'ily u liocial uorki-i tn India. 
7.IKI ji. III. > (KM'ssniaiiii (iii-mi.al N>rii!> 

iMi-<-tiim: S]n-.ik. r. .Mi<-. .\Iaifl M. .\l.i. 

Mast, r- 
7.IH) ji. ni. I ■ MonOjly miftinn ai 

S.I iai I 111. ill i<ni>jii>. N'irOi ( oll'i.'.-: 

.\li>< Ntaiy l'..-!/i aii.l Mi- Ulan. In 

Sjitirr ol Haniiishiri' t uiinty Kxl-ri-mM 

Stvik' will !«■ Kin-'^n and sUMMk' : 
7.1.'tr>. III. Iiitenla-s lloiki-y: 

Snior-. vs. S.S..\. 

Jiiiiini- y>. I-ri-'hiiii-ii 
(..(Ol). ni. OiitiiiK < lnl»: .\n illii-trat'il 

Ifiiurt' t»y I'rijt. Frank A. WuiikIi. Kiviri 

in Irr-ncli Mall. 
s.iiil i>. III. Iiitcrfratfrnity Ka<k<-tl»all: 

Latnlula ( lii .\l|>ha v-. Nim l-"rat'-riiil\ 
'.* ill |i in. Int'TlratiTnity Bask'-tli;ill: 

.\i|ilia Simiia i'hl \i. l-a< tilty 

'rhurnday 

\ i:-ity Uaskfll-ill: 

Won i-stiT I'. 1 . ln-ri' 
Imi-rfratirnily Ha«k>-tl»a!l: 

!,aiiit.<la t hi .Mpha v-i. Theta (hi 
Men's tilif ( liil) ( oiiKTl at .\shticl<l. 

Kriday 

\ar-ity llorkiy: Uati- ( iill'j;<'. ttnTi- 
Inlirlrat-riuty lia-ki-tl(ali: 

Ka|i|ia I'-psilon vs. K. K. 
I.itiotatory Dann'of tin- l^.in<ls<..ipc Oarijcn- 

HiK i)oi>art!ii<-iit. 

Saturday 

li<-hiiian Baski-ttjall: 

( l.irk S< luHil at Niirthaini'ton. 
lL'..'«ll>. m. OiitinK ' liitj hike to .\lt. I ■ 
l.'K,' 1) III. Inter, la-s H(»i k<-y: 

S-niors vs. Sophomores 
H.IK) |). III. MarrKin K<*y .Manli (iras. 

Sunday 

'M" .1. 111. Suii.l.r I h:iii"l: «.v Jr.dii 

.\li.ioii. First l'ri--l(:. cn.iii ( li im li. 

llolyoke. .Ma'*'. 
T.I-"]' '" N!':!..tih S.'i.i-.. M.iM,':,.! 

H'lil.lii..; 
Tuesday 

<i. t ■> 1). m. I>f«ii 

l.i("r:'tiif: Tall.-. i- .■.>.. i. .,■,,..■, 

liii'-rlr.itirnily Baskrihali; 

Kappa Kp^ilon vs. <J T \ 

Sii'tna I'hi Kp-ilon •. ' i K:.'/ 

SlorkhriilKi- Basket lia! 
Smlli I)<-<-r(i>''! ' • 



Ii..1m 



Toi.il. 1 .-, i: 

.it lialt tinir: Coiiim-i tn nt !». Massji.Jijj 
Ki-li-ri-i'; Ffldni.in. Tinif: 2<»-iniiiiiti 



Freshmen Defeat Holden 
High Team 22-1 5 

Wilson -Scores I.t Points in .Second 
(»ame of .Season 

Cfiat h "Larry" Briggs' freshman bas 
ketball team chalketl up its set untl win 
of the season by tlefe.iting Ht>|t|en Hi^li 
St hfKil 22 ttj I.") in a rather tlull game List 
Salurilav afterntjon. Wilkin letl the 
freshman olTense with seven b.iskets ami 
a foul ftir fifteen |M>ints, while Hemlrit kson 
was Ht)|(|en's best with six points, (apt. 
I t)iey of the frtjsli tliil not play in tin- 
game, as he hat! a slight att.it k of gri|>|>e. 
Ftiskitt. who jumps center, has ni>t 
playeil in prattiie tluring the past week 
because of an infected face, but he is 
now back in the game. The summary: 



<iilhs.hil.|. ( oIl.T. S«.-.iii-y I.imU D.ivh 

I'alih. lioM. I.iii<l.|iii,| K.t.- M.Willi.uiM 

I iiiii-: thiii' Lll-iiiiiiiiir iK'iioiN 

•ST. .STEPHENS OUIIMAVED 

In the sectiiiti game ol the two il.iy 

trip, St. Stephens .ilso lti>t to the .\g.ites 

by the score of .{ to L C.ipt.iin .N.ish 

sitireil two go.ils .md Bond one lor the 

(Ctinllnurd on I'uile .() 

DARTMOUTH WINS FROM 
AGGIE IN COURT CLASH 

Hay Slaters Handicapped by .\bsence 
u( Kllert 

.Mlhoii'^li thf M.iroon .iiitl White team 
sl.irteil .1 Liti- rally .md mil iil.iynl D.iri- 
moiitli ill the List lew minutes ot the 
b;iskelball gam<- it ll.inovii, .\. IL, last 
Weilnesd.iy evening, the points .it<iimu- 
lateil e.irlier in the game hel|)ei| the home 
team to win .•(2 to Hi. M.A.C. «iuts«<»red 
its op].oneiiis ill the List ten minutes of 
the g.ime, D.ivis starring with five points 
in as many minutes. Cheney, Swarthi>ut, 
and ("apt.iin .Sp.ieth letl in st tiring fo 
the winners ami Coukos nintribule 
seven points to the losers' tot.il. In the 
fiisl h.ilf, the visittirs imly scoretl on lour 
free t ries. 

Hantlii.ipiH'tl by the absence of C.i|»t. 
ICiJert, Massacliusett* play«-tl a giKnl game. 
To meet the .ibsenie of Uieit, .Minn was 
.Ktiii^; i.i|it.iiii, ( oiikos pLiyetl rj^jht for- 
wartl, and Kelley was shiftetl Imm fur- 
w.inl to .1 >;ii,iril beilh. Till- |jiii'ii|i: 

Darliiioiiih 



I 



I I- 

I .■ 

I V 

I 

II ■_' 

1 .", 

O II 

O II 



I ll. 11. ■. It 
111.— -I ll 

sw.iilh.iiii ll 
\ OKI. II 
Sihliiull 
l.i'wiii . 
t..iinii . 

Molsf.li; 

Sli.ii'lh.lK 
I iMiii h.ik' 
l>.-.il.ii; 
\i,..|-i • 



Tot..:- ,,, I, ., 

Sorp at half tiiiif; 

-.It« » Rl'tlTlT. II 

I irii.- L'l)-tiiiniH>' halv 



M.i>s:i< hiii«-lls 

II I- !• 

Mini,..- I I :; 

k>-ll.' 1) •_» 

M.iiii < >i (I 
Dim 

t oiiko-..tl 
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S< ort- Kl halt tiiii'-: Fri--<lim<'n i;i. Molili-n 7 
Ki-ti-ri'c: V'oiinK. Timo: h-ininiitr- (|uart<T-. 

NO'ilCE 

.\ telegram annoum ing ihi mom- of the 
Dartmouth-.Mass. /Xggie basketball game 
was sent by Mgr. Voung immetliately 
after the game but was not ili-livereil 
until the f')lli>wing morning. This ex 
pl.iins why the results were not available 
v\hen iiMiiv intpiiretl Lite in the evt-ning. 



(APIAIN EM.KRT IMPROVINCi 

"Fred/lie" FJIert of Holyoke, laptain 
of b.isketball, h.is been having a s«-vere 
ittat k of grippe. He playeil through the 
Wesleyan game although he iliil nt»t feel 
will ami immediately after the g.ime he 
WIS t.iktii to the Infirmary. .Although he 
has been running a high fever, he is now 
retm-ering, ,int| his ti-mper.it lire has re- 
turnetl to normal. However, it istioublful 
if he will play in any of the games this 
wt-ek, but liojies are held out th.it he will 
sl.irl in till- Sti-vi-ns Tei h ^am<- on Feb. 2. 



NOIICK 

L'luin .M. Whitney, who was 
s< lii-'luletl ftir Fritlay night's Sot l.il 
liiion, will be unable to be here. 



» 

1 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 23, 1929 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Ofiicial nfW6|ja|)t'r of the Massac liusetts 
Agriiultural ColltK'^- I'ublislicd tviry 
Wednesday by the students. 

HOARD OF tDlTORS 

SliKl'Ltv Clkavks "29 Kdilor in-Chief 

i:i)\VAKi. H.Nichols '29 Managinu Ktlilor 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Editorial. Siihll.i-.v Ci.EAVts ;-20 

Feature MAR(.AKlii 1'. IJonovan .S»I 

Alumni & f-h'.rt Course^ Sali.v K. Hkaui.kv M 
AthlKic I twis M LYNDs .in 

I'KANK r DmOLASS .41 

Campus J<'"N I*. UowAKDJK. '31) 

CEllL II. W'ADI.KIlill '•''<• 

Rial S. I'oiikk Jk '•'' 
(K(Ak Mai«.<)1.is ':<li 



BLSINKSS UKl'ARTMKNT 

I Ki ]>} \<u K D. Thayek. Jk. 'M llu<m'-i-i ManaK'r 

" Ad vei lifting Manager 

I.WVIIKKCB A. r*liKt'TH '29 (ircillatii.il Maiian'T 

WlMIIK'l' ('•■ Smmh '30 

JiiHS R. Tank '30 

RoiiKki <;. (;o(ii)N<)w, '31 

D.wil) .M. Nasiin 31 

rAii. A. SMI I II '31 

F. Ki.NSLY Wiirm M '31 



Suhscrii.lioiis $1.'.0() p<r year. Smue 
copies 10 ants. M.iki' all (udcrs payabl'- 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In t ase (»f cluinne t)f address, subscriber 
will pieaM- notify the business manauer 
as BC)Cjn as possible. ^^^^^^^^ 



Entered as sfcond-class matt.-r at tin- AiMli<r>l 
Post (Mlitc. A<c.i>t.-.l lot '"•>.'''"« ■iVf'l' f Vi^^ 
of postaRc provided for in .'action 1 UKt. Act ol Uc- 
tober. U»17. authorized August '.Jl), I'.tlK. ^^ 



A<;. \A\. 2fc 

We have lliis week in our cnnmuinii a 
tioM <<iiiiinn a second letter rone iriiinj; 
the introdtietory eourse niveii to sopliu- 
mores by the Aurieiihural l-xonomic s 
Department. This eontrilnilion we leel 
t-mphasizes the sentiment expressed in 
the one printed last week, and repres«Mits 
the true sentiment of the students t.ikiiiK 
the course. The eoiiditiims surroundiiiK 
this course sun^est a serious fallacy that 
has cropped <>iit in (onnection with the 
reorKi"''''''"'" "' '''^" »'»'■''»•■"'""' which 
was etlei ted last year and is now in ftill 
operatitm. 

In rl•ar^an^;in^C the course of study, t he 
retpiired number of iredits was cut down 
ostensibly so that the freshmen and 
st»phomores woidd not be so Hooded with 
work. RetiuiriiiK nineteen and twenty 
credit hours i)er term was giving the 
hiwer classmen a stilT assignment, and 
the reduction of credit hours looked to be 
a relief. What has actually happened is 
that the credit number has been tlecreasi-d, 
but the recpiired work has remained at 
the same level, iiureasing perhaiis in 
some cases. 

That is why we feel that these two 
communications have been reasonable re 
actions from contact with Ajj. Kc. 2ti this 
year. Those of us who have slrunnhd 
through the course in years past know 
that we had earned our four or five 
credits in doint; so. Now that only three 
credits are n'^en for the same w(»rk. 
there is a pure lack of justice somewhere. 
Hither aile(|iiate credit shoidd be ^iven, 
or the Department should rearranjje the 
requirements of the course to make the 
amount of work reasonable. 

llowtver, it is apparent that the stu 
tlents <U) not want more credit, but 
rather relief front a ctiurse, the benefits 
of which are <|uestionable in the minds 
of many underKraduates, past or present, 
who have completed its retiuirements. 
The concrete sujjn«'**t'"" I)resented last 
week of a student council to act as an 
intermediary between the sttidents and 
the faculty curriculum committee will 
aid materially in avoiding the conditions 
that now exist in coimectit)!! with this 
course. Adelphia or the Senate mi^;ht 
well handle this recommendation. The 
project is worthwhile, for the students 
are not only being used unfairly, but 
thev are losing confidence in .i depart- 
ment which olfers a worthwhile major. 
Immediate acti«m seems necessary. Let's 
hope for the sake of those in distress that 
it is forthcoming;. 

SPKAKINC; OF KPinKMICS 

When .in epicleinic ot sickness hits .i 
college campus, the c iistomar\ student 
reaction is to hope for enough c.ises to 
warrant the suspension of classes until 
the wa\e of illness has jj.issi'd. There 
are others on campus, however, who have 
been entrusted with the c.ire of the 
health of the student body, and an epi 
tiemic means work to them, curing; those 
who are stricken and prevent ini; the 
spread of the disease. 

I"ew of us realize the work lii.it 1ki> 
been done for llu- underjjr.iduafcs mi llii'- 
c.iiii|iii- in tlie p.i-! il.iN--. "Kill" < lorc 
h.is shown a trciiieiiclous amount ot eitei j;\ 
and devoted .i L;re.it amount of time to 
the iirolilcm v.liiili tile "tin " li.i'- i ii-.ited. 
"Chris" li.is h.iil lier h.uicis lull .it the 
Infirm. ir\, and li.i- piTtoriiicd yeoman 
ser\uc- in takiii.; i an iil lu i p.ltieilts. 



Otliirs ha\e also ^iven of their time to 
help the general cause of curative and 
preventative measures, and we feel that 
some recognition should be given for 
their services. It is easy to slide aloiin 
.iiid take things for grated, but wf can 
only clo this when we ha\e elders, in 
whom we may ha\f faith, to lake care 
of us. "Kid", "Chris", and the others 
deserve our thanks. 

iV£VV ?lk}\ BEING TRIED 
AT DINING HALL 

Initialed i>y Mead Waiter to Help 
«' Table Ktiquette 

.\l the dining ii.tll the new ".Senior 
I'lan", which has been in oper.ition tor 
less than two weeks, is working out very 
successfully. The plan i)rovicles that a 
senior shall sit at the head of each fresli- 
iii.m table to supervise- the behavior of 
the freshmen. Ile.id waiter C.eorge W. 
h.irr, who initiated the pi.in in an effort 
to bring about more orderlv conduct on 
the part of the first-year men. s;iys: 
" People expect college breel men to 
know and make use of i)rc)per table 
in.mners. If it is nece-ssary to te.K h table 
iiiaimers here, then we shall elo so." 

1 he nine seniors who have been m he tc-d 
to preside at freshman t.ibles .ire as 
foMows: Harold S. Adams, Willi.im li. 
Robertson, Arnold W. Dyer. KIdred K. 
Patch. Shepley C. Clea\es, Armond I.. 
.\rniiriiis. TaNlor M. -Mills, and John S. 
\\i)oilbiir\ . 




STOCKBRIDGE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLECHAN. Wl DNESDAY, JANUARY 2i, 1929 



COMMUNICATIONS 



I HE BESr EDUCATED 

RIVER IN niK NNORI.l) 



The following letter was sent to the 
ColUxidii Dtfice in a copy of the linsloii 
Evening Tramcripl for October U7, U)-S. 

To the Kditor of the Traunrtpt-- 

The recent graphic article in the 
Transcript on a Rixer of Colleges brings 
out impressively the notable significanc- 
of the great bodies of scholars and stu- 
dents compacted on the bank s of the 



Charles River in Cambridge and Hoston 
ll.irv.ird I'niversity, Hostem Iniversity 
and the Institute of Technology constitute 
an academic group w hose nearest counter- 
l)art is in the universities of Oxford ;ind 
l.ondem on the Thames. Hut Oxford 
and lonclon are seventy miles apart, 
while our^Charles River institutiems are 
beside each other. 

Charles River, however, is not our 
chief New England river of colleges. That 
is the Connecticut. Indeed, it is dcmbt- 
ful whether there is i n the world another 
river on whose banks are located, in the 
course of two hundred miles, so many 
colleges and higher institutions of learn- 
ing as on the Connecticut. 

Highest up and most important is 
Dartmouth College at Hanover Directly 
opposite Hanover, on the \ermont side 
of the river, is Norwich I'niversity, the 
f.imous military sch(K)l. Kntering Massa- 
chusetts, we come immediately to the 
huge and impejrtant seminaries at North- 
field and Mount llermon. Then cemies 
the remarkable group of colleges which 
includes Amherst College, the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultur.il College, Smith Col- 
lege and .Mount Holyoke. There are two 
colleges at Springfield. .At Hartford is 
Trinity College, besides the imiM>rtant 
Hartford Theological Seminary. At Mid- 
clletovvn is Wi-sleyan Cniversity, the most 
famous if not now the largest of our 
Methodist colleges; and there, tcM). until 
recently has been the Herkeley Divinity 
SchcKjl, now removed to New Haven. 
Vale Cniversity itself, at New Haven, 
is in the Connecticut X.illey ami at so 
short a distance from the historic river 
that no great violence would be clone to 
propriety if we included it in our list. 
Moreover itimust be reniemliered that 
Vale is older than its name, and the 
college when founded ^.and for its first 
fifteen vears was loeatetljjii the banks of 
the Connecticut, at its vcrv inotith, at 
Siiybrook. 

Besides ail the .imous colleges, there 
,ire on the Connecticut, as main will 
ree-.ill, manv imiMtrt.mt academies .uul 
secondary schools of various sorts, such 
as KimballiAcademy, at Meriden, N. H., 
\ eriiiont .\c-aclemv at Saxton's River, the 
tamoiis old academies ,tt Deerfield .uul 
il.ullev, .Mill \\ illiston .\i,icleiii\ .it T..ist- 
h,iir.i>liui. Altogether this group if im- 
j)ort.iiit >chools and eolleues c.mnot be 
paralleleel elsewhere. It is not tcx) much 
to s.iy tint tile ( Oniiec tiiut is the best 
educ.iteil river in the world. 

l-.iiuui II. M,;id 
Hoston, Oct. 2.') 



Campus DetNis 



Prexy Says 

IVof.inity may move a mule but clean, 
str.iight l.iiiguage is vastly more- effective 
to hurt or help a man. 
- CI) 
Intercolleftiate 

(ientlenien may prefer blondes, but 
college- boys iirefer brunettes,- if one is 
to judge from the results of a recent 
c|Ucstionn.iiie circtilatecl among fraternity 
men on the Cniversity of South Dakota 
campus. 

Social qualities head the list of de- 
sirable female <iualifications^ think the- 
Dakota boys, with intellectual powers, 
artistic ability, athletics anil ch)mestic 
virtues following in the order named. 

Wluit cUm's the old-fashioned girl do in 
such a case? 

( D 

College students are divided into two 
tyjies. according to Knute Rockne. head 
eo.icli of Notre Dame. These are the 
>tuclent and the llollywtKKl student. Ilc- 
siiys that the former is the real college 
man, who iilays footb.dl to relieve him- 
self of pent-up spirits, and the l.itter is 
the- type who thinks college is conducted 
as in the movies. 

CD 

At Springfielel College, the freshmen 
have o.-ganized their own Senate body. 
CD 

Vale has abandoned the Honor System 
as u university policy. 

CD 

Joe Found That 

Fannie Frosh says: 

If there are a thousiind things in this 

wide world 
That disturb my constitution. 
/•:i'<Ty one of them is to hear this place 
Calle-d repeatedly an institution. 
CD 
Ve who have managerial ability! Jt)in 
the human race for the best .Vaclemic 
.Activities Man.iger of I'.toO. The Hoard's 
otTering is inviting enough to anyone in 
need of fiftv berries. 

CD 

The hardest working man on campus 
last week was the bell-ringer. If these 
victories pile up tcH) rapidly, the old bell 
will begin to complain. Hut then, the 
weather man was also spending a I.ibori- 
ous week, undoubtedly working overtime 
CD 



NOR I HAMPTON lll(;il WINS 

Northampton High's basketball team 
scored a .'{() to 11 victory over the Stock- 
bridge five- on Tuesday, Jan. l-') c)n the 
Drill Hall surface. Janus, the visiting 
center, led the attatk with fourteen 
points from four floor goals and six free 
tries. Irost and Morrill, regulars on 
"Red" Hall's club, were in the Infirmary 
.ind Hill and Chaee, guards, only played 
half the g.ime because of colcls. 

■ 

James W David, S.S.A. '22, superm- 

tendent of Mrs. James J. Starrow's estate 

at Lincoln visited the c.iinpus la>t week 

interv iewing stndi-nts for pl.icement. 

Krrol F. Cook, S.S.A. '2S, is now feed 
salesman for the Larrowe Milling Co., 
covering western Massachusetts territory, 
with heachiuarters at the Hotel Bridge- 
way, Springfield. He is a frequent visitor 
to the campus. His major here was Dairv 
Manufactures. 

i;dwiii R. "Soiing, S.S..\. '27, has 
worked up to the position of managing 
forem.in of the Little Tree Farms, at 
Tr.imingham since starting work with 
them l.ist .April. He majorecl in I'lori- 
culture. 

The Sloikbridge .Agronemiy Club has 
l.cc n recently organized and held its first 
meeting Wednesday, Jan. lt>, with an 
illustrated lecture on "Pasture Improve 
ment" by John Abbott, formerly of the 
Ccille-ge Kxtension Service, nenv of the 
Nalienial Fertilizer .AsscK-iation. 

Thirty-two stuelents have enrolled for 
the ten weeks winter school courses m 
igrieultiire at M.A.C. This number in- 
cludes two H.irvard graduates .mcl one 
Williams graduate. 



MILITARY NOTES 



When are icicles not icicles? .Answer: 
Last Wednesdav morning when our mild 
New Fngl.md we.ithe-r converted them 
into nosi-s. Mark Twain was right. 

CD 

Someone has presented the following 
information: W hen the Abbey was look- 
ing for a handle, the name otTered as an 
alternative for Abigail .Adams was that 
of some fair lady whose first name was 
llrnricltu. Think of all the House might 
have collected in the way of addc-il 
appellations! 

CD — 
Speaking of the Abbey what about 
the big event of last Saturday that was 
to be featured in frcmt of it? 

.Again the well-worn ejuestion was asked 
cm the morning of the above clay: "Where 
were the snows of yesterday." 

CD 

Manly C.rass is here again, so we he.ir. 

CI) 
In the rniversily of Roc luster C'umpns 
we found this: "".Addition to roll of 
Famous Men, viz. fl.igpole sitters, mara- 
thcm dancers, long-distance cotfee drink- 
ers, et al., as supi)liecl by the .Mit.\.'i(itliu- 
,«•//.< Collcniiin, the ofiicial published-every- 
Wednesday newspai^er of the Mass;iclui- 
setts Agricultural College: 

'The honor of being the fir.st student 
to bre.ik the ice- on the college pcjnd this 
winter unes tn Albert P. Zuger '.'50. 
CD 
Someone .iskeil: What do the '-t.i^-- 
do when ,i T'ricl.iy night d.iiire i~ (.illed 
olT? 

- (\) — 



After a gre.it deal of researc h upon the 
subject, an interesting pami)hlet on polo 
has been compiled by Major N. Butler 
Briscoe and Captain Fclwin NL .Sumner. 
Some of the best polo players and authori- 
ties on the game in the Cnited States 
ami Kngland have been consulted. The 
booklet is finished and should be ready 
for distribution in about a week. There 
are abemt thirty students from all the 
classes who are at presc-nt interested in 
attending ineh)or classes in polo instruc- 
tion. As soon as g(X)d weather comes it 
will be jMissible to put four jmiIo teams on 
the field. 

The new booklets will be given free of 
charge to players. Students interested in 
learning how to play, watch the bulletin 
board in the Drill Hall for announcement 

of classes. 

Band practice is now held regularly in 
(.rii'.nell Arena instead of in a classrcKjm. 
The instruments are kept on the arena 
gallery instead of in the old trophy rtKim 
as before. The trophy rcnmi is now re- 
leased for use as a regular classroom. 
What used to be the Drill Hall attic has 
now been renovated and is also in use as 
a classroom. It will be used for instruc- 
tion in military and physical education. 

The Organized Reserve of the ;{l«'>th 
Cavalry, headquarters in Hartford, Conn.. 
is giv ing a cup for a night ride. The event 
will be known as the "Night Ride for the 
olt'ith Cavalry" Cup. 



DELTA PHI GAM.MA FORMAL 

Pl.ins are under way for the Delta I'hi 
(iamma I'ormal, which is to be held 
Friday, February 1, at the Memorial 
Building, from ."> until 1. Kvelyn Dover 
'.')t» is the chairman of the committee and 
is in charge of the affair. This dance is 
held every year and is one of the out- 
standing scxial events of the term. 

The Formal is to be followed thenext 
afternoon from 2 to ti p. m. by a tea dance 
at the Lord JefTery Inn. 



1. 



-t(»k 



Sinc-e we must be 
agricultural f.ite. why 
to the judging te.mis 
letters, lor m.--i.iii('e, 



resigiuil Id iiur 

not give sweaters 

with .ippropriate 

"L.S." would 



mean a "Letter M.m" 
Judging, and so on. 

Truly representative of old .Aggie, oh 
veah? 

ll.ivi- we ,1 murderer or a coroner on 
campus, or just wli.it is the signifi- 
ciiuc- of a notice like this "'missent" to 
ilu> C'i'llcgian Office this wk k.^ 
"Major Briscoe: 

John Brown'> body is being withheld 
for vou at the Library. 

B.i-il H. Wood. 

Libr.iri.m." 

CD 

Ccla suffit. 



The CoUeBian accei)ts no resjion-sibility for o;..-,. 
loni voiced in "The Korum." It aims to servr ,is 
a means of Kiving expreission to student opinion, 
and will print any views expressed rationally and 
.sanely, unk-^s tlie editors feel that they are jiini- 
lii-d in suppresriing them because of unfair per- 
sonal attack. Communications must be limite.] to 
!kH) words. 

To the Fditor of the Collvnuur. 

Last week's communication relative u, 
.Ag. Lc. 2t'> h.is received so much pi.i -, 
anil the Department so ni.my kiiuck- 
that I, who am also, taking the cour-« . 
will try to |)resent a few facts whiih 1 
have learned from some forty hours oi 
reading and twelve hours of classes and 
which might justify the College lor 
putting this yolk upon the student^. 

In my first assignment, after spenilin^ 
eight delightful hours reading one hundred 
IKiges or so of statistics, and admiring 
the numerous clever illustrations in tin- 
form of graphs, maps, etc.. I stumhlnl 
cpiite- by accident upon a great gem ui 
knowledge, the real reason for the assign- 
ment. It was to the elTect that grass does 
not grow in New England in the winter 
because it is too cold! Is not that worth 
knowing? Is not that in itself aniiik- 
justification for taking the course? 'Trui- 
my opponents will say they haci to re.ui 
and outline one hundred pages to find it, 
but wait, fifty pages farther on, I c-.nne 
ui>on another nugget of wistUmi. 1 
le.irned that many eastt-rn plants .\ill 
not grow on the desert because it is too 
dry fcjr them! Please examine this 
closely and vou will sc-e the great umltr- 
Iviug iirinciple which answers the fuml.i- 
mental question, "Why is the desert 
dry?" .Answer: 'Because there is no 
watc-r there." Ref. C.S.D.A. Vearb(«.k 
l<.t24. 

In case there are still a few obstiiiati 
free thinking sojihomores who are not 
vit convinced of the justification for the 
course, I will bring irrefutable proof to 
rout another e ause of their diss;itisfac tion. 
They complain that in additicm to the 
regular three class hoiirs required by the 
Ce»llege, the Department has taxed them 
with another compulsory hour, this one 
for suiH-rvised study. If they judge fairly, 
they will find two benefits derive-d from 
this hour. First, it gives a nmre la-rNinal 
and intimate relatiemship with the pro- 
fessor, and second, one learns how to 
color mails. Kvery educated man and 
woman should know how to color maps. 
Think how necessary it is for success! 
Where would Rand Mc Nally be if no one 
had learned to color maps! True, some 
of us have had the advantage of dcjing 
this delightful work in the fourth grade. 
(Well I remember how pleasc-d I was 
when the teacher praised my violet New 
Hampshire beside a reel Vermont.) The 
trees should not blind one's view of the 
forest. This part of "Aggie Ec." i> an 
art ajipreciation course. 

The onl\ cause- for complaint which I 
cannot justify is the reixtition. We read 
tomes, outline them, and sign the Ihmor 
Pledge all to prove that we have done 
the assignment. Then we are quizzed 
on it for the same purpose. Twice a 
wt-ek we listen to lectures on the readings, 
and on Wednesday afternoon we get a 
lecture on the lectures. During these 
sessions we must take notes which arc 
identical to the material in syllalii which 
we all possess. When one hundred .iml 
fifty students are admittedly di^^gusud 
with a course, something is wronu .uni 
sluiuld be corrected. 

Having cleared up two points ot lUi- 
siitislaction, I now offer a suggestion for 
clearing up the third. Namely, that the- 
rule which requires the student^ i" "i' 
line the readings be withdrawn. li"^ 
weekly quizzes should be sufficient to 
prove whether or not they have masteretl 
the assignment. At the same time, it 
would reduce to somewhere near normal 
the amount <jf work required for a ' ' 
credit course. I hope that the Agricui- 
ttiral Economics T)epartment will c^' 
this suggestion earnest c onsiderati"! 



n.iti 



To the Editor of the Collegian: 

Someone has siiid that "music 
charms to scMithe the savage l>ria«t 
For the purjxjses of this communi' i' 
we may delete the word s.iv.ikc ■'' 
the more applicable word, .lilini;. 

For the past week or more, i ' 
firmary has been a full house-. To he ' 
bed when cue is forced to is never pleasa" 
and often taxes the ingenuity to find «av» 
.iiul means to while .iw.iv the dragy:!"? 
time. If you have never before app''*''^'-' 
ated the solace that a radio can I""*' 
^Continued on Pate *) 



HERE IS ANOTHER <^"^;^„^^«"'Kl^;^'NjniS WEEK'S SPECIAL. MCE ASSORTMENT OK FRKSi. STOCK IN HIE 

RIGHT PA HERNS AND COLLAR CITS. tJOOl) REDICTIONS. COME EARLY. 

Reserve Your Tuxedo Now For Tlie Mardi Gras aitd Mtltlary Ball. 

_^ LANDIS-OPEN EVENINGS 



WINTER FOOTWEAR 
To Meet The Needs Of College Men 



"Bostonian" 

Imported and Domestic Grain Leather 
Oxfords - - - $7.50 to $9 

Dance Oxfords - - - $7 to $9 

Bass Water Moccasins - $4 to $16 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



ALUMNI NEWS 



SALE ON LINDBERGH BOOKS 

HIS OWN STORY ''Lotie Scout of the Sky'' 

WAS $1.00 NOW 79c 



''We'' 

WAS $2.50 NOW 75c 



WALL MAP SHOWING OVERLAND 
AND OVERSEAS FLIGHTS OF 

Lindbergh 

WAS $2.00 NOW $L59 

JAMES A. LOWELL, 



*' Boy's Story of 
Lindbergh" 

WAS $1.25 NOW 98c 

BOOKSELLER 



Learn The Piano 

In Ten Lessons 



TKNOR-BANJO OR NLADOLIN 
IN FIVE LESSONS 

Without nerve-racking, heart-breaking 
-cales and exercises. Vou are taught to 
plav bv note in regular professional choi^d 
Myie. In your very first lesson you will 
In- .ihle to play a ixiimlar number liy ncDte. 
Send f<»r it on approval 

The "Hallmark Sc-lf- Instructor," is the 
title of this methcMl. Eight years vyere 
ric)uired to perfect this great work. The 
tntire- ccmrse with the necessary exaniiiia- 
tiim sheets, is bound in one volume. T he 
first lesson is unsc-aled which the student 
nuiv examine and be his own "Jl D( lE 
and JIRV." The latc-r part of the "llall- 
:ii,irk .Self-Instructor," is sealed. 

I'lHin the student returning any copy 
"i the "Hallmark Sc-lf-Instructor" with 
the seal unbroken, we will refund in full 
all money paid. 

Ihis amazing Self- Instructor will be 
«ent anywhere. Vou <Ui not need to send 
any money. When you receive this new 
method of teaching music, deposit with 
the postman the sum of ten dollars. If 
you are not entirely satisfied, the money 
IKiiil will be returned in full, upon written 
request. The jmblishers are anxious to 
I'l.ice this "Self-Instructor" in the hands 
'if music lovers all over the country, and 
!» in a position to make an attractive 
proposition to agents. Send for your copy 
tciflay. Address the "Hallmark Self- 
iii^irui tor". Station <•. Tost Ofilice Box 
111, .\evv York, N. V. — Adirrtisemenl 

'22 Charles A. Buck is engaged in 

'loing co-operative extension wcjrk in 

fiairying for the Bureau of Dairying, 

' SD.A., at the experimental creamery 

' <.ro\e Citv, Pa. 



Greeting Cards and 
Suitable Little Gifts 
for your Sick Friends 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 

THE 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

<Hfers Expert Hair Cutting 
•Service for Men and Women. 

'''OP • DUWELL, Prop. MEMORIAL BUILDING 

College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH 
Reg. Pharm. 

A^'llLRST, - - MA.SS. 



Pick Relay Team 
For Boston Trip 

Five Runners to Compete Against 
B. U. and Colby 

Time trials were- held on the bo.ird 
track outside the Drill Hall this p.isi 
week-end to determine the m.ikeup of 
the relay stpiad that is to represent the 
College at the meet in the new Heiston 
(.arelen next .Saturd.iy. C.iptain "Don" 
Davis '2i> and "I'ete" Robertson '.'itt, 
the cpiartet's two avaihible lettc-rmen, 
both showed up well as was expected. 
The other two men who have been 
selected by CcMch Derby because of their 
showing in the trials are .Snell '2U and 
li.imniond '.'{(I. "Kay" Smith '.'{() main- 
tained a slight advantage over Howe 'U'.t 
who has been trrjubled with .in infected 
hand, and will accompany the team as 
.ilternate. 

This week's race is over the full mile 
course, each man being recjuired to go 
the full t|uarter mile distance. Boston 
1 niversity and Colby have been matched 
uji ag.iinst the .Xggie foursfjme, and the 
three-cornered battle will make it in- 
teresting. 



CA.ST CHOSEN FOR PROM SHOW 

(Continued from Pafte t) 

"Craig's Wife" by ( fcorge Kelley, 
author of "The Show -off," won the 
Pulitzer Prize two years ago. The play 
has just recently been released and is 
very well adapteel for college jiresentation. 



'!!• I'r.iiik i:. Kiiiglu .-..uU the iiiigiiiv 
ileep in the sliKip "\ iking" owned bv ih. 
I .iwren e- lliggiiis M.irim- Kv .. i.th ,iiid 
Water Sis., S.W., W.i.slmiKton. D. (. 
Mall ri-aches I'raiik through lt(i\ ir,, 
Mrimfiild. M.iss. 

w'Ht Kich.ird S. Ilolnigren now >igiis 
himself hvdr.iulic- engineer. His l!i)>.|iiii 
ofVuf is al Ci n«-.uoii .Si. 

w'llt Elmer [. Men ton h.is joined the 
growing iiuelc-usof .\ggie- nun .it Syi.icuse. 
His home- .iddress is L'.'il Tremont .St., 
th.it city. 

"L'tl ( icorge \\ . .XjiMV, Jr. h.is ,i 
positicin .IS li-xtile chemist with tin 
j.icipus Wolfe iSt Cei., Passaic-, N. J. 

"l-'l Newton E. Limoln is one of ilu 
few Aggie men IcM-ated in Minnesoi.i. Ib- 
is e-xi-culive- secretary ui tlu- I nii\ 
Church, St. Paul. 

w'L'l l.e.inder W'. I'isher .idvi>es th.il 
hi- is now field engine-er lor tin- Public 
Service Co. of N. I.. 72 W. .\dams St.. 
( hic.igo, III. 

'22 "llnbb.i" Cnllins beg.iii his duties 
tin-, fall as head of the- phvsii.d tr.iining 
di li.irlnient bir hoys eif tin- senior and 
jiiiiior high scIichiIs and he-.id coach eil 
.itliletics at Me-dforil High, fe.llowing 
siver.il succe-ssful ye-.irs at Heve-rlv High. 
'22 K.ilph Russell, who was re-eeniK 
m.irried, is continuing with his studies 
liir an advance degree- at the- I'niv. of 
Wisconsin, Maelison. 

'22 Josc-ph T. Sulliv.in is an assistant 
chemist at the Purdue- Cniv. Ilxpt. Si.i. 
and is the co author of sc-veral v.ilu.ible 
bullt-tins on pomological subjec Is. 

'2;'. Education.il work el.iims Iwn 
meiri- members of the- class of '2.'j, Ch.irlc-s 
I'. Russell who is a schcHil principal at 
Kent, ( oiin., and Frank D. Lueldinglon 
who is te.ic hing al Proctor, \ermoiit. 

'24 eI4 '27 Between "Ted" Chase- and 
"Bill" Dole as members of the teaching 
stalT at New lianipton .\c.ideniy, a 
Jirivate st hcKil at .New ll.implon, .N. IL. 
the sehexil is assured ol ,i not her success- 
ful year. 

'2.J John ('.. Ilolteen is a nursc-ry 
superinlench-nl .it Pate hogue. L.I., N.V. 
'2.') Andrew W. Love resigned from 
his position of instructor in fruit growing 
al the .Norfolk County .\gric iilt iir.il 
S< IhrjI recently and has taken up his 
dniit-s as instructor of biology and fruit 
at the Worcester North High School, lb 
is re.sie|ing on his lioinc- farm at .Xiiburn, 
.Mass. 



For Winter Sports Try 

Saranac Buck Gloves 

and Mittens. 

$ 1 .so TO $5.00 

r. M, THOMPSON & SON 

CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN FOR NEAR I V i||T Y VEARS 



HOCKEY lEAM WINS THRKK 
«:onlinued from r;i|ie I) 

winners, while K. Smith .starred for St. 
Siepheiis .mil scored iheir only gn.d. 

In till- middle- of the lirsl period, Itoinl 
'■peiied hostilities by shcMiting the |»ui k 
p.ist BromepiisI, the St. .Stephens g.i.ilie. 
Seven se-conds l,ile-r, .N.isli scored with .i 
pretty shot lioin le liter ice-. 'The- se-cond 
period w.is scoreless, but in the tliinl 
K. .Smith i.iged llu- puck unassisted loi 
the- hnille tiMlll. L.ili-r in the- Jicriod, 
N.ish SI Olid .unit her go.d alle-r a ji.iss 
out Irom behind the- net. The- work i>l 
the- \l,iss.ii liiisc-lts deb-nse men, C.ipt.iin 
N.ish .iiid Bciiid, sIoimI out in the- g.mu-. 
< >llensively. these- men scored .ill I he- goals 
lor .M..A.C., and llu-ir ehfe-nsive pl.iy w.is 
-IK h that .Myrick. goalie, w.is re<|uired 
Ik III. ike but sc-ve-n slojis in the- g.ime. 

The siimm.iry: 

Si. .Slfpht'HN 

Iw. N.llr. lJll.|l.\ , Sill. II. .1.1 



M'.IHMU'llllHfttH 

I'.ii. Ii. M.iiiu , iw 
I ).i\ 1^. W.ii-i hii'i, , 
ll'i^l. /lIKll. Iw 
KoikI. I.I 
N.i-li. Ill 
Mmk W. K 



l.eiiel^: .\iisli J, liniiil. K. SmitI 



KlIi'V. I'llr 
rw, (iiiltilli, Milirt 
l<l. k. Siiiilli 
ril. I.. Stiiiili 

K. Ul(illl(|lll~t 



■ ASK FOR I 

" Munsingwear" 

RAYON and SILK 

Bloomers -Step-ins -Vests 

Slips - Bandeau - Pajamas 

Night Robes 



SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

■ G. Edward Fisher 



During the evening < ieejrge "Red" 
Emory. ex-'2r>. who was revisiting the 
Colhge, dropiK'd in to witness the try- 
ejuts. Emory is well remembered as a 
member <jf the Roister I>oislers and a 
very prominent ami versiitile man while 
in col|(-ge-. 



g Town Hall Theater g 

\f .Malini-es .t:00 K\e-iilniis (>:4.S ;md N:.tO Q 



CLOSE (;aME TAKEN FROM BATES 

-M.A.C. emerged a I to victor over 
Bates in a c lose- hoc key g.ime l.isl .Monil.iy 
dlirnoon on the Aggie Pond. Frost 
seore-d the single go.d lu-ar the- mieldle- of 
the second |M-riod after he had reec-ive-d 
the |.iic k on a pass from Bond. The- game- 
was well pl.iye-d and the- le-ams were 
e\e-nly m.itc heel. For .Mass;ichusc-tls, the- 
te-.ini playi-d well together and .Myriek 
macle- some- sensational slops. 'The Bates 
dclense- men, Pooler and .Malia, fe.it iirid 
lor the- visitors. Bates defe-ate-d West 
Point fj to earlier in the season wilh llii- 
^.inu- club thatjplave-d .Monday, while 
.M.A.C. beat the same o|i|)i)iii-iil .'{ lo I. 
Poor iee and si-mi-darkness al the- c lose 
• if I lit g.oile- Ii.iIiiIk .i|i|H'i| llie- pi.iyers. 
I he- summary: 
MuNNachunellii KalrH 



i'.ii. Ii, lU 
IJaVi-. . 
l-rii-^l. Iw 
KoikI. r>l 
.\;i~li. 1.1 
\Ivil. k. K 

Cfiiiil-; Frixi . Si>;iii. 
W.ii I htir. /iiKir. Hiiti ■ 



I INK-: llltii- l.'l-IIMIIIItl' IH'IIO'N 



Iw , |lllll|-.<jl) 

< . < <iK;ifi 
nv. .NiKlir^riii 

Id. I'.n.l. I 

ret. M.ili.i 
K. ToiKilii^kv 

Miiswii lillsctis .\l;ilil\. 
.\Jilllcr. Rlf.-Ki ; |>..u.| 



TYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Rcmtnfiton, Royal 
and Corona .Sales and .Service 

Radio Kqui; mc-nt (icniTal Krpair .Shop 

II. E. DAVID 

.15 Pleasant St., just below P.O. Amherst 



Amherst Shoe Repair Co. 

. Master Shoe Rebuildera 
^EX r TO BOLLES SHOE STORE 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

OculUts' Presciiptiiins l-'lllrd. Broken lenses 
accurately re-plared 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable makes 

f PLEASANT -STREET, (up one flight) 



Best in Drug Store Service 
Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co. 



Wedne.sday, January 23 

FREEDOM OF THE PRESS 

uith I. eats Stone Murce/ine l)ay-H''ill- 
iam Ii. H ullhull and Mulcolm McGregor 
j1 thrilling and revealing story oj a 
n f lis paper' s battle ;iith the ''''Vice Rinv" 
I .IHl.l.S .^l'<jl<ri.l(.IIT COMI.DY 

'I hursday-Friday, Jan. 24-2.S 

'T//£ CROWD" 

J.WILS Ml KKW r.l.KI KiiMII „„■'. 

I-IJASOH lAlAK/fMAS. 
A iTifn piny Si'ii; 1 i'/"r itnl Juhn W'rnnr 
A mi'linn piilurr -iilh ii lirrinK mfs(ii!,e un 
mnrriit,'!- lull of the Irulh; tif lifr itmt lu-.f 

SI'AVS COM 1:1) y 

.Saturday, Jan. 26 

.1 lirnmalK , jmasAiMif invf rumanit iani "it 
a I'fHiil lUe. 

''THE RED MARK" 

.1 tru lin.; ^iri A ■■'us^.w. i )ii: uliunrr .1 

>i: in'\ ii'iiiikrninK- A James Cruzr prmlu lO'ti 

A I) I) E I) A r T R A C T I () N 

''LIGHTING SPEED'' 

/-..;../• .-; thi: I n.ir-..nrl,l /„;/(;,,; ' ;. . 
daring of n < uh Hrpurlrr. 

NEWS 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

REPAIRINf; AND ALL KINDS f)E 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Cuaranteed 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



40th Mid-Winter 
Clearance Sale 
This Week. 

Profit through our price 
reductions in all 
departments. 

Thomas S. Childs 

INCOKFOkATED 

275 High St., Holyoke, Mass. 



SIFDIIM S UK. II AVKRACiKS 

(f:untlnui-<l friini Puitf |) 

Ciroup A. SO-S.S, 
(•|.is> l!.i.".> Stephen .\d.,in-,, li.meis 
l>. All.c-ili, Olise i:. Allen, Arnicml I.. 
Aimniiis, .Si.inlcy I-. h.iile\ . ClKnles U . 
It.irr, Irene I.. Halrlelt, Finory I). Iliirness, 
lile.mor Caldwell, Alice- S. <h,i|,in, (\ 
ShepU-y Cle-.ive-s, Andic-w fe.nkos, John 
W De-vim-, M.nliii ( .. le.iiMia, Ch.irle-s 

.\. I lost, Allhlll II ( .i.ise^. |{,||,.,,|| ||_ 
Ih'll.llid, W.iher (.. Iliinlei. .\|„i.,,„ ||. 
Iliiss, I'.inl I). Ish.im, Cliliein \< jolinson, 
I.i-ro\ (). (.ine-s, Uoin.in .\. Kieie-iil..inin. 
I'diAihc-lh .\. Lynch, Kennelh I-;. Mi- 
Killri.k, Ki.l.ley \\'. \.,sh. Ilirtiet K. 
IViMieir, F.irle C. I'lenily, KoI.erl I). 
Kees, (d,ie|ys I-]. Sivirt, < .r.ie «- (.. Sl.ie k. 
Ik-ssie .M. Siiiiih, Key S. I'.irr. I<nss«|| 
K. Whille-n, and Di.ris I-i. Whillh-. 

Cl.iss I'.t.'H) K.„|,.l Alwocd, ,\l,,y F. 
linckhr, kiiili \. CMiielins, Cli.uhs |{. 
<ox, Charh-s F. Frame. Anllnmy I.. 
(..iKliardiieri. Ile-rl.erl A. (.oi.de II, liei nion 
F'. CeMMhII. I.i„y A. (.rnnw.ilili, k.,||,|, 
K. (.nnn, Arehie II. M.iehh-n, I>e>n,ild F. 
Mmphy. R11S.S1II !•:. Ni,„s. Arne K. 
I'lilt.il.i, Fve-lyn C. SiindsircMii, Ailhiir 
U. Se-e|ere|iiist, Krii: SiiiKlilcn, lemi 
Sl,inisiewski, (Veil ||. \\,„||einli, I'e-ler 
II. W ace liter, Klizahelh .M . WeMMlin. 

Cl.iss l«.t;U Fvelyn A. U.-.iman, John 
Ii. MriH)ks, Alfred A. Hro«n, Ir.ink T. 
i)oiinl.is>. AIImii ll.l.uwer, C.irl II. Holm, 
liiK<'ii«- J. K.ini, .Mainar.l F. Ken-rlieri 
John I-. I,.iwreiiie-, (.ertrinli- A. .VIe-ad, 
ls.ilie-1 I-;. Meirv-.m, (.e-rlriide K. I'i«-ne, 
l.onis I'yensoii, l..iuri S. Ke.nk.i. John K, 
Smelow. Frank K. Shaw. I'.inlme- A. 
Spie wak, I.e-op.,1.1 ||. TiikalMshi, .Marxne-- 
rili- \'. \isejinles, I ionel I,. \ ine e-nl 
Allen S. \\ esi . 



\v'IH "Jinimii " I', .Murrin, pure has- 
niK .i^je-iil and >;ene-r.il sn|M-rinteneh-nl of 
eonst rue lion Utr I he W it! rniT FlnRiiuerinK 
C.I., Si. loiiis, .Me... r(-(M.rts ,ifier .1 visit 
to the- eampiis lli.n 'ese-ryt hin^ l<«.ke-d 
the- s,ime .mil ni.ide one lonesj.nn. (or | he 
old crowrl." 



I 



M H E R ST 

THEATER 1 



Wetlnewlav, Jan. 2.i 

5 KHIH VAUOfVIUf ACTS 

|NASC^ OKI \n & I.W.I. Ke»| I INS |\ 

"PREP AND PEP" 

|( AinoON I'M III, M us 



I hurs. A Fri.. Jan. 24 and 2.S 

jHlin IJKONSON ft M I <; I KWe IS in 

['Companionate Marriage' 

H\ Jl IM.K BKN B. LINDSKV 

I I ..ti.-.iiii| -.1 ti.,u 1 1,1 ,,|,|,., ( ,„ I,,., IK \.,,i|(.,,iii 
2 Kill <''.\II|)\ M-\\S 



AMHERST FRUIT STORE 

VVHFRF AGGIF MFN MI FT 

WHIN mux TOWN 

ICE CREAM CANDY CIGARS 



|. Saturday, Jan. 2.'> Double Feature 

-■ '■' 1' ^l'. • ' I. 11.,., \Mlt.i. I \\ . I. f. 

"THE WARE CASE" 

■ '■• " •■ I .'M..!/ i,l' . , :i . ,.,. I, .11- ..I llli Ji.il 

■Ailli ;iii .1 IdiiMliiiKi liiir.ix 

"TAKING A CHANCE" 

' " '•• '*■> ' ■' ]'■ 11 'I- I-.-m: I -ii'i 

2 ki.i.i ( o.Mi-DV- I'Ai in-: \i us 

.Monday ik Tuesday, Jan. 2H-2'> 

|<;ll\S. Hii(l<l> K<)«,iKS M\K\ IJKIW 



4t 



SOME ONE TO LOVE 

I >i Ii 'liitiillv, enit ri.iinin>{lv 1 l<.ni 
2 KI.FI f OMi |)^ MUs 



fr 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Now situated at I.S 1-2 IMeasant St. 
EXCEIIENT SHOE REPAIRERS 
V. vSKOMJOMCO, Prop. 



U. A. C. Library. 



THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLRGJAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN UARY 23. 1929 



I 



vrrl!nl^ rlu'iR mMnis.mos or conn styi.e^ rich f.ihrics jsd r.numisc^ skill, wky proj'ide 
rill', s msK/cTKjx i-oi-.iLLh.n oxly jx tiif. fix est custom-XL IDE clothes. 

'^CONSULT" TOM ABOUT THESK HIGHER CLASS SUITS. 



commimcahons 

(Ciiiiiiiiucii from V:\ix i) 

llifii ;i(<iiiiif Mtmtlhin^; tli.it will K''i" 
your iidmissioii |(p tin- Intiriiiury fc»r .i 
\vr«koi iiuirt. Attn till- lii-ro has KrappU-'l 
(rhoosi' yotii own word it \<'ii i'ri' ■' 
purist) with llu' hcroiiu' tliniu^li mort- 
panes than \<)ii Ikim' "'vcr lii-lorc liaii 
j)ati«-ntT to r»M<l, just ri-adinn l»fKi">i »<' 
pall ami only music <aii chferfully pass 
away a fi-w mori- of I In- af«trcmciitioiifil 
lonn liours. 

X'ictrola iuusi< will not do, for a \i( - 
trola requirt's an enniru'iT, and often- 
times the enjiincirs cannot leave their 
beds. A ra<lio needs no such supervision, 
but will Ko on and on at t he t urti of a dial. 
Kroni wiiiih you may gather that the 
Infirmary needs a new radio liadly, one 
that will not require new parts as fre- 
<piently as a I'ord, ami one that will 
|)erhaps give "Chris" surcease fnjiu l>uy- 
inK those parts out of her own }H)cket. 

We have jjiven nohly to other causes 
why not to this? A radio isn't such an 
exiK-nsive thinn we all have them in 
our homes. Fifty cents from each of us 
would buy one of the best. The machine 
is really badly needed at the Infirmary, 
and the only way to secure one is to 
apiK-al to the students. Let's come across 
and nft ;» nvw railio! If you e\er ^et a 
temperature and are confined in one of 
the wards, you will appreciate that fifty 

cent outlay! 

J. T. l.awler, K.I. 

(Recent Inmate; 



CLASS AND FRAT SPORTS 



RTs\ 



IMKlU.l.AS.S IKU.KKY 

Inlerdass hockey got off to a tlyinn 
start last week Tuesday when the juniors 
t()l»l)ed the sophomore sextet by a count 
of ;! to 1. 'l'hurs(la\, on tiie oUl rink, the 
freshman club luana^eil to sipieeze out 
the StcMkbridne hockey te.im by a score 
of ;{ to li. Forrest an<l brown di<l the 
scoring for the yearlinjjs while ( ".raf and 
lioyt tallied for "Chick" Mc( .eodi's out- 
fit. The name was close and ex(iting 
which pleased the larne ({roup of spec- 
tators that were on hand to watdi the 
t-ontest. 

|"or this week's Colli-jiiaii the .\thletic 
Department has submitted a schedule for 
the remaining «ames of the series. 1 his 
schedule is subject to change at any time 
accordint! to the lontiitions of the ice. 
Interclass ih»ckey Schedule 

WVd.. Jan. li;i. T.l") 
Seniors vs. S.S.A. 
Juniors vs. Freshmen 
Sat.. Jan. 2(). 4.(K) 

Seniors vs. S«iphoinores 
lues., Jan. li<.», 7.15 

Seniors vs. Freshmen 
Juniors vs. S.S.A. 
Thurs., Jan. .'{1, 7.1") 
.Seniors vs. Juniors 
S.S..\. vs. Sophonmres 
Sat., Feb. •-', 4.(K» 

Sophomores vs. Freshmen 



President Thatcher 

Describes Survey 

National band <;rant Survey of 
Interest to M.A.(^. 



CLUB NEWS 



To the l-Milor ol the ( 'i>llf[iiair. 

. May 1 make a sunnestion to those 
who are not satisfied with conditions as 
they now stand? .\t the present time-. 
Ill live loyalty to and sympathetic co 
operation with the- I'resident of the 
Collene |>.uticulirly, as well as th. 
student organizations (the Si-nate and 
.Xdclphi.i, espeii.dly* which are in a 
poMtion to carry out the desires of tiie 
student bod\ . will cl.i the most to ad 
\ance the project ot c li.ini;ini; the name 
of the College. 

.Mn-ady. certain aits have so been 
interpreted, possibly misrepresented, by 
the public [iros that you are in dauKcr 
of creating hostdc- sintiinent to your 
plan amonn aluimii .end other friends of 
the Collene. Not only li.ive outsiders 
been j>artl\ misinfortued, hut also on the 
A^gie campus there are many students 
amonn yc»U who do not .ippreciate the 
true jMisition which you. real leaders hold, 
a |M)sition which retjuires the practice of 
infinite l.ic t .md considerable patience-. 

I am no or.u le. but am basing m> 
stalcmeuts on Jucts which I ha\e ob- 
served fr<»m contacts with nearly all the 
ditferent individuals and i-roups cone ernc-d. 
Let me add that my own persoii.d desire 
ih to be able to claim Massachusetts 
State College as my .Mni.i .Mater within 
,c fc W >l u>'.. 

Han.hl K. Clark '2S 



inikkfr.vH'KMTY b.\sketbai.i. 

Four names in the Interlraternilx 
H.isketball Tournament were played l.ist 
wc-ek, resulting in wins for O.T.\ ., .Mpha 
(iamma Kho. Si^jma I'hi FpsiUm. and 
Kappa Kpsilon. Two lop-sided K-'Xi^-s 
were played c.ii Wechiesday ni^ht. Jan. 
If., n. r.\ . smothering Theta Chi ^-i to 
S. and .Mplii C..imm.i Kho triumphiuK 
over Delta I'lii .Mpha by the siore of 
;{(•, to 1 1. Minkstein led y.T.\ . with nine 
b.iskets for IS points, and he was sup- 
ported by llonen with IJ points. Uow a- 
with 1», Kane with S. and I'aksiirian with 
ti. Such a club will doubtless make a 
strong bid for the championship. Steven 
son and Hicks both ca^ed ei^ht baskets 
to score sixteen i)oiiits apiece for .Mpha 
Camma Kho in the si-eond j-ame e>t the 

e\eniiin. 

Si>;ma I'hi FpsiU>n surprised the Fac ult\ 
te-.im by ilefiMtinK them L'8 to 17 em last 
Thursckiy ni^-lit. lU-rnard and Fliott were 
high scorers for the winners with IJ and 
S points, lesiHctlvcly. Numerous foul^ 
were called aj;ainst the Faculty team 
Kappa KpsihMi won over the bigger Kappa 
Sinma team in the other gaTne of the 
evening. The contest w.es dull and devoid 
of stars. 



'■2i "Itob" Woodworlh, after obtain 
in*; his Ph. I), at Harvard last June, re 



" 



i.iined there this fall to teach i.otans . 



$6.00 DRAWING SET $4.00 

Drawing Boards. T Squares, Triangles. Pencils and Erasers 

A J. HASTINGS '••'''::S^Zr AMHERST. MASS. 



JACKSON & 

l»I M.K.R.S IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERSI, MASS. 



CUTLER 

READY TO WKAR 



whi::n down town visit our 

SIORK FOR LUNCH, DlNiNER 
OR REl RKSHMENTS. 

Special Sunday Night Suppers 

Sarris Restaurant or College Candy Kitchen 



The Bureau of llduc ation of the Inited 
States Department <jf the Interior is 
conducting a survey of the band (.rant 
Colleges of the Inited States under 
authority of an appropriation from Con- 
gress secured in response to a recjuest 
made by the .Association of band ( irant 
Colleges and I'niversities that the bureau 
of luiucation should undertake this sur- 
vey. The work on this survey is progress- 
ing rapidly on the basis of three general 
princi|)les outlined by Dr. John J. Tigert, 
the Commissioner of Education, as 
follows: 

I. The bureau of Fducation regards 
the survey as a national study of the ac- 
complishments, the present status, and 
the future cjbjectives of the land grant 
type of education rather than a survey 
cjf the activities of a separate set of 
institutions. 

li. It is the policy of the Bureau of 
Fducation to maintain entire control of 
the work and to assume full responsibility 
for its reiM)rt. M the s;ime time it is 
utilizing to the fullest extent all of the 
groups, individuals, or agencies which are 
now involved in the band (".rant College 
education. 

:i. The Bureau of Fducation regards 
the functions of the band (.rant Colleges 
.,s defined by the Morrill Act and as 
developed during their past hi.story to be 
public and denuK'ratic in nature with 
ideals, practical purposes, and objectives 
which are- worthy of full recognition in 
the fiebl of higher eelucation. 

The study will in.4ucle the eonstitution 
and ccmtrol of instituticms; financial, 
social, economic, and educational re- 
lationships to the state and its cousti 
tueiicy; duties and activities of the 
president's otfiee; organiz.ition of the 
institution into colleges, schools, and de- 
partments; budget making; statT prob- 
leins: physical plant; registrar's otticc'; 
lilirar\ . 

The final reiMjrt will consist of two 
p.irts one of a technical nature, and one 
a popular summary of the entire survey. 
rhi> survey, one of the largest ever 
undertaken in the Inited .States, will 
a^sist the institutions to solve some of 
their future proble-ms relating to organi 
z.ition. financing. » urriculum lonstruc - 
lion, .mil relaticjuship to other slate in- 
stitutions and organizaticjns. 

The results of this survey will be <»f 
\ital iiitrrcst and t>f very great Uiie to 
Massai luisi'tts .\gricuttural College from 
J two standpoints. First, we will l"' able 
to examine- our methods of oi)eration and 
our attainments in the light of simil.ir 
attacks upon these problems at other 
institutions throughout the country. Sec 
Olid, there will lie set forth in very cle.ir 
detail the purpose's which an institution 
like ours may properly serve in the cause 
of ediicMtion. This will include, of course-. 
the resident teaching on the campus, the 
agricultural extension service, and the 
le-M-arch work organizeel under the ex- 
periment station and will make cle.u 
wh.it is the relationship of the many 
.icti\ities of the institutiem as a whole m 
addition to the teaching of the students I 
who come to its campus and will un- | 
dniibte-dly si-rve as a basis for .1 better j 
understanding of the functions and 
IM.ssibilities ot the colk-ge by the people 

of the- st.ite. 

R. W . Th.Uche-r 

MILITARY BALL PLANS 

^Continued from Piifte li 

Carl Bergan at the K ippa Sigm.i House 
in order that proiH-r arrangements may 
he iiKide lor t r.msportation to S>uth 
lladle> and Northamptcjn after the 
daiuf. I. ate permission has been granted 
the girls from Mt. Holyoke for the 
duration of the Ball, but the Smith girls 
mav st.iy only until e-leven o'clock. 

lunior iisliii> ,nf being c lio-eii ,ind it 
i> hoped that the\ will d<> .iw.i\ with .m\ 
pos-ibilities of a long receivim; line siu h 
,i> w.is |)articularly noticeable .it l.i-t 
vcMi'r- M;li'.>r\ Ball. 



MLNOKAII SOCIETY 

Sumlay night at 7 p. m., in the .Mem- 
orial Building, the .Menorah S<jciety will 
hold a meeting to which all who are 
interested are invited. This society was 
recently formed by the Jewish students 
on campus and has for its |)urpose the 
conducting of meetings for student dis- 
cussion of varied ipiestions. 



INTERN.VnONAL RELATIONS 
CLUB 

Dr. Ci. K. (iage, head of the Bacteri- 
ology and Physiology Department of the 
College, entertained the International 
Relations Club at their meeting held last 
Thursday in the Memorial Building with 
an interesting talk on conditions in ItaK 
under Mussolini. Dr. (.age visited that 
country during the past summer, and his 
remarks represented well the situations 
that a traveler finds existing under II Duce. 

The ne.xt meeting of the Cluh will be 
held Thursday night of next week, in- 
augurating the policy of the organization 
of having bi-weekly get-togethers. 

LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 

be Cercle Franc;ais, formerly known as 
the French Club, elected the following 
officers at the meeting held on Thursday 
evening, Jan. 10: I'resident, Eclmond 
Frost '.'11; Vice-President, Iris DeFalco 
'.■>1; Secret ar\, Pauline Spiewak '-"U ; 
Treasurer, Fdward .Nott '.'il; Progr.im 
.111(1 Fntert.iiiiment Committee, Fdward 
Beiioit and John C.uenard ';{1. 

be Cercle Franc. lis has in store a pro- 
gram of varied interests, including lec- 
tures by several professors and different 
students and slides of France and its 
varied scenery. Meetings will be held 
every two weeks at French Hall, Koom I). 
There will be no meeting Jan. -4 because 
if the varsitv basketb.dl game. 



FLORIC:i LTCRE C;LLB 

The Floriculture Club held its first 
nu-eting this term in French Hall on 
Thursd.iy, Jan. 17. at 7. ."!(». Discussion 
was lentered on the ])rograni for this 
coming term and on the question of 
putting the Club on a more permanent 
basis. This tpiestion is to be brought uj) 
at the next meeting, which will be held 
at 7.-'!0 p. 111.. 'Thursdav, Jan. J4. 




Why does a 

Bracburn cross 

the street 

that^s easy 

to buy another 
Brafbiiru 



Carl H. Bolter, 

Incorporated 

Exeter Amherst 

Hyannls 



Laid Up Cars 

S2.00 Per Month Until April 1st 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter H. Harrison, Prop. 



VMnter's Around The Corner 

.\VOlD THE RUSH. Come in and .; : 
your Overshoes for this Winter. 

Shoe Repairing Department 

JOHN FOTOS SHOE STORI 



DRY CLEANING 



PRESSIN(. 



For Prompt Service Phone 828 

••LKT DWK IM) IT" 

AMHERST CLEANERS & DYERS 

1 1 MAIN STREET NEXT TO TOWN HALL 

One l)-ay Service on Dry Cleanlnft Work CalKel for anel Delivered Dally 

REPAIRING L.UNDRY DYEING 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



.^ND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



gl|g jMagaarliuB^tlB OInlkgtatt 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY .^0, 192<) 



Number 14 



Varied Entertainment 

Given Last Friday Evening 



\n iuterestiiin Social I'liiou |irc)^raiii 
\c.t> >;i\eu l)> lleU-n Siuipsou aiiei lier 
ttti» accompanists last Friday eveiiiug 
ill Iktwker .Auchtoriuiu. Presenting; three 
re-.cclings. .Miss Siuipsejti na\e a truly 
iiitertaining evening; to those who at 
Ifiiiled. X'arying her costume, her voice 
aiiil her manner for each ditYerent charac- 
ter she showed talent in her st-lecticjus. 
adding an artistic touch to the persons 
that she portrayed. 

,\s the first nuiuher, .Albert \\ . I.ind 
^.i\e a group of three selections, accom 
(Linied by Paul (i. .\nderscjn. These 
picres were, in the order ot their pres«.-n- 
t.iticin: 

lle-fre Kati llul>iiy 

Siiuvenir Ordlu 

Kondino Krei.sler 

I lorette anel Co." Helen Simpson's 
tir>i reading, was the stor\- of a rich .ind 
iMiperious woin.in who was s*-e-kinn 
ple-.isure-s while- her hush.uid was awa\ 
ttitli the Na\y. Florette was the- inodiste- 
iil M.tdame, who found a compromising 
litiir written to Madame and |)riH-eeded 
to use it to force her hill. Miss Sim|)sc>n 
lil.iye-d the part very well. ".At Mr. 
.\hrahams", the second skit that she 
presented, was a scene in a Hower shop. 
The st-cretary was somewhat of a philoso- 
pher, and de-fende-d her work on the- 
liuuMcIs th.it It was the task of making 
other peo|)le happy. Her etTe-i t was 
>\\i\\\n a year later, when the telephone- 
calls showed that all her i)rc(jei-ts had 
in.iteri.di/ed happily. One- of the dis 
liii>;iiishiug features of the secretary, thc' 
chewing gum, was obviously present. 

I'.itd ("•. .Anderson prc-st-nted a group cd 
three piano solos aiul two encores. .As 
thi-enc-ores show, his playing at the piano 
was Kood. and he si-emed to impart the 
spirit c(f the music svhiili he was pi, tying 
(Continued on i'afte i) 



NOTICE 

Tickets hir the Military h.dl are 
Mlling fcjr .IH'.tKt |K'r couple and may 
I'l h.id from K\an C". Richardson at 
tlic Phi Sig House, who is in char^^e 
"I Ml kets, or from any cjther member 
"I tiie Hall Committee. The date of 
'Ik \VA\ is Ke-l). .s from 7. .Ill to 11. :'.(». 



Concert and Dance In 

Social Union Program 

"Polly and Her Pals" to Furnish 
Music in Drill Hall Friday Evenin{» 

.As a very unusual part of this week's 
Social Inioii entertainment a faculty- 
studeiu dance will be- held in the Drill 
ll.ill immediately after the concert in 
liowker -Auditorium. .At this dance 
■Polly and Her Pals", the vers.it ile 
instrumental group which features t he- 
program in StcH-kbriclKe Hall, will .ilso 
furnish the music. 

.An added attraction on the program 
comes in the form of ( ic-orge Pearson, a 
reader and character artist of note, who 
will assist the main yroiip of e-nte-rt.iine-rs. 
Mr. Pe.irson commonly portrays from 
twenty to thirty ditYerent characters 
during an evening's program, and has 
ap|)rc.priate cost umes .md par.iphernali.i to 
no with each t\|)c- c harac-terized. lie- will 
c hoose se\er.il characters from his ex- 
tensive repertoire to present to the 
audience next Friday niglit. 

"Polly anel Her Pals" make up a group 
which has created a widc-s()ri'ad stir of 
interest in the radio world of late, aiul 
are one of the most popular broadcasting 
units in New Knglatid. More-oxer, the-\ 
possess the (xperie-nc c- and skill which 
makes thc-m .in e-\er fascinafiuK allrac 
tion for coniert work. Polly, the le-.ider, 
(Cuntlnuftl on Pufte .<; 

NOVEL FEATURES FOUND 
IN MAROON KEY DANCE 

About a Thousand Italloons Central 
Feature of .Attractive l>ecoratie»ns 



Medici Prints Feature 

In Present Exhibition 

Inusually (;o<id Copies of .Art Master- 
pieces .Secured by Prof. F. A. >\au»ib 

I-or the- next two we-eks the |)icHMe-s 
hanging in the- Meiiiori.il Uuildinn will 
he from the- groiij) of re-productions com 
me-rcially known as the Me-dic i prints, 
riuse ]irints are reprodiicecl by .i spe-cial 
pioiess from the works of modern and 
recent artists of KmofM-. 

Hone in color, these pictures show 
faithfully the- greatness of the painter, 
as they .ire not marred in any wa\ by 
the f.ict that they arc not originals. 

These plates are on side, ami may be- 
cihtaine-d for the price mentioned on t he- 
title card of the picture. I his exhibition 
gives students, facultv .end friends the 
chance of becoming acciu.iinte-d with, and 
even owning, some of the ni.isterpiece-s of 
art. \ery good copies may be- h.id here 
lor a low price, es|)ec»ally when the price 
of the originals is cemside-re-d. 

The- exhibit has been se-e ure-d through 
the elforts of Professor Frank .A. Uangh. 
and he will give any inform.it ion .it his 
coMiMiancI to .inyonc interested. 



M.A.C Wins Exciting Game 
In Fourth Overtime Period 



Prof. Waugh Talks 
To Outing Club 

Illustrated l-ecture Showinft Typical 
Landscapes of the Inited States 

\' .1 meeting of the Outing Club last 

\\e-(lm-sda> , Professor Waugh presented 

•1 -"erie's of his own colored photogr.iphs in 

■'" ilhiMrateel lecture on tyjiieal landscapes 

■ ' I nited States. F^ery type of 

"iiiitry has charms, he siiid, and his 

'*.iuiiful slides proved this statement 

"T he has caught rare beauty even among 

t'lc Nind elunes and on the desert. The 

\ii\e, inc lufied Mt. Toby, the Ik-rkshires, 

the Presidential Range, Mt. Mitchell. 

'•»M- and river scenes throughejut the 

touMtry, the Rockies, .Arizona Desert. 

^fi'l the Cirand Canyon. Professor Waugh 

particularly stressed the Creat Plains, 

'n Ik- grew up and le;inu-d to appre- 

' their quiet beauty which the 

•' :h r often overlooks. He also showed 

^■>'r,il rural seenes which constitute a 

'VI« of l,inds<a|)e in themselves; and the 

' '1*4 r<K-k formatiejns, with the cor- 

^♦^^'I'f'iiding types of ren k gardens. The 

''ondii.linjj views of the (.rand Canyon 

"' unusuallv beautiful. 



01 


ist.andim; 


PERFORM. A.NCE | 


. 


OF TUP 


: V\l 


:ek 

.Nash 


of 


the 


:''nii koblcy 


W. 




''■.nil >tl()\\C(| 


re-.il 


figh 


tinji 




^\ licii he ret 


used 


to !<■ 


c\ c- 


the- 




'■•r having 


thrc- 


• Iroiit teeth | 




''1 111 the 1 


,lst 


period 


of 


thc' 


;' 


hockey >4,ini 


• ,lt 


Lew i> 


Ion 


Lest 


,^ 


.ifteriHiofi. 











.Among the high linhls of the social 
.icti\ities of the term was the Man"*?! 
Key Mardi (iras, helil last Siiturday in 
the Memorial HuildiuK. P.iul \< I itz 
Cerald '.il, dest-r\es c rc-dit tor the- work 
that he- performed on the decorations, 
tisin« fctr th.it purpose about a ihousind 
ballcMins, streamers anel crepe paper, dim 
light and a s[MJt light playing over the 
entire- si-ene. 

"Irv" ( iuyer and his orchestra were up 
to all ex|>ectations, and the nmsic con 
tributed in a large measure to the success 
"f the dance. They were dres.sed in co:. 
tume- and gave some siH-eialty numbers 
lo the setngs that they rendered. 

Chaperojts^ were \b=iT. - -Cr at»e from 
Mount Holyoke-, .Major and .Mrs. N. 
Putler I5ris<<K' anel .Mr. and Mrs. William 
I. (•cH)dwin of M..\.C. The prizes wc-re 
awarded by Major liriscoe- after a short 
explanation as tci the way in which the 
winners we-re chos»-n. Cert rude- .Ma\lott 
'.'{(• and Roger S. Taft ";{() won the prize- 
becaust- they danced in typical style to 
go with their costume-, dertrude Maylott 
was presented with a miniature cotfee- 
(•ercolator. with the inseription "For the- 
llope Chest." To Rog^r .S. Taft was 
gi\en a miniature oil can. with the words 
inse-ribed on it "For the l)e-an's l.iibri- 
eating Oil." 

.After the iiUermission the coidetti was 
releas«-d from the ceiling, and about fift\- 
cou|)les joined in the ensuing confetti 
fight. With this sham battle o\(-r, the 
d.iiice- soon broke up. 

TWENTY- EI{;HT INITIATED 

INTO DELT.A PHI (;.A\I.M.A 

Twenty-eight new members were form- 
ally welre)med to Delta Phi <.a!nina at 
the initiation eeremony held in the 
.\bbev Center on Tuesday evening, [an. 



MAROON AND WHITE 
LOSE TO HUSKIES 



Northeastern Piles I'p .Score in 
Whirlwind Fashion 

belori- a crowd of I4(N) people-, ihe- 
.Massiichust-tts basketb.dl te-.ini lost a 
he.irt bre-.ikinn name to Nort he.istern 
I Mi\cr;,ily List Saturd.iy riiKht by the 
>cun-o| .i2 lo 17. With but thre-e mimile-s 
to |ila\ in the- first h.ill, .Sort he-,isle-rii 
(liiiilic-d horn (he .short end ol ,i b'i lo 1 
scon- to tike- the lead at 1 I to |.;. In ilie 
sccciiid h.dl. Northeastern kepi u|i their 
sjirce to win ihe-ir lir.-l \ictory over 
M.A.C. Symancyk, I ilf.my, and I ire^iory 
le-d the- home team in storing, by Lilly in^ 
thirii-en, ten, and M-\eii poiiu> re>|M-c 
lively. Webbe-r played .i ^oocl n.ime lor 
Ma8.sichus«-lls ,iti(| <ho|)ped three baskets 
lor six points. 

In the hrst li.ilt. M \.C. scored thirteen 
|M)iiits while- .Nort he-.iMcrn was getting 
foin. The- Massic hiisetis scores were 
Ironi two floor baskets apie-ce by Webber 
and Kelley, cjne- by Coukos, and suecess- 
lul free- tries by Davis and Mann. North 
eastc-rn took the- le.id in the last ihrc-e- 
(Conlinued on Pufte .<) 



<;.\MPli.S CAI.KNDAK 

// I/Mr hr^ilr'rsi' prrdH.'^^irMK' 



\-~iiiilil\ , I'rol. L.iiiiiiii 1 It 
•li)li-s.-,<,r ot llistciry ;it .Viiiln i i 



■22. at r,o 



clock. The ideals of the s<jrorit\ 



were reviewed in worcl atnl in tableau as 
symbolic of the life ol il- nieinbers. 

Following the eeremony a large grouj) 
of aluiiin.ie- members as we-ll a*^ t he- 
initiate- .KJiourncii lo lldiii I'lTtN loi a 
delii ion- l..iiii|iiil . iliif '.iiil,i ll.iwley 
'L".t, pic-niiiit ot III It. I I'lii ' ..irnnia. 
i;re-cU(l the new iiiciiibir- ,iiid in llie-ir 
behalf Josi-phine KldredL;i ondt-d. 

.Miss Kdna I.. Skinner y.ix. . '. brief i 

mcssii;e to the' -ororitv. 



W«'dneHd;«y 

.'!. I.'i |i. in. 
r^i. k.ir.l, 
< -ill.-K.- 
Iiiicrir.iii-rnlls l<a-k<-tli.ill 
■S.«»ii. III. K k. v.. Noil l-r.ii.-rniu 
U:v> |.. III. .\.T C, V- l).li,, IMii \l|.l, , 
s.'HI p. III. Mi-n . ( ,1. , c li I. ( ,,,,, . r 

Mcjrt-mi- 
T.l.'i |>, III. Iiiuri l.i~- Ho. ki \ 
Jiiiiiiirs vs. Fii--liiii>ii 
'rhuritday 

limri la ~ lint ki'v: 
7.1.") [1. III. Sc-niof.; v-. Jiiiilnr- 

S.S.\. vs. Siiilioiiiiin- 
Inli-rfralcrnlty K:iHki-tlKill: 
s.:{0 |i III. .Vlpliii Siijnia I'lii vs. SiKiiiii I'l 

Kp-il-.n 
'.>M(> \i. III. Thi-ta < hi v<. K.'i|>rui Sirtiim 
7 .'.0 II. III. l-lori< iilliin- ( liil> M<-i>tliiK in 

Fnixli Hull 
♦>.^."^ I>. rii. International Ki-lation- ( liili 
.M<-(-tini( in tii<> Mi-iiiorial ItiilliliiiK 
Frldiiy 

7liCI|).ni. Sew iai I'nion. ■'l^lllv an<l Hi- 

I'.il." with (li-oriii- I'carson as-i^tinu 
s .iO i>. 111. Uanii- for fa< ulty and stiKlint 

in till- Diill Hall 
Dilta I'lii <i,iniiiia l-otiiial l);in. i- in Ih^ 

Memorial UiiildinK 
\ar-itv llixkev: < ..\ « .here 
Slo. kl.fKliie »a«kell,all: 

.\iw s;,|,.|n ,\(ai|eiii\ . lien 
III ■^lllllall Ba<ketliall: 

SiUtll l><-erlie|(|. Iiep 

Saturday 

SIHI |,, Ml. \ ,ir-ii-. I'... k. 'I,;,ll: 

Si Stephens. Ii> !• 
\ .ir~it V Ho' ke\ : I i. 

h.-r.- 
I.'KI ], Ml Intenlass Hockey; 

Sji.honiores v**. Frc-slimen 
\ ar-ily Helay: B..\..\. .Meet in Ko-t-.: 

\I .\ ( . V-. ( oltjy anil .\nilier-t 
Suii khriilKi- Basket liall: 

( larke S IhidI. tlieie 
Dilt.i I'hi <.:iiiiiii.i 'I'e,, l);in''- in tli. 1,' 

JetTer\ Inn ir'ini _' f. (i p. m 
.Sunday 

't 10 a. in. SiimlaN ( Ii.iimI .S|j«'aker. I're 

ileiil Donalil T ' owlinK of < arli-t 

( oil' - " ■ ■ • |i.-,ot.l 

!ii..:o , ,!ik.- i., Ms r 

Tuesday 

fl I "i ;i Hi. Dep.iri iiH 

l.ai-i.itiiie M'-.ini.: 

hri.li'e Hall. 
S.S..\. v<. Nortliiiiniiioii ' . 
Iiitirlralernit\ l{a-k>i1..ill 

l-ainlii|a C I,- .\lj,ha v-. K k 



llain|i-liii 



Williams Flashes In 

Closing Minutes To Win 

R«»yal Purple Flashes an .Atiftressivc 
.Attack t«» Snatch \ ictory from Ai^ates 

Coming from be-hinci in the- closing 
minulis ol pl.iy III score lour baskets, t he- 
Williams College- basketeers won a thrill 
inn victory over the M.iss,uhuselts e|uin 
let \2 to <,t last we-ek luescLiy evening in 
the Drill ll.ill. This is, pe-rh.ips, I he- 
lowest score- ever m.icle- in .e v.irsily 
b.iskelb.dl g.mie play«-d on the home (loor, 
and it exhibits the strong ch-fe-nse- which 
both te-.ims pres<-nted. .At half time tin- 
score w.is "> to :{ in favor of the M.iroon 
.md White with the defense- ol the home- 
club fututioning to pe-rfection. Ilouevi-r, 
in the List few minutes of the- se-i ond h.df 
the- visitors forged .ihe.icl to win by three- 
points. .A l.irge- crowd was preseni to 

witness the- g. - which proved to be ,i 

I loM-ly conle-sle-d b.itllc' Ireim beginning; 
to end. 

After the- g,ime- opened se-ve-r.il minulis 
I l.ip>cd beloic- .Andy Coukos sioie-cl on .i 
--liort loss from the- foul liiu-. He-thani, 
the- Willi, tins c.ipl.iin, i-vt-ned the- counl 
.1 lew minutes l.ile-r with a shot from the 
sich-. R.i\ Mann's long shot Irom ne-.ii 
the center of the- (loor .in.iin piil the- home- 
cpiinlet ill the- li-.id. Tom I let herinnlon 
and beth.im then .idded one foul shut 
.ipie-ce- as the- h.df ended, the- v,elle-\ tcim 
le-,idinK '< lo .'1. 

(Conllnuvd i>n I'afte 4) 

ROYAL PURPLE NOSES 
OUT AGGIE PUCKMEN 1-0 

Williams Pressed Hard in East Period 
Itiil Earlv iailv lo<» Much 



.After winning thre-i- straight vii lories 
the- MareM>n and White Ihm ke-y le-,1111 w,is 
forced to bow lo the- slronn Willi. nils 
■H-xtil 1 to (I List week I iie-sday in .1 fast 
K.I me play e-cl on the ( olli'^e- pond. Dm iii^ 
the- hrst period the- visitors showed 
su|Mrior s|K-e-d, but the- .Mass^ii hiise-tis 
defense functione-d e-xi e-llent ly ihroiiKli 
out the- (onte-st. A few minutes after 
till- hrst [K-ricKl o|H-ned the- Willi.ims 
pill ksti-rs m.ide se-veral ofte-nsive- drive-- 
into the- lioiiie- f«-:ifn's territory, whiiji 
iiilminale-d in the- only scor«- of the name-. 
Prigh.im, playing right wing for the 
Aisitots, sco red this goal by driving the 
puck past Myriik from the- side- i>f I he 
rink. 

During; till- SI -I Olid pe-riod both le-.inis 
took the- offi-nsive- se-vi-ral tirne-s, but 
neithe-r was .ibli- to score, hot h goalies 
were lalli-d upon to m.iki- ve-rv diffli nil 
stops, which they did iredil.ibly. 

Ill the final |H-rieid, I- rosi i,irriiil iIm- 
piii k down the- ire- .iiid passed to .M.inty 
in trout ot the op|>one-nts' ^;oal. During; 
the process of the flurry Manly hil I he- 
rolling pink tow.ird the- goal, only lo 
h,ive- the- shot bounce ov(-r the cage-. 

Myrick playeel a very genwl game- at 
no.il for the- home ti-am. lie was cr»-dite-d 
with li2 stops, showing how ihorounh he- 
did his weirk. Fro.st, the- .M..A.( . left 
wing, |)layed a brilliant game although he- 
was not able- to srore-. Se-\e-r;il tinii-s, 
(Continued on Pa|te i) 



.\lle-r siM\ ininutes ol iii|i .md link 
b.isketb.dl played List Thursday eveninK 
m the- Drill Ibill, .Andy Coukos tossed ,1 
one- h.inded shot from the- corner In give- 
the- M.iroon and While .1 .'!(» In L'.S vie lorv 
over Worct-sler Tech in the- loinili over 
time pe-riod. Itefore a crowd ol c-m iied 
basketb.ill f.ms the b.inU. w.iued b,ii k 
and lorlh, hrst one- te.im .md thi-n the- 
other n-»iiiiiin the- upjie-r h.ind, until t he- 
home- te-,im fill. illy m,in,ine-d to nose- out 
the- e-iinine-e-rs. Dan.i Webber and .Andy 
Coukos were the hi^;|i seoiers of 1 he- 
g.iiiie-, colle-cting II .iiicl ',t points re- 
spe-c t ive-ly . 

Following the o|K-ninn whistle- 1 lu- 
v.illc-\ i|iiintc-l sl.irle-d oil with .1 six 
point li'.id. Cokous Slink .1 shot Irom 
long r.tiine-. Wt-bber 1 iit to ,idd ,1 double- 
dec ke-i ,iiid I hen duphr.itecl I he- fe-al .1 
ininutt- l.itc-r. M.ibbiii, the lech center, 
got a b.isket .iiid Cciiion scored on a 
loiil, m.ikiiig the- score- (1 lo .'< in favor of 
the home- nuintet. Coukos got .in .icldi- 
tion.il three- points with .1 loul and a 
short toss from under the baski-l. The 
lech ee-nter got anolher two poiiUs .ind 
VVe-blH-r eepiah-d his e-tTorts with .1 b.iske-t. 
Worce-sle-i .idded three points on a 
basket .md a foul .is the- h.df ended with 
the- v.dle-y hve h-.tding I I to '.t 

During the- early part ol the- second 
|Mriod both le-anis seoied se-veial tinu-s. 
With six miiiute-s lo pl.iy I he hiiiuc , lull 
W.IS le-.iding 2\ to 2U. .Asp and lloliiie-s 
nave- the- visitors a three point had with 
two b.iskets. ( oiikos cut the- margin lo 

(Coiillnucel nil I'aUe 4) 

(^REENFIEI l> Ill(;ii <;\M|; 

1 .1-1 S.itiiri|,i\ .ilii'iiiiHiii on the- ( ollene 
I'oiid, the < .le-e-n he-Id liiKh Imm ke y le.ini 
oM II. line- till- M..\( . jiinior Wusity 
hockey sextet in .1 rou^;h b.iltle by ,1 .'1 to 
I score. It W.IS a f.iirly f.ist g.iine-, how- 
ever, and I lines li.id lo m.ike- bS sti)ps, 
while the- visiiiiio j.(.;,|i|.^ Itaueh-n, m,ide 
s<-ven. 'I he siimniary: 

M..A.( . Ji \arsily: 
Kinney, e. .Swift, Iw ; 
H.irtseh, Id; iline-s, g. 

(.leentii-ld llinh: Trela, Iw ; l.iMuie-y, 
«; .Moylan, rw ; Corsinli.i, Id; U.iker, 
rd; Itauele-n, g. 

Sore-: <.re-i-nfie-ld ,'., .\1,.\ ( . Jr. \ ar I. 

Kc-feie-e-: Cox. Time-: lliri-<- l.'im. |H>rio<Is. 

Win and Lose On 
Maine Ice Trip 



Pillsbuiv, I w ; 
S.ile-nius, id; 



ll«H-key Team l>efeais liaies 
Loses lo Itowdoin 



and 



INTERFRATERNITY RASKETB.AI.E 

Two inti-rlrale-riiily basketball games 
were played at the Drill Mall last week, 
the- Faculty winnin>< ove-r Alpha Sigma 
Phi .'i4 tc» 10 oil VWelnesday night, ami 
Kolony Kliib (li-fe-atiriK Ka|)|)a Fpsil<»n 
|.» to 'i ejii Thursday evening;. In t In- 
former Kaiin-. the laciilty at .ill time-s 
showe-f| tlie-ir siipe-riorit y. the- wore at half 
time- be-iii;^ IH to 7. "l..irrs" UrixKs 
tallied 1.") points and Williams anel I' ranee 
Kot SIX apie-ce- for the laeulty. wliili- 
Wherity anel Zielinski did the seorin^ lor 
the |f)s(-rs. On 1 hursday night, the 
Koionv Kliib will W.IS ,1 rejiiKh ,ind ehill 
i;anie-. lor the- winne-rs. Itelde-n s< ori-<l 
-i\ .iiid I lililiir lour poml-. .ni'l <,.n\i\ 
;;ot tiM- ol I he- six pouit 1. K.ipji.i 

r.psiioi). 



by 1,1^111^; .1 shot bom epi.irter-tcc, 
Wai-elili-r SI -I ure-d b»r the- siroiix .M,iss.i- 
iliii-ett- hiMkey team another victory to 
be- ,idili-d l<i its siring by <le-fe-,iliii>; the 
M.ilis ( olle-k;e sexlil in ,1 ri-liim KaiiH" 
pl.iye-d .it liwi-loii, M,iine. I.isl Friday 
with .1 lin.il store ol 7 to •;. The- entire 
H.imi- was e har.ie li-rize-d by the- e-xielle-iit 
teani work in passing by the .Maroon and 
White- pin ksti-rs. The- ^;(km1 god lending 
by I opolosky, the- Hales go.ilie-, prevenle-d 
the- se eire- from beitiK rmii h hirxi-r in tin* 
first iM-riod. 

If,it«-s st.irled »»ut by seiiiiiiig ,1 ^o.il 
after about a minute e>f play but this 
was imint-diate-ly swam|M-d by a di-luge- of 
shots from the .M..A.C. te-.im. of whom 
Frost, Davis, (apt. Nash, .md Waii liter 
each < ageil one- in i|uii k sin 1 i-ssioii. 
This e-xp«rl display e»f fe-am work pl.iii-d 
the .Aggies .ilieail f lo 1 at I lie- 1 lose of 
the first (M-rKxI. 

Johnson. Uobi.il win^. then .scoreel two 
in ,1 row .ilioiil tin- middle- of the- seeonrl 
|)erioi|. only to h.ivi- |- rosI . .Agate wiuK. 
ag.iin se ore- to 111, iki- the- result iit the i-nel 
of the- se-eriiid pe-rie»d ."» lo .! iti f,i\or of tin- 
Ma ss;ichus«-tt s te-aiii. 

In the- last iH-riexl, ( og.in, the bates 
ii-nte-r, s«ore-d three- goals t(» give- the 
Mobcit- .1 ti to .') Ie-,id. .M.mty. .M..A.C. 
wiiiK. tied the se-ore by caging a reiKnind 
shot with only thirty s<-ee)rids left to 
|il.i\. ('.iptain Nash of .Massiichlisi 1 1 s 
v..!- -iriiik in till mouth .iboiit tisi- 
iTiillUlr- liclolc the llin-li ot tin- |.i: ■.! 
((.k>ntlnued on Page 4' 



t 



THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30. 1929 



THE MASSACHUSET1 S COLLEGIAN, VVKDNKSDAY. JANUARY 30, 1929 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Oflicial new8pa|)er of the Massai liustlts 
Agii(ultural CulUn^'. Piiljlishcd every 
WediuMlay by tlie students, 

HOARD OF EDITORS 

Shbplkv Clkaves '29 IC.lilor-in-t liief 

EdwakhH. Nichols '29 ManaKiiit; Kditor 



DKI'AKTMliNT KUITOKS 
Editorial. bHhi'LKV Cl.KAVES ;29 

Feinuri; MAROAKti 1'. Uumjvan .iU 

Alumni & Short ( ourses Sai.lv K. Ukaulev ■jil 
Athletic l-EWis M l.vNUs , 

tKANK T iJOK.LASS .11 

Campus John H. HhwakdJk. "att 

(KciL II. VVadlek.h ':$•) 
KiAL s. roiii-.u Jr. "il 

()s< AK MAKi.or.lN '.i- 



BU SI NESS UKI'ARTMKNT 

F«Ei>Ei<icK D. Thayeh, Jk. "lU lUisiii-3s ManaRfr 

•• " " " Advertisinu ManaKcr 

I.AWRKNCB A. Cakkiith '29 t irtulalioii ManaK-r 

WiNTHRuF f;. Smiih "M) 

Jc.MN H. Tank '30 

RollKKI G. G(K)I)N(IW, '31 

Davih M. Nason "M 

J'ai L A. Smith "M 

K. KiNsi.v WmrTiM '31 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Smg e 

copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Coli-egian. 

In rase of change of address, snbscriber 
will please notify the business manager 
as soon as [xjssible. 

Ent'rea at second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Oflice. Accepted for m.iilinR at signal rate 
of postaRe provided for in section 1 UV.i. Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917, authorized AuKUst '2(). \'.ns. 



|,()()KIN(; AHEAD 

Now tliat tlie excitement iniidellt to 
the campaign for (liaiigiiiK the name of 
the College has died <lo\\ii, tiie question 
arises as to how best to orgaiii/e the 
stnilent body so that there will be definite 
leatlers to keep the projei I ali\i- and 
maintain contart for tiie students with 
thosi- who are in p«)wer to take ai lion on 
the proposal. This cpiestion has been the 
chief motive for the letter in our (om- 
munication column this week signed by 
the three undergraduates who have been 
most I iosely conned ed uilii I tie allair. 

Their suggestion comes in ample time 
to allow .\delphia or t!ie Senate, either 
alone or in conjunction, to formulate a 
plan before the next Student l-orum w hi( h 
will insure the iKrmanency ol the mo\e 
ment which has had such an impetus in 
the past two months. The approval of 
the i)lan by a recorded student M>te will 
render definite any further student 
actions, for there will then be oftit ially 
endorsed leailers working in the manner 
specified by the student body. 

Finally, it is the purpose- of the i'ollfniait 
to express ins<ifar as p«)ssible student 
opinion, and for the acct)mplishinent of 
this, there are two mediums, the edit<»rial 
column and the comimmication column. 
Censorship niiist necessarily be practiced 
in both .It times, but any contribution 
will be acce])te<l if the ideas therein are 
ration.d and worthwhile. We all must 
atlmit, however, that censorship of this 
sort is not always infallible which means 
that we cannot gu.irantee satisfactitm to 
everyone. It is up lu the ILditor to govern 
his etlitorial column as he sees fit so long 
as he can siitisfactorily justify himself. 
~ \t hi?n" xpi e ss ions ^tr twt meet wi4h^tlw 
ai>iiro\al of the student body, they h.i\c 
the privilege of expressing their views. 
There is no reasim why the Ci'llcKi'i" 
should hesitate to express student opinion 
on the matter in question if that opinion 
has resulted from thoughtful consitUia- 
tion on the p.irt of the iindergr.idii.ites. 
We can make no promises now, tor the 
CollfK'"" Hoard must mulergo its .innuai 
reorganization within a few weeks, but 
we feel siife in assuring our readers tli.it 
there will be a spirit of co-oj)eration on 
the part of the future Roartl in any ph.ise 
of the project which will be reasonable 
and beneficial. 



•,.iy "Amherst •\ggie." That is what is 
unpleah;int to those connected with the 
I oilege. 

Mr. M.irsh stresses the point that the 
New laigiaiid states need their agriiul- 
tiir.d colleges. I think that the most of 
us will .igree with him on that point but, 
the mere process of (hanging the name 
of the college iloes not necessitate the 
(hanging of the personnel or the ( urri( u- 
lum. The lollege would be the same 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, but 
under a new name. The \arious dei)art- 
ments would remain and the farmers, as 
well as every other person, w(nild be 
helped in exai tly the siime way. 

Therefore let us try to give the .Massii- 
(husetts .-\gri( ultural College a different 
and better name. If this is found to be 
undesirable, let us all learn to call our 
state college either Mass. Aggie, or 
.Mas.sa( husetts .\ggie. 

Raymond K. Smith 

llssex, Jan. It» 

Rcl>niilfd I rum llif liostmi Herald. 

FRKF. FLVINC; COCRSK OFFERED 

.\n op|M)rtunity to win a free Hying 
(ourse is offered students of Massiichu- 
setts Agricultural College by the Massa- 
chusetts Airways, ojjcrator of a large 
Hying schiK)l at Springfield, Mass. 

The Mass;ichus«tts .\irways, a dis- 
tributor of Eaglerock airplanes in the 
New K.ngland states, has announced it 
would aw.ird a free ten-hour flying course, 
worth approximately $;MK), to the (ollege 
student in its territory who makes the 
best showing in the aeronautical s( holar- 
ship contest which the Alexander Aircraft 
Co. of Colorado Springs is holding this 
spring to arousi- more (ollegi.ite interest 
in a\iation. 

The Alexander company will award a 
completely ecpiipiied Kaglerock. or if 
prefernd, a four-year university scholar- 
ship in aeronautics on June 1 to the 
uiidergr.idu.ite who submits the best four 
short articles on avi.ition before May I. 
The contest is open until that date, 
r.oth men and women are eligible. 




STOCKBRIDGE 



ril.XNK YOU, MR. SMFtH 

To the Kditor of I'lie Hrrald: 

Being a graduate of the Massachus( tts 
Agricultural College, 1 feel (lisi>osed to 
take exceptions to the statements made 
in vour column on J.m. 11, by Stephen 
Marsh. .\t the first glance I felt that one 
of m\ fellow .thimni was championing mir 
Alm.t Mater; but. on re.iding the umi- 
munic.ition further I re.ilized my mistake. 
Your corresp(mdent is just another one 
of those people who are m.iking the 
.studeiits .iiid .ilinimi ot tiie M..\.( . ilc 
sirous of ch.mging its name, lie h.is Ire 
quently mentioned ".Xmherst .\ggie" 
with its tine personnel and ((iiiipnunl. 
Doc- tic n.ili/c tli.it there is no siK h 
pl.u t? I> it true til, It in this age of mad 
rush one does tiot feet inclined to t.ike 
the time to s.iv NLi-sachusetts .Agricul- 
tural College"; it is much quicker to use 
an abbreviation or .i pet n.inie. There 
would be no olijertion to this praititc il 
the name used were Massiichusetts .\ggi( 
or Mass. .Aggie, but no, the (K-ople must 



EMPLOYMENT .\(;ENT 

Recreation leadership as an attractive 
and uncrowded held for college graduates 
will be des< ribed on February ti 7, when 
Willard Sutherland of the I'layground 
and Recreation .Asscm iation of .'\meri(a 
visits Mass. .Agricultural College. Mr. 
Sutherland represents the National Re( 
reation .Sch<M>l conducted by the .Xssoci- 
.ition in New York City, which offers a 
one-\e.ir course to about fifty college 
men and women chosen for their (pialities 
of leadership and athletic and scholastic 
.ibility. 

The forty students in this year's class 
were picked from one hundred and sixty 
.q)plicants in the graduating classes of 
leading colleges last June. A few of the 
lolleges contributing these students are: 
t)hio State, Brown, I'enn St.ite, Middle- 
bury College. Drake, Illinois Wesleyan, 
.uhT tTTt- T*nTversiTu>s t>f l^ebTasfcr .ind 
Kansiis. The forty-four members of 
last year's class are at work in public 
recreation (le])artments, community 
hcnises, etc., throughout the country. 

S.ilaries in rccreatitm work range from 
Sl.-lXl to *<■>.. VKI a >ear, a recent survey 
showed. The lower sidaries arc for 
assistants in the recreation centers and 
playgrounds, the highest for superinten- 
dents of recreation in the larger cities. 
Many women as well as men are holding 
the most respt)nsible jKJsitions. 

Mr. .Sutherland will be glad to advise 
members of the senior class about op|>or- 
tunit'es in the recreation field and to 
tell them how they may ap|)ly for en- 
train e in next year's school. 



Campu5Det)il5 



Prexy Says 

In science, a law is not a controlling 
force, it is only a description of what has 
occurre«l in the i)ast and what we may 
reasonably expect in the future. Whereas 
in society, such a (les(ription is called 
"custom," and a law is a fornmlated 
order from organized society for its mem- 
bers to obey, 

- CD 

Intercolleftlate 

.\ silver loving cui) is to be awarded to 
the winner of a "Heaver Contest" at 
Detroit City College, in which partici- 
[)ants vie to see who can raise the longest 
beard. 'The barbers ought to letaliate by 
instituting a bald-headed week. 

Then will be shown the "tonsorial 
discrepancies." 

CD 

'To win an im|M)rtant basketball game 
fr(nn .i much stronger o|)ponent, a 
Chinese (ollege oiled its basketb.ill court 
and practiced playing u|Mm the slippery 
surfa(c. When the \isiting team arrived 
for the crui i.il contest it h.id to pl.iy upon 
the oiled floor and was easily defeated. 

Rather smooth, eh wot? 
CD 

Hecause girls at Hrxii M.iwr (olline 
who still cling to (igarette smoking are 
classed as spinsters, many female stu- 
dents h.ive .idopted pipes of dainty, 
girlish designs. 

I'erhaps they will now h.i\e more 
'pipe-dreams"! 

CD 



DEERFIEEU HOCKEY GAME 

Deerfield .Academy annexed another 
victory to its list when its hockey team 
defeated the Sto(kliri(lge School of .Agri- 
culture pu(kstersal Deerfield last Satur- 
tlay afternoon by a score of .'J to 0. -Al- 
thmigh the score points to a one-sided 
game, it was in truth quite fast and 
interesting. The summary: 

S.S.A.: C.raf, Iw; Hoyt, c; Durkin, 
rw; W. lirown. Id; Kyeberse, rd; Swain, 

g- 

Deerfield: -Abercrombic, rw; Powers, 

c; llolner, Iw; Heard, rd; Hastings, Id; 

Ray, g. Spares: lirowiiing. Lisle, \alen- 

tyi.e, Sands. 

Store: Deerfield .">, S.S.A. 

Referee: Dowd. 



COMMUNICATIONS 



ARMS WINS 15—14 

.Arms .Academy defeated Stockbridge 
School on Tuesday, January 22, after 
the \arsity-Williains game, by the score 
of 1.") to 14, in a rather po<jr exhil)ition of 
basketball. Coach "Red" Hall's dub led 
S to :J at the end of the first half, but 
.Arms pushed forward and with less than 
two minutes to play, Ilr(nvn put the 
visitors ahead with a jiretty basket. 
Hokina scored six points for the winners, 
while Fletcher featured for S.S..A. with 
nine points. 



The Collegian accepts no responsibility for oi.in. 
ion* voiced in "The Forum." It aims to serw? uj 
a means of giving exi)ression to student ojiiiiiun, 
and will jirint any views expressed ration.iily anj 
sanely, unless the editors feel that they are histj. 
ficd in suppressing them because of untair ;,.r. 
sonal attack. Cominunic:itions must be limit.. 1 .q 
500 words. 

.At Kongo Hall 

Jan. 2(». I'.tJ'.i 
To the Kditor of the Colleiiioti: 

'There may be some results In.ni 
"watchful waiting" for the change in 
name of the College. With "wat( lilul 
waiting" we might get somewhere. Im 
it may not be the jilace we want to go 

It seems to us that the thing nn.st 
needed at present is a definite organi/.i 
ticm and a plan of campaign not merely 
approved by personal interview with each 
student but supported by a recorded vote 
of ai)proval at Student Forum. We M 
(ertain that the student governnuiit 
bodies should at that time form su( h a 
plan. 

We feel that the CoUci^iait should .i> 
the students' newspaper take an aitive 
l)art in expressing the student sentinuiu 
on this important matter, and we ho|)e 
that the Cdllfniun will approve such a 
definite plan of action. 

Dennis M. Crowle\ 
Henry Wilhelm Jenxn 
I.auri S. Ronka 



no'itc:e 

The results that were obt.iined from 
the (piestionnaire which was distributed 
in ChaiK'l List Friday morning h.i\e not 
.ill been tabid.ited as yet, but believing 
tliev will be of interest to many of those 
who .mswcred the (|ueslions asked, 
arrangements have been made to h.ive 
this m.iteri.il avilable tor next week's 
issue. 



Wil.I.IAMS-M.A.C;. HOCKEY (JAME 

(Continued from Pafte I) 

c-pci i,ill\ in ttie List lew iiiiniilcs of jilaN'. 
he m.ide shots th.it seemed almost 
destined to get b>' the Willi.ims goalie, 
but cull lime llie thrusts were turned 
aside, lor the \isitors Cqitain Howe, 
who played left defensi . ,md Ho\t played 
\(r\ well. The liiu up for the Massachu- 
setts team w.is ,1- lollows: Frost. Iw; 
D.iMs, c; Patch, Waei liter. Manty. rw; 
N.isli, Id; Hond, rd; Myrick. g. 



Professors at Michigan are threatening 
to resign if a plan by which students 
would grade the efliciency of their in- 
structors goes through. 

What the fear of hearing the truth 
about oneself can cause! 

CD - 
.-\t the I'niversity of Washington the 
exchange mag.izines were placed on a 
(•(umter with a sign above them inviting 
the students to help themselves. Inside 
of four days all comic publications were 
gone, while all those of a serious nature 
remained. 

CD 

Joe Found That 
Fannie Frosh says: "I came to this 
agricultural college to see the angry 
farmers I had heard so much about, 
but the so-called cross-country men 
(lon'T seem ve i y ttoss to ittr. Cmess I 
must be dumb, or somep'n." 

CD— 

The freshmen cry: "Since the w.iils 
of 'Ontogeny recapitulates phytogeny,' 
'Thus a vacuum is created.' 'Then tomes 
ditTerentiation.' .ind 'Why all the maps?' 
have been given so many times, we don't 
want to stay here unless we ha\e .i new 
tourse, 'cuz the sophs ha\en't left us 
an\ thing to complain about." 

CD 

Now comes the co-eds' annual (mner- 
ship of the week-end. 

CD 

Hoys, how is the family behaving? 
Kmily Post's ears must be burnt olT by 
this time. Well, forks weren't the first 
ftHxl-shovels made, anyhow. 

CD 

Yeah, more snow, but no carnival. 

fl) - 
When the nightwatchman arrived .it 
the Drill Hall to l(Kk it up. the basket 
endurance performance was still on. He 
said he didn't see any sense in playing so 
long, because when he came in the 
bottoms of the baskets were all broken 
out. 

"Ome lo e\(r\ te.im .i victory," ,uid 
w luit .1 g.ime! 

More fun. more fingerinils cluwid. 
more interrupted heart-beats, .md the 
rest . 

CD 



COMMUNICATION 

"Since graduating in the class of lil21 
I have gone through the Colorado .Agri- 
cultural College and am now doing 
gr.iduate work in the S<»cial Sciences at 
the Iniversity of Chicago. Though the 
intervening years have been busy and 
full of new experiences and delightful 
.ic(pi.iintanies. the two years 1 spent at 
.Amherst will alwa>s remain fresh and 
vivid in my mind, .is pei uli.irly enjoyable 
.iiid worthwhile. Words f.iil me ade- 
ipiately to express how much it would 
mean to me to see some of the old gang 
once more, and talk over the old times. 
I am looking forward to the time when 
I may be able to return to the campus and 
see all the improvements which no doubt 
have been taking place."- Harohi T. 
Lawrence, class of U»21 S.S.A. , C.oo<l- 
speed Hall. University of Chicago. 



RELAY TEAM DEFEATED 

In the new Hoston C.arden. the Mass.i- 
chusetts relay team was defeateil by the 
Northeastern I'niversity in a rather one- 
sided race last Siiturday night. 

.Although the .Maroon and White four 
ran .i very good nice, they were no match 
for the Husky quartet. Shea of North- 
eastern slipped away with a flying start, 
which gave the Engineers a lead which 
(ould not be decreased by the .Aggie 
foursome but continued to increase until. 
.It the close of the race. Thompson, the 
Northeastern anchor man. crosseil the 
finish .ilmost a lap ahead of Robertson, 
the anchor man for M.A.C. The time 
w.is .'{m. -i'-i ;i-.")s. 
The summary: 

Mass;ichusetts: Donald Davis, Robert 
Snell. Clarence Hamnnrnd, Harold Robert- 
son. 

Northeastern: F. L. Shea. W. K. 
Thompson, \V. J. Hanson. C. W. Thomp 

son. 

Won by Northeastern 
Time: :?m. -V-i :{-os. 



\\ .lilted: An e\< -(';ropp<'r wilti wliich 
to ser\e the thirdly players the Hdrcr 
aqua. 'The\ .ire needed in preference to 
the eiionuoiis cups used between fxriods 
last week. 

CD 

Anyone going north from the college 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Jolin Noyes '(Ht has opened a new office 
in the Railway Exchange Huilding. St. 
Louis, Missouri, for handling all branches 
of landscape architecture. Mr. Noyes has 
been practicing in St. Louis and vicinity 
for several ve.irs now and has built up a 
large business which justifies the pro- 
vision of these new f.icilities. 

'24 Walter M. Morris has left the 
high elevations of Petersham, Mass.. for 
the sea breezes of Kdgartown. M.irtha's 
X'ineyard, where he holds tlie title of 
principal of schools, including high and 
grammar. 

'24 Harold I). Stevenson, who was a 
nurserym.m with "Chick" Hoardm.m '20 
for ,1 time this summer, has accejited a 
position as ,i landscape gardener for the 
Cr.igliohiie Nursrrx Co., at < ".reenwich, 
(."onn. 



enters .No M.in's Land," "Nowhere," 
or "Anywhere, " after the annual ravages 
of the initiates. Who believes in signs. 



an\ wa\ 



CD 



Cela Suftit. 



Maynard, Mass.. 
Jan. 2:5, l'»2'.t 

To the Filitor of the Collcf^ian: 

"Ciifair, n.irrow. selfish, iKslitical, sour 
lemons, detestable, degenerate" why art- 
such expressions to be found in a cohirim 
|)lanned for rational, sane, and f.iir c\ 
pression of opinion? It sounds .is il it 
were written by one who thinks he may 
have friends at court, but, doubting their 
support, threatens to "make a fiwd out 
of the professor." If politiis fail, bl.ick- 

mail! 

I am wondering if the student hody 
wants tlie ( ollege, or any part of it, niirc- 
seiited in su> h terms as were part ol ,i 
(ommunication in your issue of January 
It'i. I am wondering if the president and 
trustees are going to be impressed with 
the necessity of preparing students lor 
"non-agricultural" graduate schtnils. or il 
they .ire going to interest themselves 
seriously with a particular student wli". 
when a little hard work gets under hi* 
skin, loses his sc-nse of propriety and 
writes with such heat and s<i little illumi- 
nation. 1 am wondering if the best thiin; 
for this fellow who finds himself in sudi 
depressing en\ ironment wouldn't he lo 
join what was known in the ante-betlum 
days .IS the "army of the one-way ticket. 

.And finally, -Mr. Kditor, I wonder 
where you were when the conmmniiation 
was passed to be printed in the Coll>'zi<'"' 
I ccmsider that it contained an unfair 
(K-rsonal attack ui>on the head ol ihc 
Kconomics Dep.irtment. .ind unjustitieil 
insinuations of deliberate malpractin' on 
the part of the faculty committee. 

F. M. C.ifford 1^ 



To the Kditor of the Collegian: 

I noted with amusement the dispart, 
ing ami I sujipose hopefully facetimi' 
references to .Agriculture and es|>e<i,illv 
to Judging teams in the Campus Hd: - 
column of last week's Collegian. The Lumc 
industry of the world i incidentally .\yy 
its largest I which supfdies man with hi-* 
three biological necessities food, cloth- 
ing and shelter, shouhl need no sfff'^' 
I)leading before intelligent people to set 
forth its indispensiibility, importance ami 
dignity. Critics of this sort display not 
(miy their lack of breadth but also a la>k 
of g(M)d taste since such criticism i- 
real humor but merely a symptom ol an 
impaired digestion, mental or other«;^- 

The fact that .Agriculture has re '^ 
been and still i> p.issing through .i \' 
trying economic readjustment, of omix 
renders it peculiarly vulnerable to attai* 
from those not acquainted with its i' 
lenis. possibilities and not sulfi<i<n'> 
courageous to meet the competitinn ■ 
now entails. By the same token ; 
who select .Agriculture in any o' '^' 
branches as their chosen field of endeavor 
display a degree <jf courage met !^ ' 
infrequently in America today. Eciiomi': 
facts tend to limit the numbers '<! men 
electing .Agriculture, and these s;in ■ ■ ' 
act as a guarantee of their qualit> 

There seems at present, howex'i ; 
crying need for memf)ers of the 1'^ 
stock judging team to parade an oatwar 
Continued on Pafte i) 



COLLEGE NECKWEAR IS THE FEATl RE FOR THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL. STRIPES, FKU RES, AND SOLID COLORS IN \| | PRK r 
RANGES. THIS IS Ql ALITY MERCHANDISE, BROl CUT IN BY LEADING IMPORTERS AND THE PRICFS WH I VI I R \( T 

GET YOUR TUXEDOS FOR THE MILITARY BALL, COED FORMAL AND INITIATION BANQUETS AT 

LANDIS-OPEN EVENINGS 



WINTER FOOTWEAR 
To Meet The Needs Of College Men 

"Bostonian" 

Imported and Domestic Grain Leather 
Oxfords - - - $7.50 to $9 

Dance Oxfords - - - $7 to $9 

Bass Water Moccasins - $4 to $16 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



VALENTINES 

FOR SWEETHEARTS. MOTHERS AND FRIENDS 
ALL STYLES ALL PRICES 



'My smtle won't work 

When I'm alonr 
Why don't you colt 

or telephone/" 

JAMES A. LOWELL, 



"You tun treat me with candy 
With jewels and with gold 

I like lo he treated 

Put don't treat nte cold" 



BOOKSELLER 



COMMUNICATION.S 

(Continued from Pafte 2) 

si>;n of their aptitudes .ind .iccomiilish- 
imiits before an awestruck and admiring 
jiiipulace in the form of college insigni.i 
of .in\- sort. Their ego is full\ appeased 
•11 the cups. me<lals and trojihies which 
u((,i>ionally reward their efforts so that 
criticism" can be released for the 
amelioration of some of the more pressing 
needs of suffering hum.init\. 

The insinuation that endeavor of this 
Hirt. and by inference the men eng.iged 
111 it. is not representative of a worth 
while stratum of this College's life really 
|)i(|iies. My humble o))inion is that nu-n 
(if the stamp of Hill Roper '2H, I lap 
I'arsons '27, .AI Mann '2(1. Iluck Love '2"). 
Kit Ingraham '2.') et al.. are represititati\f 
111 .IS high a t> pe as is fr>und on this cam- 
pus, an<l my hope is that their sj)irit of 
\\\nh endea\()r, broad-mindedness, atten- 
liiin to their own affairs and tolerance 
nia\ \et lea\en the mass at Massu husetts 
•\«gie. 

\ . A. Kice 

PI.WS FOR SOCIAL CMON DANCE 
(Continued fr(im I'ufte I) 

:> hers<'lf a concert artist of distinction, 
■iiiil was for a time one of the \'inceiit 
I iipez Debutantes. 

Various types of entertainment are 
introduced during the e\ening. .Sjixo- 
;iiiime solos, s<i.\ophone trios, \ioliii and 
I'l.ino solos, and songs, both individual 
attif as a group. In addition no\elty 
if.itures are introduced from time to time. 

"■'■' i.il Ciiion tickets will admit the 
i'caiera to the dance. 



Landscapers Hold "Lab" 
Dance In Wilder Hall 



<iay Party .Spttiisored by landscape 
Club 

.A very successful experitiuiit w.is 
carried out by the members of the Land- 
scajH- Club in the form of a "lab" dame 
given ill Wilder li.ill List Friday t-vening. 
Professor and Mrs. W.iugh. Professor and 
Mrs. Harrison .md Professor C<M>ml.s 
were the cha|HTons. 

<iaily dressed couples daiued in the 
l.iboratory r«K)ms. the walls of whii h wire 
decorated with drawings and designs by 
Francis I). .Albert i '2'.t and by other 
contributions from various stinUnts in 
Professor VVaugh's course in design. 

tanney's four-piece orchestra su|)plied 
excellent musii and refreshmell|^ .,f 
punch and c<x)kies were served. 



VALENTINES 



f 



or 



Sweethearts, Mothers, 
and Friends. 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 

THE 

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

'Offers Expert Hair Cutting 
Service for Men and Women. 

POP' DUWELL, Prop. MEMORIAL BUILDING 

College Drugstore 

W. H. McGRATH 
Reg. Pharm. 

AMIIERST, - - MASS. 



.SOCIAI, CMON ENTERIAINMENT 

(Continued from Pu^e li 

to his he.irers. His pn'seiit.iiiuii^. ueie: 

Stherzo in (i .Minor Chopin 

Pnlude No. 2(1 Chopin 

Country ( i.irdens Pen y (, rainier 

Cor.ilit.i J'aitlC. Anderson 

.S haryadah I'a ul C. . t nderson 

The last two numbers, the encores, were 

((imposed by Mr. .Andersfm himself, and 

showed real appreciation of music . 

Coming on to the st.igc re(iting a 
humorous little |)oem about the (omjili- 
(ations of the f.imily where love did not 
run so snifMithly, Miss Simpson proceeried 



I ASK FOR I 

"Munsingwear" 

RAYON and SILK 

Bloomers- Step- Ins -Vests 

Slips - Bandeau - Pajamas 

Night Robes 



Plaque Presented To 

William Wheeler 7 1 

Trustees Express .\ppreciation of 
William Wheeler's Long -Service 

• \ pl.i(|IK- upon wliiih is iiis( libed .1 
testimoni.il signed li\ the memlni>. ,,| 
the Hoard of Trustees w.is ret (inly 
presented b\ the Mo.ird to Willi. mi 
Wheeler (if the (I. iss of 1,S7I. Mi. \\ hriici 
since his gr.idu.it imi h.i^ devoted .1 nie.ii 
de.il of lime to this College and has been 
.1 meiiilier of the Hoard of Trustees since 
I.S.SII, li(ing elected ch.iirman in l«.»2t'i. 
l>uring this time he tendered iiuk h mi 
vice to the institution, and this pl.upie 
expresses the Hoard's .ipprei i.ition ol 
this f.ict. 

( »n the pl.i(|in' is insi ril.ed the follow iii^;: 

TO WII.I.I.WI WHFKI.IiR 

In riitif^nition ol distinguished ser'ne. 

The Ho.ird of '!rusle«s of the M.issi- 
(husi-tts .Agricultural College desiring to 
recogni/e the long and important s»rvi(c 
to the College whi( h .Mr. William WIn-eler 
has rendered and wliii h h.is few, if .mv 
erpials in the hi.story of Americin edm .1 
lion, .ilfect innately tender lo him this 
formal statement of their .ippreii.it ion 
• md esteem. 

Mr. Wheeler is a gr.iduate of t li< 
College in its first ( I.iss, 1,S71. He w.i> 
.ippoinled to the Ho.ird of rriislees in 
\SS{\ .mil sciAcd (((iitiiiuously as a 
Iriistee from !SS7 to I'.tJ'.t. beinn i hair 
111. Ill ol the Hcird since l!l2ti. Sik h ,1 
reiord is of itself almost unii.iralleled in 
the .St.ite's history. W hen there is added 
to this re((ird of time unselhshK' gi\cn 
without limit .md without remuner.it ion, 
the (pi.ility of careful thought ,ind wise 
.ittenlion lo the institution's best interest- 
.md the .State's welfare wlii( h h.is i h.ir.n 
terized his services on this Ho.ird, this 
reiord be( omes most impressivf. 

It is with pleasure, therefore, tli.it we. 
the members of this Ho.ird, nive this 
testinioiii.il of our high n ^;.ird for him 
.md the splendid ser\i(c whiili he h.is 
rendered. 

lo ( liange into her (i>stiinie (»n the st.ige 
.md alter a brief expl.iii.ition, went right 
into her last reading, portra\ing an 
( Iderly dressmaker visiting .1 we.iltlu 
New ^■ork home. Her troubles in tin 
gre.it (ity of New \ur\i seemed ( liiefh 
o\tr her inability to find any "traflii 
jam." 

Com hiding the progr.im .Mr. Find 
pla\'ed two selections and an eii(or( 
number. He seemed lo be .iliie to evpress 
the tone of the piei e tli.it he remhred 
and his ability with the \iolin was very 
evident. His si-lections were: 

Meditations from Thais MassinrI 

Spanish Dame Hehfetd 

Canebreak Gardner 



New Arrivals Every Day 



Spring Mallorys Arc Here. 
Spring Suits aiul Topcoats. 

Tuxedos and 'Tiixetio Accessories. 

Come In and Look Them Over 
F, M. THOMPSON & SON 

CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN FOR NEARLY IIITY YEARS 




SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

I G. Edward Fisher ■ 



FYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Remington, Royal 
and Corona Sales and .Service 

Radio Kquirment General Repair Shop 

H. E. DAVID 

35 Pleasant St., ju»t below P.O. Amherst 



Amherst Shoe Repair Co. 

. Master Shoe Rebuilders 
^'EXT TO BOLLES SHOE STORE 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Ocuiiatt' Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCK.S and other 
reliable maken 

i PLEASANT STRKET. (up one flight) 



9 Town Hall Theater g 

12 .V1;ilin('ts .<:00 i \cnlii(is (>:4.S ;in(J S:.<ll Q 



Get 

Your 

Tickets 

for the 

Military Ball! 

$2.00 per couple 

Feb. 8 



7.30 to 11.30 



Best in Drug Store Ser\'ice 
Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co. 



Wednesday, Januar>' i9 

t.KI.I A <,\htlui _ (('\I<M) \V,II l\ 

**The Mysterious Lady" 

l>nr i,K,rrl<i ■■ hrst I'ltlurr;. Ihm't Mf.s II 

Fa hies Oddity 2 Reel Comedy 
Thur.s.-Fri. Jan. .^I and Feb. 1 

ii/.ll I: li()Hlil:S ^- .1 \l K I'll KIHKD ni 

"Gang War 

A liritmn Ihiil iliirr^ In he liillfrfHI I hr lnr\ 
■<l priiple slrUKkli»K '" '" hilppy whin Ihr 
t>riir III life t\ nitin •lenlh unit n'ttriinr is ihi 
tril i>< frtrnilshtt'. An fl>ii ni unniilnnit -nir. 



NEWS 



COMEDY 



L 



Saturday, Feb. 1 

Sonnenherg vs Lewis 

( ■nii'ni'l >i-(,H ."^nitiu iihiri; tiikf liu Itln 
(rum l:d "Slrnniilrr" l.r.ii^ . I hr unly pulun 
in existrnir nf Ihr. hnut taken ill Ihr rinKside 
■hn-iim; the entire hmt Irom slnrl In isnrh 

■mil HI. 1. 1. h IIEWh.ri in 

"The Power of Silence** 

ll'iw Innit iitn It -Human keep a ierrrll 7 An 

I' Ihr iin\-:ver. ^ mmplrle hiru-s ul l! 'I'l-H iO 

.W'.ir.s- 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

RKPAIRINr; AM) ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING UONK AT REASO.NABLK 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 




That adorn the foot 
are admired by all. 

Our selection of styles 

and materials is most 

complete. 

Thomas S. Childs 

INCOkPORATED 

275 High St., Holyoke, Mass. 



AMHERST FRUIT STORE 

WHERE AGGIE MEN MEET 

WHEN DOWN TOWN 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGARS 



Freshmen Outplay Clarke 
School In Second Half 

Captain Foley and Wilson OITcuNivu 
.Slar.s f«»r Neophytes 

Oillpl.iyiiiK llieii (>|>|M>iii'iits in iIh- 
s.(uml li,,|| of the n.inu-. Ill,- .M.A.C. 
Iiishm.ifi b.i>,krlb.ill tf.iiii won (.\,r 
t lark<- SiIkm.I .n Nniihiiniplon l.isi 
S.iliii.|,i\ iiij.;|it |.\ |||(. Miirr ot .{.{ to LM. 
WiKoii .iiiil ('.i|.|.iin I ol. y led the .ilt.uk 
ul ilu- \isitois with fifUen .iti<l l«n (Mtiiils 
ie.s|M( lively, uliiic Aib.mi .stored twelve 
points on six llooi b.iskets lor Cl.irke 
S<h..ol. At li.ilf tinu, III,- fnsiun.tn led 
by I lie rount ot il to Id, jiut WilMin, 
loley, Cfinneil. .md .\birilt s<<>red from 
four to einht iHiinls .ipi,,,- in I lie sei oiid 
li.ill lo de( ide tlu' K-iine. I osk«lt, reniil.ir 
(inter for the fr«sliiM4ii, is out ol (lie 
H.iiiK- .in.iin with .III iideiied I. ire. 

Tlu' siiniiDary: 



Kreshmen 


It 


!• 


!• 


CLirk*- 


St'hiMi 

II 1- 


l> 


Ull-nli.ll 


l> 


'. 


1.. 


' .Hlllll. 1 IK 


11 II 


II 


< <>|||||.||.|| 


■» 


II 


1 


1 Ml. Ii.ii nil Ik' 


1 1 


.1 


M< inlt.c 


T 


'J 


1 


.■>! Illlll/... 


1 (1 


• t 


I-..I.V Ik 


.1 


II 


III 


jolll'.ll 


•J II 


1 


liki.lski.ik- 








n 


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li II 


r/ 


I'.ilo .111, IK 


n 





(1 









TotalM 



I I 



.•i;i 



Tilt .lit 



HI I L'l 



S...H. .,( ImII tiiiK-: l-i.-slnnrii II, ( l.,tki- S Ihh.I 
Mt. Rfli-li-<-; l).i\ . liiin: .H-iiiiiMil.- .|ii.iii,.t». 



•M.A.C. I.O.SK TO NOR I IIKA-SIFRN 
((^onllnuvd troni l'u|l« l> 

niiiiiiles of the h.df with b.iskils by 
.S\iii.,ii,yk .md Iitf.mv. In the first five 
iiiiiuites ot the s.-c,.ii.l h.df, the home 
team K-'in'd .1 substantial ha«l lhroii>;li 
the «llorts ot < .nnory. S\iii.m,yk, and 
Iitl.m\. and (onimned lo |ii!e up tlitii 
.idwml.ini- to .Jli |M»iiils. T In- snniiii.iiy: 



.Siirlhraslrrn 






MilHhilt hu-l«-|lH 




IS 


1 


!• 


It 


1 1' 


svm.iiii ■, k.ii 
TifhiiiN.ll 


ti 
1 


1 


1.) 
Ill 


k. II.•i.I^• 
.^l.lnll.lK II 


<l 1 
I 1 


I'I'ti lift.i 


II 


T 


II 


O.IVIH.I II 

MiilllHJi'U skj.i II 


n 


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.Ah «nl,.4tt 


11 


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n 





< oilke.-ll 1 


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Tr.liil- 



I I I 



lol.iU 



7 .1 17 

S<<»n. ill h.ill liiiic .N'liiilii'.i.tt'iii II M.msiii till- 
Hitu l.{. K.liif, : Sw.illii I.I I iii|.ii. . f.uk.i 
Tiim-: 20-ituiiiitc lialvi-x 



AMH 

Jt\ THl 



ERS 



THEATER 



T 



Wednesday, .laii. .Mt 

5 Kflin VAUDfVIUf ACTS 

ON Mil SrKKKN 
MAKII I'KONOSI A RAI I'll «,KAMS in 

"THE SIDESHOW 

< AKlnoX l-.MIII. M us 






Ihurs. & Fri., Jan. .41 A Feb. I 

HI III l>AMKI.S A SHI ll\V1II.M>\ in 

"OH, WHAT A NIGHT* 

M).\ ( <'Ml.hN M US 
-Saturday, Feb. 2 

GKO OHHII \ ^ I OIS M(>KA\ In 

"BLINDFOLD** 

I'AR A.MOI \ I ( OMI h\^ M.U S 
.Monday & Tuesday, Feb. 4 A .S 

R O N \ I I) « «) I M \ \ In 

"THE RESCUE** 

2 Kill ( OMI I)\ NI.Ws 



SI'M.IAI. AIHMIi MIRA<;llON 

Mon. Feb. 4. Matinee & Fveninft 

felix ferdJMndo And His Orchestra 

17 I'liiMTs ill ;i ( (iniiri Simli> rrniir^ini 



announcp:ment 

Now situated at 15 1-2 Pleasant .St. 
EXCEIJENT .SHOE REFAIRERS 

V. fikOMXhXFCO, Prop. 



I 



^3:jV? OaDiW 



I 



V\IK MASSACIIUSKTTS COLLKf;i\N, VVKDNKSDAY. JANUARY 30, 1929 



WALSHIZA TION PA YS! 

mCKEY-FRIU'M/LY SIHTS HOLD THEIR SHAPE, IT IS TAILORED LV. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



CLASS NEWS 



COED NOTES 



CLUB NEWS 



IMKRCI.ASS ll()(:kK\ 

Last \\«(lii<-.il.iv riiKlit. ill llif iiit»i( lass 
liockry Imiriiamtnl . tin Miiiors lust Id 
tlu' S.S.A. M'xUl \>y a wore of 4 to 1. 
Tin- sopliomoifs alsii tiM)k tin- seniors 
into caiiii) last Satimlay to tlu- tuiu' of 
10 to ;{. it was a faifial j;anK-, the seniors 
only haviiin ac rt-ss (o fnc men tlir<nii;ii 
out the K'l""'. ^I'"'"'' ai(k-<i tin' sopho 
niorc-s greatly in tluir stoririK- 1 Ih- 
seniors were minus a Koal tt-nder and 
keenly fell their loss. The summary of 
liotli names is as follows: 

S.S.A. : (iraf, Iw; Jloyt. t; K. Hrown, 
rw; W. Krown, 111; KyelK-rs*-, r<l; Swain, 

v.- . , 

Si-niors: Sullivan, rw; McKittrick, ( , 

Howe. Iw; J«)hnson, r<i; Kirhardson, Id; 
Steere, «■ 

Si'ore: S.S.A. 4, S«Miiors 1. 

Sophomores: Kin>i, Iw ; (ox, c; S.i 
lenius, rw ; Harts( li. Id; Hieks, rd; 
Mines, «. 

Seniors: Howe, rw ; Johnson, c; Sulli- 
van, Iw; Kirhards4.n, rd; .Adams, Id; 
no noal tender. 

Score: Sophomores 10, Sc-niors M. 

CLASS MKKTIN(;S 
1929 

.\l the nuctinn of the senior class last 
Wediusd.iN a tommittee was appointed 
to (onsider « li.it functions the class will 
hold this year. Shepley Cleaves and 
T.iyior Mills were appointed to this 
committee. 

ViM) 

The junior class voted to reelect alt ot 
it- iithcers tor the term. 
VKM 

ilulm.i I'rieih ich was elected set ret.iry 
of the sophomore class as the lesull of a 
liallot to determine a tie vote lutweeii 
Miss l-riedrich and Miss Spiew.ik at the 
|>re\ious nuelin^. 

M.A.C. WINS OVKK riMK (iAMK 
(ConllnuiMl (r»m Paftc I) 

two |M)ints with a foul shot. 'Ihen. with 
a few seconds to play Kay Mann tossed 
a lonv; basket which went cleanly through 
the lu)op to tie the name at 124 all. 

In the first five minute overtime period 
\Vel>l)er was the first man to score with 
a short toss from the siiie. Holmes tied 
the (ouiit a^ain with a lon^ shot from 
center as the period ended. Neither 
team was .ilile to liK.ite the basket in 
the second overtiiiu- and the stoie le- 
mained l2ti to li<'>. However, at the end 
of the |H-riod .Asp hH)|Hd a shot which 
tertererl on tht-riin of the h<M»^p and tell 
tlie vvronn way fur the visitors as the 
nun soiindefl. 

line Kellev's h.nn shot in the thir<l 
period raist-d the home teani's hopes hut. 
Dennison duplicated from long ran^e as 
tiic oviitinie ended. Koth teams ap- 
pe.ire.l we.iiv trniu the fast and furious 



(;h<i.s <,id:i, iAAii 

The ( lirl's (.lee Cluh, in spile of the 
loss of many memf>ers hy sickness, has 
recently rendere<i t\Mt imiMirtaiit an<l 
successful concerts. At Leeds, before the 
r. S. X'eterans, on Jan. IH, the selections 
"l)oan \e Cry Ma Honey" and those l)y 
the double trio were most |)0|)ular. On 
Jan. 2*1 at the Jones Library Sunday 
afterno<»n entertainment, the Club v-ave 
a creditable i)erformance. This was a 
unique experieiue and much appreciated 
by the ^irls. It suffices to say that a 
very larne part of the success of these- 
concerts was due to the excellent leatier- 
ship of (.uilu Haw ley "29. 

SPECIAL COURSK 

Miss Margaret Kiinhall, <lirector of the 
western division of Massachusetts C.irl 
Scouts, is to nive a course of ei^ht lessons 
in (.irl Scout Leadership liere on campus 
this term. There is to he a charge of 
oiu- <U>llar to each student of the class 
whidi will lueet one evening a week. 
Anyone interested in this project please 
(h) not hesitate to join. It is open to all. 

Iknry K. Francis '10 is the editor of 
a very attractive publicition recently put 
out entitled "Proposed I'arkw.iy .Around 
On.mdaRa Lake." This publication and 
project are promoted by the Onondaga 
I'ark and I'lanirmn board of Syracuse, 
N. V. The very attractive landscaix- 
plans indudc-d in the publication are from 
the desijjnsof Professor Francis. 



(;li:l cllb concilrt 

Last I hursday, Jan. 24, the combined 
C.lee Club and Cdee Club orchestra went 
to Ashfield by i)us to entertain in the 
Town Hall. The cpiartet consisting of 
Paul I). Isham "2\K Lucien W. Dean "JO, 
Matthew L. Mlaisdell '2\). and Kemu-th 
K. Hodne '.{2 was very well received. 
Taylor M. Mills '2<t gave some very in- 
teresting readings. Kmory Hurgess '2<« 
and Hirger Kudcpiist "2Si put on their 
little act, "Sonny Hc»y," to the delighted 
appreciation of the audience. John 
C.uenard '."{1 and Philij) Comiell ':52 ccn- 
duded the program with a skillful banjo 
duet. After the entertainment there was 
a dance, the nuisic being provided by the 
(.lee Club orchestra. 



I'llYSICS CLUB 

On Wednesday, Jan. 1»1, the Physics 
Club held an interesting meeting. Fred 
\V. Jones sjKjke to the group on the 
subject "The Kxact Deteriuination of the 
Charge Carried by an Klectron." During 
the l)usiness part of the nteeting, a clis 
c ussicm took place as to the advis;ibility 
of admitting scjphomores to the club as 
assoc iate members. Nothing was decided 
upon, however, and the discussion was 
postponed till the next lueeting. Ke- 
fresh mcnts were then supplied by Dr. 
Wallace F. Powers who is to address the 
club .It the next meeting. 



IIOCKKV IKAM'S MAINK TRIP 
(Continued from Pafte I) 

i he blow ioosc-nc-d some teeth and he- 
was unable to eejiitinue playitig. 

.At the- start of the overtime, Waechter 
scored and the M..A.C. team held that 
lead for the rest of the encounter. Cogan 
aiul Anderson played an outstanding 
game for Mates and their passing was of 
first (juality. The hnal score was 7 to tl 
in favor of the Massachusetts se.xtet. 

The summary: 

M.A.C: Manty, rw ; Davis, c; Frost, 
Iw ; Bond, rd; Nash, Id; Myrick, g; 
Zuger, Waechter, Patch, spares. 

liates: Johnson, Iw ; Cogan, c; Ander- 
son, rw ; Pooler, Id; Malia, rd; Topo- 
losky, g; Maher, Daigler, Lane, spares. 

Store: M.A.C. 7, Bates 0. 

C.oals made in first period: Frost, 
Davis, Waechter, Nash, Cogan; Second 
period: Frost, Johnson 2; Third iH-riod: 
Cogan .5, Manty; Overtime: Waechter. 

Referee: Murphy, Bridgton. 

Time: three la-minute perioefs and 
ten minutes enertinie. 



pace which the-y had se-t during the 
previous extra sessions. The home- club's 
defense was outstanding and the visitors 
h.ul much trouble in jwnetratiiig it. .Ml 
the baskets which they collected were 
from long shots, showing how well the 
vallev b.isketeers were defending their 
hoop. Webber seemed to be the inipor- 
l.mt clog in this excellent exhibition, his 
t.isl floor work keeping the Tech guards 
always on the- move. 

In tlu- List overtime session Asp had 
.1 shot from the foul line but his failure 
to c-olle-ct the point possibly s;ived the- 
g.ime for the Massic husc-tts .i:.;«regation. 
With two minutes to pl.iy Coukos cut, 
received a pass from Kelley, and tossed 
.1 i)retty one handed overhead shot from 
the corner, ending the longt-st and tight 
est b.ittle ever waged on the; old Drill 
Hall lloor with a .W to 2S Massiichusetts 
vic-torv over Woin-^tcr Icca. 



The summarv : 
Massai-hiisetis 

I-. I 

VVtl.1..-f.it 

C ollUii-.ll • 

M.iiii-i<-w*lvi.< U 
K.il.y.ll. ■-' 

M.ii\n.ili ■-' 



\Vi>ri-e!iter Tech 



1- 



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S..1.' .It ii.tll luii.-; Miss.., liii-'.-ll-' 11. \V<..v.-st.-r 
T.vli •• K.l.r.-.--. \Vli,il.-ii. Tim.-: l«<> iO-ininut.- 

l.iKi- ,111.1 f.Mli .'.-iniiii;l-"vrl'ii"' I»-Ti'"'l^. 



CIIKMISIRY CLUB 

Miss Majel M. MacMasters spoke- at 
the- meeting of the Chemistry Club. Her 
t.ilk was a general discussion on Si)ace. 
Time, and Matter; also, the movements 
of electrons. Next there was a general 
discussion, after which lots were drawn 
to determine who should be the speakers 
for the rest of the year. .After the ne-xt 
time-, the nu-e-tings are to be held bi- 
weekly with two speakers for each 
occasion. 

OlTIN(; CLUB 

( )ii lu xt Sunday, February ."J, there- 
will be- a be-efste-ak roast at the eaf)in on 
Mount Toby, at a charge of twenty-hve 
cents. The i)arty will leave on the 10..S0 
a. m. bus and will re-turn about f'< p. m. 

On the hike hist Saturday tlu- group 
]>assed by the Mount Toby falls and 
fouiul that a perfect cave had been 
formed between the rcak ledge and the 
pe-rpendicul.ir sheet of ice from the frozen 
falls. 

MENORAII SOCIETY 

.At tlu- meeting of the Menorah Society 
on Jan. 2ti, Tlu-odore Marcus s])cik<- on 
variiHis interesting phases cjf the history 
of the Jewish race-. A lively eliscussion 
tcK)k place afterward with all present 
taking part. .At the close of the meeting 
it was announced that Mr. Maxwell 
( ".oldlierg will be the siieaker for next time. 



BOWUOIN WINS ON LONG SIIO'I 

in the second game of a vieek-end trip, 
the Mass;uhusi-tts hockey team was de 
feated by the- liowdoin College st-xtet at 
Brunswick, Maine-, List SaturcLiy after 
ncMjn by a score of 2 to 1. In the second 
period. 'I'ha\t-r, a Bowdoin defense luan. 
crashed the pue k past Myrick, the Aggie 
gcjaiie, for the only score e»f the first two 
periods. I'he .Maroon and White tic-d 
tlie score earlv in the third period when 
Manty. whcj had replaced P.itc h in t In- 
final |)eric>d, ol>tained the |)uck from a 
scrimmage in front cif the- e-.ige and scored. 
Stone, the Itcjwdcjin dc-lc-nsc- m.iii, caged 
a long shot from the- cc-ntc-r of the ice to 
score the winning point near the close 
of the game. 

This makes the- thitd ch-feat for the 
Mass;ichusc-tts team, all of which have 
been lost by onlv' one |>oint. Hamilton. 
W illiams. and Bowdcjin are the only ones 
to nose out the Aggie team, which has 
take-n the count of West I'oint, St. 
Stephens, liates (twiiei, and the Conn. 
.Aggies. 




You'll never 
have to take 
a back seat in 

a Braeburn 
Prom Tux. 

Carl H, Bolter, 

Incorpotaled 

Exeter Amherst 

Hyannis 



The summary: 

Massachusetts: Patch, Manty, rw ; 
Waechter. c-; Zuger. Iw: Bond, rd: 
Davis, Id; Myrick. g. 

Ivuvdoiii. D\\>ei, Iw. Tlemtr. c: 
Ward. I'arker, rw ; Thayer, Id; Stone, 
rd; Hovvland. g. 

Score: liowdoin 2. M.A.C. 1. C.oals: 
Stone. Thayer, Manty. Relere-e: Irench. 
1 ime-: thrc-e- l.'i-inimite periods. 



Laid Up Cars 

$2.00 Per Month Until April 1st 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter H. Harrison, Prop. 
Winter's Around The Corner 

AVOHJ THE RUSH. Come in and k^i 
your ( )versh<)es for this Winter. 

Shoe Repairing Department 
JOHN FOTOS SHOE STORE 



DRY CLEANING 



PRESS|N(i 



$6.00 DRAWING SET $4.00 

Drawing Boards. T Squares, Triangles. Pencils and Erasers 

A J. HASTINGS ^'''^l^^^iZr AMHERST, MASS. 

^JACKSON & CUTLER 

|)K.\LKRS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS READY TO WEAR 

AMHERST. MASS. 



WHEN DOWN TOWN VISIT OUR 

STORE FOR LUNCH, DINNER 

OR REFRESHMENTS. 

Special Sunday Night Suppers 

Sarri's Restaurant or College Candy Kitchen 



Wll IIAMS-M.A.<:. BASKETBALL 

it:<jntinut-(i from Pafte I) 

Icir some time after the whistle Mew 
lor the lie-ginning of the second jieriod. 
neither team was able to gain the upjier 
hand. The visitors missed numerous foul 
shots and finally the Williams captain 
scored a (mint on a gift shot, making the 
count ") to 4 in the home team's favor. 
Ken Davis, playing center for the Marenm 
.md White, got a double decker on a cut 
and overhead toss. Immediately follow- 
ing Hetherington tossc^-d a long simt 
cle.mK through the hcH)]). gi\ing the 
(.ore le.im ,i 9 to 4 U'ad and prospects 
ot ,1 vutory. .Alii-n. the tall Williams 
(cntc-i . sunk .i long shot from center and 
( iKldi-li.ick du|)iic,ited the- feat. Allen 
then scoreMJ the winning b.isket on a shot 
from loiiii r.mi;c. i;iving the visitors .i 
l(t to it ie,i<i. Just ;)c-fore the game ended 
.Alexander .idded .mother two points for 
Willi. iins. The -iinim.irv: 



For Prompt Service Phone 828 

•-1.KT DAVK l>0 IT" 

AMHERST CLEANERS & DYERS 

1 1 MAIN STREET NEXT TO TOWN HALL 

One Day Service on Dry Cleaninft Work Culled for and Delivered Dally 

REPAIRING LAUNDRY DYEING 



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Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO, 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



(S\^t MnBBUc\}\xBHtB QlnU^gtan 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 192*) 



Number^ '5" 



'POLLY AND HER PALS'' ENTERTAIN 

AT SOCIAL UNION AND DANCE 



c;eor(;e pearson gives 

READIN(;S 

Social Union Preijjram Well .\dapted 
to (a>llege .\udience 

■fully and Her Pals," u snappy ijuin 
tttte, and (jeorge Pearse)n, a reader, com- 
prised the Social Union entertainment 
List Friday evening in Stockhridge Mall. 
1 lie first group are well known to radio 
f.ins and have an interesting and varied 
program. Mr. Pearseju makes his charac- 
ters live and apjK-ar before the uuclie-nie 
.l.■^ though in reality. 

The program was o|R-ned with two 
luiinhers by "f'cjlly and Her I'als," whcj 
api)eared on the stage dressed in red 
•■wi-aters. red berets, red searfs and whitc- 
.skirts. Their appearance and entertain- 
iiic-nt was gexKl, with several skits and 
iiii\elty numbers that were interesting 
.iiul musing. "Ucjt" followed with a solu, 
called "A little advice to the ladies," 
Continued on Haftc 4) 

DK.BATING TEA.M OPENS SE.ASON 

\arsity debating takes its place on the 
lainpus calendar this week when Spring 
tifld College sends its team tcj the .Memo- 
rial Building Friday night to bandy words 
with the best orators in the College. 
Dennis M. Crowley '29 is manager of 
ck-hating this year and will make a strung 
ii-ader for the Aggie unit with his experi 
i-nie cjf former varsity work. Leonard .M. 
Morrison '29, although without experi- 
ence as a debater, has capitalized on his 
career as an actor and his courses uncler 
I'rofessor Prince and will make a strong 
running mate for Crowley. Marcus '.{(» 
i> .1 third member of the squad who can 
hold his own in an argument. 

further debates this year have been 
arranged with Clark University and the 
I niversity of Maine and arrangements 
are |)ending for matches with University 
of N'crmont and Colby. 

revised^rushFng plan 
before conference 



Discussion Follows Presentation of 
Tentative Plan for Rushing 

.\ revised plan for deferred rushing was 

I'rcM-nted at the last meeting of the 

Interfraternity Ccjnferenie bv' Kdward H. 

.Nichols '2^(, chairman of the committee 

on rushing. The other members are 

.\rnold Dyer and William Kobertsun. 

both of the class of 1929. This meeting 

WIS held in the Memorial Building <jn 

Thursday, January :n, at 7.;>l) \>. m. 

ria- plan, laici by for the approval of the 

V irious fraternities, was as follows: 

1 .\il fraternity houses shall keej) cjpen 

house on the first twej evenings uf the 

college year, as usual. 

- \lter the first twci eveniIlg^1 of general 

inspection of the fraternity huusc-s, 

rushing of any kind shall be illegal 

imtil the first part of the se-eond term. 

a. No traternity shall allow freshmen 

in its house at any time during 

the first term. 

1'. No fraternity may hold organized 

parties for freshmen during the 

first term. 

' • No fraternity shall be any action 

or conduct, bind an\ freshman to 

said fraternity, either bv an 

agreement or by actual |)ledging, 

during the first term. 

Note.— The preceding rules sh.ill 

apply tc) all members and alumni 

(Continued on Page 4i 



'H rSTANDING PERFORMANCE 
OF THE WEEK 



i.aureiue 15. Packard of 
• 'I si College, in hi- address at 
\\' dnesday's Assenihly last week. 
•itnion-tr.ited ver> al.K the weakness 
w the popular fallai > tiiat armament 
"^" ia-s (irotection. 



Sorority Dances 
Fill Week-End 

Delta Phi Ciamma Holds .\nnual 
Formal and Tea Dance 

.-Xnotlu-r Slice ess w.is scored bv t he- 
annual Delta IMiid.imiua fonn.il held on 
Friday, January lil, in the Memorial 
Building. The decor, it ions were- novel 
.mil testivelv brilliant. ( ireeii, white, and 
rec] paiH-r erepe ribbons hung from the 
windows, while skis and snowshoes formed 
the main wall decorations. The music was 
furnished by Wallin's Orchestra from 
Kasthamptoii. l-'orty-tbree louples were 
present. The dance began at five o'eloi k 
in the .ifternoon. In the receiving line- 
were Prof, and Mrs. (iuy \'. (datfelter. 
Prof, and Mrs. Ilubc-rl W. N'ount, (iiiil.i 
(.. Ilawley '2'.» and Alfii-d ( .. Ililbert 'L".t, 
and Kvelyn Dover '.'{D and Ch.irles M. 
Cox ';!(». 

At seve-n o'clock dinner was served in 
l)ra|R-r Hall, which was alscj decorated 
in winter carnival stvle with Iu-iuIck k 
branches and pa|H-r snowballs and color- 
ful ribbons of pa|»er crejie. There were 
evergreen tree placecards. The favors 
were keyi-ases stamiK'cl with the initials 
of Delta Phi (lanim.i. After a gay elinnc-r 
party, everyone returned to the Memorial 
Building where the d.iiuing lontinuc-d till 
one o'elock. 

About sixty louples attended the Tea 
Dance at the- Lord JelTc-r\ Inn on S.iturdav 
afternejoii from tvvooc lock till si.x. Major 
anel Mrs. N. Butler liriseex- were the 
patrons. Caniiey's ()rihestr,i playe-d we-ll 
and the dance was a very pleas.int alf.iir. 
.\t half past five a delicicjus buffet sup|K-r 
was served bringing to a e lose the vve-c-k 
end festivities conducted by Delta Phi 
(iamma. 

Those who deserve most of the credit 
for the suceess of the Prom are the five 
members of the Prom C'cjinmittee: ( iuila 
Ilawley '29, President of I>elta Phi 
(iamma; Kvelyn Dove-r ';{<(, Chairm.m 
of the Committee: Ruth Faulk '29, Ruth 
Stcjne '.■{((, and Margaret K. Coerber ".i\. 



Boost th* Building I 



Fraternity Banquets Will 
Draw Alumni This Week 

KraternttieK to Mold Initiation 
Banquets in Nearby Hotels 

Saturday, February 9, has been .set as 
the day u}X)n which the annual fraternity 
initiation bancpiets will be he-hl. Many 
alumni are expected back to visit cjld 
familiar scenes both on the- camjius and 
around the fraternitv houses. This year 
nc) formal meeting of the returned alumni 
will be held, the alumni a.ssociation belic-v- 
ing that informal get-togethers will i)ro- 
vide aini>le- c>|>portuiiit v to go c»vc-r old 
memcjries with one anothc-r. 

(Continued <>ii Hade 4) 

LAD.VS .\GAI\ ORGA.MZING 
MODEL UEACil E 

Work has been pronres>i!i>; >leadil-,- on 
the pre|)araticjns for the- 1929 meeting of 
the .Model League of Naticjns .Assemfily 
which is to be held at .Mount Holyoke- 
College this year. .April l.i, under the 
suixTvision of the New Kngland Student 
Conference. Much interest has f>een 
aroused in the affair, the cjrganization of 
which is being directed by Cejnstantine 
P. Ladas, a member of the class of 192.S 
.md nf)W coiiiie-cteil with the- So<if)logy 
Di-p.irtnient on thi^i.impii> 

PI. ill", for the sf>sir)ii- l,.i\c been com- 
pleted, at Ic-ast so f.ir ,i- the subjec'ts to 
be discussed are coiirerned. In the morn 
ing a meeting f)f the l.ci^uc- Council is 
to be held to disc us^ the- Holiv ia-Paraguav 
boundarv dispute. '\'\\\t, nieeting is to be 
informal lur the (lelc-^',ite« u lio i ate to 
attend tor ttie morning se-ssion is mtc-nded 
to be strictiv a Council meeting rather 
than a meeting of the general Assembly. 
(Continued on Pafte S] 



Give your bit 



Cruiser Bill Assailed 

By Professor Packard 

.Xniherst Professor (iives ('onvincing 
Speech on Dangers e»f Preparedness 

("ert.iiii probli-ins .iiising from the bill 
recentiv introduced into Congress author 
iziug the construction of fifteen new 
cruise-rs furnished the- b.isis of discussion 
lor Professor L.iureiui- B. Pack.ird of 
.■\iiihe-rst College last Wednesday in 
.isseiiibly. Prt>fessor Packard is professor 
of history at Amherst College and has 
appeared before the stude-nts and t.iiiiltv 
of M..-\.C. several times in the i)ast. 

Professor P.ii k.ircl startc-d his talk with 
.1 consider. It ion of the ne-vvsii.ipi-rs' con- 
ception of the term pacifist. There are 
two re.il dc-fmitions of this word; thc- 
first of whic h st.ites th.it .i pacifist is one- 
vvho dex's ne)t believe in resistance in any 
se-nse. The other definition ]>ertains to 
those- who are opposi-d to war as a means 
of s(.>ttling disputes. In the newspajM-rs 
no (jistinction is made between these- two 
iise-s. s;iid Professor Pack.ird. .-Xs a re-sull 
the pe-ople as a whole designate persons 
belonging to either group as yellow or 
cowards. Such terms should not be usc-d 
to ch.ir.icte-rizc- conscie-nt ions obje-ctors in 
the second group, for they sometimes are 
more couragc-ous than those- who meekly 
follow t he crowd. 

The s|)e-aker de-cl.iie-d himself to be- 
against too much prep,irediic-ss, as this 
h.ts tcM) often li-d to conflict in the- past. 
He stated th.it no naticMi reaely to light 
has ever been afraid to do so bee-ause of 
any state of prepare-clness of their enemies. 
"Of what use," siiicl he, "was prejjared- 
ness to Louis XIX', Na|M»leon, or ( iermanv' 
(Continued on Pufte .t) 

MILITARY BALL 
FRIDAY EVENING 

Last Minute Announcements indi- 
cate a Dance of Unusual (Jaliber 

At last the time has arrived for tlu- 
Military Ball and frcjiii ,ill indications 
the number of couples wliic h will enjoy 
the festivities to be held on Friday night 



NEW HAMPSHIRE CAGES PUCK IN 

SECOND PERIOD TO DEFEAT AGATES 



Close Game Goes 
To Stevens Tech 

Marcton and While Hopes Fade with 
Last Minute Shut hv Stevens 



.M.issiuhusettslost another luMit bre.ik 
er last .S.itiuelay night in the Drill 1 1. ill 
when the Stevens Tech epiintc-l c.imi- 
froni behind in the last half to win over 
Coach "Kid" Core's v.irsity basketb.ill 
te-.im i;{ to 11. The- clubs weie- eveiilv 
matched and the score se-e sawed back 
.md forth with the- hn.d outcome vc-ilc-d 
with line e-i t.iiiitv throughout the- contest. 
.-Xs in the- prc-vioiis games played on tin- 
home lloor this se-.isoii the- strong livc- 
m.iii chlense- as playe-d by the- v.ilhy 
•tggregation kept the scoring at a mini 
mum. Stanisiewski. the tall, l.inkv 
.XL.X.C. center, starred for the Maroon 
and White. His clever passing and 
faking g.tined six |)oints for the Bav 
State c|uinti-t. l-'or the visitors H. Main 
hold, who is re-puted as being one of ihe- 
be-st shots on the eastern courts this y«-ar, 
collccte-d thre-e- baskets, the List of whic h 
gave the- visitors the two points tli.it veon 
the game. 

Smiii afte-r the game opc-ned the- New 
Je-rse-v team rolled up a three |K>int Ic-.id. 
Thackaberry got a "sucker" shot from 
under the- b.isket and Pe-rsson galherc-d .i 
third point a tew minutes l.ite-r on a fiee- 
tri.il. Stanisiewski eijH'ned the scoring for 
the B.iy Staters by faking ami dribbling 
to sink a shcit from bene.it h the liiMip. 
Kelley put the home team in the le.id 
I to ."! bv' scoring on .i cut. .X Mainhold, 
(ConllnueJ on Pafte 4) 

Relay Team Cannot Stay 
With Colby and Amherst 

Agate Runners Outclassed in II. A. A. 
Games 



REINIIARI SCORES LON(; SHOT 
Wildcats Pressed Hard in Closing 



Last Saturday the Massachusetts var- 
sity relay team lost to Colby .md .Xmlu-rst 
ill a triangular iiit-et in the B.A.A. games 



in the Drill Hall will be upwards of on. I ^t'ld at the- .Xrena in Boston. Colby h-d 



hundred and hfty. The cadets of t he- 
College heartily invite the Faculty tei 
come to the Ball and wear their uniforms 
if the-y have the-m. 

ke-uarding music for the- evc-ning it is 
needless to s;iy anything about the ex- 
ce-IIc-nci- of "The Bohemi.ms" from W'or- 
ceste-r w ho h ave be-en st;e:u£ec| and t hose- 
students who attended Prom and Hcip 
last ye-ar knf)w the- smcMith brand of 
music which this group of music ian> are 
in the habit of furnishing. In addition 
to one or twc) spe-cially numbc-rs which 
the cjrchestra will play there will be a 
feature dance, the details of which are 
such that it is best not to disclose them 
now. 

^Continued on Pafte i) 



<:.^Ml•l s CAl.K^l>.^R 



" Mniienttii III i\ Ihe silkrn ■•Iraml runniHi; 
IhriiUih Ihf [xarl i ham nj nil virlue," 

Itiihnp If all (( hriHian Mo'trnttinn] 



Wednefuiay 

.i i.'i I.. 111. .\«^-iiil)lv, i'rof. < tirry S. Ili<k-. 

M..\.( . ■ Tti<- \<-w I'hv^i. :.l l-.l M.,11 

liiiildiciK " 
Inti-rfntli-rnif H.i«ki-tUill : 

> :i<l I). 111. I'lii SiKiii.i Ka|ip;i \^ l>i It.i 

I'hi .\lplia 
'I '.O II III. kajipa SiKtiia v?. <J.T A 
I'hurfiday 

\ ir-ity I^mk<-tt)all: I>ow»-ll Terli al \l .\ ( 
'iirls' <»li-«- (lilt) < omt-rt at lla'll>-y. 
Kliirii iiltiirf (lull M<-<-linK. 
S.S.X tJaskftLall: S;c. re.l U.-art . lure- 
Kifslanan Baski-tball; Tiiriii-rs Kails, tli'-n 
Friday 

7.;«)i.. m. Military Hall: Drill Hall. 
\'ars||y IV-tjati-: Si)rini{li>-li| < ')llri{i-. 

.Mfiiiorial KtiiMifiK 
Intt-rfran-rnity Ba^kc-tball: 

■*s..'il) p. m. KapiKi Kpsilon vs. Noiihrai 
!)..'iO p. 111. .\.T.<». Vs. Siitiiia I'll! Kpsiloii 
Saturday 

\'arsity Ho. key: Coltn- at \1..\.( 
\'arsitv Baski-tb.il!: (lark at \\<.r' 'stit . 
N'arsity K'-lay: .\rmory Meet al Spr inL;tii!.| 
2 to (i p m Hri'lijt- I'arty an<l T<' i Uni' 

for ( fi.ftl, in Memorial Buil'lini; 
Frati-riiit\ Ilaniii'ts (For Din 



.irtii ]• 
Sun«ta.\ 



I-..--,Ui.-f 



!!ll- 



I-..; •■ 
M, 
'ru«?Mlay 

Iiltirtr:i:. ■ 

«..■{<) p. V... :-' - 

9.:j() p m, I iK-t.i 
0.4.') p m r>-t>.irti' 

l..t, . ;•' 



both .•Xiiihe-rst and .XL.X.C. o\e-r tlu- e-ntire 
route, and eonipleted the event in .{ 
minute-s and .'{9 I-.') s»-corids, e-.ic h runner 
covering a ejuarter mile. ;\t the beginniiiv; 
of the race Colby took the lead with 
Brown outrunning l-i-lt of .Xmlu-rst and 
Captain D.ivis of .XI.A.t . Snell, thi- 
secoiid XIaroon aiicl White re-lay man held 
his ctwn but (fammond was not able- to 
hf>ld the- pace- set by Rivkin of ( Olby and 
L.'tstman of .Xniherst. Rc)lK-rlson ran I he- 
fourth rouiul for the v.ille-y team and 
gainc-d ccinside-rahlv' but the- clisf.incc- lost 
was tiK> gre-at tcj rc-iove-r. 

Following is the li'-t o| enlrie.', in I lie 
event : 

.l/..l.(. Amherst i'nlhy 

Davis Felt Brown 

Snell Nc-ah- Potter 

llaiiimoipl Lastman Rivkin 

Robe-rtson Keith .Spragiic- 

FRESHMEN IWIGE DEFEATED 
IN BASKKIB.M.L 

The frosh b.isket ball te.iiii clro|>|M'd 
tw<j close games this past week, whe-n 
they were de-feati-d both by XV'illistoii 
.Xr;ic|i-my at l-^isthamiiton ;inil the fast 
South Deerfie-ld High five at South 
De-erfield. Playing a fast game last 
W'edne-sdav afternoon on their home- 
court, the XNillislcjii c|uintel was victorious 
ove-r the Ireshmen when the game ended 
v^ith a score- cjf 27 Ici li.'J. ('apt, tin Folc-\ 
ol the neophytes was outstanding as tin- 
high seeder while Heller, the \\'illist«>n 
right ff»rward, was a c lose* se-cotid. Last 
Friday night, the Soutfi DtH-rheld High 
bask«?teers overcame the XL.X.C. Fresh 
me-n in an exeitiiig game at Smth Deer 
field by a store of 21 t'l l(j. The Pii-loc k 
brothers fe-atured lor the winners, while 
Captain I'olcv did the- Ix-st work for the 
\<-,irlin«s. I lie ^iimni.iry of both ^arne-, 
i - .1 s |i)ili)\>. - : 

Oiniinued on PaHe S, 

Let's push the project ! 



.Mlhough Coach "Rc-d" B.dl's varsity 
hoc kc-v Ic-.ini st.igi-d .1 >;iMid tight ig.iinst 
the- I niversity of New Hampshire sc-xtet 
l.ist S.iturclay afternextn on the College 
rink, the visitors enu-rge-d with .i 1 to (I 
victoiy ove-r the MariNxi .md White by 
caging the puck in the s«-concl period. 
With the ice in good condition and .t 
l.irge crowd of s|H-ct.itors who ^.xw the 
home- te-ani vyell clc-se-r\e-d support there 
w.is not .1 dull minute- during the entire 
K.iiiie. 

During the- first pe-iiod the- v.illey sextet 
W.IS on the- olTen.sive most of the time. 
The- defense- of both c liibs ,ip|H-arc-d to be 
functioning very well. Once- the Wildcats 
< .irrie-d the- puck to the .XL.X.C. cage- otdy 
to h.ive the- home- te-.im duplicate- the fe-.it 
.1 fe-w minutes I, iter. 

vCunlinued un Pufte J) 



INTERFR.VIERMTV HASKETILXI.L 

S-ver.il inti-rfraternitv b.isket b.ill names 
were played last we-ek, result ing in wins 
for y.T.X'.. Alpha (^amnia Rho, Kolony 
Klub, .X.'r.(.., Alpha .Sigma Phi, aticl 
ihet.i Chi. On Tue-sdiy, Jan. 29, (J. I .X'. 
buried K.ippa Fpsilon under a .'(4 to 9 
score. Paksarian with It) |M>ints, Howie 
with S, and Minkslein .md llor.in e-.uh 
with 11 Ic-d the attac k. In the- second game 
of the evening. Alpha Gamma Rho won 
.1 close- (h-eisioii over Sigm.i Phi Fpsilon 
by the- score of l,S to Id. Hicks seoreel 
nine- ot the |«>ints for the- winners, anel 
Bernard got seven for the- losers. On 
Wc-diiesday night, Kolony Klub defeated 
the Non-Fraternity represt-nlatives !."> to 
.'» in a loose- game. A.T.G. won ovi-r 
Delta Phi .XIpha 12 let ».» in ancjthe-r h)W- 
scoring contest em Wednesday evening. 
Sigma Phi l-Ipsilon forfeitt-d to .Mpha 
.Sigma Phi on Thursday night, and .n the 
s«-cond game sche-duled, I hcl.i (hi won 
l.{ to 7 over Kappa .Sigma. Howe and 
Pvie- scored nujst of the winne-rs' |H>ints. 

OVER TWELVE HUNDRED 
GIVE TO GYM FUND 

Building Fund (droning Gonlinually 
Wiih Added (.onlrihiitions 

Ovci twcjvc- huinlred lejjiilribulicjns 
h.ive U-en made toward the Physical 

I'.dui ,it ion Building F-'und lo d,ite. The- 
llind now .imoiiiits to .fio.li.'iO.lNi, repre-- 
st-nting an average gift from e-,i< h donor 
of about •'J.'I". 

( )f till- lIlldeiKiailii.iti- c l.isses wliwh 
v\ere in Collc-ge when the iani|t.iign 
st.irte-d last .XIarch. the classes of 192S 
ind 1929 .ire- lii-d for first honors in the 
|>e-ri e-ntagi- of inc-mbe-rs contributing, (».'{ 
pe-r ci-nt cif the- memlH-rs e>f c-ae'h ela.ss 
have- contribiitc-cl. 19.'{() e cuiies ne-xt witn 
."i7 |M-r ce-nt and 19;{| third with .'fci pe-r 
c c-iit. 

.Xniorig alumni classes, including I92S, 
T.'.H out of 2297 graduates e»f the- ( olle-ge- 
h.ive- given their sup|M>rt to the- project 
anel in .iddition over KH) non-graeluates 
h.ive- contributed. The class«-s eif '.SX, '2K, 
'H.i, '97, 'H2, ■7.t, '7'(, '27, '9H, and 'K', 
still retain the It-ad, in the orefer given, 
over all either c lasse-s fcir the- highe-st pe-r- 
eenlage-s of living mtinliers contributing. 
(Continued on Pafte .f j 



WINTER CARNIVAL 

If vs eat her ccjndititins arc favorable, 
the lejng deferre-el Winter Carnival, to 
which everyone has been lexjking for- 
v\,ird f'lr so many w»-eks will f.ike- 
pl.ice Siiturday, February I'. Ihe 
()utiiig Club announces that tin- pro- 
yr,trti ^vill rein.iin unc hangi-d. |-,vc-rv- 
oni- i~ iiiw;i-l to particifKite in tlie- 
e-ve-nt's ,iiid in. ike the d,lV a meme»ralile 
I ic casn iii . 



t 



Endorse the Phy. Ed. Building 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6. 1929 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLE(;iAN. WEDNESDAY, M MRUARY 6, 1929 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Oflicial newspajHT of the Massai liuht-tls 
Agricultural College-. Published every 
Wt>dius<lay by the students. 

BOARD OF EDITOUS 

SHKi'i.hv Cleaves ^tt Editorin-Cliief 

liUM AHi. H. NicMOL* '29 Maniiging Kditor 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial Shkflky C leaves -29 

Feature MARf.AKET I'. Donovan M) 

Alumni & Short Courses Sallv E. Bkaolky .Jl 

Athletic l-BWis M l.vNUS . o 

EkANK T 0(jr(.i.Ass .11 

Campus John B. H(.waki>Jr. ;3ii 

Cecil II. VV adiku.ii .Jtl 

Rial S. I'onKu J» '•*' 

()S<AR MAk<.ol.IN "i'J 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Eredf.ku K D. Thayek. Jr. -W Husin-.ss ManaK'-r 
• • " •• •' A<lvetlisiiiK Man.iKfi 

Lawrence A. Carrutm '29 ( irtulatioii Matian°r 
WiNiiiRop C,. Smith '30 

Ji.HN R. Tank "30 
Robert G. t;ooi)Now. "11 

Uavu) m. Nasci.n ':;i 

I'Al L A. SwriH "il 
E. KiNsLY WiiiinM "M 



Subscriptions $2.00 per year. Sinn e 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In ease of change of address, subscrdx-r 
will please notify the business manager 
•8 Boon as possible. ^^^^^___ 

Ent-re<l as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at siiecial rate 
of postage provided for in section 110.i, Act ot Oc- 
tober. 1017. authoriwd August 20. 1«1«. 



FR.VrKRNUY RUSIIINC 

Fraternity rusliinn, its regulation and 
methods, is a problem whiih is taxing 
the inneiuiity of iiiterfraternity groups 
throUKhout the rolUges of the (ountry. 
At present M.A.C. is fate to fare with 
the situation, as evidenced by an artule 
publishetl elsewhere in this issue, whirli 
outlines a (jroposetl system for deferred 
rushing. 

As we see the situatiim the prolilcm 
resolves itself into a (piestion of whether 
<ir not the present system of rushing at 
M..\.C. is s.itisfartory and, if not. what 
system tan be substituted to best <()rre< t 
the existing evils. Obviously the prts<iit 
system is not satisfactory else a com 
mittee would not have been chosen to 
jiresiiit a new plan. Tiie committee, in 
its report, has presented a plan calling 
for deferred rushing. This proposal im- 
medi.itely brings up the (piesticHi ol the 
relative merits of deferred rushing as 
opiMise-d to those for the system now in 
vogue. 

The opponeiUs of deferred rushing say 
that (1) no rules can be devised to keep 
rushing, in all forms, in check during the 
hrM term; (2l th.it it will leatl the way 
to a worse condititm than ever existed 
under the old system; CJ) that freshmen 
will group up in such a way that some 
houses will get a group with all the good 
men aiul others will have no < hoice but 
to take groups with inferior men; i4i 
that such a system is unfaii to the fra- 
ternities as a whole; and (.">• th.it the 
fraternities cannot stand such a system 
tinancially. The proponents of deferred 
rushing ma-ntain that (l! rules can In- 
devised which will minimize the tempta- 
tion to rush during the first term and 
that the real check will be exercised 
through the necessity that the fraterni- 
ties keep their individual reputations 
clear in the sight of the freshmen; (2i 
thit deferred rushing is nmch fairer 
to both fraternities and freshmen th.m is 
the present system; <:5) that under the 
prese-nt plan the fraternit'es are "buying" 
the freshmen instead of the freshmen 
choosing the fraternities; (4) that de- 
ferretl rushing wcndd cre.ite a better spirit 
in the freshman class and help to soUe 
the problems coidronting the Senate in 
dealing with freshmen who have been 
treated like kings by the fraternity men 
iliiring the first week of college. (.')! that 
deferreil rushing is the only alternative 
to the present system, which is not satis- 
factory. 

Of course there .ire other arguments on 
both sides. However, it seems to us that 
the fraternity rushing system needs to 
be revised; that the arguments for de- 
ferred rushing are strong; tli.it .is \(t no 
better plan has been suggested: .uid thai 
a new system, the idtiniate form to be 
determined liy the fraternities, might 
be a decidedly worth-while venture. The 
l)lan presented to the Interfr.ilernitv 
Conference is a starting point .md some- 
tliint; which can be criticized, worked 
n\«r, .111(1 perfected by the fraternity 

K.ll.N. 

ASSKMBLY SLEEPERS 

Sim (• wc till that we ha\e something 
import. lilt to s,iy. \ct feel the l.u k of 
contidenn- that i> pi. iced in the^^words of 

Have you made your contribution ? 



an iiii|)ro\ed philosopher, wf are calling 
upon the opinion of Dr. William UeWitt 
Hyde of How (loin College to s<iy for us 
what we wish to bring out. He calls it 
"The Offer of a College." 

"To be .It home in all lands and 
all ages; t<» (ount Nature a familiar 
a< ouaintance and .\rt an intimate 
fritnd; 'o gain a stamiard for the 
ai)pre< iation of other men's work, 
and the criticism of your own; to 
c.irry the keys of the world's gieatest 
library in your jaoket, and feel its 
resources behind you in whatever 
you undertake; t<» make hosts of 
friends among the men of yoiu- ciwn 
.ige who are to be leaders in all walks 
of life; to lose yourself in generous 
enthusi.ism, and co-operate with 
others for lommon ends; to learn 
m.mners from students who are 
gentlemen, and form c haracter under 
professors who are Christian this 
is the offer of the College, for the four 
best years of your life!" 
These words ex|)ress the ideals of our 
college as well as any other, and when 
groups of individuals in the under- 
graduate body begin to swerve from the 
privileges that are offered them, the result 
is a mutual loss. The College is failing 
to turn out men that appreciate the re- 
sponsibilities of their collegiate training, 
ami the men are setting themselves up 
as careless and lazy in allowing their 
jKitentialities to l>e underdevelo|HMl, or 
perhai)s overdeveloped in the wrong way. 
This is a long introduc tion to condenm- 
ing Assembly sleepers, but the flagrancy 
of their violations of decency and courtesy 
can never be tc«» strongly brought out. 
"to learn manners from students who 
.ire gentlemen " I'.ven the cows whose 
heads graci- the frieze that borders the 
ceiling in Bc)wker Autlitorium are on a 
level with those whose sleep is obtained 
dining .Assembly, for they have not the 
lap.icity to learn or understand the 
difference between connnon decency antl 
degenerate mannerliness. If on no other 
grounds, can't we appeal to the olTenders 
on the groimds of their own self-resiK-ct .-• 
riu>e men h.ive the cap.ic ity to know at 
least .1 slight incisure of the bound. iriis 
of politeness. When they refuse to m.ike 
use of their poteiiti.dity, why should they 
be considered .my more intelligent on 
this subject than the aforeim-ntioned 
cows? Of course, smne will s;iy that the 
sleepers know what they are do.ng, but 
isn't a ccmscious process of impoliteness 
much more to be regretted and repri- 
manded than an unconscious state of 
discourtesy? 

I'erhaps we have stated the case a bit 
strongly, but the appearance that the 
student boily wants and needs to give to 
visiting speakers was siidly lacking last 
Wednescl.iy. and all because of .i group 
of students who cast disiretion and 
thmightfulness to the winds and settled 



i-«2. 



\\ 






STOCKBRIDGE 



down to sleep through a le<tiir<- that 
should have rivaled any we have heard 
from the platforiu this year for general 
interest. The subject was of importance 
to every student, citizen or not, for it 
revolved abinit a point that the nations 
of the world are considering closely, 
namely, armament. 

We appeal to you who come to .Assem- 
bly with eyes heavy laden. Don't belittle 
vourself in the minds of ycnir college 
mates, nor belittle them in the mind of 
the speaker. Let's have a just pride in 
our student body, and hold up our heads 
when any critic marks us down on the 
count of respect. 



Campu5Det)il5 

Prexy Says 
The best reward of honesty is fK-ace of 
mind. 

CI) 

Intercollegiate 
Students of the Connecticut College 
for Women will be allowed to help plan 
the curriculum in the future. Two seniors 
and one junior will form a committee to 
help determine the course of studies. 
What's v^rong with that? 

CD 

"It is regrettable," writes a contem- 
|)orary editorialist, "that oratorical con- 
test does not hold the place in the esteem 
of college students that it formerly held. 
(Juite ai)art from one's vocation, the 
ability to sjK'ak with ease and clarity 
before an audience is a valuable asset." 
Does this tap fit us? 

CD 

Much comment seems to have been 
causicl by IL O. Doyk*. •'I'i'" "f ^'^'ofKi' 
Washington I'niversity, who reiently 
issued a tpiestionnaire to the cleans of 
four lumdred American colleges, in orcU-r 
to tind out how many "collegiate" stu- 
dents there are. Dean Doyle is trying to 
find out. besides various other things, 
just how m.iny students there are of the 
type depicted as "lollegi.ite" by the 
humorous press and vaudeville stage. 
— V\) 
Joe Found That 
I'.innie I'rosh s.iys: 'If what I h.ive 
he.ircl since I've been in college is true, 
tiicn when is a hike not a hike? Here's 
,in ex.imple. "The Out-of-D<K)rs Club 
will have .i liikr today. Take the bus and 
bring your lunch." 

CD 

F.innie also says that that over-night 
popularity seems to have been gained bv 
the communication column. Keep up the 
giKid work. 

CD 

.As at "StK-ial Union,"— The annual 
winter carnival which was to be held on 
J.muary H>. will be held some time in 
the future instead of last S;iturclay. 

CD 

Have our helping canines been sub- 
jected to the ravages of "la gripiw"? 
Stockbridge has lost its daily enter- 
tainment. 

CtK 

Do you suppose that a "whooping" 
cough is any relation to a "wlioopee " 
cough? 

CD- 
Stephens came back "red hot" as 
formerly. Heat must be faster th.m 
cold, because anyone can catch cold.- 
whereas those- red jersevs were one steji 
ahe.id of us. 



COMMUNICATIONS 



CLARKE SCHOOL MCTORIOCS 

Last Saturday night, Clarke School won 
a I lose- basketball game from Stockbridge 
.Aggie at Northampton by the store of 
J9 to 27. Clarke led slightly at half 
time, and held a four yto'mt lead near the 
end of the game before Bower dropped a 
basket for the visitors with about a 
minute to play. .Albani was the important 
cog in the Clarke offense- with eighteen 
(loints, and in the second half, he .sccjred 
all but one of his team's baskets. For 
the losers, Morrill played well defensively, 
and Sarris and Caijt.iin Bower led on the 
offenst- with i:5 and 11) points respectively. 
In the New Salem and Clarke games, the 
Stockbridge team showed improvement 
in their game, a good passing attack being 

a feature. — 

NEW SALEM SMOTHERED 
New Salem .Academy was smothered 
under a oti to lit score by the Stockbridge 
.Aggie basketball team last Friday night 
at the Drill Hall. I'or Stcxkbritlge, Bower 
dropi)ed nine floor baskets for IH points 
.md Sarris, .M.iyo, Ilayw<x)d and Coyle 
e.-ich tallied S points. L. Wetherbee 
scored eleven points for the losers. 
Numerous substitutes were used by 
Stockbridge, but the visitors could 
make but little headway. The home team 
scored all their points on floor shots, no 
foul shots being made. 

SOITH DEERFIELD WINS 

South Deertield High School defeated 
the Stockbridge basketball team 2:5 to Iti 
last Tuesday night. January 2«.t, at th« 
Drill ll.ill. The visitors' advantage was 
gained in the first h.ill, as both teams 
scored c-leven points in the second half. 
C.ipt.iin Bower of Stoc khridge w.is high 
scorer of the game with eight points, 
while diet I'ieloik and the Klinker 
brothers did the bulk of the scoring for 
the visitors. 

SORORITY DANCE 

S.C.S., the StiK-kbridge stirority, is to 
give a \alentine Dance tm February l.'i 
.It the Memorial Building immediately 
following Social I'nion. The program .is 
planned consists of m.my novelty num- 
bers and the decorations will also be in 
keeping with Xalentine's Day. The 
following committees are in charge of 
what promist-s to be a right "gala affair": 

Kntertainment and Decoration: Doris 
Fletham S.':}(l chairman; Floretta Brain 
aril S.';«» and Cornelia Smith S.':{0. 

Orchestra: .Agnes Tamm S.';{(l, chair- 
man; Mary Beaumont S.';{(>. 

Refreshments: Betty Sherman S.'.JO. 
ch.iirman. S;irah Mintz S.'.H). and Char- 
lotte Milner S.'.jll. 

Tickets may be obtained from any 
Stockbridge- co-ed for Sl.(M) per couple. 
It is hojK-il that many will join S.C.S. to 
make this a real g«K)d time. Canney's 
Orchestra has been engaged for this 
oce-asion. 



The Collegian accepts no res[)onsil)ilily for osun- 
ioni voiced in "The Eorum." It aims to serve ds 
a means of giving expression to student opinion, 
and will print any views expressed ratioiwlly an<t 
sanely, unless tlie editors feel that they are justi- 
fied in suppressing tfiein betaiise of unfair per- 
sonal attack. Communications must be limited to 
50() words. 

I-"viclently "Dutchy" Schai)|K'lle h.i> 
not forgotten his work as a relay num. 
We are glad to print this note from 1,im 
spring's track c.iptain who nuide .,u 
envi.ible record on the cinders while m 
College. There is a bit of worthwhile 
sentiment expresse-d in it. Editor 

Barnesboro, I'a. 
Jan. 2H, P.lJ'.i 
Dear "Derb" and Relay Team: 

The period of real action will soon l.i 
on. I wish I could go along to Boston .i:, 
a member of the relay team again. How- 
ever, the best I can do is to wish you tin- 
very best of luck from the very depth of 
my he.irt. 

Kveii though odds seem against us, 
there is nothing like frying and givin^; 
all we have; what more can one do.' 
There is more s;itisfaction in running a 
good, clean race and losing, than to h.ivt- 
a team of rough-necks and win. 

Well, the best of luck to you. I will 
watch for the results in the CoIU^kiii. I 
am far away in body, but very clo.se m 

feeling. 

Most sincerely yours, 
".Shap." 
(Newell .A. Schappelli- 
B.S. 1 hope I c.in find e-xpression to 
some of my feeling next spring when 1 
co.ieh trac k here .it the high school. 

S. 



To the l-.tlitor of the Collrf^itin: 

Is it possible that Professor Kice is not 
a fretpient reader of the Collcnidit'* lli> 
rather Anuising cimimunication last week 
woultl indicate as much, in view of the 
f.ict that In- did not seem t«i recognize 
the true n.iture of the "Campus IKbri>" 
column. 

Possibly the little not*- among the 
Debris which provoked the communication 
only precipitated a growing sc-ntime-m 
which could be no longer repressed. It 
there are tht)se who doubt the worth ol 
the individuals Professor Rice mentioned, 
or who .ire im lined to deride the purMiii 
of agrieulture. let them be dragged into 
the o|K-n and la- pilloried as betrayers ol 
the benefits they are receiving at .Aggi<-. 

However why affront the Feature 
FLditor. whose' particular province it is to 
discover humor in anvthing from the 
Dean's necktie to the World Cmiri? 
May I suggest to the Feature Edittjr 
that, as a protection against si-riou> 
mindetl readers, she place a little l.ibel 
at the opening of her remarks— "Strictly 
humorous! Not to be taken when feelini; 

in earnest!" 

A Reader 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

The regular wet-klv sermon will be 
preached this Sunday by President John 
F'.dgar Park of Wheatem College, Norton, 
Mass. The following short resume'- etm- 
cerning this eminent speaker is give-n by 
vv.iy of introdiiitii)!!, in ordir that he 
may not be entirelv unknown to tlu- 
student body when he comes here next 
Sund.iv morning. 

President P.irk holds the degree of 
Doctor of Divinitv from Tufts Colli-ge. 
.ind also the degree- of Doctor of Laws 
from Wesleyan I'niversity. He h.is been 
a student at New College, l-.dinlnirgh, 
Scotland, at Roy.il I'niversitv. Dtdtlin, 
.md at till- Princeton Theologii.il Semin- 
ary. He is .It the iiri-sent time .i member 
of the f.iiiilty of the boston University 

School of Tllinloi;v . 

In .iddition to the duties ent.iiled in 
the pcjsition as president of Wheaton 
College, President Park h.is found time 
to publish several books, which bring the 
total from his pen up to fourteen. 



Now that the "Janes" have enter- 
tained the "Johnnies" in the annual 
celebration, the former will not sit back 
anil wait for another year before they 
can exhibit their ability as social lights. 
CD 

.And now, little boys and girls of the 
radio audience. -Aunt .Aggie will tell ,i 
little bedtime story: "Once upon .i time 
there was a big strong man who went to 
Massachusetts .Aggie who made a trip to 
11.1111]) every week in an .uitomobile. 
not his but .mybody's. He didn't meet 
with very good success until he donned 
a small bl.ick c.ip with a !.;rceii button 
in the center of it. Now not .;/;.v''i'(/y'> 
auto stops to have him ride, but <:,ry- 
loilx's. S). you see. de.ir children, th.it 
this little cai) marked his victory." 
CD 
1 certainly would like to s.iy a few 
more things, but 1 know tli.il >ou woiiM 
only laugh at them, or peril. ips you'd 
write a soiucthing in the right-hand col- 
umn, 

( D — 
Cela Sufifit. 



We must have it ! 



ORCHE.STRA FORMED 

.A Stotkbridge SihcKil Orchestra has 
recently been organized under the tem- 
porary leadership of Kenneth C. Leonard 
';{t), .Abbington, Mass. Kehearsjils are 
being held weekly on Tuesday evenings 
.md a regular coach has been secured. 
Twenty-nine students have shown they 
are interested in forming .in orchestra. 

ICE CREAM COURSE 

The ice ire.im short cenirse opened 
Monday. January 14, with a registration 
of fourteen students. The course will be 
carried on for two wt-eks. 

CO-ED PARTY 

.A co-ed bridge and tea dance of all the 
co-ed students of M..A.C. is to be held 
this S.iturday afternoon. F'ebruary 9. 
from 2 to "■> p. 111. .it Memorial Buileling. 
W'.S.(i..A. is to sponsor and finance this 
exclusively co-ed entertainment, and all 
girls .111(1 women members of the faculty 
are invited and urged to come, have a 
good time and become better actpi.tinted. 

Canney's orchestra will rendu imisic 
for the oc-casion and iirograms m.iv be 
obtained from any of the following com- 
mittee in charge: Betty Lynch '29. chair- 
man; Fldith Bertenshaw '2^1 Bessie Smith 
'2'.>, ,ui(l Margaret Dimovan ';>(». 

Mi>s Kdna L. Skinner. Miss Margaret 
Hamlin. Betty Lynch '2'l and Bessie 
Smith '29 are to constitute the receiving 
line. 



We want that bnilding ! 



To the i:ditor of the Collegian: 

".A woman well bred and well taught, 
furnished with the additional accom- 
plishments of knowledge and behavior, 
is a cre.it ure without comparison; her 
society is the endilem of sublimer enjoy- 
ments; her jH-rson is angelic and her 
c(mvers.ition heavenly: she is all soil- 
ness and sweetness, jwace, love, wit. ind 
delight. She is every way suitable to tin 
sublimest wish, and the man that hi' 
such a one to his i^ortion has nothing t<> 
do but to rejoice in her and be thankful. 
This quotation presents one man's kI'M 
of womanhood. 

It is striking to note how exactly oiu 
present-d.iy woman lives up to this noM' 
concept ion. Let me cite an example " 
this superb femininity. One luay stroll 
into the Memori.il Building occasion. i!^ 
to watch a bowling match. The tu-i 
sight to greet one's eyes is the "t.ii' ' " 
vivaiit" <)f two or three co-eds swaggc '"'-^ 
about nonchalantly sinoking cigarette- 
One notices, incidentally, the game : '■' 
which they are entering with -o ^■ 
.ibsorption. 

( )iii' cannot help but consider tm 
analogy presented by the artist \\i ' 
paints a life-sized portrait, let it be c.ill"i 
"The Rose." of a \enus-like creatun 
holding, daintily, a fresh-plucked ro^* 
fietween the thumb and finger of her 
right hand. When one ^..lances at the 
title one cannot be mistaken as to the 
imiKtrt of the creation; the paint-r i' 
toncent rating his attention on the ro«" 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Left iet up steam ! 



A limited supply of Woolen and Corduroy Trousers, Breeches and Knickers are offered for This Week's Special. Attractive Shades. Substantial Price Cuts. 

Tlie early bird gets the better cfioice. Rent your Tuxedos for the Military Ball and Initiation Banquets from 

LANDIS-OPEN EVENINGS 



Men's ''Tux" Oxfords $7.00, $8.50 

Men's Black Dress Oxfords $6.00, $7.50, $10.00 

SPECIAL SHOWING OF 

Women's New Spring Style 

Patent Leather and Satin Pumps 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



VALENTINES 

FOR SWEETHEARTS, MOTHERS AND FRIENDS 
ALL STYLES ALL PRICES 

"My smile won't work 

When I'm alone 
Why don't you coll 

or telephoned" 

JAMES A. LOWELL, 



''You can treat nir with candy 
With jewels and with gold 

I like to be treated 
But don't treat me cold' 



BOOKSELLER 



MW HAMPSHIRE IIOCkEY (;aME 
^Continued from I'aftv I) 

111 the second period Reinhart, |)l. tying 
idt wing for New I lamiishirt-, g.ive .111 
.\(tlleiit exhibition of f.mcy stick work, 
irricd the puck through the home team's 
Jeleii^e. and scored with a long shot 
which glanced into the cage. Later in 
!lie period F'rost, the .star wing for the 
M,i>-.ai husetts aggregation, did some fast 
rk.itiiig and very accurate shcniting. but 
Hum, the visitors' goalie, stopped suc- 
usslulK thesi' offensive drives. 

Missichusetts made a bid for victory 
.. tile last period with Frost and Davis 
'liiiiig very well on the offense-. However, 
the vi.»iting defense was functioning well 
ami all shots were stopped without a 
wore. The work of Bond, the stellar 
I .\ki;ie defense man, was outstanding. He- 
■vjs in every play and took the puck away 
Iruiti the opposing wings time .ifter time 
1 m theii excursions into the home team's 

■rritcitv. The summary: 

I Vfv» ilainpNhire MaHKachuHetIs 

<' . Iln;j;ins. rw l\v. Frost. /uKi-r 

<-'\. \'c>un«. c c. Davis. \Va<-> lilir, Taiih 

1:1.. II. Moore. Iw rw. .Manly. Patch. Waci lin-r 

I "l.inrl. Miinliard. r<l Id, Bond 

-1/11111, Id rd. \a~li 

P'™".K K. Myri.k 

s-nrc: New Hampshire 1. Massai hils<-tts (1. 

""il: kijiihart. s<-cond jM-riiid 1 iiiiassisu-cli 



I paredness, as a scarecrow, h.is tiev t-r been 
a success. 

.Army .imj n.ivy powers h.ive .ihv.iys 
h.id .1 slroiin influence u|m)ii tht-ir govern- 
ments, .iml there really is no galns;iyin>4 
their claims that no ii.ition is ever fullv 
prepared. A n.ilion. in the j.ist analysis, 
can never be completelv prejured. 

In the spe.iker's opinion llu- i)re->eiii 
ipiarrel between the United .St.ites .md 
<;reat Britain, if it e-.m be so lernied, 
has arist-n out of the belie-f of e.ii li n.ilion 
that the other is Iryiiij^ to jmu up .1 bhiij 
Jigaiiisi i(. A little study .iceording ,,, 
Professor P.ic kard would point out ij,,. 
futility of any such moves. 



PROFKS.SOR P.VIIER.SON SPK.VkS 

Aliout thirty of the faculty .md >tii.leiii> 
li.id the jileasure of listening to .1 i.ilk on 
Dion Boucic.iiill. .it .1 Dep.irtmeiil ol 
l.mgu.iges and l.iter.iture meeting l.isl 
Tuesd.iy evening in Stcukbridge H.tll. 
Prof. Charles II. P.itterson g.ive- .111 
interesting i.ilk on this Irish pl.ivwrighl 
of the late nineteenth lentiirv, telliiiv; 
m.my incidents of the life ,iiiel |>l.ivs nl 
this voiiii^ .lutlior. "London .AsMir.mi-e, ' 
.1 |»l.iv written while he w.is.t voiin^; m.in 
w.es his most outslanding effort. Uoiii i 
i.iiill W.IS will .uipi.iinted with the most 
l.imoiis .!( tors ol his time, sin h .is Irving, 
blferson ami Coepielin. He ni.ide the 
story of Rip \'.m Winkle into a pl.iy .it 
the reipiest of Irving, who Liter pl.ive-d 
the li-ading p.irt, il becoming his must 
l.iminis role. 

IWEI.VE HUNDRED C;ON IRIBU I E 
(Continued from I'aite I) 

The following is a summary of the 
coiiiribiitors received ti|i to Febru.iry 1: 
I ndetgraduates: 

(■'/ass Annniiit /'.('. 

Ii»2'.t ... $\()\u\ ti.{ 

H'-'«> . . llL'.'i .-.7 

I!'-'U UHhl .-,.; 

\\y-i2 JO 1 

*;{24:{ 

Mt2.S . I2tl4 .■.(» I..; 

.Alumni lint lulling 'J.si :;i,l(;7 K'. 
Sie)ckliridKi- (.Alumni .inci 

Undergraeluatesi Ki.Vs ."id 

I. unity 2:','A\ 

t'thers ."..s:;i 10 



^^o; Arrivals Every Day 

spring .Mallorys Arc Here. 
Spring Suits and 'I'opcoats. 

'I'luxedos and Tuxedo Accessories. 

Come In and Look Them Over 
F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN FOR NEARLY FII-TY YEARS 



I .k. :.r.i- 



IJ<>«(1. Tinii-: lll-iiiinutc ix-riods. 



(RCiSER BILL IS A.SSAIUED 

(Continued front Ptt^r |i 

j-^ l'.M4? It availed them nothing when 
h^v\ rame uj) again.st the "will to win" 
In their less favored opponents. Pre- 

Voil and trouble, contributions double! 



FRESHMEN 


LOSE IWf) 


c;ames 


(Conti 


nued 


fruin i'aiie 


I; 


.Si.utii Derrlivid 




M.A.t;. 


Krosh 




H. 


1- 


I'. 




H. I-. 1' 


C .ravi-s.lf 


1 





•> 


Tikofski.rK 


1 n J 


1' Klinlc.-r.lf 











F(.l.-v.!u 


., .| - 


( lii-t I'ii-I... k.rt 


:t 


•> 


H 


I-ahyan.lu 


n n 


< W.i- I'kI.h k.c 


1 


■> 


4 


-Mcriitl.c 


(1 1 1 


S klink.-i.lK 


2 


1 


.") 


K.ilivan.i 


11 II II 


Woiikliiiii z.r({ 


T 





• » 


( Onnrll.ii 


1 II •' 


.S>koloski,rK 








(I 


Wilson.ll 


2 n 1 


Totals 


K 


•') 


21 


Toi.iN 


«i 1 It; 


Kcfcre-i-: Williams. 


Time: H-iiiiniit 


■ iMtiiids. 


WilliNlon 






M.A.C 


Fr<»sli 




K. 


I. 


I-. 




K 1- r 


1 Idler. rf 


t) 


II 


12 


Tikof-ki.U 


n II II 


t".ori-,lf 


1 


:{ 


.» 


l-i>l<v.ri; 


*> :t 1.-, 


I'n-ston.c 


1 


J 


A 


( ..1111.11.. 


1 2 


l.aiidi-u.rn 





1 


I 


WilM.n.lf 


2 1 .". 


TvI.t.Ik 





II 


II 


l-al.van.rf 


II (1 (1 


K.-id.c 


J 





1 


M.-rtitl.M 


(1 1 1 


KickHs,lf 


T 


(1 


•t 






\\.in.~.l. Ilicd.c 





II 


CI 






Clark.rf 


(1 


II 


II 






MilK.ll 


11 


II 


II 






Tot,,!- 


1 1 


t 


_'S 


T.it.ils 


'1 :, s.', 


Kill r.-i : n.ii 







< .r.inil Tot.il 



.f4:{,«i.'>> I Ml 



Every class one hundred per cent ! 



VALENTINES 

for 

|Sweethearts, Mothers, 
and Friends. 

liss Cutler's Gift Shop 



THE 



-OLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

^*ffers Expert Hair Cutting 
•Nervico for Men and Women. 

"^f" DUWELL, Prop. MEMORIAL BUILDING 



ASK FOR I 

" Munsingwear" 

RAYON and SILK 

Bloomers - Step-ins - Vests 

Slips - Bandeau - Pajamas 

Night Robes 

SOLD ONLY at IHIS STORE 

G. Edward Fisher ■ 



MILIIARV BALL FRIDAY 

(Conllniit'd from I'aUi- I) 

Major .iiiil Mr?.. Iliriii.iii Kolilic hmii 
I'lov ideiic e-. R. I., .ire ekpecli-d lo l» 
present .is quests of honor. .M.ijor KoI.Im- 
w.is lie.id ol till- .Military Department .it 
M..\.( . Iiefore M.ijor IfrisiiM- e.iiiie here 
.md is now st.it ioiied at the .Arniorv of 
Moimted Commands at rrovidence. 

Decorations for the Hall will In ,ilt.> 
gethi-r of a different sort from those used 
last year. .A rather simple lint ver\ 
effective decoration scheme has lieiii 
worked out Ly the- Dec iirat ioti ('omiilitl*-e 
of which t'.idet .Major Raymond I'lnmer 
is in eharge and the plan will he disclosed 
on Frid.iy night. 

rickets ha\e he-en selling f.ist over tin- 
past few cl.iNs an. I I here will lie some for 
s;de at the- door, (".ipt.iin Richardson is 
in eharge of ticke-ls which are- si-llinn for 
■f2.tK)a coupk-. The- .Milit.irs .ilunini wlm 
graduated in the classt-s M»2»i-2X hav«- 
lieen invileil hy person. il invitaLions to 
.itti-iiei the- H.ill. 



COM.MUNICAIIONS 
tCunlinued from I'a^e i) 

One's imagination rushes .dicid to ilu 
d.ivs when some of tlii-si- sinu- eo i-ils will 
he ir.idling icisv cheeked h.diies in iheii 
arms. .Ami tin- mothers? Oh, they will 
lie improving their ediic.ilion with .1 liook 
in one hand .iiicl .1 e ig.iiette iu the other, 
.ihsentmindedly Hicking tht-ir ashes into 
the- lialiies' eyes, or, more appro|>ri.ile-l\ , 
into the haliies' milk. (,A sugge-slioii (o 
those who have nu-ch.mieal .diilily .im| 
inventivi- genius: gas masks for liahii-s. ) 

Is it not wonderfid toolisi-rve i .le h d.iv 
• lie .icK.incemenI this old weiilcl ol oin s 
is linking low. ltd the- nine h clesiied 
X.ilh.iil.i.-' One i.iiinot liel|i Iml emi 
gr.iliil.ile hiiiisill III. It his liiilli did ii<i( 
01 1 III ,1 cenlinv e.irlie-r. 

Will. N. I'hinii.v 



Every little bit helps 



t 



olleg^e Drugstore 



^V. H. McGRATH 
Reg. Pharm. 

^^'MEKST, 



MASS. 



I^mherst Shoe Repair Co. 

^Jaster Shoe Rebuildpnt 
RXT TO BOLLES SHOE STORE 



We need enthusiasm ! 



FYPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Remington, Royal 
and Corona Sales and .Service 

Radio Kquirment General Repair .Shop 

H. E. IXWID 

35 Pleasant St., ju»t below P.O. Amherst 

S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

OruliRts' Prescriptions Filled. Brolcen lenses 
accurately replaced 

BIG BE.N ALAR.M CLOCK.S and other 

reliable makes 

3 PLEASANT .STREET, (up one fliftht) 



fi Town Hall Theater g 

\f Maliiu-«-H .<:00 l-.\<-ninUs <i:4.S and N:tl) Q 

Wed.. Ihurs., & Fri., Fefi. 6-7-K 

"KING OF kings:' 

(Viil li. I>< Millc's /iHiiiorlal M<i^ 

Irrpirrc A Musi Hrirrrnt- Sink til i!_ly 

Hfdiiliful I'liniiriiniii of the 

I rua^cdy nf the Ai\v\. 

Slarlinil 'lime K»-aliire S«r«-ein-d 

Mai. S.m. Kvf. 7.«0 Al S.m and 1 2» 

Vial. fJhIldrtn i.Sc. Adults .S«< 



FACULTY SOCIAI. 

With the purpose- of having I he mem 
liers ol llu- Si. lie- ( omniissioii o| .Ael 
minislr.ition .mil I'in.mie- meel .mil 
liiioiiic liitter .K i|uainted with I he e i(lle-v;e- 
Ii-.ii liili'^; si, ill, ,1 s<i< i.il iiieiliiig w.is liel.l 
i.i-l Mond.iy evening in I he- .Meiiioi i,il 
Hnilding. Tliin- wen- |)res4-nt four gut-sis 
of lioiHir. ihre-e meiiiliers of the Com 
mission .iml Dr. Mi I'lii .irson of the- Slate- 
Se hool ,it Ifeic hertovMi. l<<-pr«-s4-ntiiig the 
(dnmiission were Mr. C. I'. Howard, 
c li.iirm.in of the- Hoard, ami two ini-m- 
liers, Mr. Cronin and Mr. .Morg.in. Lae h 
gave ,1 lirii-f talk on their weirk, telling of 
Its purpos«- and ace urnplishnn-nts. I'rof. 
Ired C. Sears gavt- .1 Immnrous I.ilk, 
e line hiding the speaking program, (lames 
were- played and the- serving of refresh 
nienls e iMicliided the- pro^r.iiii. 

S-ve-i,i| memhers of the Collifiuin 
Lditorial Hoard were- kindly iiiterrnple-il 
in I heir process o( prep.iring this nimilie t 
of the LnllcKKlli .mil Ire.ileel lo 1 iille-e- .iikI 
sandwiches. It w.is a kindly .icl, and 
those liii ky ones who shared the- faculty 
refreshments take this opportunity to 
express their ih.mks. 

We must have student endorsement ! 



I'rires 



l-.veninfts. All Se-als .S«c 



Best in Drug Store Service 
Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co. 



.Saturday, Feb. ') 

Biggest Double Bill Yet 
Shown At This Theatre 

MAKKiS l>A\ ll:> I \ 

''THE FAIR CO^ED' 

1 ill finiHks ,ni(l hiininr uJ ctil/ijif ItU 

icerr nnrr so htlurwusly brouf^ht /" 

//; ' ycri'fti htfiiJe ./s in litis 

■jrrnt comedy. 

AM) 

Kh.X. THE WJ/.I> IIOR.SI: IS 

''WILD BLOOD'' 

RKt.i I.AR ITMK AM) I'KICI S 




LAD.vs or(;anizin<; iea(;iie 

(Continued (run) Pafte li 

In the .ilterniMiii ihi- Kellojin P.n | , i )is- 
.irin.ime-ni, .iinj ih,- Mdvcmeni low.inj 
Intel 11. ition.il I'e-.ne- will liiiiii llu- |,.,>,is 
lor diseiission. 

In the evening, plans are lieing l.ii<| i.. 
hold a s«-ssion that will follow the- work- 
ings of Ih.ii sulisidi.iis ol I he- I e-.i^ue- of 
N. It ions whie h eh-.ils with lahor prolih-ins 

•nid c litieiiis of wtnkmen Ihe world 

over. Mils is ,111 e-iilitilv new pli.ise- oj 
the- process ol sliiehnl e-din .11 ion m ||||. 
work ol Ihe- l.e.iniie-, .mil .iltlion^ji |||<. 
I.ilior disc iissioiis .lie- mil held in ijn- 
gene-r.il .Asst-mlily. the- Instilule is spoii 
sored liy Ihe- l.e-.i^;ue- .ilid I Inn lore is ,1 
ji.irl ol Ihe oig.iiii/.itioM. 

.\l pieseiil, sevei.il coin mil lee-, cc iile re ij 
on Ihe- Moiml llolyc ke- .md Smiih ( i,lh-n,. 
i.iinpuses .in- liiisy pie-p.iriiig liililio^;i.i 
|)liies »>f avail.ilile m.ilei jal on the- siilije. Is 
lo he- ilisiiissed .il ihe Model .\sseml.|y. 
t •llier e Kiiiniille-es .iii- .urangiiig piiMie il v , 
cii ope-ialing .i>;i ne jes, rev;is|i.i( Jon ,,| 
dell-gat ions, .mil i.ilii-i pluses o| 1 h. 
jiioicel which iii.iv !.<■ woikeil on In l..u-- 
li.iiid. 

This ye-.ir, the p.irl M.A.C is lo i.iki- 
in the- .Asse-mliK is midet ihe iliieiiiein ol 
the liilern.ilion.il kelalioiis (lull. The 
League Commillee- on this campus is 
hcidi-il liy .Arnold .A. |)>e-r ':,".♦, anel al 
ic.iilv there h.is hee-n sulmiilleej ,1 list ol 
Ihe College's eUh-^>ates. All |M>liii|ial 
delegale-s will le-ie-ive- fioin the I'resident 
ol the- Council, ( . |*. I.adas, from lime- te) 
lime-. .1 lellir skele hiiig the woik that 
h.is heeii eloiii- and is lieiiig done so lh.it 
the- ( oiinc il m.iy keep in leiiic |i willi e.ic h 
dileg.ile-. .Aiiv infoim.iijon tji.ii is eh-siii-il 
icineeriiing the proje < I in.iy he gaiiu-d 
1 1 0111 t he .iliove meiilioiie d iiu-n or ('le-avcs 
'2'.t, jense-n '.•'.(!, .md Miss S|e-iiil,iigler '211. 

.Alter atlending e l.issi-s lor sixti 111 
years, Uende-ll .Me lie h, evening studeiii 
at NorthTtTstrnr University, finally ri- 
ei-ive-d his di-giee-. \')riui>nl I ytiii . 

Every Aggie Man a Contributor ! 



SING LEE HAND I^AUNPRY 
No. 1 Main St. Amherst, Mass. 

REPAIRI.NG AM) Al,l. KI.NDS OF 
WASIIi.NG DONE AT REA.SONABEE 
PRICES. 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 
NEXT TO THE TOW.N HALL 



That adorn the foot 
are admired by all. 

Our selection of styles 

and materials is most 

complete. 

Thomas S. Childs 

INCOKPORATKD 

275 High St , Holyoke. Mass. 



A 



MH ERS 

THEATER 



T 



VVetJiHsilav, I e-h. U 

5 KEITH VAUDIVIIIE ACTS 

ON I lit s«:km \ 
l«)iS VMI>e,N VV NOKMAN IKiVOK IS 

'OBJECT, ALIMONY 

All M|, II. Ill- 1.1 ,1,1. . .,[,„ ,\: .1 ,,i, , 

r'KAM'.l .\l ( OMI |,\ l'.\ I III. \|..\VS 



AMHERST FRUIT STORE 

VVHLRF AGGIK MF\ MRKT 

WHFN IX)WN TOW.N 

ICECREAM CANDY CIGARS 



Ihurs. & Iri., l-eb? & 8 

CIIAKI.KS KOGIKS. \\M;\ (.^HKOI 
aii.l Jl \\ III KSIiOl I in 

"ABIE'S IRISH ROSE" 

I, \t-.il> nil IIkcdIk.iv. J Vl.;ir- III i'o<llltl 

I' li.i,- iilayi-.! Ill IS.cmiMieill ipnii* .111.1 il, rv. r. 

-l.ii. ill 1 1» I 1111,11 ..ikI I 1 ^<.r> ii;ii e iniii-rH'^ 
-' Kl-.l-l, ( OMI-DV I'AHAMtll NT ,\ l.Ws 
M;ii 111 J. I ..-. onu- iH 7 HI He- Iiiliir I'rii rn 

.Saturday, Kel». •» 

Willi \\l I . )\ I'KI ^|•.\ I s 

SWIMV f:OliKS. MAKJOKIK Bl-.l HK h, 

"HOMESICK" 

llikmy. .tii^l liu.u.i; !.. til. 1 iiiK >il lu»i l^injii!. 
•-' RKKI. < «)M|..t)V I'.XHA.NtOI NT NlUS 
Mon. and Tiies. Feb. II and li 

( I l\l IIK»»«»K t\l I ^ S HKIM 
VMI I I \M roVM I I IXtKIS Kl N WIN in 

"INTERFERENCE" 

L' f-;l I I ( n\ii |)\ \|,\\s 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

Now situated at 1.5 1-2 IMeaHant St. 
EXCELLtNT SHOE REPAIRERS 
V. (;K0M>()MC0, Prop. 



{ 



Mi • 



A. - 






I 



THE MASSACHUSKTTS COLI-ECIAN. WEDNESDAY. FF.BRUARY 6. 19y) 



——— MICKEY. FREEMAN CLOTHES 

A better class of clothes for the better class of trade. Get your new suit at "The House of Walsh". 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



It pays to pay for quality. 



RKVISKI) HlSIIINt; IM.AN 
(Conllniieil from i'ufte I) 

of the fiiitiiriiiics in llif Confer 
fiici-. I'lirllifrmorc ilirs*- riiU-s 
shall ai)i)ly diirinn all holiday 
piiiod-., indiiilin^; tin- C'liiiM iiia> 
holidays. 
.\l till- tinu-of if^istratioii. ta< h fiish- 
inaii shall Ik- «ivfn a form KtUr from 
the liiHrfraH-rnity Coiifercnt i-, whii h 
sh.ill im liidi". 

a. A >4fneral KnotiiiK to tlie frishncm 
and a warninK of the importaim- 
and striousnc'ss of sili-ctin^; a 
fraternity. 
I). OtVicial information aUoiit the fra 
ternities. 

1. Kxpenses for the initiation 
year, sul)se(inrnt nn<iernradu 
ate years, ami alumni years, 
expressed in round numl>ers. 
(These exi>enses would hesuh 
milled hy earii fraternity at 
(he heuinninj; of the year and 
would inelude sueh items as 
initiation fees, dues, dance 
taxes, and sueh recjuired ex- 
penditures as are contem- 
plated, i 

2. Koom rent niveii sei)arately. 
;{. Scholarship averages for the 

pre(e<lin^; three years. 
Ueferenie to Itaird's Manual. 
Particular emphasis on the 
fact that any fraternity 
which breaks the rushinu 
rules, either in letter or in 
spirit, is not worthy of the 
consideration "f ^my fresh- 
man. 
A week of rushing at tlie l)eKinninn of 
the second season governed t>y a lew 
sin\ple rules. 

Much discussion ensued as to the 
desirability of a < hany;e in the |.resent 
rushinji system at M.A.C". 



4. 



4. 



FRAT BANQl'Kl S THIS WEEK END 

(Continued from Faftc 1) 



Those who return on lebruary S will 
have op|K)rtunity to attend two events 
which formerly have not taken place at 
so opportune a time. The first of these 
is the Military Hall, which is to l)e held 
in the Drill Hall in the evening of that 
date. The other is the varsity h«Kkey 
trame between M.A.C. and Colby, a ^ame 
originally planne.l for the ninth, but 
,>(jssil)ly coming the eighth, if present 
plans mature. 

The following is the schedule for the 
fraternity b.mcjuets, to be held Saturday 

evening: 

O.TA'. Hotel I'erry, .\ndui>t, 7 |.. m. 
T'hi Sigma Kapp.i Draper Hall. 

M.A.C, 7 p. m. 
Kappa Sigma Davenport inn. 

.\mh»-rst. 7 p. m. 
rhct.i (hi The Lord JelTery. AmherM. 

7 p. m. 
Sigma I'hi Kpsilon The Lord |etfei>, 

.\mherst. 7 |). m. 



"POI.LV AM) HER I'AI.S" 
(Conllnufd from I'afti- I 

iKcompanyiiig her.-.U \sitli a banjo 
ukelcle. A dance novelty, the \arsit\ 
Di.ig, was given by i'oHy, succeeded l)y a 
solo, "Memories of i" ranee," sung by 
Kuth. "l he lull- of St. Mary'" were then 
played by the trio. 

( .eorge i'earson presented seven »hara(- 
ters from "Connnencement Day at the 
Little Ked Sch.K)l- House." Heginning his 
characters with NLiss i'riscilla, the school- 
mistress, lie ai)peared in the typical <lress, 
with the typical manners and siH-ech, of 
a village school teacher. Mr. Pearson 
ali.is Miss I'riscilla presented two short 
poems, the first of which was "The Kiss" 
and the second an encore. That all-im 
portant man, the sui)ervisor, was next, 
with a few disai)propriate and wandering 
remarks. .Xdolphus Woggles, the young 
man just back from college, followed. 
His talk was on food in tablet form, and 
his greatest difficulty was to find s> nony- 
mous words, much to his discomfort ami 
embarrassment. I'rofesscjr liillington 
Hoggs read the announcements for the 
week, owing to the absence of the pastor 
from the meeting the previous Sunday. 
Antonio Angelo told next of his exix-ri- 
ences in the l)ig cities of Ameri.a. and 
of the scenes that he witnessed there. I he 
sixth im|K-rsonalion was advice to the 
ladies in regard to the use of the fan by 
Miss Samantha Simpkins, the village 
lulie. Lastly, Mr. Whittemore, the village 
philosopher told of his trip to New York 
and of his ditVK ulties in the hotel there. 
Mr. Pearson .ilso recited Ldgar C.uest's 
poem "Home." 

"Just aS<mgat Twilight" was i)resente(l 
by the trio, who interpreted the teelmg 
of the song through tfie meoldious notes 
of their siixophones. Kuth and .\lice 
followed with a duet novelty, "I Ain't 
(.ot Nobody." The ensemble then 
played a medley of favorites, among 
which were "Way Down I'pon the 
Swanee River" and "Massii's in tfie Cold, 
Cold Cound." Wiedoft's "Valse \ enite" 
was played J)y Alice, who interpreted that 
piece very well. The program ended with 
a dance novelty. "That's My Weakness 
Now," played l)y the trio. 

.•\fter the entertainment in liowker 
Auditorium, "Polly and Her I'als" went 
over to the Drill Hall to play for dancing. 
Their music was varied and interesting 
and received much favorable comment. 
In spite of the fact that there were more 
th.in enough stags to go around, the 
dance was quite successful. 



CLVB NEWS 



IMEKN.VnONAL REI-AIIONS 
CLLB 

At the regular Thursday meeting of 
the international Relations Clul) held 
last week in the Menu^rial iUiilding, 
several books an<i pamphlets donated to 
the Club Ity tiie Carnegie Kndowment 
iund for International I'eace in connei - 
tion with the nation-wide project they 
are sponsoring in the formation of these 
dubs on cdlege campuses. The material 
whic h has been given to the Club deals 
with South and Central America, at 
times touching on the relations of the 
Latin American nations with the Cnited 
States, and in other cases treating only 
local conditions. These l)Ooks and pam- 
phlets are to l)e placed in the Sociology 
Office and will be availalile for reading 
to any student who so desires. 

The main item of business to l)e tran- 
sacted consisted of the appointment of a 
program committee to handle the meet- 
ings for the remainder of the year. 



EEORICIIITLIRE CLUB 

The meeting of the Floriculture Ciul) 
was hdd in French Hail on Thursday, 
January :U. Professor Clark F. Thayer 
was the speaker of the evening, and gave 
an interesting talk on the history of the 
dub since its origin in WVi. 

i he chief l)usiness issue was the adop- 
tion of a constitution. Intil the present 
the club has l)eeii run more or less in- 
formally. In tlie future the meetings will 
be carrietl on in a more business-like 
manner. The next meeting will l>e held 
Thursday, Fd)ruary 7. at 7..'U). The 
speaker will be HaroUl Keyes of Florence, 
Mass., wlw will sjK-ak on the subject. 
"The |)eveloi)ment of a Small Retail 
Kstablishmeiit." 



M.A.C.-STEVENS TEtll (iAME 
I Continued from Hafie I; 

the Stevens captain, (iropi)e(l a l>asket 
from the foul line to gi\e the New Jerse\ 
aggregation tlie advantage. Webber then 
gathered a foul, l)Ut Persson duplicated 
the performance to retain the lead for his 
dub until a few minutes l>efore the half 
ended. At that time Stanisiewski again 
l(K)ped in a shot from under the basket 
to give the Agate quintet a 7 to (1 lead 
as the period ended. 

Four minutes elapsed at tlie i>eginning 
of the second half before Mann, acting 
(-a|)tain for the home team, sunk his 
customary long shot from near the center 
of tlie floor, widening the margin to three 
points. H. Mainhold, substituting for 
Fenn at right guard, failed to sink two 
attempted hmg shots but the third went 
through the hoop. For the next few 
minutes neither team was able to find 
tlie basket iiut finally the Tech star made 
another long shot from the side to jjut 
the New Jersey basketeers ahead 10 to It. 
Stanisiewski collected his third l)asket 
but -A. Mainhold collected a gift shot to 
tie tlie count at 11 all. With two minutes 
to play H. Mainhold popped another 
long basket, ending the scoring for both 
teams and giving the \ isitors a b'i to 11 
victory. The summary: 



Stevenii Tech 



Tliii. k.il«rrv.lf 1 

.\.M;iiiih.)M.if 1 

l'cr:i.-«)in: t) 2 

Uti^t.T.U C) o 

l-.nii.rn U 

II.MainhulcJ.rK 3 U 



U J 



Massachusetl!i 

H. !• 

Muiin.ru t I) 

K.-lley.lK 1 <) 

Staiiis'wski.c :i H 

( <.iiko>,il U 

W.l.lM-r.ll I 



T.il.il- 



.-> :i i:t 



Totals 



I I 1 



RfltTi-f: JoliiiHoii. Time: LMI-iiiimilc IkiIvc--. 



Let's pull together 



Lambda Chi .Mpha DraiM-r Hall. 

M.A.C., 7 p. m. 
Alpha Sigma Phi Hotd Northampton, 

N()rthampton. S p. ni. 
K.ippa Kpsilon Long House' inn. 

llolyoke. .S p. m. 
Alph.i (.anima Rho Highland Hotel, 

Springfield, S p. m. 

The time is ripe ! 



Calling Card Sale— Two Weeks Only 

100 Cards $1.49 Panelled 20 Cents Extra 

A J. HASTINGS ''''^^^r AMHERST. MASS. 

^"jACKSON & CUTLER 

DE.M.CKS IN 

DRY AND F.\NCY GOODS READY TO WEAR 

AMHERST, MASS. 



AGRONOMY CLUB 

In his talk to the members of the 
.\grononiy Club on Wednesday, Jan. .'{O, 
Mr. C. W. Clemmer of the Eastern 
.States Farmers' Kxchange siKike of the 
seed situation and also of seed selection. 
During the business meeting a new secre- 
tary, Henry J. Hartness S.'21t, was elected 
to take the place of Klliott P. Joslin 
S.'2'l who is ill. The speaker for the next 
meeting to be hdd Fel)ruary i:{ will be 
Mr. Roland Payne who will siK-ak on the 
subject, "The Place of Potash in Soil 
Fertility." 

LE CERCEE FR.XNCAIS 

I-ictions in French were the order of 
the clay at the meeting of I.e Cerde 
Fr.iiuais on Thiirsday. J.muary ;}1. Kach 
of the members was recpiircl to tell a 
story or two in French, a program very 
much api)reciated by all those presiMit. 
.After the story telling, a brisk and in- 
teresting discussion of conditions now pre- 
vailing in France t<K)k place, with every- 
one taking part. The next meeting of the 
dub will be (Ml February 14. 



INTERCL.XSS HOCKEY 

In the interclass hockey series, last 
week the freshmen won from the seniors 
by a forfeit on Wednesday and the Stock- 
bridge sextet defeated the juniors by a 
score of - to 1. Warren of the juniors 
o()ened the scoring in the first period but 
was closely followed by (iraf's tally for 
StcH-kbridge which tie<l the count. Follow- 
ing a scoreless second j)eriod, Iloyt, S.S.A. 
center ice man, cagetl the puck with less 
than two minutes of the final session re- 
maining. 

To all those who suffered from too 
much study, Purdue offered an attrat - 
ti\»' program. Recently a long-distance 
walking contest was held in which twent\ 
men entered. The contest, which was 
called the "all-L'niversity cross countr\ 
walking race," was hehl over the regular 
two and one-half mile cross countr> 
course. Four rewards wi-re otU'red. 
\frmoHt Cyiiii. 

Money means endorsement! 



For The 
Military Ball 

A good Band, 
A beautiful Girl 

and 

I 

A Braeburn 
Tuxedo. I 

Then you will be 

all set to make 

''Whoopee" 
I and you II 
I have no 

worries and 

you won't have a 

care in the 

world. 

Carl H. Bolter, 

Intorporated 

Exeter Amherst 

Hyantus 



Laid Up Cars 

$2.00 Per Month Until April 1st 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter H. Harrison, Prop. 
Winter's Around The Corner 

AVOID THE RUSH. Come in an.l ^t 
your OvershcH's for this Winter 

Shoe Repairiiiii Department 

JOHN FOTOS SHOE STORE 



DRY CLEANING 



For Prompt Service Phone 828 



PRES.SING 



••LET l>.\VE IM) IT" 

AMHERST CLEANERS & DYERS 

1 1 MAIN STREET NEXT TO TOWN HALL 

One Day .Service on Dry Cleaning Work Called fur and l>ellvered Dally 

REPAIRING LAINDRY DYEINC| 







VVHliN DOWN TOWN VISIT OUR 

SrORL I'OR LUNCH, DINNKR 

OR RKl'RKSHMKNTS, 

Spccia/ SionLiy Night Suppers 

SarrissRestamantor College Candy Kitchen 






OUTING c;lub 

Fieven members of the Outing Club 
went on the hike over the Mt. Toby Tr.iil 
last Sunday. The first stop was the tower 
on top of the mountain, after which th*' 
weary hikers made their way to the girls' 
cabin and enjoyed a steak roast, returning 
to campus late in the afternoon. 

.\N1MAL IIUSB.VNDRY CLLB 

Mr. Kenneth Milligan 'I'T will be the 
speaker .it the .\niiiial HusbandiA Clnb 
meeting. Wednesday eveniiiv;. I ••!>. •'. 
Mr. Millig.in is the present iii.m.i^ir of 
the Fllerslie Farm, Franklin. M,is>. His 
topic will deal largely with (l.in\ pro 
ducticin .iiid manageiiient . 

The meeting will be held in room 114, 
Stockbridge Hall .it 7 (). m. F.Mryone is 
corcli.illy invited to atteiul. 

.\t the Iniversity of Washington ,i box 
ut 1 ig.irs w.is |)reseiited to t lu' ni.in who 
!i ul the h.inii>omest beard in the sdiool 
tirhirc It ( Id^f.j l.)|- the hoi H 1.1 \ •• I'lrnimit 
( yim . 

The Building needs your 0. K, 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



Qi\)t M^BB Utl^nBtttB Olfllbgtatt 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY K^, 102«) 



Number 16 



Successful Hockey Season 
Ends As Colby Is Beaten 2-0 



Abates Whirl in Two Fast .ShiUs in 
last Two Periods of Colby (;anie 

Aiding another to their alre.idy long 
string «f \ictories, the .Ma.ssichusetts 
hcH key team defeated the Ccjlby College 
^■xtet last Friday noon on the College 
iKjiid by a score of 2 to t). The game was 
[il.ived early to permit the \isiting team 
(11 I. itch a train for Uoston. In spite of 
till mild weather, the ice v\as in pretty 
1,111 MPiidition, and the conti-st w.is cpiite 
i.i-i ,ind interesting throughout. 

Ill the first perioti, both teams were uii- 
sijiicssful in scoring, although maiiN 
(K'^|pirate attempts were mack- to cage 
ihc riibl»er disk. Frost, an Aggie wing, 
in the second pericxl took a cle\'er i)ass 
trciiii Captain .Nash, anci shot the puck 
■,1-1 lr\ine, the C«)lby goal tender, loi 
till- lirst s<i)re of the game. In the third 
|)truid, another hot shot from Frost's 
,ii(k boundeci off Ir\ine's pads and 
M,iiit\ w.is on h.ind to sl,i|) it in lor 
MAC. 

(C:unlinued on l'u|i« .<) 



I'KOF. MANTIIEY-ZORN TO SPEAK 

I'iuUssor Otto .ManthcN -/orn of the 
Amherst College faculty has been secured 
ill ■speaker for the International l<«la- 
i;. ii- Club meeting this coining Thnrsda\ 
iit^lit. to be held in the Memorial Unildiiig 
,ii •> 4."i |>. m. I'rof. M.i!Ulie\ /oiii w.is 
rii^,i^;ed to speak la^t term beloii- t he 
(lull, but due to a misuiider>tanding. his 
t.ilk W.IS postponed. 

lur his subject, the spe.iker will con- 
-;i|it the subject of the union of tiermaiu 
;M<1 Austria which was effected in the 
Liltir i».irt of I'.H-'S. IVof. Manthvv Zorn 
is very well cpialitied to spi.ik on this 
suhject, for he has recenth returned from 
.t six months stay in .Austria where he has 
Itilinwcd the activities of the S<Kialist> 
ilierc with c'areful obser\atioii to discoM-r 
wh.ii actually constitute the motive forces 
',t tli.it lountry which sernred its inde 
;iinilenie as a result of the World W.ir. 
riic meeting promi.ses to be intcTcst iiig 
111(1 instructive, and it is hoped that a 
I.ir^e number of stuclents will find it coii- 
\ttiicMt to take advantage of hearing 
tifsi hand information about im]iort.int 

I iin.iHMM .ilT.iir-.. 

Chapel Speaker 
Unusually Good 

l>r. .1, lldward Park C.i\e,s One of the 
I'.est Sermons of the ^ear 

till- nio--t iii'.c restir.g sermons of 

wa> delivered b\ Dr. J. Friward 

\\ heaton College on Februar\ 10 

; ii.< perorations, and speaking di- 

■" instead of at, the audience, he 

■i all by hi? ioT'^fuX yet quiet 

it I, and by his eomi)etenex' to handle' 

■i.;.., t. He exjKisiteel some \aluable 

lis on the- subject of ruling one's 

•'ider to m.ike for success anel 

■sr "< s;,. In this rla\' and age of keen 

«>mi>.tition, siiid Dr. I'.irk. that man i.-> 

successful who, more- than his fellows. 

iHiusts his inner life- to meet the clemands 

of the- nbjottive world. Often we meet 

I*'»|il>- w ho have nejt done this, ancI almost 

■ihv.iVs they are- those who c iniiplain that 

"ifv ire- misunderstood, that f.ite- is 

■lnni, that they ne-\ er li.i\e- ,in\ 

1 hese- |)eople have been, consciously 

" onsciously, suggesting to them- 

liits e)f laziness, noniH-rs«-\eran<e-, 

''"'' i.uhjre anel ,tri thcrel.N nnde-rtd 

"'"'t'i'ss Ui sucHe-ed. I iie remedy .iihI 

'iitati\e is tf) emplox the lone- of 

"iiv^' ;;.in oil the either side-. I nder- 

(ionlinued on P-.ific .%) 



Large Co-ed Party Held 

In Memorial Building 

Novel .\ttuir Turns "M" liuildinti 
Intel "N«> Man's Land" 



• 'J'.k. 

nr , 



01 


iSIANniNc; PKREORMANCK 




OF HIE WEEK 




'liny si\te-en points .igainst 




; 1 \vi \\v points .ig.iinst l.owe-ll 


1. 


' \\( (k. 1 .e-nll Sl,llll~i('U -kl. 




i-kethall ce-nter. h,i^ led the- 




-,,iin~t the-->e- o)ipoiiinl^ .ind 




t !i, n-i ()| thi- ii .1111 wit h ,1 




. -i'Ult. 



Make your pledge 



.\ novelty in the way of .i co-ed te.i 
.md bridge part\ w.is held last Saturcla\ 
afternoein in the Memorial Huilding from 
'2 to ."). 1,"). It was entireh' a feminine' 
.illair, the onK males i>resent being tlii- 
me-mbers ejf ( ieorge Canne\ 's fourpiect- 
orchestra which su|>plied the music- for 
d. Hieing. Those in the receiving line we-re- 
Miss Milna I.. Skinner, Miss Margaret 
ll.imlin. |-'.ii/,ibi-th 1 \ iich 'JM. .ind lU-ssii- 
Siiiith 'l.".i. 

rniic h .mil cookies wc-ie- pU'iitiliil .IS 
were also mints and hard c .indies in I he- 
form of he.irts. eli.imonds. sp.ides, .ind 
clubs. The- bridge- t.ible-s we-re- set up in 
the social room and were- \i-ry popiil.n. 
Sime spe-i i.il fe-.ituri-s of the- progi.im 
were a S|).iiiisli D.iiice- b\ |-lditli Uerie-n- 
sh.iw 'L".t .mil l-".sllicr I'erkiiis 'Jit; a ele 
liglitlilll\- amusing .ict. pie-se-nle-d by 
I'.iuline Spiewak '.51 and Mildre-el rwi>N 
'■ij; 'The .\rkans;is Traveler," a ve-r\ 
vivid daiiee portrayal bv Kuth l.iiilk 
'l'H .ind liessie Smith '•2\l 

The party was sponsored .ind lin.inie-d 
bv till- W.S.(i.A. The- leimmittee in 
iliarge coiisiste-d of the lollowing; l.li/.i 
bith Lynch 'li'.t. ehairm.m. .M.irg.iret 
Donovan 'J'.', Ildith Uertenshaw 'J'.t, and 
Me-ssie- Smith ':,".». .About eight v girls 
were- pres<-nt. and it h.is since been 
bruited about the eampiis th.it all of 
them found it lots of fun even without 
bovs! 

PROF, DURKEE TALKS 
ON GOETHE'S ''FAUST' 

liitervstinft I ecture (Jiven Cnder the 

Prejftrani <»f the Department of 

Eanguitges and Eiterature 

On luesil.iy eve iiing, lebriiarv Hi. Mr. 
I., helaiid Durkee, instructor in (le-rman, 
gave a talk in Koom 114. .Stoc kbridge- 
llall, on the subject of (.oethe's "lausl" 
.IS om* of the series of le-e lures being di- 
livi-red by the l)ej>.irtme-!it of Language- 
.ind Literature this term. I >ing I5av.irii 
T.ivlor's traiisl.ttiem and reailing from the- 
original tierman. Mr. 1 )in ki-e- brought 
Milt maiiv s.ilient point- in llit philosophy 
of < loethe-. 

The prologue ■ i ' i - i loptc ej 

by Cieiethe- from the I'.ook 'ii Job m tlic- 
IJible lor his own u.scs. Meplii-ioiuic-li-., 
the l-'allen .^ngel. comes be-fon tm I ri- 
biinal of the Mo'-t High to ,i-k for a 
cliani"!' to seelnei- Dr. laiist, in i.rde r 
(Utniinuitt on V.t(^te 4, 

Springfield Loses In 

Opening Debate 

Morrison Shows Cp Well in First 
.\ppearancc as a l^ehiter 

( )ii Iridav e-viiiing. the- M..\.C. elc-b.it 
ing team was host to two refiresentative s 
of the Springfield College- di-b.iting te-,im. 
Mr. I'aeterbridge and .Mr. Dr.ikm.in. who 
look the- negative side of the epiestion on 
the- subject. "Resolved, that the jury 
>vste'm shouM Ix- e-onij)letely abejlishefl." 
Dennis M. Crowle-v ''2\K anel Leonard \\ . 
Moni-on J'.' di i( iidi i| till- affirmative so 
.ililv til. It till- i'iili;i - wen un.inimenis in 
awariliiig the- dri i-oti to the- M..\.C. 
te-.iin. Morrison <lid \i r\ udi in IiIn tir-l 
,ip|H-arafie e- ,is a varsitv debaic-r 

In spite of the- poptil.iritv "t tin Mili 
l.irv l?.ill. wlii' li ,i!-o KM.k : . ■ I i id.iv 
evc-ning. tliiri' '.>. .i- .i '^oud -;/i<i .uidienee- 
in atte-nil.ini e. 1 •mti --ur ( ■|i;irlcs ||. 
I'.itterson, uiio pn-idi.i. <\ii;i-~i>l the 
ii(,|,c ih.il l!ii- ii.ii( .itc-'l .1 re\i\.ii •i\ 
ititiT' -I III lii I'.i! iii^. 'I'm li'. ird I.! jii^li:!- 
( oiisi-tt il (il i'rulr--Mr ll.i.T\ \ '.lick. 
|'iritc--(ir 1 ic-'li ink M ( III 111 .iiiM 
I'r. ilr^-or ll.iriild \\ . '"^iii.iM . 

Retire the Drill Hall ! 



Nine Fraternity Banquets 
Held In or Near Amherst 

Saturday Eveninii .MTairs Attract 
.Many .Mumni 

.\s one eif the import. int p.irts in the 
Iraternity initiation program for the 
present year the fraternities held their 
annual banepiets List Saturd.iy evening 
in hotels in .ind around .\mlierst Niiie- 
of these bane|uets were held in .ill. .iiid 
each served as a place of meeting .ind 
gooil e lieer bir both alumni .ind .lelive 
members, as well .is for those- initiated 
into till- v.irioiis gidu|is. 

O. r.\ . held their banepii-t in the- Hotel 
I'erry. .it .\iiihe-rst. .\t this ine-e-ting HI 
were present, including Willi.ini K. Cole- 
ot the- L.vte-nsioii Service, .ind Cl.ireiue 
II. r.irsoiis of the faculty. 

I'hi Sigm.i K.ippa this year met it 
Dr.ipi-r 1 1. ill .iiicl niimberi-d .">7. facility 
menibeis prc-se-nt were Sc ret.irv of t he 
Collegf KoIm-ii 1). ll.uvle-v, Professor 
I'r.ink P. Kind. Director Kokind Ii 
\irbe-.k. Philip II. Smith. Will.ird A. 
.Muiison, .ind Professor ()itoii I.. Clark. 

K.ipji.i .Si^m.i convened .it the D.iveii- 
port Inn at .Amherst and the g.itheriiig 
lot.iliel .'.I. Prom the f.uulty there were 
l>res»-nt Probssor Prank .A. W.iugh, Pre>f- 
Icssor (liiy \ . (datfelter, Professor James 
A. Pewird, Professe)r Iri-deriek .\ Me 
i.aughlin, Professor M.irsh.ill O I. .in 
plie.ir, ,ind P.ml Willi, iiiis, >iii<liiit -.ee re 
l.irv. 

Tliet.i Chi sii.ired with Signi.i I'hi 
I'.psilon the- ccingenial atmosplieii- of t he 
Lord Jelfi-rv Imi. The first group iiiim 
bered 4J. and Director Fred J. Sii-ve-rs, 
Professors Oliver C. Robcils .md Willi. iiii 
C. .S.mi-|iiary repre si-iite-d the- f.ieiilly. 
The- see-oiid g.ithering lot.deil 41. Prei- 
le-sseirs Frede-ric k M. Culle-r and Willi hrop 
L. W'e-lle-s we-re- the l.iiultv ine-mbe-rs 
prc-se-nt. 

I li.iper ll.ill was .tlso c hose-n by L.imbcl.i 
(hi .Mpha, anel oT were pre-se-nt, iiicluding 
.\liiiniii S<'crelary (iooelwin. 

The- llote-l Norlhamplon was i hose-ti b\ 
.\lph.i .Sigm.i Phi .1.-, '.ill- pl.u. for lli.- 
bani|iic-t .iiiel .V) nie-n we-re pre-se-nt. I- roin 
the- I. II lilt V there- were Professors .\le-x 
aiide-r \-'.. Came-. Stow<-|l C. ( •oeliiig. Dean 
Mailimer, F^.irle- S. C.irpe-nte-r, Fldwiii F . 
<i.iskill, and .Marvin W. (looilwin. 

((•oniinufd em l';i|te .<) 

FRAIFRNII V AM) .SORORI I ^ 
AVFRAC.I.S 

De-ll.i Phi Alph.i T'.t S-J 

K.qijia |-.psili)ii T'K (t'.l 

Dill.i Phi (.amiii.i 78 .S7 

Phi Sigm.i K.ipp.i 7H 7<i 

g. I ' 7s H 

.Alpll.l -i.i;!!!.! Tin 77 O? 

K.ippa Sigma . >'• W 

Nein I r.ii nr Se»r<;rit\ i*'i 42 

.\lph.i < ..iiniiia Rho 7<»..'{2 

The-ta Chi 7*S Lit 

I .,.1;1m1., ( in Mi,; ., 

Sigin.i I'hi I .omIoii . ■■ r.t 



Over A Hundred and Fifty 
Couples At Military Ball 



M.A C. Basketeers Run 

Wild Against Clark 

Mariton and White Piles I'p lti)t Lead 
In One-Sided (iame 

Presenting an impenelrable deleiise- 
diiriiig the first h.ilf, Co.ich "Kid" ('.oie-'s 
v.iisitv b.iskc-te-e-is inilid ll|i enough 
points ill the- liist h.ill to send the CI. irk 
rniversity ipiiiiti-l down to .i .{4 to 17 
dele.il l.isl S.itiircl.iN night in the- Com 
ineice- (ivninasium .it Worcester, .M.iss. 
With "Sl.in" Slanisie-wski enlleelinn H; 
points in the g.inie .mil le.iding | he 
att.ie k. till- Comiectiiul \ .illey li.ini 
g.iineel .i JO to I .idv.int.ige .is the- li.ill 
i-nde-d. In tlu" seioiid pel iod the- Si.iilti 
c.iine Ironi be-hind to lolle-cl l.'i points, 
hut the visitors went one belter to sieiie- 
14 .md .III e-.isy win ove-i the lioiiie te-.im. 
The- g.lllie, which tlltlli-d out to be the 
tenth str.iight de-fi-.it tor Cl.irk riiivei 
sitv on the- b.isketb.ill eiiuits this se.isoii, 
W.IS witne-sse-d by ,i sin. ill erowil ih.il 
g.ltheie-d with the- hopes th.il I In- Wuki-, 
ler .iggng.ilioii might score- its Cirsi 
victorv at the- expense of the- Massn hii 
setts ep|i|ite-t; but the ho|)e-s were v. in 
i|llislie-il .1 le-w minutes .illei the iipening 
whistle. 

riiroilghoiil till- g.lllie till- sl.ite colle^r 
h.lsket li.ill pl,i\e-rs clispl.ived .i strong 
live- ni. in di-teiiM- that hurried the shots 
which the- Cl.irk pl.ivers did .itli-mpl. 
tin the- olteiise- the v.illev ti-.iin loiind 
little- trouble- in weirkilig its way down llie- 
eiiiirl and slitting the I nive-rsity's de tense 
bv a e levi-r passing attack. 

((IiinlinuftI em I'uUe 4) 

AMHERST TAKES RIVAL 
AGATES BY ONE POINT 



<..\,Vlfi S <..M.KM>.\K 

Wh-iii . i'r,,ni I r,r.,r a I fttrr mun. 

■ <.,ir 

Hi'hnnl prti-fi 

\\ fdnrsdiiy 

\nr-il'. Il.i-Ki : 1 l.irv ;i|i| .it ( ;iriil)li<llv 

iTiti'itrHtiriiiis Koki lli.ill: 

».:>!» ji. Ill l.^iiiilii^i (111 .Miilia vs. K;iiiii.i 

SiKilia 
'.l.'id |.. III. .\liil.a (.aiiiiiui KIki \~ I'l.i 
M«iiia K.ipiKi 
'.uroniiMiy ( liil) Mi-<Iimk 

Thursday 

Imirfriitirnily KHsketliall: 
*..>li |> III. .\.'r.<i. vs. Fiu iil'y 
'.t.'i>t (>. III. Tli'-lii I lii vs. Noil fnitcrnity 
<>.I."( 11 111. Int>-imiii<*iuil Kel.ittiiiis e liil> 

.Mci-tini! 
l..'{(l II III. Uitili- l)i^> iissiuii e,i(,ii|, 

Friday 

,' 'iC' ;. III. Sii l;il I 1:1'.- ' :ii-f| M ii -i. .,1 

>- '~ C I>iill. I- 

lii'-itTaii-rnity H.i-k" ■ l.,ill : 

' !i. ni. A-T.i. V-. .Vlptu SiKiiiii I'lii 
! r.iii £lask«-lljall; l-.iislli;iiiij(ton. thi ii- 

Siiiiirdiiy 

W iiitir Carniva! «i.iilii-r ;■■ 
11^11.. Ili.ri..-. 

Siinela> 

i'.iii 
\1.. 
M.r,..i. 
I'uesduv 



K.. 



Nichols Drives Winning Shot in 
Closing Minutes eif Ihtckey (;ame 

In a clos4-|y contested f.ist g.iliii- pl.ivc-d 
liiesd.iy afte-riieMin l-eb. .'i. on I he- 
.\liiliirsl College- rink the .M.iriHin ,iiid 
White vatsit\- se-xtel lost the lioe ki-v 
championship <•! I Ik- town to the Kov.il 
I'lirple by tin- si ore- .'i to I. With the- 
.\iiilie r-sl sk. iters showing their best 
olle-iisivi- work eif tin- si.isnii .md iln- 
v.ille-y te-,iin ciiming in List on the ri- 
botiii'ls, the t;.iiiie w.is .i ihiilli-i Iroiii 
stall li. Iiiii'li .Mtlio.i^h iiiinii'ioiis 

|ie-n.ilties we-t4' h.iiideil mil ehiriii^^ I he- 
i(Hit«-sl, the goexl iiiiidilion of the- ii i- 
e-n.ible-i| ,i l.irge group of s|H-elatoi- li 
wilne-.> .1 l.isl ami iiili-n-si in^ g.iiiu- not 
kicking in hiimorous iiiiidenis. | ros.t 
W.IS the- oiilsl.iiiiling man (<»r the- Iomi^. 
II ;.••'! hooting g.ivi- I he 

si.iii- (oiUj;! ii.iiii I... I |ioints. F'or I he 
winners Captain Parin II and P.iniik 
pl.iyeil the- best games. Tlie-ir olle-nsive- 
vvork iie-tted the victors .i tol.il of tjiiii' 
points. 

(Ceintlnufd <m Pajie .<) 

Harvard To F*resent Real 
Problem To M.A.C 

.Aftates Will ,\l tempt to .\venfte- Last 
Year's Defeat 



Whe-li the- .\l.iss,i( Imset ts li.isket ball 
team me-els Harvard tonight in the- 
llcnii-nw.iv ( •yirmasium. .i li.ud coiirl 
h.illle- will be- w.iged. Last m-.h , ll.itv.iid 
was V il torioiis 117 to bl, altlioiij^h .\I..\.( 
e>utM'f)rei| its oppoiK III ^ 111 I Ik -imiihI h.ill 
12 to !♦. This >iar ll.irv.ird his .i rallie-r 
iiii|)re-^^iM- re-crirel with wins ovi-r North 
i.!~iciii Won c-ite-r, Middli-biiry, .iii<l 
boston LiiiM i-.il \ lI'iv.iMr, tlie-y have 
Ik en d« l< Il >' "t !■■ '.: !■■ M I T '•'? to 
J.Ma II. ' .,,, 

• ■' il, I lie i.il I t 1 ^.1 nil u .( ~ ; ,1,1 '. I .| 1,1 -I 
-„■; 1,1 d.i 'i m',^iil, .md I ).ii I inon.-ti. .\ il h 
I .,iit t ill- -crv K es ol Sp,i( I h, r.in up .i niii< h 
'■n ih.in Ihev di<l .i^.nn-i \1 \ ' 
'Omiintii-il iin I'.iiie- t/ 



Cooperation will win ! 



Pu^h the ball along ! 



"itoheniians" .Xjiain Score ilii With 
Sludenls. Excellent Dance 
S|H>nsored hy R.O.'i'.C. I nil 

.\pproxim.itely .i himdie-d .md liliy 
couples .itlended the Mihl.irv Mill l.isl 
I lid. IV eve-ning in the- |)ii|| ||.i|| .md 
d. lined to the- music of ih.il iiicieMsiliglv' 
lM)i>iil.ir ore he-sir. I, "I he- ISohemi.ins" of 
Woiie->.ii-i who pl.ivecl for the Junior 
Pioiii .ind .Seiph Senior Hop l.isl ye-.ir .md 
.lie- 111 pi. IV .ig.iiii loi the- Pioni this \eMr. 
riiose ni.ijoiiiig in Milil.iiv, who we-re 
le-sponsible tor the dance- de-se-i v e much 
cu'dit loi till- se-lectioii ot the- orclieslr.l 
.Hid toi the- skilllnl h.indling ol I he 
de-coi,it ions. 

On eiili-iini4 the Dull Hall (he- ••uiples 
well- loiiltoilli'd with .1 low of III, II lime 
guns .icioss the- llooi , sin iiiuiidinu t hi- 
oiihe-sli.i which W.IS ihesse'd in bl.ii k 
I'le-iieh costumes with flowing bl.ick lies. 
Stii-.ime-rs weie- hung Ironi the ceiling in 
.III inloini.il m.imie-i .ind on the vx.dls 
were' crossi-il s.ibe'rs, symboli/ing the 
K () re ..iv.ihv unit 

('.iiiilliiiit'il em I'liftf 4) 

RELAY TEAM LOSES 

.Mlhouuli the- M.1SS.H hiise-tts v.usilv 
111. IV tc-.ini losi its e-ve-nt to Spiingfit-hl 
.ind Worcester Tech it the Spiiii^;fie-|i| 

.\i I V 1. 1st S.iiiiid.iv, ll.immoiid '.'■() 

.md D.ivi^ J'.t pl.iee-d sec einil and lliiid 
le spec tive-lv ill the- .KM) v.irel run, the- time 
ol the- winni-i be-ing .'!*> .'i .*i se-coiiels. Tlie- 
invil.llion lel.iv eiileiid bv the tllli-e 
eolle-ge-s brought I hi ills ,iiid i he-e-rs from 
the- imiisnally sin. ill gioiip of spe-cl.ilors. 
I.c-.imy .md Smith, who i.iii in the first 
two pl.H IS for WP.L. g. lined c oiisider- 
.ibly over the- Spiiii^rtild iiiniiiis; Kobi-rt - 
son, llii- M.A.C. le. Ill oil III. in; .iihI Siie-ll, 
who I. Ill second. llovM'Vei, whin I lu- 
ll. iloil WIS li.iiided to ll.iivev ot Spiing 
liild. the- Kill .Old White rel.iy sl.ir took 
o\ei the- le.id liom Townse-nd ot Te-cli 
.iiici kept K. Smith ol M A( in third 
pl.lci-. < )ii the- List lolllid Mill hell 
wiileiied the- m.irgin for Springfield .md 
the v,ille-y ipi.uli-t was forii-d to place- 
.liter Wore e-sle-r, e-ve-ii though D.ivis 
I niiiiing as aiii hor in.in, did iii.ike .i c tedi 
t.lble- .itli-liipt to will b.n k the- lost dis- 
l.lllc e. 

Ill the first tli.il lii.il ol llii- liiter- 
si hol.ist il JtlH) v.ircl I nil. 1 1. 1 III II ic Hill pl.H I <1 
si-iollil. Ill the next lie.it D.ivis won .1 
til. I pi. II I- with little opposiiioii. How 
e-vel, Divoc- ol the lio-luii \ .\ |i.|iii| 
I l.iiiiiiioinl .iinl D.i\i-~ into si-i niid .iinl 
t liii >l pl.H Is Ml t he lili.il 

Lowell Tech No 
Match For Aggie 

Stanisiewski Stars as M.A.C. Wins 
'lech ll«H>p <>aine- I'.isilv 

Stiowini- .1 -troll;.: ^loriiig pu;. iiul 

pr(-s(-fitiiig .III almost iin|H-netrabl<' (|e-. 
fcnsi-. the M.iss.n hiisi't Is baski-lb.ill ipiin- 
ti-t e.isily de-fe-,ili-«l l.owe-ll Te-< h List 
Thursel.iy night bv the- si on- of :!.') to I.'), 
'st.inisii-wski led the- se oring .itlai k with 
lour tliMir .111(1 four foul baskets. ,in<l 
M.iiin .md Webbe-r .llso pl.iye-d wi-ll 

.Although J.iri-k ope ne-d the- seoring of 
I 111- game- with a fri-e- try, L<»we-ll did not 
get through the- .Mas^.ieli use-Its di-fe-nst- 
lor .1 ll'Hir li.isket III the fiist ten mimiles 
of |)Liy During this period, •.M..A.('. 
sc ori-d i|e-v<-n points in a strong offensive- 
exhibition. Sl.iiiisiewsk iMi.fl tin fn ,t 
seve-ii points witli thlec- li.iskets .md a 
loill. .iihI Webber and Coilkos f«i||owi-(| 
with one llooi ;'o,il .ipiice In tin ic 
m.iiiielc r ol the- period. S.iv.ikI, J.irek, 
.Old .\ll.ird caiiii through with t«o 
pointers, but their i-fforts w<!' noi. 
than olfse I with biiskets by Weblii-r, 
D.IVIS. ,ine| K«lle-y, ami foul shots III, I'll- 
by Stanisiewski ami .M.inii. V\ hen ilie 
v;iin -oiiiidi d It h.df tiiw, M..A.C. w.is 
on !' ' '' ■■ irid of .1 'J) to H seore, 

M ; 1 n - • ..Ml iiiiM d till II .lit M k 

III till- se-( Olid li.ill 'Aitli >i\ door b.i^kets. 

' ' .|i M(<.(e iii.idc- the oiiK ►double 

' I' ' ki I I'll I lie \ !-,ii(ii s ill t his pi r lod i or 

(^iinliniie-tl oil l',ii;>' I 

Our dreams come true ! 



I 



t 



THE MASSACnUSKTTS CIOLLlXilAN. WKDNKSDAY, FKBRUARY 1.^, 1929 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Oltiii.il i)t w^i'.ii" ' tjl tl»» M.issadiUMllb 
AKii< iiltural fulltu^'. PuMi-lud tvt-ry 

Wclm v<|,iv 1)V till- sllKl<llt>. 



KOAKU Ol' I.DITOKS 
Sliin.i.v { LtAVKh -JU K.litor iii-l liiel 

tHW AHH H. Nkhoi.s '2'J 



M;iii;iRiii|5 I'lditor 



DKt'ARTM i: N T KDITOkS 
Ediloriiil Siihi-Ll-.Y I i.hAVi.s ;_».( 

Peat;iic Maui.akI-1 J". I^i'Novan ■i'l 

Aliiiiiiii 8; Mi'.ii ( unices Sai i.v K. Hkaolkv ;31 
y^tli,.ut Lewis M I.vnus .10 

I'KANK 1,. SI kIM.KK ':'>-' 
hKANK I !>"■• <.I.AS> "M 

Campus John B. HdwakkJk. H'i 

Rial S. I'oiikk J« ':<1 

OscAK Maki.oi.in "■>'■'- 



Bl'SINKSS IJKl'AKTMKNT 

Fi<i;i)KHi( K U, Thayer, Jh. "^i* IJusini-as ManaKt-r 
■• " •' AdveilisiuK ManaKi-i 

I.AWHEMK A. Cahri'TH '29 ( irciilatiiii] ManaK"' 

WiNIIII'llI- (>. Smii 11 "M 

J.iiiN K. Tank "30 

RoBliKI (i (icKlDNOW. "M 

Oaviij M. Nasi.n :U 

I'AiL A. Smith "il 

F. KiNSLV Whittum "M 



Sul.M-iii.iions JL'.OO prr year. Single 
copit s lU cents. Make ill ordtrs pa;,'abk' 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In ( asf i»f cluiii>;o of addrrss, siibscrilx-r 
will phase notify the business mananer 
as s(K)n as ixissibK*. 



Knt reil :i» seconel-clas!! niatt'-r at the Ainht-rst 
Post Ofticc. A.cei.tid for mailiiiK at spe. ial rate 
of pf>slaK<' proviiled for in settioii 1 HI.!. Act of Oc- 
tober. 1«17, authorized August 20, I'.MS. 



WIDKMNt; OIR SIMII.RK OF 
INFI.l'KNCK 

S<i many tliiuKs are bein^ iiititi/ed and 
re^ oiled at on ( .iinpiis that we have rele- 
gated to I lie background a projeit that 
means perlia|>s the sohition of the prob- 
lems til. It are m.ikiiiK so many stmlents 
dissatisfied with eonditioiis as they are. 
This projeit is the drive for the new 
I'hysital llfliK .ition biiihlini;, and it lias 
a dirert bearing on the fill lire <>1 the 
Colle^;e without any (iiiestion. 

In the hrst phue, it will inc.iii ih.il 
students with athletir interests will be 
offered advantaKes whieh will eii.diU 
them to enjoy the attivities in which 
they partiiii>ated while at preparatory 
seh«Kil. We realize that athletiis should 
ni>t be the stile reason b)r the seUrtion 
of a. college b\ .i pros|R'<tive student, 
but they are an important factor in the 
lib- of the rollene in that they establish 
a common interest lor the whole under 
graduate group, as well as offer a chance 
for i)arlici|>alion in a<ti\ities whii h build 
physitpie and meiit.il attitii(hs of work 
and fair play. The new buihliiin will 
attract a class of men who have formerly 
ignored the (."ollene because- of its lat k 
of i>hysical education (-(piipnient. 

This benefit leads to others, most 
iniiiortaiil of which is the extt-nsion of 
the splu-ri- of intUiente of the College, it 
will mean a sort of unconscious ad\ertis- 
iiig, not only throunh the iniiividual stu- 
dents, but also b\ their work on teams or 
in other studtnt K'oups. .\n athletic 
retold that indic.itrs success with jihysiial 
filucalioii on t his c.iiiipus will U.id people 
to iiuestinate the otlur dixisions ot the 
edticaiionai pioj;i.iiii i.iiiied on at I he 
institution. The building will be an in 
direct inlluenn' in educating niaiiv people 
- Tibrnit mn^ CoHegt-, w hert-as m>w they art- 
hardly aware that we exist .is .i student 
body of collegiate rank. 

A third vital factor that has an appli- 
catitin to the outsider's attitude toward 
the Ct)llege is the aw.iketiing of public 
philanthrojiic persons or other interests 
willing to. lid t-duc.itional i>rojir,ims which 
offer wcrthwhile results. The i.iiupaign 
ft)r this Uuilding may well nu-.m the 
stinuil.ition of acti\4- pt-cuniary interest 
in our Ct>lltge as well as .i passive at 
quaintancc with the class of students 
which make up the stutlent btxly, our 
location, and most of all, the scope of our 
currii ulum w hich is ever being misuntler- 
sttjod by jH-ople of the state who through 
their taxes are contributing to the Col- 
lege's support. With success in this first 
appeal to outside inteiests, the future of 
the Massiichusetts Agricultural Colh-ge 
cannot be easily foretold becaust^ it will 
me.m the optiiin^; up ot possibilities 
whi( h formirK l.t\ latent but which h.»\e 
been developecl to aid .m iiidepeiuleiit 
exi)ansion ]irogr.iin which has been 
launched to a ct rt.iin degree witht)ut .my 
fin.inci.il assist. nice from the state. 

\\ li.it belter iiuiiiod liavf we ol ire.it 
ing a St. lie-wide pride "ii the collegi.ite 
division ol 1 lie (.'oiumimwe.ilth's educa- 
tional s\>tcin lli.m lo obnin this new 
Ibiililmi; which i.uinot help but gi\e the 
Col l( lie exulhiit publicity through its 
added students, its impi o\ eiiuiit irom .i 
jilnsu.il ( iliii .itioii standpoint, .iiid its 
support troiii iiilliuiiti.il ]iersolis o\ e: the 
state? 

DONT I.KI (,K()R(;i: DO If 

Winter teinis ,il\\,i\s me. in ,l flood of 
act \ities .Old fuiutions on the campus. 



.mil tills yc.ir is impressing; the lail on 
students .ind fatuity more than ever. 
N(jt only ire the standard athletic anti 
ac.ideiiiic acti\ities in the midst of their 
se.isons, but there li.i\e also bun d.intts 
,111(1 Sot iai Inion enti-rlainnit nt s to hll 
almost every week-end. 

Of cotirse, w<- all know these things 
\\ilhout having lliem brought to mind, 
hilt what we invariably overh>ok is the 
work of those few selei tetl and energetic 
students and f.Kulty members who have 
put lime into lii<- organi/atioii of tlit- 
s.irioiis attivities. It is criminally easy 
to take things for gr.mted, and a iiiajorit> 
of tollege students fall into sii< b a state 
of mind th.it they depend entirely on their 
fellows to provide oct asions b»r their en- 
tertainment without giving a thtiught bir 
those- who have done the work. 

We all know the phrase-. "N'oii get out 
of .inything you do, no more than you 
put into it." No eine ought to bt- lontent 
with the game of follow the leader, for it 
is merily an admittaiue of inferiority, 
l-lvery bit of work offers some sjitisfaction 
lor tilt- doing, .ind when one's elTtirts make 
conditions which others can enjoy, the 
satisfaction is evtn greater. 

In t-very student body, we tan lotate 
a tlitpie t)f undergraduate "parasites" 
wht) criticize the other fellow who is 
doing all the work wliih- thc-y themselves 
sit back and look for Haws to ex.iggerate 
antl hold up to ritlicule. The best way to 
enjoy a good time is to have a part in 
making it. but if you can't do that, at 
lia.st confine yourself to helpful comment 
if not actual ctiinmendation of the energ\ 
that has been spent in youi behalf. 




STOCKBRIDGE 



OIKSTIONNAIRK lAIUI.ATIONS 

We hive received reports on I'.irt I of 
the tpit-slionnaire which the student body 
rcct-ntly answered in Chapel. This cpies 
tionnaire was made up by a graduate 
studt-nt registeretl in the .-Xgricultural 
I'.chuation Department, Miss Mary O'- 
Ihien of (ireentield, who is working for 
an atlvanct-d degree, and our student 
body is only one of several that will 
answer the cpieries. .\s soon as reports 
.ire tabulated on the t)ther se-ctieins of the 
tpiestionnaire, we will publish them I'd. 

1. I believe in the existence of a (Hiwer 
or force which is su|M-rior to life antl 
m.itter. \es2:5") No IS Hlank .". 

2. I belie \t- in the e-xistence t)f < iod. 
\'es J(»4 Nei.{.'» Hl.ink lit 

;{. My belie'f in the existence of C.twl t)r 
.1 superior force- m.ikes a difference in my 
d.iiK life. ^■es 1»>4 No TJ Hlank 22 

4. I believe that C.od si-es, kntiws, ami 
takes intoaetoimt .ill th.it I tlo. 

Yes l.-!.'. No'.M Hlank L".l 
."). My belief th.it Cod se-es, knows, and 
t.ikes into acctiunt all th.il I do grcitly 
influences my mtiral life. 

Ves 1012 No 11.". Hlank 41 
Ci. I believe in tlireet mental eoniniuni 
i.iii.iii bi tweiii CkxI and man. 

Ves:i2 No ]\2 Hlank .'vl 
7. I believe- ('•(»{ re-alK listens to 
|>rayers antl a4>swers them. 

Nes lO'.l No 1(17 Hlank 4J 

5. 1 believe prayer has a psychologital 
or subjective influence upon the erne pray- 
ing. 

Yes J 17 No 17 Hlank 21 
<». I believe tli.it all ftHins t)f |)rayer 
are worthless in every way. 

YesJl No2J2 Hlank 1.". 

1(1. I believe that life and mind are 

tomi)lete-ly destroye-tl at tieath antl that 

thert- is no immortality of any kind 

whatst)ever. 

Yes 44 
11. I l)elieve in the 
minti and btitly. 



No LSI Hl.ink ;;:{ 

inmiortalitv of btith 



2--' Nt» UtJ Hl.ink 44 



1:2. I bi'lieve in the inmitirtality of mind 
but not eif btwly. 

Yes 141 No 71 Hlank 4»". 
i;i. I believe that good pe-ople- will be 
happy after tieath. 

\ es 12K No It.") Hlank o."» 
14. I believe that bad pee>ple will b,e 
unhappv after death. 

Yes ,V) No l.")2 Hlank ."il 
1.'). I believe in hell as a place of 
punishment b)r the wicked. 

Yes t.d No l.">4 Hlank 44 
Iti. I hope tt) see mv frientis again in 
the time to ctime, th.it is, after death. 

Yes 12.S No S(\ Hlank 4',t 
17. My belief in inmiort.ility greatly 
influences my mor.il life, 

^.s s_' No 12.". Hl.mk .".1 

is. 1 feel th.it to belitve in inimortalit>' 

is olcl-l.ishioned. snuie-thing that is not 

nuicUrii .111(1 iIk rctore slinuld be put asitle. 

\is 1,-, Nt) 1«»;{ Hlank .">(l 

I'.t. 1 (Usirc ,1 lilt lire I'fe-. whatever the 

conditions lu.iv be. 

\ es 124 No .SM Hlank .">! 



CarnpusDebiis 

Prexy Says 

.'\ man's grt-atest investment is in him- 
self. It ought to be atlded to each Aw 
by mental iinprovenient, by improvement 
in manners and talk, and by inerease-d 
.ibilitv to clo well some worthy thing. 
CD 
Intercolk'ftiate 

The admininistration of Washingtein 
and JefTerst)!! Ct)llege tiwsn't believe that 
married students can study, so they have 
made a new rule that after I ebruary 4, 
married undergraduates will be auto- 
matically tlroi)ped. 

l.cM.ks like no family co-operation there. 
CD — 

Howdoin 1(K» years agti. Kstimated 
cost of a stutlent at HowiU)in Ce)llege is 
.'!fl20.7(). Hoard is charged at .'SI. lb a 
week, washing for term !82.(K) antl rotjm 

rent SKI. 

Yes, UK) years ago. The gcMid ole eiays. 

t I) 
Two hundred .md twenty ce»llt-ge girls 
in the l-^ast were aske-d some mighty im- 
port, int epitstion in a si>e-c ial tpiestitmnaire 
regarding the types of men they si-ek as 
husbands. 

Wealth and fame were entirely ignort>d. 
There was however one tpiality that was 
very mu( h in demaiul a si-nse- of humor. 

CD 

Joe Found That 
l-"annie Krosh s;iys: "I stepped oul to 
the Soldiers' Hrawl only to get stepped 
ou. What a motley mob! .Ml while the 
elame was under way I was untler fool. 
Once I was hetlge el untler feet in the 
middle- of the flenir, but in my aKe>ny I 
could se-e the Stars and Stri|H's above and 
I knew there was A//'Cf/.v somewhere. ,\t 
the List d.inie I thought suceess v\as 
aehieved, for I re-.u heel the sielelines, 
but onlv te> hear the tmhestr.i w.iil /.//>>." 
CD 
Who would believe the jMivvtr of ee.s- 
metics? In the exe ite-inenl one of the 
co-eds brushetl hir teeth with v.inishjng 
e re.iin anel Itjst her Noice in the course of 
the- evening. 

Moral: Ue .id the l.ibe-ls on liilxs 

(!) 
Slop me if you've luaril this e.ne, and 
it seems there were two Irishnun. hut 
tl.ti ri ininels nu <.f a storv: I am ne)t 
preparetl tt» sjMak but. unaccusteiiiied 
.IS I am to public siHtelu's. Well, it's 
just th.it any of these- loulel be worn out 
last Siiturtlav night. 

CD 
.\loie and more publicity! .Ntiw that 
the burning t|iiesti«Mi has receivitl sufti- 
cient receignititm. the chic kens .ire getting 
mort- attention. b>r these- heaellines ap- 
(Karctl in the press last wt-ek: 
"MAC. STIDFNTS SIT \V 

NK.HTS WITH CIIICKKNS" 
Wt-ll. well. well. Kxinrience is the best 
teacher, no tloubt. IVrha|>s they ought 
to try walking, as that form cif exercise 
at night might In- most use-fiil in later life. 
Hut . asks stime-one. w here are t he college 
authorities tt) allow snch eonduet? What 
next will h.ip|Jen at that little ci»llege up 
in the Stvx? 

CD 

What a tongue-twiste-r fe>r the Dean I 
I.es .Anibrtisialians. Mystery with a 
eapital M. 

CD 

Where is "No Man's I anel"? It isn't, 

but it 'ue/.v last Saturday in the ".M" 

buileling where the wght of a man was 

as ex|H-etetl anel vvanteel as much as stags 

at a Frielav night dance. 

CD 

Cela Sutht. 



SIIORIIIORN BOARD— 1929 

Kdittjr-in-Chief 

James II. Wtjtjdger '2y, Lenox 

Husiiuss Manager 

Herman F. lloyt '2\\ Newton 

.Assistant Kclitttrs 

C.eorge T. I.incoln '29. Harre 
.Mien M. Helden '29, Springfield 
Cloyes T. Cleason ':{(), Hanover 
C^harles Y. Hecker ':{(), Westptjrt, Ct. 

.Associate Fdilor 

Clara L. Dillaway '20, Hoston 

.Assistant Husiness Managers 

Kdwartl I*. Ilobart '29, Duxbury 
Sanborn A. Caldwell ':{(). I.ynufield 
IlansC.Stephansen ':«), Churchville.Pa. 

.\dve-rtising Manager 

Henry J. Il.irtness '29, Sutton 

.Assistant .Advertising Managers 

Frnt-st II. Worthington '.SO. .Auburn 
.A. Sumner Crane 'oO, Springfield 

Jejke Fditor 

Donald I,. Townsend '29, Salem 

.Athletic Ktlitf)r 

Winstjr C. Hrown '29, No. .Attleboro 

.Art F.ditor 

William W. .Mdntire '29, l.owell 

IMiotograplis 

Thomas I.. Kwait '29, Newton llighl'ds 



COMMUNICATIONS 



BASKKIBAI.L 

Stockbiidge aelfleel another plume to its 
basketball cap when its team tiefeated 
the S.icrt-tl Heart five in a fast game at 
the Drill Hall last Thurstlay by a score 
of 19 to 14. Hemer and Ct.yle shared the 
high-seoriiiK honors for the winners with 
each caging six points while Sheeh.in led 
tilt- losers seejring with 7 |M)ints. 

Last Saturtlay, however, the Keeiie 
Ntirmal tpiintet secured a victory cpiite- 
tlecisively over the Sttxkbi itigers by a 
sct)re ejf '.iA to Hi in a game playt-d at 
Keene. Sarris letl the S.S..A. storing with 
K |K)ints tt) his cretlit while Stree'ter le-tl 
the winners by caging 10 jM)ints. 

iioc;kky 

111 .1 fast game with (ireenfield High, 
.1 wt-ek aj^o last S.iturday, tlit Stoekbridge 
School of .Agr'culture hockey team was 
victt)rious by a sct)re t)f 5 to 4. The 
|)assing combin.ition tif Ciraf and lloyt 
l)rtMlucetl most of the goals for the winners, 
as each secured two tallies fremi passe-s 
by the other member of the duo. Wh'te 
also cage-d out- to htlj) tlit- S.S..\. sexttt 
win. 

The game with Keene Normal Sche)e)l 
was tance-lled on account of the- |Kior 
ec.iidition of the ice, ar.d a game with 
Williston .Academv his be-in arranged to 
be pl.ived her in xt S.iturd.iv as a substi- 
tute for the canctllt-d Ket-ni- Normal 
ence.unter. 

S.C.S. NOTICE 

.\t S.C.S. D.mce this Frid.n night at 

.Memori.il Huilding. Director .ml Mrs. 

Ktrl.tn+1 \eflje^4-k, Miis^Maruaict H.inilin 

l.mtl Mrs. M.iud M.ir-^hdl will act as 

chai>e-rt)ns. 



Tlie ColleBian arcepl' no re>|»nsiljilily fo: 
ioni voice! in "Tlic l-".)rniii." It aims to ., ■ 
a means of Kivins expression to -itudent ij, 
and will print any view;- cxpri-- »-d ration li 
sanely, unless the e<litors ft-el tli.il they ai. 
tied in suppressiiiB them l>e ailse of unfan ,... 
sonal attack. Communications must be linii-.- ; >, 
."HJU words. 

To the Kdilor of the Cullegum: 

1 also, like one other reatler oi 
Collegian, was of the opinion that iju 
re-cent refere-nte to Live Stock Jud^ i^ 
teams was intended as humor and .a- 
tributetl its creation to thoughtlessiics!, 
rather than malice. It seemed to hk 
however, so httle in keeping with ih, 
concluding statement of Thomas Huxl. \\ 
definition of a liberally etiucatetl nun. 
"one who has learneel to love all bc.iut\, 
whether of nature t)r of art, to hate ,ill 
V ileness antl to respect others as hiiiisdi" 
as to retpiire an answer. 

I had always conceivt-d humor .i- , 
mixture of love and wit and siiK ( j 
lierhai.s due to niv' Fnglish extraiiioi) 
was unable lo clisct)ver eithei in tin 
tjriginal note, I could not classify it as 
such regaidlessof its possible intent. 

I find to my chagrin, that my n pK 
has also been misconstrued since A Kc.nl.! 
has reatl into it an "atTront" to the cilitur 
of Debris which I tlid not iiiteml to (on 
vey, 1 ho|H-tl my rei)ly might stiniiil.u, 
more careful thought and prevent dcru 
gation from niascpierading as humor i; 
the- future. If what I s.iid ilicl .illimii 
1 .nil soirv, and he-rewith offe-r my apolo^v 

\'. A. Uh, 



Co-ed bowlers have renewed with /.est 
weekly visits to the bowling alley in the 
base-ment of the "M" Huilding. Me)ntlay 
nights are reserved for the girls. 



Prof. Hicks Discusses 

Plans For Gymnasium 

Outlines Developments in Project 
to Date 



MID-WINTER 

coLEECJE conferen<:e 

Northtield will again be the scene of the 
.Annu.d .Mid-Winter Ce)llege Copfercnte 
for We-stern New Knglanel, which this 
year comes the week-enti of Febru.iry 1.'). 
li; and 17. 

The general theme is to be tin In- 
dustrial Situatiem in New England, with 
(Continued on Pa«e -^ ) 



Primarily for the freshman and Sttn-k- 
bridge Sehcwl stutlents. Prof. Curry S. 
Hicks gave an explanatf)ry talk tjn the 
New Physical Felucation Builtling last 
Wednesflay afterntKjn in .Assembly. His 
talk was prattically the siime as last 
year, telling t)f the plan of the bu'ld-ng 
antl the project being carried on by the 
alumni tt) pay for it. 

She)vving the plans and drawings of the 
architects, he gave a detailed rei)ort of 
the building as it has been planned and 
the extent anti the place that it is to 
Oft iipy. He g.ive the progress tif the 
fund anti the standing of the various 
classes that have contributetl. 

Those who have not had a chance to 
pledge ate given one by obtaining a 
pledge blank after .Assembly and passing 
it in at either t)f the next two chajjcls. 
Professor Hicks stresseei the importance 
t)f the building, the need t)f such a struc- 
ture on the campus antl the splendid wf)rk 
of the alumni in putting this project 
across. 



To the Fditor of the Cr./Zcij/cn/: 
"W.is this the ll.ime tli.it lit a thoiis.iiKJ 
bi.inds 
.And burnt the topless towers t)f llitiii! 
Sweet Ct)-ecl, tht)u'rt m.ide iniinori' 

with .1 'cig'." 
I am very glati to know that we- ii.i\. 
among us at least one upright and iimim 
character who realizes the deadly i-vii 
in our midst, the se-rpent that all iiii 
wittingl>' we have taken to t)ur bosons 
It seems that someone has put st)nietliink 
over on us ch. impious of the lioim 
-Something must be done immedi.itiK 
.Are girls tt) be alU)wed to go "swaggering; 
about, noni halantly smoking cigaretli- 
to epiote the admirable letter in lj>t 
wt-ek's Cillixiitii. .Are the brazen c rt-.i 
t tires to be alloweti to blt)vv smoke riii<» 
in public with perfect impunitv? Al.i- 
tli.it the f.iir n.mie of M..A.C. should i\(i 
be dragge'd so low I To every man wli" 
longs btr the woman who is In "every w..- 
suitable to the sublime-st wish." liic 
cannot but conie a thrill of horror .it if 
sii;ht th.it me-tts our evts daily, coed- 
i-vervvvhere smtiking like holtxausts .m 
tiie altars e)f prtipriety. 

Mv friends! There is still tiiiu t" 
.stuiiij) out this tl.iming iniquity. This :- 
m\ plan: Let all t)f us Typical An.it 
.Men t.ike .i solemn oath never to iiLirr;. 
a girl wh«> wpuhl sttMip so Itjw a* t" 
intlulge in nict)tine. If only we act a' 
once, success is assured. 

Hilt alas! I ftar me we are cf)me uiMin 
trt)ubU)Us times. No more does .Man 
exact his rightful htjinage from woman 
indeed it has come to such a pass that 
in my mt)re melanchtily moments. I .t'- 
alnu)st convincetl that she imagines iui 
self to be the etjual of Man. Hut no I 
am too broadminded to believe tli.it <'l 
her. I shall give her the benefit of tt't 
tloubt. However, I must deplore htr 
arrant intractability. We must s.ive lii-r 
from herself and teach hei to occupy her 
own sphere and not to encroach on our^ 
That df)ne. we shall reward her by m 
throning her forever on an aiirtai' 
IH-destal. her angelic person and hcavtni) 
conversation ever to be our light of 1 "^ 
antl guiding star. There, safely m- 
shrinetl. she shall give us inspir.it!"" 
instead of conifK-tition; and under thai 
inspiration we shall go forward, ever un- 
ward and upward; anil she. too. m^) 
follow the triumphal ni.irch, until at 1-'^^ 

she has reached that estate which > ''"■ 

n 



her, the zenith of progress,- the ' •■''-*'' 

(iirl. Excelsior! 

(). M. 

P.S. I have just hatl a horrible thoUjjht- 

.inu 



Suppose when the co-ed graduate 
gets married and has children- ^i 
that the baby swallows her patent i 
lighter and it starts to functif)n! 



To the Editor of the Collegian: 

My plea is to those students who are 
sj)ending their week-ends on the canip"'- 
and who would like to fill their few leisu^^ 
(Continued on Pafte *) 



TIIE MASSACIIUSIXIS COI.LKC;! \N\ VVI DM.SDAY, I I MRIAKY l,\, J«»2«> 



Cold Weather Sox are offered in This Week's Special 
Hosiery for all your needs may be seen in our spacious windows. - - Tuxedos to rent for all occasions. 
LANDIS-OPEN EVENINGS 



Community Sale. Fru-Sat., Feb. 15-16 

Greatly Reduced Prices on 

Men's Bass Moccasins Winter Weight Oxfords 

and 4 Buckle Arties 



Turners Falls Spurts In 
Last Half To Trim Frosli 

Well Played (>anie Dropped to 
Turners Falls \\\0\ School 



Women's Silk Hose High and Low Cut Oxfords 
Sport Oxfords Pumps and Oxfords (Broken Lines) 

BOLLES SHOE STORE 



COMMUNITY SALE, FEB. 1 5 & 1 6 

wore $1.00 now 



INC.KRSOI.l. KOINTAI.N IMIN.S - - 
sr.\'I'U)M:KV. 72 sheets and oO envel()|X'? 
UOOKS AM) C.Il'l ARTICI.K.S - - . 
1.L\1)BI:RC.II I^OOK.S. Ili> ..wu >i<.rv 'WK 

•i.oNK scorr OF ini: .sK\- - - . . 

I.I NDBKRf'.H MAPS weiv .sl'.OO now .Sl..-.!» 

LAST CALL FOR VALENTINES 



I'.if 

(;<»r 

- - .'Sl.OO tahle 
was $2..")0 nt)w 7.V 
was .sj.oo ntiw 7\ic 



JAMES A, LOWELL, 



BOOKSELLER 



CO.M.MINICAIION.S 

(Conlinueti from I'aue it 

Iniiirs with a ust-ful antl enjt)yable mental 
tvriise. Not all e.f us are- alhlett-s, sing- 
ei>, debaters, or tlanct rs, and many, 1 am 
sure, woultl appreciate a useful entertain- 
ment. On winter week-emls, stmlents' 
iiiiiids turn away frt)m th» books and 
o.ive ft)r some new kind of exercise-. 
I'l.iving chess at least t)ne hour a wet-k 
would make such an exercise possible. 

In e)reler to have the necessiiry e.pjK.r- 
tiinities to play the game, let us organize 
,1 ("he-ss Club. We have the necessiiry 
l.iiilities in Memori.il Hall, and tmce a 
week we would be able to li.ive lourna- 
iiKiits. I am sure that there are- maiiv 
students wht> wouhl e-njoy i.l.iying this 
iioliie anel usc-ful game. Many other 
roileges, antl even high schfM)ls, hav t- e hess 
(liihs nowaelays, antl these have jiroven 
111 be a source of worthwhile enje.vnu-nt 
.iiid relaxation. 

l.rt us have a Chess Club! T. K. 

r>. Those interested phase notify 
! kill. in ':{1, at bi South College. 

MSn FR.VrKKMl V B.WOIK'IS 

i<;untinued Iri.m Huftc 1) 

U..|ip.i Kpsilon wtiit to the- l.ong Ib.usc 
liiM Inr their bantpiet. anel the gathering 
:uinil.eretl '.'A, inclueling Harry ('.. I.iml- 
ijiii^t ol the faeu ty. 

Alpha C.amnia Kho made- the longest 
trip of any fraternity, going to the 
lli>;lil,intl lb)tel in Springfield. Here 47 
|«rsoris, inclutling Pj-ofessor Clark I.. 
Tii,i\(r s;it eiown to the banquet. 

Every Aggie Man a Contributor ! 



DISCUSSION GROUP 

"What the College (iradii.ile Should 
Know .iboul the Ibble" will be the sub- 
jet t of a five-.sessit)n eourse whiih is 
being sponsore-tl by the Christ i.m .\ssoci- 
ationsand whit h is to hold its first meeting 
Thurstlay afterntHin, Keb. 14 at 4. .10 in 
the 'M" Muihiing. .Mr. Williams, th. 
Intere hurch See ret. try, who is to contlui I 
the ct)urse, niaile the b)llowing statement: 
"The applieatittn within the List et-ntur\ 
of the technitpit-s of historit.il rt-s*-.trch 
and literary critiiism te) the btH)ks of the 
bil.le has hail results as signifii.int h.r 
religit)n as tht- appliiation of enipirii.il 
inethoels te» the n.ilural world li.is h.id 
for science. This course will give those- 
who are seriously interested in .t stiidv 
of the Hil.le a rapiil survey of the more- 
significant results e.f the research." 



1 iirni-rs I". ills High SiIuk.I i.iine In. in 
behintl in the seit»nel half of the- b.iski I 
bill game with Ct)ach "l.arrv " Ihiggs' 
M.A.C. freshman team l.ist Thiirsd.iy 
night .It Turners Falls to v\in L'7 to 2\. 
.At the e-nd of the first half, the visiting 
team was leailing by the score t)f 10 (o 4, 
but the elbirts of Ibisli, Sovecki, ami 
Sic.irtl in the st-contl half sct)retl 2'.i points 
tor Turiiers I'alls. while tht- frt-shineii 
.iddeil but II points to llu-ir te.t.il. The 
K.iiiie w.is wi-ll pla\e-d .{\nl re-m.irk.il.lv 
lie-e- lioiii lonls. onl\ out- point Irom .i 
tree throw beinn ili.iele. The floor w.i- 
r.illiei slippery .iml this cin iinist.int e- 
h.indii.ippfil hotli te.iiiis. lor riiriu-is 
I .ills, bush sti.ied twelve points. Snviiki 
e-iKlit, .md Sic.iril se-vt-ii lo get .ill t he 
home te-.iin's haskets. The freshni.in 
showed .III Mniirovtiiienl in their te-aiii 
we.rk. .111(1 pieseiiti-el .i l.iir defense-. 1 he 
team is still h.indicappe-d by the absenee- 
trt)ni the lineup of "Clifr" |-..skilt, 
I lankv ct-nter. The siiiiini,ir\ : 



New Arrivals Every Day 

Spring Mallorvs Arc Here. 
Spring Siiit.s and Topcoats. 

Tuxedos and Tuxedo Accessories. 

Come In and Look Them Over 
F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN FOR NEARLY l-IITT YEARS 



'I'lirntT.s 


1- 


.ills 

11 I 


IV 


Irt-sliii 


I'll 

li. 1 1 


Uii-IliI 




li 


ij 


l-..li-> .Ik 


I tl s 


"si, ,11,1.11 




:t 1 


1 


'likiil-ki.m 


** II I 


M.>llrllt>li» ,. 




II 


o 


Miiiiii.i 


•_» II I 


Ilii*;!..-.. 




11 II 


o 


W il-uii.ll 


.'< 1. 


.■xivci Iki.n; 




i u 


s 


« .IIIIK'II It 


1 :• 


S< hull-. Ik 




n 


U 







CLASS AND FRAT SPORTS 



T..1.11.. 



1:1 I 27 



r<>t..i< 



!_' II :'i 



.Niiic;it li,,,| liiiu-: Hr<-.<>liiii<-n 10 Tiirm-r-i l-.ilU 
U.lcii-f: ( ...4-y. liiiif: S-iiiiimli- .iii.tri. 1-. 



NHMTARV NOn: 

t )ftii i.il iiolitt- has bee II re-ceiviil |i\ 
Prexy to the elfe-i t th.it M.ijor .\. Ibitli-i 
Hristije- will not he witlnlrawn freiin the- 
ei)llege until June, Ml.itt, ,uiil perh.ips not 
then. The- einrent rumor tli.it he is to 
be- reialle-d in urouildle-ss, .md he .till 
re-Ill. lin in e harge h.r at le.ist .mothei vf.ii. 



rf^rrHall Theater S 



8 



M.iiinfes 3:00 Kve-ninjls 6:4.S iinel H:.t« 



e 



WI.DNESDAY, FEB. 13 

/ . M.^ I m.f<\ ^- II li. iVAHMJ'! I\ 

THE NAUGHTY DUCHESS 

■I hn,ilriiu\ DiiKr /<-«./s hi-, nitmf ;«. <i litdy 
"• I'lin^ uhi' IS </<«/>;iHt Ihe noliir and hii\ In 
'1' ' htr In hi\ I htsldiu n^ his uife ami Ihrn 
»■: ■ he,i( ^1,1,:^ in fiirni-t itrr ihr \iikf of fun 

I Mil KS ODDITV COMKDV 

TMCRS. & FRI., FEB. 14 & 15 

■' '/'iv /).ii //;s ^- ir\/ //.i/v/,-. /.I 

''SHOW PEOPLE'' 

!■'■ tulute Ihe ■i.hnlf uarlii i\ talking ahnut 
" •«(• heaulifut .Muriim Diirirs iiniihrerzv 
U'lines lijtethrr in a pii lure uilh a > '•»•■ 
'f >Mr, liki- I hiiflin und Fiiirlmnk', 
NEWS .\M) (.OMF.DY 

^AICRDAY, FEB. 16 

"SAL OF SINGAPORE'' 

/./^ //.li/i.V .1/,4V HAU. IKI.Ii 
'III.i.H III /) sfa itrama <if rare htauly 
iiml ihiirm Ah4 

HONEYMOON FLATS' 

' friilif^omf romriiy hffnrf ^au ilrdde 
•r marriage n or is not a laui^hitig mul- 
linllmnt and Ony -.iith hrart throbs. 
NEWS 



CIIAPKI, SPEAKER VERY C;C)OI) 

(CuntinUL-il fruni I'atte.- t) 

gratluates at et)llege are in a habit -b)rniing 
sta^e when suggest itiu is ine)st el'feelive 
and laslinji. and it is now that the loun 
d.ition tt.r their future h.nipiness or regret 
is being laiti. Dr. Park urged that each 
per.son sht)uld attach himself .is ., whole 
hearted wtirker in the interest of some 
Kie-.it iiiovement in the worltl totkiy. In 
this way too much intros|)iction may be 
aviiitletl, antl people, interesting tlitni 
st-lves in an unselfish itUal, will find the 
true way to happintss. 

We must have student endorsement! 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
^^' 1 Main St. Amherat, Mass. 

f' ''mring a.nd all kinds of 
dV,')"''^^ ix>ne at reasonable 

^"' • .untlry First Clas* 

Our Policy Guaranteed 
NEXT TO THE TOWN HALL 



■ ASK FOR 

"Munsingwear" 

RAYON and SILK 

Bloomers - Step-ins - Vests 

Slips - Bandeau - Pajamas 

Night Robes 



SOLD ONLY AT THIS STORE 

■ G. Edward Fisher ■ 



nPEWRITER HEADQUARTERS 

Authorized Remintiton, Royal 
and Corona .Sales and .Service 

Radio Equirment General Repair Shop 

H. E. IMVID 
35 Pleasant St., juil below P.O. Amherst 



AMIIERSi -M.A.C. HOCKEY (;AME 

i<Uiniinuvtl from I'aiii- |j 

.Mtire- thin half of the- first |>erio<l h.id 
elapse-d befe.re- P.iiiiell uf .Amheisl 
man.i^ed to open the- -ii.riiiK- .As he 
look .1 slie.t from the- side, .\lvriik, the- 
MariM.n .iiid While goalie-, turned tin 
pink the vvroin; w.iv into liis own net. 
I. ess tli-m a iiiiniile later Irost re<» ived 
the- ilisk frejin W.iei liter anil dre.ve it p.i 1 
ll.insoM for the tyinn pejint. 

I' iict be-^.in the- scoring in the se-emid 
|M-riod with a shot from the- siile-, Ki^'UU 
tl.«- .\^;.lle M-xtc( a 2 lo 1 julvantage. 
Ib)we-\e-r, .-Xmherst [K-ni-t rated the oppi.s 
inu ili'le-nsc- during the- reni.iintler ol the 
perir.il Ui stt»re three times iind t.ike the 
U-a«l 4 U> lir Patriek lealurwl in litis 
offensive playing, twite- t.dlyin;: e)n short 
drivfs from a i)e)int in front of the t agi . 
Willi tvst) .\mhirst plavi-rs off the in 
ill the thin! |K-riod M.A.C. (.|Mne(| up it^ 
olfenst- and tie-d the- e ouilt before- tin 
peritid was h.ilf over. ( )ne of t lie-se I wo 
points tMme when Nichols deflet IttI the 
(Hit k into his own strings. .A few minutes 
be-fore the- final whistle- blew l-i-lt receiveel 
a pretty pass from .N'ie hols iitid tlrove- it 
intt) the net for the final score and the 
.Amherst hockey chiimpirxiship. 

The line-up: 

MaitHarhuhetlh 



iNIERCI.ASS IIOCKFV 

In the interclass ho< kev loin iMmini , 
the- frosh deft, lied the sophoiiion-s List 
Wedne-sd.iv on the- lolleni- poml by .1 
score e.f I to 0. lollowing is .1 list e.f the- 
re-suits of 1 he- g.iines pl.iytd in Ihisloiirii.i 
nieiil: ruesil.iy, J.m. b". juniors .;, 
Se. fills I; riiiusilay. J.m. 17 l-'rosh .;, 
S.S.A. 2; We-.lnesilav, J.m. L'.'; S.S .\ I. 
St-niors 1; Tuesilay, J, in. J',t .S.S.A. :.', 
Juniors 1; S.itui(l.iy, J.m. L'li Siphs III. 
Seniors .■); We-tlnesilay, J.in. .Ill Seiiiois 
birfeit lo liosh; Tuesd.iv . leb. ', 
S.S..A. .'), Seiphs 1; Uedllesil.iv, leb. I'l 
Frosh 1. S.phs O. 

The- sl.mdiii|4 ol the 
I III III 
llosh 

S.S.A. 
jiiiiiois 
Sophs 
Se-nieirs 



CLUB NEWS 



1 



teams is ,is follows: 

lie;; J,„.st 

:; O 

'.i 1 

1 I 

J .! 

,{ 



INIERFRAIERNH Y IJASKEIHAI.I. 

K.E. 10, L.<:.A. •» 

< >n liKsd.iy e-ve-ning, leb. .'1, K.ipp.i 
l^psilon defe.iteil l.ambd.i (hi .Alpha in a 
1 lost and iHM.rly pl.iveil n.inie-. I re-v .ind 
(t.irvev pl.ive-d will foi the- winners, 
while l>.iiigleiiii-yer s< on d seven points 
lo be the li.i<|i-r of the h»^e-rs. 

y.T.V. M, K.S. 20 

'.». 1 \ . l.iuiii he-d a siiung g.inie- a^;.iinsl 
K.ipp.i Sigma I.isl Wi-dni'sday iii^lit to 
will by the- st dm of .'il lo L'U. I lor. in .md 
.Millksteiil l< d the .III, Ilk with eleven 
points e.ieh, while liowie I oiiliibiiteil ^ix 
l-or the losers. liMnner and Howie II 
jil.ivid well, smriiig ei^lil .iixl -. •. i n 
point - ii'-pei t ivi Iv . 

U.r. A. J LPJi.K. Til 

In the sectmd «.iini- hist We-elne-stl.iv 



Every class one hundred per cent 



AN I MAI. Ill SIIANDKV 

A \ei\ interesting t.ilk w.is v;iMii to 
the niembiis of (he- .Anini,d lliisb.indry 
(lull, Weilnesd.iv e■v^-nill^;, librii.irv «'». 
Mr. Ke-iim-th Millig.m 'L'7 w.is the 
-pe.iker of I hi- e-veiiing. ih- told of his 
e-xpeiii iiee-s .is in.in.l^er of l;i|ii>|i,- f.o m 
in I r.inkliii, M.is. Ail the iikii who 
iii.ijore-d in AiiiiiMl I IiisImikI, v in 1 he- 
■ l.iss of "IT were- pie-se iil .it the- iiieelinK. 
Duiiny; tin- business nu-e-linK. I.t-wis K. 
KiiiK w.is .ippoiiiicl se-cn-l.iry treasuie-r 
lo till I he offi. !■ Ml v.ii.inl bv the- resiv; 
n.ilioli of .Merlon ,A. Cottrell. Keliesh 
meiils eonsisliiiK of in- . re-.iin .ind lookie-s 
were- seivid .it the end of tin- iiiiilin^ 

MFNOK.Ml .SOCiEl Y 

lliere- will be. I mi-.-tiiin oj ||i, M< iioi.ih 
Soiielv this Siiml.iv e veiling in I Ii< \b in- 
<•1i.1l liiiildiii>; .11 7. M,. j. Paul Willi.uns 
will le-.id Ihe- <hs( iissioii imd be I lie- spe.iker 
eif Ihe e-venin^; on .1 subjii 1 of < oiiimon 
mil lest to the- sllldelits. 

MID-VMNIER CONFERENCE 

(Gonlliiufil from l*ii|ii- ii 
f).illi.iil,ii lehrenee lt> the Ne-w Hedforel 
Strikt-, .md om relation as Christ i.m 
sfiidi-nts and lili/i-iis to such verv difli 

• lilt probh-ms. Dr. Harry F. W.ml. of 

• iiioii riieologiial Semin.iry, li.is bee 11 
•Im.mii ,is the lirilliip.il h-,i(|i| .III. I I lute 
e. plob.ibly no oik- mon- .il.li to ilisi ijss 
Ihi^ f|ue'sli(in Ili.m h<-. 

S.-\er.il si mil III-, fioiii .M .\.< . .mil |. 
P.Mi! Williams, inli n hiinli siiiil.ni sr. i< 
l.iis, .ire goiiiK Iriil.iy nieiil. 



I 



imkIiI, I I'll, I I'iii AIj.Im nose.j 
l.;o<ii| two fl 



Si^,li.,i K'.ij,|,.i ti lo 10 wjicii Siihi 



'■I |.l.iy. 
ivin iiei's, 
I hi' loser 



oiii Phi 
ii.Kte- 
i» lues ill the I liisiliK se-i otids 
( e.he II I r.M .1 Ii\i iioiiils for the- 
w-hrfr- KimhafbettftTtje^sime for 



Toil and trouble, contributions doubh 



.\n)hersl 

l';iiri' k. Iw 
\i. I.olv ( 
\\ illiiitiis. rw 
i'. rr\ . 1.1 
I'iiiii;.!!. I'l 
ilall-^.ll. ii 

^t>tf. AiiiImi-i .'i. .\l.i- 

Iijifi- W. K.lloKt!. M. 

Ma-^satliiM-tl-i spans I'; 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

Oruliata' Preacriptions Filled liroken leniiet 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALAR.M CLOCKS and other 
reliable mattes 

.« PLEASANT STREET, 'up one fllftht) 



Best in Drug .Store .Service 
Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

Henry Adams & Co. 



Ki-ff-rrf [>(>w<l Tiim- 
'in.* 2*l-niintili- j.erifi'1. 



rw, VVai-< liiii 
. . I>ati- 

Iw . I-Ifl I 

rd. lioii'l 

I.I. \;.-ii 

K. Myri. V 

■.f liii-. n- 1 .\niln-r-i 

K.ll.iKu. \Val< rmaii. 

it( 11. Ziiii'T. Maiitv 



tvnj l.'i-niiiiijtc ii<iio'l- 



COI.BY-.M.A.C. HOCKEY CiAME 
(Continued from Page 2) 

Misfortune seems to be- folltiwing (apt. 
.N.tsli. wht) hatl some teeth misi)laced in 
the last Hates game, antl was also rpjite 
severely injured in this ctjntest. 

The summary: 
M.A.C. Colb> 

l-'r.'-l. Iw rw, K.'iin.'. 



New 

Tallies and Napkins 

For Your 

Bridge Party 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 




A 



M HE RS 

THEATER 



T 



THE 



COLLEGE BARBER SHOP 

Offers Expert Ilair Cutting 
Service for Men and Women. 

"POP" DUWELL, Prop. MEMORIAL BUILDING 



l'at< h. rw 
l)avi«. c 
N"a-li. rd 
Itc.n.l UI 
Mvri( k. K 



Iw 



I'.iiiicrli ..li 

. . I»VI|1 

Ifl. I'..llar<l 

rd. ( arl-iiii 

U. Irvim 



Si«r<-«: Masrttichuo-lt-i -.Mam\.ZiiK.r Kinii'v 
I Olliy I>lawar<-. M. lionnall. Ri-fi-rt-f-: I)f>«il 
Tiim-: tliri-c- l.Vniiniite [.•^riofl"'. S<or^; Fro>l. 
-«i onti iK-ri(i(l. -Manty. thirt) j*-riod. Massathii- 
s«tt>« 2. ( o!by 0. 



Evtry little bit helps 



Colle^fe Urugf Store 

VV. II. McCRAIII 
Keg. i'harm. 

AMHERST, - - .MASS. 



Amherst Shoe Repair (Jo. 

Master Shoe Rehuilders 
NEXT TO BOLLES SHOE .STORE 



Wedn, sti-.iv. lib. |.< 

tELIX FERDINANDO 

AND HIS ORCHESTRA 17 MUSICIANS 

ON I III. .SCKI-.I \ 

Romance of the Underworld 

Kl 1.1. ( O.MI.DV I'M III. MUs 



I hurs. & Krl., Feb 14 A I.S 

\ II M A I'. \\K\ ,„ 

THE AWAKENING 

U I Ml I (.1 I \\i .1 III )\l 



ii' 



ft 



lO.X (<!.\I|-.|>\ 



.M.US 



.Saturday, Feb. If> 

RIN TIN TIN in 

MILLION DOLLAR COLLAR 

L' Kill. ( 0\II.I)\ i'.AIlJI. M.US 



Mon. and I ues. Keh. 17 and IS 

\.in. • ( \ k- )'()]. ( ,,n\ ( OOI'I k In 

THE SHOPWORN ANGEL 

2 Kl.l.l. ( O.Vll.DNAl.w 



*SIMBA" IS COMINn 



ANNOUiNCEMKN'I 

Now situated at 15 1-2 Pleasant .St. 
EXCELLENT SHOE REPAIRERS 
V. CiKOMKJNFCO, Prop. 



rilK MASSACIIUSKTTS COLLF-GIAN. WEDN'KSDAY. FKBRUARY 1?. IW 



HICKEY-FREEMAN SUITS „ . , 

A new lot of Hickey-Frteman Spring suits has just arrived. AH the neu) patterns-all the new colors are on mew. 

See "TOM", he will help you mahe your early selection. THOMAS F. WALSH 



l.OVVI I.L II.CII NO M ASCII 

iCoiillniit'tl friiiii I'aiit* 1/ 

I lie Massat liti?.ill> scori-s, Maiiii t\\i<f 
got away from his nuanl, WiIiIht, Staiii 
ftifwski, ami Davis made- sii<< cssftil shots, 
and llclhi linnlon loo|i«(l a Iomk toss. 
Niiimioiis fonts sscrc lalicd in this hah, 
till IxiiiK (harmed to M.A.C. ami six to 
I.owill. Mami and Davis cacli made 
yood one tifi- throw for the liomc liam, 
whih' l.owcll ;;•""•'■'■<■<' ''^•" 1><>''>I^ "" '""' 
shots h\ llaidm,iii, Allard, Savard, and 
Jarck. 

A strong passinn atta(k Ity \lassa< liii- 
si'tts oasily hrokt- through Lowell's iiiaii- 
to-maii drfinsf, while the home team 
allowed the visitors Inn four floor baskets 
in the Ki"»f- Staiiisiewski's srorinn fea- 
tured for MAC. and for l.owell, ( aptaiii 
Allard and Jaiek played hard and well. 

The summary: 

MUNMUl-hUSfttS l.owi-ll 

It I I 



VVrl.tMT.il :'. n i> 

llctlii riiiKloii,!! I 11 t' 

l);ivi-.lt •-' 1 ■> 

( iiukiis,it 1 o 'J 



|{ililiaiik.if 
Sl.iiiiMr\i>ki.i 
K.IUv.Ik 
M;iiiii.ru 



(I O II 

1 II-' 

1 o •_: 

■2 •_' <> 



■MLii.l.in 
Ism. 11 Ik 
II.iiiliiiMii.il'. 
KiioviT ,1k 
M.(..m-.Ik 
S;i\ Mlil.i' 
J.iiik.ii 
(JiiiKlrV.lf 



I 



Totals 1 1 7 .1.'. TotaN 

Sole at li;ill tiiin-: M.i-><a. Ini-rtt- Jl. 1.4i\mII 
I.mIi S. K.liirr: iMliliiiiiii. liii"': 20-111111111. • 

ll.llV<"i. 



'•_•(■> "Al" I'lyitii is putt inn his 
ed" eoursi'S into praitiie as 
of the hi«h s( hool at Sudluiry, Mass 

Money means endorsement ! 



Born Feb. 22, 1732 



iiAKVARi) IS bk; pkobi.km 

(Coniiiiuiil from I'Jilf I) 

I he prol.al.le Harvard line up tonight 
will l)e Captain O'Conneli ami WVnner 
as forwards, I'ptoii at renli r, ami Munis 
and l-arrell in the ^iiard positions. The 
forwards are the only lettermeii on the 
team, and have been doiiiK consistent 
uork all seascm. Upton, the six-fool-six 
so[)homore renter has been s» orin^ heavily 
in many names, but \n- was held to three 
lotils by Middlebury and Dartnxmth. 
Burns will In- the stationary v.uah\, wliile 
I'arrell, another sophomore, is the running 
nuard. and has a hiuh sioriiiR retord. 
First string substitutes are Maliady, 
.enter, Wanl, forward, and Hex, Riiard. 
Harvard uses a man-to-maii defense and 
a hard passing offensi-. 

Coarh 'Kill" < ".ore's <|uintet has been 
h.ird hit by the inlUien/.a epi«lemir this 
winter, Davis and Webber beinn the 
latest victims, followinn the illness of 
Captain ILIlert, lletlu-riiiKton, and Stani 
siewski. However, the streuRth of the 
team may be shown b\ the fa. t tint the> 
lost to Stevens lech by the .lose s.i.re 
of i:{ to 11, while Stevens trimmed 
Amherst last Saturday ninht :;'.• to II. 
Captain 'i-reddie" Kllert has recovered 
from his illness ami will iirobably play 
part of the Kame Kmi^ht at a forward 
berth. With Davis an.l Webber out of 
I principal Ida- line-up. the pr.ibable starting com- 
bination against Harvar.l will be Couk<.s 
ami either Hmbank <»r Kllert. forwards, 
Stanisiewski. center, an.l Kellev an.l 
M.inn, uuar.ls. This team is confident ol 
..x.iiRinu last year's .lefeat, ami m..k.n« 
„,, for the .losi' losses on this ye.ir's 
s.itre car.l. 



fill 

|{. I-. I'. 

I I :t 

n 11 
(I :i :t 

II <i 11 

1 o :'. 
I 1 :i 
I J I 
o o n 



I.' 



aRKi. 




Spring Tournament Plans 

Well Under Way 

|M!ur Invitations Sent Out Already 



l.iur invitations ha\e been sent out 
to IurIi schools for the Se.oml Annual 
Invitation liasketball T.)urnament for 
small hi^h s( h.Kils which will be jilayed 
at the Drill Hall «m March 7, «. and it. 
South Deerfiel.l lliuh. winner .if the 
touriiitment last year. Turners Falls lli^h, 
a semi fin.dist last year. Kasthampton 
I bull, and Arms Academy of Shelburnc 
Falls are those teams which have reieive.l 
bi.ls. The tournament is under the 
auspices of the I'hysi.al Kducation De 
partnient of M.A.C., with l.awrenc- Iv 
HriRKs .IS manager. 

.\s in last year's totirnameiil. the oiit- 
...nie will be determineil by strainhl 
elimination. There will be four v,^iuns 
pla>ed on Thursday. March 7. followe.l 
by the semi finals on Friihty and the 
iinal on Sati:rda\. .\ han.lsome pla.itii- 
will be presented to the team winniiiK 
the toiiiiiament. rermanent possessi.m 
of this troiiln will be gained by the team 
whi.li wins the tourn.imeiit three years. 
Adilitional in.lividual lewards will be 
maile to the players on the teams whi.li 
meet in the lin.ils. 

The tournament is reslriitnl to hiRli 
s.hools in Hampden. Il.impshire, an.l 
franklin c.iuntie:. whi.h lia\i- .in enroll- 
ment of umler li\e hun.he.l. last winter 
there was considerable inltnst in lh<- 
tournament, and this season it is expect e.l 
tli.it tlare will be e\eii more. In order 
to ..)\ir the necessiiry ex|K'nses a small 
.i.lmission fee of twenty-five cents will 
be . harRC.l for each brace of ^james. 



M.A.C. SWAMPS CKARK 
(Continued from I'afte I J 

After the .ip.iiiiiR whistle the M..\.( . 
team starte.l t.> roll tip an overwhelminK 
l..id with Stanisiewski doing most of the 
r,..)rinK. The R-ime be^.m with Kellev 
sinkiiiR a l.aiR shot from the si.le. followe.l 
by a tlouble ilei ker by Whitman, the 
Clark tenter. After this basket by the 
home club Mann got a long shot ami 
Stanisiewski began to loop in baskets 
from various ranges. Toward the end 
of the half Coukos tossed in three sli.its 
in i|ui(k order and Webber contributed 
one in building up the sixteen |)oint lea.l. 
Just before the period eniled Nicot tollec- 
ted Cl.irk's se.ond basket of the game, 
making the score 20 to 4. 

So.)n after the beginning of the secoml 
peri.).l Kelley again sunk a long shot, 
but this time Ams.len. I)laying right for- 
ward for Clark, got a basket and ,i free 
try. However. Stanisiewsjii e<iualled his 
efforts .111.1 .ontintied to roll up point 
after point lor the victors. Later in the 
half a luimbir .»f substitutes were sent 
int.) the Sc.ulet's lineup, but the tide of 
vi. t.iry ..mid not be turned. Massaihu- 
setts had won its fourth victor\ of the 
season, ;i4 to 17. 



George Washington 

discovered that truthfulness 
pays. Our smart 

"Professor" 

Oxfords are true values. 

New Spring Models. 

Reasonable Prices. 

Thomas S. Childs 

INCOKHOKATKU 

275 High St , Holyoke, Mass. 



.\,nHBRSI FkliU STORE 

Whl.Ki 



■M.Ci 



1 Ml N Mill 

WHIN I OWN rows 
ICE lREAM CANDY CIGAKS 



I'KOF. 1)1 RKLK (ilVKS lAl.k 
(Contimii-J fr.»ni Piifte •' 

,l,.,l tlie w..rtliv Do<tor's s..iil mi«ht be 
.arried oil to hell by his S..t.ini. Majesty. 
C.o,i c.msents t.) have his set v.int teste.l 
but warns Satan that in the end roo<1 will 
,,i,„„pl, „ver evil. Faust is then por 
ir.ive.lin his stu.ly where he haser.uhe.l 
a point, .ifter ten years of teaching, that 
n,,,gic is the only worthwhile subj.-ct l..r 
.tii.lv He t.impeis with this .langer.ms 
subject, hn.dlv evoking the devil who 
.threes to serve Faust in all thin«s until. 
Satan savs, Wt the moment thou sli.ilt 
to any woman. 'St.iy! rh«m art fair!' 
then thou art mine an.l must serve me." 
l-.iiist lives c.irelessly. and fuuilly the 
levil ...mes t.i claim him, but If I'^s re- 
1 ..ml C,...l lifts up hi'- soul t.. 
.\n inteuMing sidelight wis 
shetl bv Mr. Dtirkee on the |.art of th. 
plav .•.•lerrinii to I'.amis .m.l I'hilem.m. 
..It a!.-,e.l couple who resiste.l progress, an.l 
whom Fault in.lire.tly fle>troye»K in.nirr 
ing thereby m. guilt. T'.-m w' n op.v.-e 
pi.igie.-s. Mr. Diirke* ' 

i.dilyswei ..»"Fuu: ■ uu!l\ 

^iiows. 

The time is ripe ! 



niVSIC:AL EDUCATION 

BLILUINCi CAMPAI(;N 



Summary of Contributors to Date 
February K. l'>2«> 



'Ihe li 


ne-u 


>: 










MaKsachuKvUs 




C:iark 








li 


1-. 


IV 


H 


1- 1' 


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1 


(I 


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1 


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1 1 


.M.iiii^iivv 


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1 


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lt> 


Miiti-<.ii.l« n 


11 II 


K.ll.-v.lii 




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4 


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; 1 


M.IIlll.l K 




T 


1 


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.\.ii-il.n.rl :; 
Sli.in.ilian.lt 1 


11 1 

1 .") 

2 1 


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i.'i 


4 


:{4 


Tiil.il- (i 


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^.ilislll 


iitions: 


( 1 


.rk 


I'li-t. r lor M. 


tl.-<>ii 



.IS 

-.l\ 



devi 
|i<liti'd 
I Ic.iM n. 



rnilernra.liKiie classes: 








CIlISS 


.1 Hiotnil 


/' 


.C. 


1 !••-".• 


$l(H)ti 




tV.i 


i'.(;;(i 


ii2;l 




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ItMIl 




.'>:^ 


lit:?'-* . 


2(». 




1 


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I'.l-JS 


V2f\\ ."lO 




t'lii 


Alumni Mnclti.linj; '-S 


;;i.L'.;i u". 






S.S..\ .\lumiii .tn<l 








I'n.lergraduates 


10.")K .")(l 






r.Kiiitv 


L»:!f.f. 






1 Mliers 


.-).s:U 40 






< .1 . mil I 1)1 .il 


!«-i:!.7:!;! oil 







500 Sheets Good Typewriting Paper 89c 

A J. HASTINGS ^''V::-i;,^;!;r' AMHERST, MASS. 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

UI.AIKRS IN 

DRY AM) FANi:Y GOODS READY TO WEAR 

AMIlKRSr, MAS.S. 



CO-KDl C.VnoN— A DFIVVl F. 

Deb.iting has always beta .11 activity 
th.it has had \ cr\ liille supp.)rt in p.i.-t 
\ears althou;-:h the College has produced 
some forceful debaters. During tliis 
college year, the Deb.iting Club has .Ion.' 
;i bit of oriuinal work in organizing; ,: 
(lil.M. wi;i.ll v...> ''.'Id in the fall, .111. 1 
wii.ii W.I.- nip.di 1 1» li \>\ I'Hii from tl■.i^ 
r.impus. 

lUf.iuse n! the interest th.it w.i- 
stmmlattd by this first d.b.ite. Dcimi- 
Citiwlev '"J'.V m.inager of the forensi.s. 
ii.is m.i.le pl.ms f.ir anotlur to be held 
Wednesday. I ebrnar\ 20. l.eon.ird W. 
.\l.>rris.<ii '2lt. Shepley Cleaves '•_".». .m.l 
Theodore Marcus 'oO in .id.lition tn 
Crowley will birm the prim ip.ds with 
the subjeci to be the hows an.l whys of 
co-e.lu. ation. The proposition has not 
been iletiniKly wor.kil as yet. but tlu 
re~i)liitiiiii w.il be published next week xi. 
the il.l\ of llie ileb.lle. 



Ma- ailiiHi-lt-. Hiirhiiiik li«r .iniku^, llilliriiiiK 
lull l.ir WcMht. liic k-^ l.it Ki lli\ R.-Ii-kt: NukUi - 
TiiiH-: ■Jll-iiiiniilf halvi-;. 



MILITARY BAI-L 

(<:onllnue(l from I'ufie I) 

The d.in.e presente.l an extremely 
..•l.irfiil affair with the bright ami el.ibo- 
r.ite .Iresses .)f the girls c.intraste.l t.i the 
more s«)mber dress of the nun. 'Ihe 
etTect was heightened by the la. t that 
there was an unusually large number ol 
p«ople on the floor. 

Sever.d specialty numbers by the 
or.hestra .ittracted many of the loupUs 
to the extent that they stopped daiu ing 
in order to hear the versiitile artists, ami 
.1 very evident wave of approbation swejit 
o\ir the crowd as it was aiinoun.e.l that 
the Bohemi.ins" had been eng.igcd for 
the Junior I'r.im. 

Uifreshmeiits were served by frer-hmeii 
meniber> of tiie K.< ).T.C. iiiiil in the form 
of punch. 

'J." < leorge V. Siiimuva;. is le.nniiiK 
the boiler making business with the 
b.ib.-.Mk i\: Wilc.ix Co.. .it l'..iyoniie. N.J. 
He lives at 2.")!' \\. 1; i'.isoime. 



Feb. 15 and 16 

Fellotvs, for two days 
we are going to run a 
Bargmn Sale which will | 
make Raymond's look 
sick. In other words \ 
we desire to make 
"Whoopee'* with the 
cash register. 

SUITS- . - - AT $10 

SHEEPSKINS AT $10 

OVERCOATS AT $25 

SHIRTS ■ - - AT $1 
are just a few samples 
of what we will have. 

In order to tell you all 
about these bai gains we 
would have to buy the 
whole Collegian. Come 
down and look at our 

I windows, then come in 
and see us. Remember 

I the date and also 
CASH AND CARRY. 

Carl H Bolter, 

Incorporated 

Exeter Amherst 

Hyannis 



The Building needs your 0. K. 



Laid Up Cars 

S2.(!0 Per Month Until April 1st 

Amherst Nurseries 

Walter H. Harrison, Prop. 
Winter's Around The Ccrner 

.WOll) THK i<l>H. Cume in ;iml . ' 
Nour Over-^hocs for this Winter. 

Sln>e Repairing Department 

JOHN lOTOS SIlOi: STOKB 



DRY CLEANING 



i>Rtssi\(; 



For Frompr Service Plione 82S 

AMHERST CLEANERS & DYERS 

1 1 MAIN STREET NEXT TO TOWN HALL 

One IJay Service on Dry Cleaiitnft Work <;alUHl fur an.l DelivereU Uaily 

RErAIRIN(; I.AINDRY DYKING 



I 



VALENTINES 

Paige 8c Shaw's Heart Shape Boxes and 

other Novelties. 

Mailed afiyivhcrc, 

Sarris's Restaur ant or College Candy Kitchen 



Let's pull together ! 



TUFTS COLLEGE 

DENTAL SCHOOL 



Founded IBfi? 

foi IKGK men Mu\ u.:;un iirrparr f. r .1 ;iri>- 
('■iNion of wiiltninii inti-rcst .iml uppiyrtunity. 
i<i'cint rr>c.-irch h.i^ enlarutil the *roi«' of 
every pha>^' of il.'niislry. The fic'il ilrmands. 
more than I'vcr twdirf. nun anil women of 
aliililv liarkfjl hy superior trainin.:. Suih 
iraini'ns Tufl> CoUeite Orntal Srhoo! offers to 
its students. Sihiiol rpens on Sopteii'.hrr 25. 
lo'o . uir 1 A '.''•:: irav 'juide you in 'iLi'i^ini: 
>-"ur larnr l-or inimn ilinn ail'!ti — 

!)K. Wit I UM Rii:f, Peiin 
416 Huntinilton Avenue Boston. Mass. 



Everything in Hardware 
and Radio Equipment 

ATWATER - KENT 



AND 



MAJESTIC RADIO 

TH[ MUTUAL PLUMBING & tILATING CO. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



Bl|^ jJaggarlittBgltB OlcU^gtatt 



Vol. XXXIX. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1929 



Number \t 



COMBINED MUSICAL CLUBS PRESENT 
CONCERT IN BOWKER AUDITORIUM 



KKNESTINE GAUTIIIER REED 
GUEST ARTIST 



Clubs Present Finished (-oncert Last 
Friday Evening 

\ \iry able and finished concert was 
iMii l)y the conihini'.i Musi.al Clubs 
l.ist iriday evening in Howker Aiidi- 
tiiriiiin. The guest artist of the evening 
«as Krnestine (iauthier Reed, a soloist 
of some repute. 

A College song, "When Twilight 
Sh.iiluws Deepen", i)y the combined 
fliihs started the program. Tliis was 
very well received and ser\cd to create 
.1 (.ivurable impression on the part of the 
juiliiiice. Following this selection the 
(,irls' (ilee Club siing a gr.»u|) of four 
niiinliiTs, including selections by Arthur 
>ulli\.in and Carrie Jacobs Bond. These 
[luiiiliers also drew much applause. 

The third portion of the program was 
in the form of seven short selections by 
ihe iiuvnl artist, Krnestine (iauthier 
Kieij. In this group were such well- 
loveil pieces as the "Midsummer l.ullab\ " 
III M.l. Dowell, and the "Habanera" from 
larimii by liizet. The marked abilit\ 
i)( the |)erfonner to interpret and repro- 
iluce the varied uukmIs and temjKjs of these 
H'l.'.'ti.ins ({uickly wtJii the approb.iti.m 
o! I lie audience. 

Two numbers by the (iirls' Trio were 
next on the program. The first of these. 
Dvorak's "Songs My .Mother Taught 
Me", was nicely rendered b\' the six 
nienilMTs of the double trio. 

.As the part of the |K'rforniance to 

ri-ieive the greatest applause-, however, 

was the selection "Bridal Rose Overture" 

of 1-avaiee, by the College orchestra. 

When tailed upon by continued applause 

to play again tliey responded by giving 

' IVtite Pas", a light. mel.Klious conipo- 

i-itioM. 

Continued on Pa^e 4) 



Jl RV SYSTEM TO BE DEBATED 
Wnii CLARK FRIDAY EVENING 



Tlic varsity debating team composed 
"i Dennis Crowley '2i>. Leonard M. 
.Morris.jn '29, and Theotlore C. Marcus 
•iO. will meet the Clark I'niversity 
ditiiters in the Memorial Building on 
Ftliruary 26 at S p. m. The subject for 
iktwte is "Resolved: that the present 
jury lystein be abolished." The liome 
I t(.ini will .lefen.l the jury system. Since 
the recent victory over Springfield the 
var>i|y debaters have worke.l har.l in 
pripar.ition f.jr the Clark Dntest. for it 
is their ambition to defeat this team 
«liiih s(-.iired ,i decision over .\I..\.C". 
"W \i-.ir. 



I'lHI I DLSCtSSION GROCP 

( ONDLCIED EACH TUCRSDAV 

'" "iijer to furnish the students with 
- i'lU.r knowledge of the Bible and its 
'■flitum to science, a Bible Discussion 
''ffup is being held each Thursday after- 
noon in the loggia of the Memorial 
I5iiil<iin«. Mr. J. I'aul Williams, who is 
itadinj; the group, is en<leavoring to 
ans'Air these five questions: 
1 Dii.s the Bible tontradict science? 
- ' 1 one believe in evolution and 
'""tvt in the Bible? 
•' '- >t inspired? 

• ■- it contradict itself? 
■ 'In w.' kc.]) the Bible, anyway? 
- -i»ions have been arranRcd. the 
"' ■■ '.hirh has already lie.n li.ld. The 
M-; will be riuirMJ.iy. Fib, 21. 
iif time .and in the same pla.e. 
' interested in these- vital fnies- 
^ited to atttml the iliscii-^ion^. 



<)( 


'"^lANDING PERFORMANCE | 




OF 


TIIE PAST WEEK 


l.'S- 


'iii^ II,ir\.iril 1,1-t Weil 




. I 


s .it ( .iniliriikc .'Il to 


27. 




• 


M.A.C. v.irsity JM-kct 


ball 




■ .1 


'1 .1 \i.tor\ til, it oiilv 


the 


- 


' nil 


had heretofore be.n .ibl 


• to 




"finish 


• 





DEAN MACHMER TELLS 
ABOUT EUROPEAN VISIT 

Relates Experiences of Past Summer's 
Trip to the C«>ntinent 

Stuiients antl faculty of M.A.C. were 
.(inducted, so to sixak, (»n .i tour of 
Kurope last We.liies.l.iy afteriio.111 in 
assembly. This tour w.ts le.l by I )e.in 
Willi.iiii L. M.iclmier, wh.i b.ise.l his 
talk up.)n the trip which he ma.le to t he 
(ontinent last summer. 

As (ierm.my was the lu.iiii objective 
for Dean .M.i. Inner he sp.)ke, for the in. 1st 
part upon his ex|H'riences there. lie 
meiitione.l several customs wli'ch are 
always very noticeable to tourists, among 
which were the almost universd customs 
of (lipping the hair .lose to the head, of 
.arrying canes, an.l of w«'aring short 
le.it her trousers in s.)iiie of the provinces. 
These latter caused much amusement 
wherever they were noticed. .Another 
striking thing, s.ii.l the spe.iker, w.is the 
fact that strict cleanliness is the order of 
the flay, all thr.iugh (■ermany. Not only 
is this e\iilent in the houses or cities, but 
it is clearly seen even in the enormous 
government-owned forests, wlu-re the 
brush is carefully cleaned up. 

Concerning the iK>ople themselves Dean 
M.i.hmer stated that an unusual amount 
.if or.lerliness ;s to lie met with through- 
out the entire nation. The Germans 
have seemingly an innate idea of the 
fitness of things, s;iid the sjieaker. They 
are up to the minute in .scieii.e, in e.ltica- 
tion, and in other fields. I'hey have 
realized the value an.l w.irth of their 
youth, and are establishing more an.l 
more sch<K)ls in order that the citizens 
of the future will have healthier b.Mlies 
and keener minds. As an example of the 
wide spread interest in this field Dean 
•Machtiier mentioned the great Cologne 
"Turnfe.st" in which 2.j(),IK)<) gymnasts 
took part. 

(Continued on Pafte 4) 

IMPORTANCE OF 



Marlowe's Death 
Subject of Talk 

Prof. Walter E. Prince Discusses 
Versions of Mysterious Demise 

Kit Marlowe's mysterious <ieath w.is 
the subject of ,1 t.ilk given by Professor 
W.ilter ]•;. Prince of (he laiglish depart 
nient last Tuestlay evening at the weekly 
lecture con.liicted by the Dep.irtiiient of 
Language and Literature. Prof. I'riii.-e 
s|)oke of the versions of the alTair which 
were curniit until Ht2."), an.l of the tlis- 
covery by J. Leslie llotson, of cert.iin 
evidence which disjiroves the accepted 
story. In l.V.t?, four years after Marlowe's 
death. Thom.is Beard, in his I'luuitrr of 
Clod's Jiiilf^nnnl, writes a scarifying a.- 
count of the ptnt's char.icter and tin- 
blasphemous 111. inner of his .King. ()ther 
writers ol the p.-iio.l, .im.iiig whom .ire 
to be foiiii.l Irancis Meres .111. 1 Willi.ini 
X'.iiigh.in, were r.ibi.l ptirit.tns ami ..tiled 
M.irlowe a bl.ispheming iiifi.li-l an.l 
atheist, when in reality he was merely a 
liberal an.l .m .i.lvanced tliink»'r. Among 
these writi'rs the coiisi'iistis of opini.m 
seems to be that Marlowe w.is killed in 
in .itlenipt to st.ib one Ingr.im or Kraser, 
.1 "bavv.ly serving man" .luring .1 tavern 

(Contlnuetl un PuAe 2) 



STANISIEWSKI AND KELLEY STAR 

IN 31-27 VICTORY OVER HARVARD 



n 



SELF' STRESSED 



Reverend Parry Emphasizes Culti- 
vation of Personality 



At the Sunday cha|)el services on Feb. 
Hi. the Reverend Burfor.l Parry of the 
Hope Coiigreg.ition.il Church in Spriiig- 
heUl. s|)oke very well <mi the subject oi 
present day retrograde teiideii.ics on 
the part of s<x:iety. .\Liss production 
and routine specialization. s;iid Reverend 
Burfor.l, have become the wat.hw.ird ol 
today. He protested again' t the inent.il 
and physical laziness of so many |R-ople, 
and against the invisible forces whi.h 
today are i>lotting out individuality and 
initiative to so great an extent. The 
sermon was \ery eloritient, and well 
interspers<'.l with interesting anecdotes 
from the pers«tnal experieiue of the 
sjKaker. I he real things in life, he said, 
are our (.o.l-given |M-rsoiialities; let us 
then disiH-ns*' with too mui h ..jiisidera- 
tion of outward things such as fine 
.lothes and luxuries, and givi- f)ur atten- 
tion more to the fiin.l.miental thing- of 
life. 

SECOND CAMPUS DEBATE ON 

SUBJECT OF CO-EDUCAIION 

On W'ednesd.iy. I'ebruarv 20. .il .S p.m.. 
tlif Debating Sficiety will .omlu' t .moth.-r 
(anijitis ilel)ate. Ihe mii 1 <^- ol the 
()oliti<al deb.ite l.t-t f.ill li.t- m-pii.-d the 
trrouf) interested in lunri-n- in nlhr ,t 
(li-rii-.-.ii)n on th.- l)<iirht> .iiid !.iiilt> of 
( o.dii' ation. 'Ihe i)rij|)osil ion for debate 
is "Kcs(il\.-ij: tli.it ( o-.'.liK .ition should 
be .ilioli-liiij." Leonard Morri-'ni ,ind 
Theiidore M.in 11- uill t.ikc th<- .ittii in t 
ti\e and Dcniii- ('rnulf\ iii'l Norm. in 
Mvri'.k will oii|iii-- tin in. M\rii k. ,il 
though not a \,ir-it\ <lrli.il<i. h,i> Ion;; 
be. .-1 iiit.rc-trd in t lie .n ti\ it > hhI mjIiiii- 
tcir.ij to t.ikr tlu- ;i!.M r ol Sli. ple\ 
( li ,i\<>. u lio is ill. 



TOURNAMENT PLANS 
BEING BROADENED 

Invitations .Sent to Three .\ddilional 
liii^h Schools 

During the p.ist week, three addition. tl 
iiivit.it ions have bi-en sent out to high 
SI liools for parti, ipatioii in the .Se.ond 
.'Xnntial Mass.u husetts Agricultural Col- 
lege Invit.ition Basketb.ill roiirnament 
for Small High St hool s whi.h will be 
played at the Drill Hall on .M.in h 7. .H, 
and U. The latest schcMils to receive 
invitations are Smith .A.adeiiiy, an.l 
Orange and Chester High Schools. The 
sch(N)ls which have already l>een invited 
are .South Deerfiel.l, Turners Falls, 
F,astlianiptoii High S>< ln»ols, an.l Arms 
;\<adeniy. 

In addition to tlie toiirn.iment, on 
I Thursday, March 7, the Western .Massii 
1 husetts Coaches Club will c«invene at 
M..\.C. for ,1 meeting and sup|Mr. Thus 
it uill be |H>ssible for i-ach coa. h t«i see 
the styles of play of each of the eight 
teams |iarticipating in the tournament, 
as four braces of games are to In- playe.l 
on the first .l.iy. During the toiiriiam. til 
entertainment will be provided In-tween 
the halves of the gimcs by students at 
the College. S)ine very interesting .on 
tests will un.loubtedly bi' jilayed 111 this 
totiriMiiient , .mil they m.iy be Men for 
the small adiiii-sion fee of 2.')f for .mi h 
pair of games. 



i.win s <:.M,KM).\R 

Kind Hi , ii'.liUr ner than c .... 

- ^huktiPrart 1 1 , > >jh I.iI >■ li, 

WedncHday 

.; l.'i 11 Ml. .X-Minlily: SiKMki't. W.iri<-n K. 

fini-ti'-, l'ri>l<>»<)r ol .\><troiiiiiiiy at 

.Xiiiliirst t iill<i!i.. 
SS A Ua-k.ll...ll: Tiirm-rs Kiills. Ii.r.- 
siHP [1. IN. IXIi.iti- nil < (j-i-HiKatiun, 

M"iii>iiial Uiiil'iJiii;. 
liit'-rfratirnitv lia<ki'ilK<ll: 

N.'ill l,aii)l»ia ( hi .Mi.lia v-. ' > I > 

'I ■'" .Mplia Sii;riia \'' ''ili.i <..ii;nii.i 

Kh'i. 

Thursday 

I .in 11 VA. Hililr Di'o.'iission (irotip. 

Mi-iiiiiri.il HnililiiiK. 
I 'KI J,, m. Aniiiial llu^liamlry ( liil) im> tin^- 
I iit'Ttrat'Tnity B.iHkitltall ; 

I'lii Siisiiiii KapiKi v-i. Katully 



Kriday 




l|.,!i.|.'.. W , !iMii;ton'» Birtlidav 




. '.'. ,1, III, 1 I ' ' t, liiki: to 


Moiii'.i 


Monailivt' . 




hilimr Ira. ,: VV !• 1 ,; 


\V.,t. . 


~- '«' I' "1. \';ir-ily H;. 




M I T. HI raTiiliri'l/' 




S.iiiiril.,\ 




\.\^ ■ ' 




Sunday 





Miinil 



Tim-.. I 



II;.:; 

Infrlr ■' 

- :;■! iJi ii.i I'ii. 

'' ;•< Kai»ii,i Si 



'ti-Fr.iii'riiii ■. 



M.AC. HOCKEY TEAM 
TAKE C.A.C. TEAM 4-1 

Maroon and While .Sextet Successful 
in Post -.Season (lanie 

Bv st-oring a I to 1 triiiiiiph over 
C.iiine. tictit .\ggii- l.isl week Tiie.s.l.iy on 
the College I'on.l, .M.iss.i. husetts .1om-.1 
its I'.t2lt hotkey season in a very s.itis 
l.iitory iiianner. With the ice in goo.l 
KMidition the speedy M.ii.ion .iiid White 
sextet found litth- trouble in turning b.i. k 
the visiting .-Xgates f.it tin- se.und tinu' 
this season. For the v it tors f ro?.l . 
.\Liiltv, W'.le. liter. .111.1 Ziiger sc.ire.l the 
lour |i.)iiits. Brown, who pl.iyi.l go.ilie 
l.ir the visitois, g.ivi- .1 s|il.'tidid exhibition 
ol go.il ten. ling, an.l his work st.ipped the 

aggressive Massiclnis«'tls te.iiii ft. .ill 

ing up a l.irge one si. le.l s<ore. To S.iss.i, 
the Connecticut right wing, g.Ks the 
credit of saving his team from a shutout. 
With less tli.iii a mintite to pl.iy in tin- 
l.isl |Kri.).l an.l tlu- g.inie hopelessly lo.st 
l.ir the visitors he shot the pti. k p.t^l 
Mvri.k for Conneiticut's only si.ire 
.ig.iinst the Bay St.iters this si-ason. 

Iliree minutes after the game op.iu.l 
the Massachusetts state college si-xttt 
t.Mik the li-ad with Frost, ag.iin sl.irriiig 
tor \I..\.C., sh.Miting ,1 rebotiii.l into t he 
Conne.ti.ut tage. L.iler in this s.ime 
IH-ri.xl .M.iiity ..irriiil the disk d.iwn the 
ice an.l t.illi.'.l .lining the s.rimin.ige 
whi.h took pl.nc in front ol the visitt»rs' 
..ige. 

In the si-ton.l perio.l the B.iy St.ite 
skaters were unable to s..ire b«-cause ol 
the ex. client work of Brown, the C.A.C. 
goal teniler. The home team was on the 
olTensive during most of the |Rriod, 
• arrying the puck to the op|H)nent's 
strings time after time only to be stop|M<l 
in the Hurries before the C.inne. ti« tit 
cage. 

During the third [nrioil .\I..\.C. store.l 
another goal in the first two niiiiules ol 
«:Ujntlnued on Pufte 4) 



1929 HOCKEY SEASON 
VERY SUCCESSFUL 



FIRSr MCrORY OVER CRIMSON 
SIN<:E i'»24 

Aiiates Turn in Hitt Surprise last 
Wednesday Evening 

SluuNiiig theiiiselvis stipi-riiii l.i Ji.ir- 
v.ird's stmiig (|uintel, the .M .\.C. b.tsket- 
b.ill te.iiii iii.id.' hisi.iiy |,in( Wednesd.iy 
iiiglit bv .lele.iting the Crinisoii .U to 27 
It the llenuiiw.iy (iymnasium in C.ini- 
bii.lge. I.e.Mi Sl.inisiewski, center, am! 
( h.ules Kelley. left gii.inl, were the stars 
ol the g.iiiie, Ihe former dropping seven 
tlooi baskets an.l three fouls lor seventeen 
piiints, an.l the l.itler st.iring twelve 
points trom four long shots, a List tut, 
.iiid two free throws. In .nl.lii ion to lliis 
strong otfeiise, .M..\.C. prexiii,-,! .1 .|e- 
leiise so light tli.il ll.irv.ird .lid not s.ore 
li.im the thiol in the lirst .lev. 11 minutes 
ol the se..nid h.ilf, .ind w.is not abh- to 
get .1 b.i^ket iiii.ler t hi- ho.ip until the 
l.isl i|u.irl.r of the g.iiiie. Ill Ihe , l.isinj^ 
iiiiniites of the g.ime. Il.trv.ti.l st.iiie.l .1 
dtNp.r.ite r.illy whit h iesult»-.l in five 
tlooi b.iskets lor ten points. Therefore, 
the store il.ies ii.it re.illy iiidi. .ite what 
t 111- .M.ii.Hiii .111.1 W hite dill t.i 1 he ( rinison. 
I In- l.if>l .M.issiu husitts I. -.1111 III beat 
ll.irv.ir.l W.IS "i;.l.li«" Bike's l<.t2J basket- 
b.ill (lull, (oiii|Mis«(l of Siiiiiiels and 
leniple, forwards, Jones, .inter, ,ind 
Bike, Smiley, aiitl lerranti, guards. 

.Mthoiigh I'plon, the six fool six ll.ir- 
v.ir.l .enter, st. tiled the g.tmi- We.liies.l.iy 
night with a llooi li.i>,k.l, this w.is the 
only siore th.il he w.is .ible t.i ^;.t in the 
g.iine. Only in the first five minutes of 
the first half was the Crimson in the lead, 
.111.1 then Mass.i< husetts erasi.l a 7 t«i 4 
ll.irv.ir.l a.lv.int.ige by the efforts «>f 
Stanisiewski anil Kelley. The first half 
lontiiitied to be .lose, but M.A.C. stayed 
ahe.i.l and leil after the first twenty 
minutes 17 to V.i. 

(Continued on Pate 4) 

PROSPECrS FOR WORCESIER 

MEET SEEM FAVORABLE 



t 



Ihe |iros|)ects of .iccumulating many 

lioinis at the iii.l.mr tr.i. k meet against 

Won.Mer T«'i h nixt Iri.l.iy afternoon in 

the Woinsler gym at 2..'!(», ,ire very 

.Seven Out of Twelve (iames 'Taken <l.irk With the s.pi.id iiiu. h smaller 

Into Camp than usti.il, f.w.r men will be entereil in 

Ihe ditleriiit events. ( 0.1. h Derby is 
planning to run .\l.iiily and VV.ililgren in 
the .i(t yard sprint, while Captain Davis 
and ll.niimond .ire entered in the .ilM) 
yar.l.riin with Siiell in the (KNIy.ird event, 
kay Smith and KolM-rtson, who is re- 
fov.ring from illness, will prob.ibly be 
in the MMMI-y.inl run, wliile (oven looks 
like the In-.st in the mil.-. Bl.iiii.piist will 
possibly lake p.irt in the high jump .m.l 
the men for the hurdles .m.l shot |)iits 
li.ivr not y .1 been pit ked. 



C.i.i.h "Ke.l" Ball's varsity ho. k<y 
team has just .omplete.l its l<.»2'.t sea>.oii, 
winning seven of the twilve g.iiius 
played 1 b ,ii that has not iKjen aiioni- 
plished by a .Maroon .mil White sixti-t 
for several years. Iurt iin.ilely. this 
season the team has not been liaiidi. ap|>ed 
by poor ice; thus, it w. tit tliiougli the 
sehedule without postponing or (antclling 
a game In-cause of thi^^ .ondition. .\t the 
beginning of the season Coa. b B.ill w.i^ 
.«»nfronled with a striotis problem of 
h.iving only one letlerni.in av.iil.ible for 
the I'.t21» team. However, ili. .andidates 
from l.ist year's freslim.in tf.iiii and the 
.s<iphoniore substitutes of the I'.«2.S v.irsily 
.lev. loped into .1 \.r\ goo.! aggregation 
espe. iaily strong on the i|. fens*- through 
out the se.is<in, .i> iii.iy be seen li\ the 
I'fionllnued on I'afte 4; 

C;iRI,S' f;LEE CLUB A 

DECIDED sl(;<;e.ss w iiadlkv 

The Cirls' '.lii ( Inb Or. Iie>ir,i w.is 
[M-rhaps III. i)iit-l.iinliiig feature t>f the 
|»erforiii.ini e ol tin- <.iil^' ( ,1. <• (lul, ,,i 
H.i.liey .III llitirsday evening, feb. 7. 
L.illowing a v.irierl, intiresf ing, and 
sii' < i-^-tii! loiiiiii .iikI I nil tiainnient 
iliiil.T the ellK lent ]ea(lerslii|) of ' .nij,, 
ll.iul.S '2'.) and m.iii.igenienl i){ M.u •, 
K.iiii' '_".•■ 1 1,1 OK lic^ii.i conrlucted ;i 
il.iiK i mil il I I p. Ill 

'I ill-, first appiMi .iiK I \v.i,,i r'.il indil 

■ ' !ii- iiiiisi. .il .il.ilii \ I, I I III- ( ,, ( .j, ,,t 

.\l..\.< I Ik- loiiowing (il.iyeil foi il.mi in. 

;,n'l .ludii 1(1 <• ,|, members of lh<- on In- ti,i : 

I • ' J'lvM-ll '2'.t. . I.inii.i , < ,11.1,1 

I I.IVV \l-\ _".», illllln- , ll.ll ! . : : , I ,. , , 

v loliii ; .\im,i I'.ii-Mn^ ■;;_'.. .11 ii. I . \ii|.iti.i 
'lui-.-, ■:;_'. -,i.\,i|iii()iii , .nil] \<i.t Uiii;lit 



M. IT. AND I NIV. OF N. il. 

ON SLATE THIS WEEK 

'lw.> stiff .(ppoiKiils will II. III. I by 
C(»;ich "Kid" Core's basketball five this 
weekeml as M.I.'T. anri New Hampshire 
.ire playerl on Friday ami Salnrday 
evenings res|K'ctively. 'These teams will 
Im; real mat« lies for M.-'X.C. as is shown 
by the fa. t that they, too, li.ive both 
be.iten I larv.ird. 

Mil. h.i-> .1 VII y impr.>si\e re.ord 
lor this season, ji.iviiig won six g. lines ,ind 
lost but one to V'.ilf. 'This string of 
V II till il- III! hid" ■■ v^ iii^ iiM I I '.row 11 \t\ t he 
SI nil- 1,1 :;j to 2'.i, ,nid over ll.irv.ir.l 2U 
lo J.; I lie te.iliI whiili will probably 

I. lit ;i;MIII-I \1 \ ( I '.II : I i ,\ ( , Mil, III! 

Bum kl. 111. til, iiniri, .\rlsoii ..iid .\l|i n, 
torw.itil-.. .iikI I ..lu -Oil .iiifl Mot ter. gii.iids. 
Bini kliiii.iii, .\lliii. .111'! L.iwsoii have 
'lone iiio-i ol I 111- M onng this season. 
Siili-i II i|i.,, vUiiili ni.iy M."e action in the 
M A* .•Hill ,,M ( offey and l'.,ii.-,, 
I'll w.ird--, .iiid Ml I I. . .' • ' I , ! 

W lull- ill.- I 111-^1 1 ,1 , .,| ■,.,.,, ||,,iii|, 
-^Ime li.i- uoii I liii I I ml in ,t 1 j,, , m,, 
number ol g,iiin-^ I hi-, winl.r, luo m| i Ik- 
lo-.-^-s h.ive been to the strong t.-.ini-> of 
( onne.ticiit .Aggie ,ind Sjiringfield College. 
(tjonllnued on I'age 4; 



nil: MASSACIlLSI/nS COLI.KCIAN. WKDNKSDAY, I I HRLARY 20. 192*) 



THK MASSAClIUSrns (:()LLK(;iAN. VVI DMSDAY. I IMKl AKV 2«, V)2*i 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Oflicial ncwspaiK-r of thf Massacliusttts